Podcasts about Cold War

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1947–1991 period of geopolitical tension between the Eastern Bloc and Western Bloc

  • 6,215PODCASTS
  • 15,405EPISODES
  • 53mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
Cold War

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    Best podcasts about Cold War

    Show all podcasts related to cold war

    Latest podcast episodes about Cold War

    Our American Stories
    Stalin's Daughter: American Citizen, Wisconsin Cheesehead?!

    Our American Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 38:16


    On this episode of Our American Stories, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and America's Cup winner Bill Koch doesn't like being cheated. Tom Acitelli, author of Pilsner: How The Beer of Kings Changed The World, tells the story of how America's favorite drink came here and stayed here despite a world war and Prohibition. When 85-year-old Lana Peters passed away in 2011 from complications due to colon cancer, the nation seemed to have forgotten the woman who had become a sensation during the Cold War.  The History Guy recalls the extraordinary life of the woman whose defection to the United States represented a seminal moment in history. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)   Time Codes: 00:00 - The Man Who Spent $35MM Fighting A $400k Fake Wine Fraud 10:00 - How The Pilsner Arrived, Survived, and Thrived in America 35:00 - Stalin's Daughter: American Citizen, Wisconsin Cheesehead?!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    American History Tellers
    Civil War | Emancipation | 3

    American History Tellers

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 41:20


    The Civil War began as an effort to hold the country together. Few Northern soldiers marched into battle to end slavery. But tens of thousands of enslaved men, women, and children took matters into their own hands, using the chaos of the war to free themselves from bondage. Their action forced a gradual shift in Union war policy.After a bloody, hard-fought victory over Confederate forces at Antietam, Abraham Lincoln decided the time had come for what was once unthinkable: a proclamation that would end slavery for good.Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/historytellersPlease support us by supporting our sponsors!Netsuite- Head to netsuite.com/tellers for a 1-of-a-kind financing offer to grow your business!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    StarTalk Radio
    Nuclear Winter with Ann Druyan and Brian Toon

    StarTalk Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 58:54 Very Popular


    Are advanced civilizations doomed to destroy themselves? Neil deGrasse Tyson and Chuck Nice explore the Cold War, The Drake Equation, and nuclear winter hypothesis with producer of Cosmos and Carl Sagan's widow Ann Druyan and atmospheric scientist Brian Toon. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/nuclear-winter-with-ann-druyan-and-brian-toon/Photo Credit: United States Department of Energy, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

    dot com: The Wikipedia Story
    The Hacking | Ep 3 | Domino

    dot com: The Wikipedia Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 42:48


    Psychological pressure...that's what ransomware is all about. Holiday weekends and Fridays are prime time for ransomware attacks, and on Friday 2nd July 2021 Robert Cioffi was looking forward to celebrating Independence Day with his family. But soon he'd be caught up in the biggest single ransomware attack to date, that would have a disastrous domino effect on up to 2000 businesses worldwide: kindergartens in New Zealand, dental practices in the US, supermarkets in Sweden. Is the post-Cold War era over? In this brave new world, nothing is too small, or big, to be digitalised…including acts of war. Russian ransomware attacks almost doubled last year. At this very moment, cybercriminals are crippling schools, supermarkets, dentists, kindergartens, hospitals, oil pipelines - all in the name of money. Katie Puckrik wants to know who, and why. You can binge the whole series now and ad-free by subscribing to the Crowd Stories channel on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Jay's Analysis
    Dialectics of Manipulation: Espionage in Man Nobody Knew, Courier & Spy Who Came in From the Cold

    Jay's Analysis

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 138:56


    n this new dialectics analysis we will cover more Cold War themed films and a documentary that was brought to my attention about William Colby: The Man Nobody Knew, produced by his son. Colby was a traditional Catholic Cold Warrior and headed up the Phoenix Program. We will analyze the documentary in light of Wemhoff's book, as well as the recent Cumberbatch film The Courier, and the LeCarre classic with Richard Burton, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, as well as Mobius. Tickets for the Orlando Event Here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-jay-dyer-fr-vladimir-jamie-hanshaw-live-tickets-396637652897

    Constant Procession
    313 Constant Procession

    Constant Procession

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 18:52


    Part 13 of my first book, "The Constant Procession." The Fatima apparition of the Virgin Mary asked, 'Pray for Russia.' But it went unheeded following WWII. Though the Great Return brought relief in France. It was different in Eastern-block countries. They were robbed of religious liberties, as the roots of the Cold War evolved. There are links, photos and more about this on my website. Also, Pray for the People of Ukraine. There are links to ways to support them on my website: ConstantProcession.com   I value feedback through the comments section on my website OR- Better via email at NikosSteves@gmail.com Constant Procession tells of key apparitions of the Virgin Mary since she passed on from the world and how she serves humanity through Christianity. The origin of these podcasts began with my book The Constant Procession. An e-book copy of the book can be found on my website: ConstantProcession.com

    The 'X' Zone Radio Show
    Rob McConnell Interviews - DAVE HOGAN - What Are UFOs?

    The 'X' Zone Radio Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 60:26


    Since the famed Kenneth Arnold “flying saucer” sighting of 1947, the world has been fascinated and unnerved by these mysterious objects in the sky. Millennia of recorded human history report UFOs, and everything from the extinction of dinosaurs to the origins of humankind have been attributed to them – but what exactly are UFOs?Featuring material from a treasure trove of UFO/Project Blue Book archives declassified in 2015, UFO FAQ is an all-inclusive guide to UFO lore – hard science and hoaxes, sightings and abductions, noted UFO proponents and skeptics, and sanctioned research and purported government cover-ups. Readers will meet cultists and explore worldwide UFO “hot spots.” They'll learn about UFOs in World War II, the Cold War, and the age of terrorism. And they'll zip along with UFOs in movies, comics, TV, and other popular media.Also featured are an international UFO timeline and a valuable UFO checklist that includes step-by-step suggestions on how to prepare and make the most of your UFO sightings – while ensuring your credibility. Dramatically illustrated with nearly 100 photographs and drawings, UFO FAQ combines historical accuracy, provocative speculation, and compulsive readability in one handy volume.

    New Books in European Studies
    Ariane Knüsel, "China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China During the Cold War" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    New Books in European Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:41


    During the Cold War, the People's Republic of China used Switzerland as headquarters for its economic, political, intelligence, and cultural networks in Europe. Based on extensive research in Western and Chinese archives, China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China during the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2022) by Dr. Ariane Knüsel charts not only how Switzerland came to play this role, but also how Chinese networks were built in practice, often beyond the public face of official proclamations and diplomatic interactions. By tracing the development of Sino-Swiss relations in the Cold War, Dr. Knüsel sheds new light on the People's Republic of China's formulation and implementation of foreign policy in Europe, Latin America and Africa and Switzerland's efforts to align neutrality, humanitarian engagement, and economic interests. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

    New Books in History
    Ariane Knüsel, "China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China During the Cold War" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:41


    During the Cold War, the People's Republic of China used Switzerland as headquarters for its economic, political, intelligence, and cultural networks in Europe. Based on extensive research in Western and Chinese archives, China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China during the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2022) by Dr. Ariane Knüsel charts not only how Switzerland came to play this role, but also how Chinese networks were built in practice, often beyond the public face of official proclamations and diplomatic interactions. By tracing the development of Sino-Swiss relations in the Cold War, Dr. Knüsel sheds new light on the People's Republic of China's formulation and implementation of foreign policy in Europe, Latin America and Africa and Switzerland's efforts to align neutrality, humanitarian engagement, and economic interests. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    New Books in Chinese Studies
    Ariane Knüsel, "China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China During the Cold War" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    New Books in Chinese Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:41


    During the Cold War, the People's Republic of China used Switzerland as headquarters for its economic, political, intelligence, and cultural networks in Europe. Based on extensive research in Western and Chinese archives, China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China during the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2022) by Dr. Ariane Knüsel charts not only how Switzerland came to play this role, but also how Chinese networks were built in practice, often beyond the public face of official proclamations and diplomatic interactions. By tracing the development of Sino-Swiss relations in the Cold War, Dr. Knüsel sheds new light on the People's Republic of China's formulation and implementation of foreign policy in Europe, Latin America and Africa and Switzerland's efforts to align neutrality, humanitarian engagement, and economic interests. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

    New Books in World Affairs
    Ariane Knüsel, "China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China During the Cold War" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    New Books in World Affairs

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:41


    During the Cold War, the People's Republic of China used Switzerland as headquarters for its economic, political, intelligence, and cultural networks in Europe. Based on extensive research in Western and Chinese archives, China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China during the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2022) by Dr. Ariane Knüsel charts not only how Switzerland came to play this role, but also how Chinese networks were built in practice, often beyond the public face of official proclamations and diplomatic interactions. By tracing the development of Sino-Swiss relations in the Cold War, Dr. Knüsel sheds new light on the People's Republic of China's formulation and implementation of foreign policy in Europe, Latin America and Africa and Switzerland's efforts to align neutrality, humanitarian engagement, and economic interests. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

    Probably About Politics Podcast
    Cold War: Chile - August 8, 2022

    Probably About Politics Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 38:06


    In this month's summer school, we are discussing the Cold War and the US' Operation Condor's effect on democracies across South and Central America. Alex and Kaleigh are zooming in on Chile and how their upcoming referendum on a new constitution is part of the country's ongoing efforts to build a democracy from the effects of the Cold War and decades of military dictatorship. Got any questions you'd like us to answer? Or just come to say hi! Instagram: @probpolitics Twitter: @probpolitics Email: probablyaboutpolitics@gmail.com

    New Books in European Politics
    Ariane Knüsel, "China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China During the Cold War" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    New Books in European Politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:41


    During the Cold War, the People's Republic of China used Switzerland as headquarters for its economic, political, intelligence, and cultural networks in Europe. Based on extensive research in Western and Chinese archives, China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China during the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2022) by Dr. Ariane Knüsel charts not only how Switzerland came to play this role, but also how Chinese networks were built in practice, often beyond the public face of official proclamations and diplomatic interactions. By tracing the development of Sino-Swiss relations in the Cold War, Dr. Knüsel sheds new light on the People's Republic of China's formulation and implementation of foreign policy in Europe, Latin America and Africa and Switzerland's efforts to align neutrality, humanitarian engagement, and economic interests. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Departures with Robert Amsterdam
    Historical memory on trial

    Departures with Robert Amsterdam

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 29:37


    “Imagine that all of humanity stands before you and comes to this court and cries. These are our laws, let them prevail.” -Sir Hartley Shawcross, War Crimes Trials, Nuremberg, Germany, July 27, 1946 After discovering a former Nazi who belonged to the same killing unit as her grandfather and was the subject of a posthumous criminal investigation and concurrently a rehabilitation petition in Latvia, author Linda Kinstler began to deconstruct what these laws really mean when people are removed by time and memory from historical truths. A phenomenal non-fiction debut, in “Come to this Court and Cry” Kinstler explores both her family story and the archives of ten nations, to determine what it takes to prove history in the uncertainty of the 21st century. In this week's Departures podcast, Robert Amsterdam and Kinstler discuss the implications of the neoliberal memory boom and unravel the perversions of law, when revisionism, ultra-nationalism and denialism can alter history and open rehabilitation to those who were never formally oppressed. As a new generation reckons with the crimes of the Holocaust and the shadows of the Cold War in a post-truth era, they examine what justice means when we no longer have a shared agreement of the basic facts.

    Stories Fables Ghostly Tales Podcast
    800th Episode: Hisashi Ouchi: The Walking Ghost - 83 Days till Death

    Stories Fables Ghostly Tales Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 40:43


    Welcome you little lovelies! My 800th episode!!! Radiation has always been an interest to humanity, it is both complex, volatile, and can be profoundly destructive. Since its discovery and weaponization, humanity has looked into the impacts of radiation on living organisms, especially humans. And this interest stems all the way back, when experiments were conducted during the Cold War to examine radiation's effects on living beings, which killing so many, humans and animals alike, with fatalities related to cancer and cellular mutation. Today, we're going to know more, about radiations impact on the human body, with a research piece on Hisashi Ouchi, the man who absorbed 17 Sieverts of radiation... Enjoy the episode mates!

    Decisive Point – the USAWC Press Podcast Companion Series
    Dr. Richard A. Lacquement and Dr. Thomas P. Galvin – Framing the Future of the US Military Profession

    Decisive Point – the USAWC Press Podcast Companion Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 12:43


    Released  8 July 2022. The military profession needs to be redefined by examination of its expertise and jurisdictions of practice, whereas previously the focus was on securing its professional identity. Twenty years ago, the original Future of the Army Profession research project responded to growing concerns among officers that the Army was no longer a profession in light of the post–Cold War drawdown and the onset of global operations including Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, the profession faces recurrent challenges raised by the changing character of war, the renewal of great-power competition, crises surrounding issues of sexual harassment and assault, the effects of a major global pandemic and associated social and political unrest, and the growing societal distrust toward professions in general. Richard Lacquement and Thomas Galvin propose that the questions of professional identity, while still important, are now less salient than those about the professions' jurisdictions of practice and domains of expert knowledge. Clarifying them will help better prepare US military professionals to exercise discretionary judgment effectively. They also propose a new Future of the US Military Profession research effort that addresses these jurisdictions across service, joint, and defense enterprises to clarify the divisions of professional work and responsibilities. This is a must-read for any steward of the military profession. Click here to read the monograph. Keywords: character, leadership, self-awareness, effectiveness If you enjoyed this episode of Decisive Point and would like to hear more, look for us on Amazon Music, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or any other major podcasting platform.    

    New Books Network
    Ariane Knüsel, "China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China During the Cold War" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:41


    During the Cold War, the People's Republic of China used Switzerland as headquarters for its economic, political, intelligence, and cultural networks in Europe. Based on extensive research in Western and Chinese archives, China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China during the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2022) by Dr. Ariane Knüsel charts not only how Switzerland came to play this role, but also how Chinese networks were built in practice, often beyond the public face of official proclamations and diplomatic interactions. By tracing the development of Sino-Swiss relations in the Cold War, Dr. Knüsel sheds new light on the People's Republic of China's formulation and implementation of foreign policy in Europe, Latin America and Africa and Switzerland's efforts to align neutrality, humanitarian engagement, and economic interests. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    The Short Game
    330: South of the Circle

    The Short Game

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 67:30


    An Apple Arcade original that is finally making its way out into gen pop, South of the Circle is a film-like narrative game set in the Cold War 60s. It alternates between a climate scientist...

    PBS NewsHour - Segments
    Residents in the Southwest struggle with the health effects of nuclear ore extraction

    PBS NewsHour - Segments

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:40


    Residents of the Southwest including many Indigenous people have for years been exposed to high levels of radiation from uranium extraction and refining, a toxic legacy from the Cold War's weapons program and nuclear power generation. Stephanie Sy reports in partnership with investigative news outlet ProPublica on a community's fight for survival and to hold a company and government accountable. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    New Books in East Asian Studies
    Ariane Knüsel, "China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China During the Cold War" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    New Books in East Asian Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:41


    During the Cold War, the People's Republic of China used Switzerland as headquarters for its economic, political, intelligence, and cultural networks in Europe. Based on extensive research in Western and Chinese archives, China's European Headquarters: Switzerland and China during the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2022) by Dr. Ariane Knüsel charts not only how Switzerland came to play this role, but also how Chinese networks were built in practice, often beyond the public face of official proclamations and diplomatic interactions. By tracing the development of Sino-Swiss relations in the Cold War, Dr. Knüsel sheds new light on the People's Republic of China's formulation and implementation of foreign policy in Europe, Latin America and Africa and Switzerland's efforts to align neutrality, humanitarian engagement, and economic interests. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

    Dan Snow's History Hit
    The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb

    Dan Snow's History Hit

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 27:44 Very Popular


    On August 6 and 9, 1945, US B-29 bombers, dropped their nuclear bombs on the two cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, killing hundreds of thousands and consigning millions to disease and genetic defects. The accepted wisdom in the U.S. since has been that dropping the bombs on these Japanese cities was the only way to end World War II without an invasion of Japan that would have cost hundreds of thousands of American and perhaps millions of Japanese lives.Gar Alperovitz is a historian, political economist, activist and writer. A critic of the bombings, Gar joins Dan on the podcast to discuss how the decision to use the atomic bomb was wrapped up in atomic diplomacy: that the U.S. used nuclear weapons to intimidate the Soviet Union in the early stages of the Cold War. To mark the anniversary, we also dug back into the archives to bring you the human story at the heart of the tragedy - Hirata San, a survivor of the Hiroshima attacks, shares his experiences of the bombing.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    LongDays with Yannis Pappas
    Cold War Opening Ceremony - Longdays with Yannis Pappas

    LongDays with Yannis Pappas

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 96:21 Very Popular


    Nancy Pelosi travels to Taiwan for the Cold War opening ceremony and Yanni has some hot sauce for his general tso's opinions on it. Shaun King caught in yet another scandal has one play left, Yanni explains. Tiger Woods puts principle over profit as great men like he & MLK do—if they got a little side strange big deal they are still great men, and Beyoncé & Monica have a “woke off” in the oddest most unlikely shared headline in human history. It's summer, so prepare for a long day of sunshine and heat with a side of feta crumble! Wasdadealis! Sponsor Shady Rays https://shadyrays.com Promo code: longdays

    TNT Radio
    Dirk Pohlmann on The George Eliason Show - 06 August 2022

    TNT Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 55:33


    GUEST OVERVIEW: Dirk Pohlmann is a German journalist, author, screenwriter, director and producer of more than 20 historical documentaries for Arte, ARD and ZDF. Pohlmann has increasingly focused on intelligence operations during the Cold War and after.

    Stories From Space
    Behind The Scenes At NASA | Guest: Space Journalist Nancy Atkinson | Stories From Space Podcast With Matthew S Williams

    Stories From Space

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 48:30


    Noted space journalist and science communicator Nancy Atkinson is the author of "Incredible Stories from Space" and "Eight Years to the Moon: The History of the Apollo Missions."With her long history of covering NASA missions, she takes readers behind the scenes to hear the untold stories, and learn about the unsung heroes who make space exploration possible!_______________________GuestNancy AtkinsonOn LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/nancyatkinson4/On Twitter | https://twitter.com/Nancy_AOn Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/nancy.atkinson4_______________________HostMatthew S WilliamsOn ITSPmagazine  

    The Morning Toast
    S5 Ep105: Righteous Indignation: Friday, August 5th, 2022

    The Morning Toast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:13 Very Popular


    1. Kylie Jenner Defends ‘Unsanitary' Lab Pics (Page Six) (16:24)  2. Victoria Beckham in Cold War with New Daughter-in-Law, Nicola Peltz (Page Six) (31:45)  3. Meghan McCain Reveals Joy Behar's Comment That Made Her Quit ‘The View' (40:00)  4. Lady A Postpones Tour to Support Charles Kelley's ‘Journey to Sobriety' (Page Six) (45:22)  5. Brittney Griner ‘Devastated' After Russian COurt Sentences Her to 9 Years in Prison, Lawyers Say (People) (50:37)  The Morning Toast with Jackie  (@JackieOshry) and Claudia Oshry  (@girlwithnojob) NLOG Tickets Merch The Morning Toast Patreon Girl With No Job by Claudia Oshry (Book)

    New Books in Intellectual History
    Itay Lotem, "The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021)

    New Books in Intellectual History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 108:29


    In The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021), Itay Lotem explores the remembering of empire in Britain and France. By comparing these two former colonial powers, the author tells two distinct stories about coming to terms with the legacies of colonialism, the role of silence and the breaking thereof. Focusing on memory as an ongoing, politicized public debate, the book examines the afterlife of colonial history as an element of political and social discourse that depends on actors' goals and priorities. Itay Lotem earned his Ph.D at the University of London, Queen Mary and is currently a senior lecturer in French Studies at the University of Westminster. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

    New Books in World Affairs
    Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

    New Books in World Affairs

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


    In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

    New Books in Critical Theory
    Itay Lotem, "The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021)

    New Books in Critical Theory

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 108:29


    In The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021), Itay Lotem explores the remembering of empire in Britain and France. By comparing these two former colonial powers, the author tells two distinct stories about coming to terms with the legacies of colonialism, the role of silence and the breaking thereof. Focusing on memory as an ongoing, politicized public debate, the book examines the afterlife of colonial history as an element of political and social discourse that depends on actors' goals and priorities. Itay Lotem earned his Ph.D at the University of London, Queen Mary and is currently a senior lecturer in French Studies at the University of Westminster. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

    Cold War Conversations History Podcast
    A daughter's 18 year search for her Cold War CIA pilot father at the Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba (247)

    Cold War Conversations History Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 57:11


    In 1961, members of the Alabama Air National Guard secretly took part in the failed invasion of Cuba by U.S.-backed Cuban exiles known as the Bay of Pigs. This was a covert attempt by the United States to overthrow the Soviet-allied Cuban government of Fidel Castro. Pete Ray was one of eight Alabama guardsmen who flew combat missions on April 19th 1961,  which resulted in the deaths of Pete and three members of the Alabama unit.  U.S. President John F. Kennedy later acknowledged America's involvement but denied that American military personnel had entered Cuban territory. It was not until 1987 did the U.S. revealed that eight ANG members had indeed flown into Cuban airspace. We hear from Pete Ray's daughter Janet, who tirelessly worked to find out the truth of what happened that day despite the best efforts of the CIA, the Cubans, and the US government to obstruct her investigations. Cold War history is disappearing; however, a simple monthly donation will keep this podcast on the air. You'll get a sought-after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping preserve Cold War history. Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.I am delighted to welcome Janet Ray to our Cold War conversation…Photos and videos here https://coldwarconversations.com/episode247/Follow us on Twitter here https://twitter.com/ColdWarPodFacebook here https://www.facebook.com/groups/coldwarpod/Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/coldwarconversations/Support the show

    New Books in Economic and Business History
    Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

    New Books in Economic and Business History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


    In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Seriously…
    Sideways: A Nuclear Awakening

    Seriously…

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 28:44


    It's a little girl's eighth birthday. She wakes to a sight that looks like the end of the world. A radioactive mushroom cloud rises 130,000 feet in the air. And the world wakes up to the devastating fallout of nuclear weapons. In this new mini series from Sideways, writer and Times columnist Matthew Syed is calling for a nuclear awakening. Since the end of the Cold War, when relations between two of the world's nuclear superpowers - the former USSR and the USA - seemed more rosy, Matthew argues that many of us have slipped into a kind of comfortable amnesia about the presence of these destroyers of worlds. The wake up call came when President Vladimir Putin launched the invasion of Ukraine in February accompanied by veiled nuclear threats. It was a reminder of the mind bending fact that there are weapons in existence that are capable of eradicating our species. Over four episodes, Matthew explores the intellectual and strategic frameworks birthed by the bomb and the tensions of the Cold War, which sought to contain the ultimate destructive force. From deterrence to disarmament and non-proliferation, these ideas all aim at one goal - protection from catastrophic nuclear use. Understanding their origins and complexities is urgently needed, Matthew argues. Ultimately, Matthew will be asking if the actions of Putin in Ukraine call for a new intellectual framework to help make our world safe. Presenter: Matthew Syed Producer and Series Editor: Katherine Godfrey Researcher: Nadia Mehdi Sound Designer: Rob Speight Special thanks to Jessica A Schwartz for her recordings of Lijon Eknilang which form part of the material for her book Radiation Sounds. Also to Ali Raj and Susanne Rust, whose reporting for the LA Times informed this episode. Contributors: Evelyn Ralpho Jeadrik, daughter of Lijon Eknilang, Marshallese singer, composer and anti-nuclear activist. Ariana Tibon, Commissioner, Royal Marshall Islands National Nuclear Commission Alex Wellerstein, historian of science and nuclear weapons and a professor at the Stevens Institute of Technology. David Holloway, Raymond A. Spruance Professor of International History and author of Stalin and the Bomb: The Soviet Union and Atomic Energy, 1939-1956 A Novel production for BBC Radio 4

    Crashing the War Party
    A militarized America is not my America: A conversation with Monica Duffy Toft

    Crashing the War Party

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 39:57


    After the fall of the Soviet Union, scholar (and former Army linguist) Monica Duffy Toft noticed something odd: the number of U.S. interventions overseas seemed to go up, not down, after the Cold War was supposedly over. Today, she is fully embroiled in a project that is collecting data on all of those interventions, their toll on the American taxpayer, and on peace across the globe, and is coming up with some disturbing conclusions about the nature of American exceptionalism and the military-industrial complex. In the first segment, Kelley and Dan talk about Nancy Pelosi's big trip to Taiwan this week and why Washington today appears to be completely inept at foreign policy and realpolitik.More from Monica Duffy Toft:America’s modern addiction to the big stick — Responsible Statecraft, 6/21/22What the United States needs to own in Russia’s war on Ukraine, Responsible Statecraft, 5/16/22 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit crashingthewarparty.substack.com

    We Hear: Quick Fix
    Victoria Beckham and her new daughter-in-law are in a cold war, more

    We Hear: Quick Fix

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 5:12


    Victoria Beckham and her new daughter-in-law are in a cold war, Ne-Yo's wife claims he had a baby with another woman, and Aaron Rodgers opened up about his ex-girlfriend Danica Patrick. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    New Books Network
    Itay Lotem, "The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 108:29


    In The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021), Itay Lotem explores the remembering of empire in Britain and France. By comparing these two former colonial powers, the author tells two distinct stories about coming to terms with the legacies of colonialism, the role of silence and the breaking thereof. Focusing on memory as an ongoing, politicized public debate, the book examines the afterlife of colonial history as an element of political and social discourse that depends on actors' goals and priorities. Itay Lotem earned his Ph.D at the University of London, Queen Mary and is currently a senior lecturer in French Studies at the University of Westminster. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in History
    Itay Lotem, "The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 108:29


    In The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021), Itay Lotem explores the remembering of empire in Britain and France. By comparing these two former colonial powers, the author tells two distinct stories about coming to terms with the legacies of colonialism, the role of silence and the breaking thereof. Focusing on memory as an ongoing, politicized public debate, the book examines the afterlife of colonial history as an element of political and social discourse that depends on actors' goals and priorities. Itay Lotem earned his Ph.D at the University of London, Queen Mary and is currently a senior lecturer in French Studies at the University of Westminster. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    New Books in French Studies
    Itay Lotem, "The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021)

    New Books in French Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 108:29


    In The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021), Itay Lotem explores the remembering of empire in Britain and France. By comparing these two former colonial powers, the author tells two distinct stories about coming to terms with the legacies of colonialism, the role of silence and the breaking thereof. Focusing on memory as an ongoing, politicized public debate, the book examines the afterlife of colonial history as an element of political and social discourse that depends on actors' goals and priorities. Itay Lotem earned his Ph.D at the University of London, Queen Mary and is currently a senior lecturer in French Studies at the University of Westminster. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

    New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
    Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

    New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


    In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies

    New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studies
    Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

    New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


    In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/australian-and-new-zealand-studies

    New Books in History
    Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


    In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    New Books in European Studies
    Itay Lotem, "The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021)

    New Books in European Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 108:29


    In The Memory of Colonialism in Britain and France: The Sins of Silence (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021), Itay Lotem explores the remembering of empire in Britain and France. By comparing these two former colonial powers, the author tells two distinct stories about coming to terms with the legacies of colonialism, the role of silence and the breaking thereof. Focusing on memory as an ongoing, politicized public debate, the book examines the afterlife of colonial history as an element of political and social discourse that depends on actors' goals and priorities. Itay Lotem earned his Ph.D at the University of London, Queen Mary and is currently a senior lecturer in French Studies at the University of Westminster. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

    Un-Common
    ANTIFA the Pool Noodle Army

    Un-Common

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 35:49


    Email: Uncommonpodcast@outlook.comFacebook: @UncommonPODTwitter: @UncommonPC Instagram:  @dustin.duff     @Bpop80    Gettr: @DuffdbGab: @Duffdb Clips:Portnoy Interview Antifahttps://youtube.com/shorts/iwj-4RphglU?feature=shareAdam Calhoun / Upchurch (Funny)https://youtu.be/5oGKXIibAD8White guy on a rant about “facism”https://twitter.com/sunshinegirl754/status/1551362689833639937?s=12&t=eCseX_pMr--XQX-yODJabQMTG on Jan 6th Committee https://youtu.be/F_Au-e8imnkMatt Gaetz fat chickshttps://twitter.com/realJoelValdez/status/1551647747484311553 Docs / Articles:Useful Idiot: In political jargon, a useful idiot is a derogatory term for a person perceived as propagandizing for a cause without fully comprehending the cause's goals, and who is cynically used by the cause's leaders.[1][2] The term was originally used during the Cold War to describe non-communists regarded as susceptible to communist propaganda and manipulation.[1] Virtue Signaling: the action or practice of publicly expressing opinions or sentiments intended to demonstrate one's good character or the moral correctness of one's position on a particular issue. Jan 6th v BLM Riots Comparisonhttps://www.realclearinvestigations.com/articles/2021/09/09/realclearinvestigations_jan_6-blm_comparison_database_791370.htmlFacism v Communism v Socialism Dochttps://examples.yourdictionary.com/fascism-vs-communism-vs-socialism-differences-explained