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Latest podcast episodes about house committees

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Oscar winner Lee Grant (Shampoo), featured in new film Killian AandD The ComebackK Kids, in theaters and VOD

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 8:55


ABOUT LEE GRANT (FROM TCM.COM)An attractive brunette with angular features, Lee Grant began her career as a child performer with NYC's Metropolitan Opera. By age 11, she had become a member of the American Ballet Theatre. After music studies at Juilliard, she won a scholarship to attend the Neighborhood Playhouse and switched her focus to acting. Grant understudied the role of Ado Annie in a touring production of "Oklahoma!" before landing her breakthrough stage role as a young shoplifter in Sidney Kingsley's "Detective Story" in 1949. Hollywood soon beckoned and she recreated the role in William Wyler's 1951 superb film version. Grant won the Cannes Film Festival Best Actress prize and earned a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination for the role. Seemingly on the verge of a brilliant career, the actress found herself the victim of the blacklist when her husband, playwright Arnold Manoff was named before the House Committee on Un-American Activities. Grant herself refused to testify and the film offers over the next decade were sporadic.Returning to Manhattan, Grant found work in TV (e.g., the daytime soap "Search for Tomorrow") and on stage (i.e., "A Hole in the Head" 1957; "Two for the Seesaw" 1959). After earning an OBIE Award for her work in Genet's "The Maids" in 1963, her small screen career began to pick up. In 1965, Grant joined the cast of the primetime soap "Peyton Place" as Stella Chernak and picked up an Emmy for her work. She earned a second statuette for her performance as a runaway wife and mother who ends up at a truck stop in California in "The Neon Ceiling" (NBC, 1971).By the time she had earned her second Emmy, Grant's feature career had been rejuvenated with her stellar work as the widow of a murder victim in Norman Jewison's Oscar-winning "In the Heat of the Night" (1967). That same year, she essayed a neurotic in the campy "Valley of the Dolls." In "The Landlord" (1970), she was the society matron mother of Beau Bridges and her comic portrayal earned her a second Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress. Grant then played the mother of all Jewish mothers, Sophie Portnoy, in Ernest Lehman's film version of Philip Roth's novel "Portnoy's Complaint" (1972). Hal Ashby's "Shampoo" (1975) finally brought her a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award as a Beverly Hills matron having an affair with her hairdresser. The following year, Grant received a fourth nomination for her deeply moving portrayal of a Jewish refugee in "Voyage of the Damned."Her subsequent screen roles have been of varying quality, although Grant always brings a professionalism and degree of excellence to even the smallest role. After striking out as a sitcom lead in the underrated "Fay" (NBC, 1975), she delivered a fine portrayal of First Lady Grace Coolidge in "Backstairs at the White House" (NBC, 1979), was the domineering mother of actress Frances Farmer in "Will There Really Be a Morning?" (CBS, 1983) and excelled as Dora Cohn, mother of "Roy Cohn" (HBO, 1992). On the big screen, Grant lent her substantial abilities to "Teachers" (1984) as a hard-nosed school superintendent, "Defending Your Life" (1991), as an elegant prosecutor sparring with adversary Rip Torn, and "It's My Party" (1996), as the mother of man suffering from complications from AIDS.While Grant has continued to act in features and on TV, she has concentrated more on her directing career since the 80s. After studying at the American Film Institute, she made the short "The Stronger" (1976) which eventually aired on Arts & Entertainment's "Shortstories" in 1988. Grant made her feature debut with "Tell Me a Riddle" (1980), an earnest, well-acted story of an elderly couple facing death. She has excelled in the documentary format, beginning with "The Wilmar 8" (1981), about strike by female bank employees in the Midwest. (Grant later directed a fictionalized account entitled "A Matter of Sex" for NBC in 1984). She steered Marlo Thomas to an Emmy in the fact-based "Nobody's Child" (CBS, 1986) and earned praise for helming "No Place Like Home" (CBS, 1989), a stark look at the effects of unemployment. A number of her documentaries have been screened as part of HBO's "America Undercover" series, including the Oscar-winning "Down and Out in America" (1985), about the unemployed, "What Sex Am I?" (1985), about transsexuals and transvestites, "Battered" (1989), about victims of domestic violence, and "Women on Trial" (1992), about mothers who turn to the courts to protect their children. In 1997, she produced, directed and hosted the well-received "Say It, Fight It, Cure It" (Lifetime) which focused on breast cancer survivors and their families.ABOUT KILLIAN AND THE COMEBACK KIDSIn August, film distributor Hope Runs High will release its latest feature film across VOD platforms - bringing the much-lauded "Killian & the Comeback Kids" to a national audience outside of its 30 city theatrical release. For composer-writer-director Taylor A. Purdee, "Killian & the Comeback Kids" is a passion project that has united a dynamic team of creatives both onscreen and off. Concurrently with digital release, the film's screenplay will be preserved by The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' permanent archive.With the film's initial theatrical releases, Purdee became the youngest director in 2020 and 2021 to have a film playing in major American exhibition circuits. He is also the first bi-racial director-star of African American descent to have a film theatrically released in the United States in the 21st century.'Killian' is the story of a young mixed-race musician forced to return to his rural hometown, burdened by the expense of his college degree. A chance encounter with a childhood acquaintance takes his summer in a new direction as the pair enlist a rag-tag band of other struggling locals to play a music festival coming to their once-prosperous steel town. With youthful ambition and an unflagging passion for folk-rock, Killian and the band take a shot at uniting their divided community and setting the stage for their futures.Purdee discusses the film's resonance in the current moment. "Folk music has always represented three things: a lot of self-determination, social responsibility, and a DIY spirit that happens to run through most younger generations. In a moment where the culture seems increasingly divided, when higher education could be viewed as more of a corporate scheme than a ticket to prosperity, and when one-third of our young people remain suspended in an elongated adolescence, our view of professional and personal identity is worth reimagining."The film's music by Purdee and his The Cumberland Kids bandmate Liam Higgins garnered Oscar buzz, and Purdee's original screenplay will be preserved in The Academy's permanent archive. The film stars Taylor A. Purdee, Kassie DePaiva, Nathan Purdee, John Donchak, Shannon O'Boyle, Shane Andries, Emily Mest, Yael Elisheva, and Andrew O'Shanick, and features Maddi Jane and Academy Award-winner Lee Grant."With a cast built of new faces, street musicians, Broadway mainstays, daytime superstars, new media darlings, and a living legend of classic Hollywood, our disruptive star power is the perfect mixture for an unconventional film in unconventional times."SYNOPSIS: Killian & the Comeback Kids is the story of a young mixed race musician forced to return to his rural hometown after an expensive college degree. A chance encounter with a childhood acquaintance gives the summer new direction. Together they throw together a rag-tag band of other struggling locals for one shot to play a music festival coming to their once prosperous steel town. Armed with only folk-rock, Killian and the band hope to unite the community - - if just for one night. A little musical at the cross roads of small town America and a burgeoning youth culture only just beginning to find its voice.Here's the trailer:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI6n2nkk8V0

Voices in Advocacy Podcast
What is Too Much or Too Little to Have in Your Legislation? Learn more from this AG CEO.

Voices in Advocacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 30:02


What is Too Much or Too Little to Have in Your Legislation? This and many more fabulous advocacy tips are shared as we speak with the CEO of an organization that defends and protects the ecosystem beneficial to the success of wheat growers in the United States.   ABOUT the GUEST Chandler Goule is NAWG's Chief Executive Officer, coming into that role in July of 2016. In this capacity, Chandler will oversee NAWG's industry relations, act as Executive Director of the National Wheat Foundation, and lead NAWG's efforts to advocate for American wheat farmers. Prior to his position at NAWG, Chandler served as the Sr. Vice President of Programs for the National Farmers Union for several years. Goule also formerly served as the staff director of the Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy and Poultry for the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture under former chairman Rep. Collin C. Peterson, D-Minn. Peterson is a member of the conservative Blue Dog Democrats Coalition.     Thank you to our sponsor: Rap Index, tell them Roger sent you. https://www.rapindex.com   This podcast is dedicated to the art of advocacy. Contact Voices In Advocacy at: www.VoicesinAdvocacy.com 480 488-9150 At Voices in Advocacy, we work with organizations that want to inspire, educate, engage, and activate their supports to become even better influential advocates

Southpaws
Southpaws 8-5-22 Pod

Southpaws

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 59:21


Darren Gibson is celebrating his birthday today, but he left a new episode of Southpaws as a present for the listeners. Topics include:Federal charges were announced against four current and former Louisville, Kentucky police officers in the 2020 shooting death of Breonna Taylor.Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-IN) and two of her aides were killed in a car crash in northern Indiana.John Gibbs defeated Rep. Peter Meijer (R-MI) in the Republican primary for Michigan's 3rd Congressional District. Gibbs was endorsed by Donald Trump.Both Meijer and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) called out the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee for running advertising that endorsed Gibbs over Meijer. Darren agreed with both of the representatives.Tudor Dixon defeated four other candidates to become the Republican gubernatorial candidate in Michigan. Dixon received an 11th hour endorsement from Donald Trump after Betsy DeVos sent a letter to him requesting one.Dixon is dangerous for women in Michigan if she's elected. She would ban abortion with no exceptions for rape, incest, or to save the life of the mother.Republican gubernatorial candidate Ryan Kelley refused to concede the election, saying that the fix was in from the beginning for the "establishment candidate" (presumably Dixon).Darren read other results from Michigan's primary election.Kansas voters overwhelmingly rejected a ballot proposal to further restrict abortions. Could the overturning of Roe v Wade be a huge miscalculation for the Republicans?An Oakland County judge has issued an injunction to stop enforcement of Michigan's 1931 ban on abortions after the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled that local prosecutors could enforce the ban.The attorney for plaintiffs in the Alex Jones defamation lawsuit told the court that Jones's attorney accidentally sent him two years worth of his client's text messages. Now the January 6 House Committee wants those texts.Jones was ordered to pay $4.1 million in damages. He may have to pay more in punitive damages. And he may also face a criminal trial for perjury.Hammer Time: Political consultants David Doyle and Ed Kettle formed a group to oppose efforts to eliminate part of the Grand Rapids city charter that requires 32% of the city's budget be allocated to the police. What local media didn't tell you is that both men supported the original effort to add that to the city charter. Did we mention that Ed Kettle's wife is the current director of Silent Observer and works closely with the police?Off The Cuff: A Utah man trying to kill a spider with a lighter started a wildfire that destroyed 60 acres.

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
Cognia CEO Grilled Over Handling of School Inquiry

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 12:44


Cognia CEO Mark Elgart testified in front of a special House Committee about the inquiry of Cobb Schools; Austell has a new police chief; And Kennesaw State will present a "Double Exposure" at the KSU Dance Theatre in Marietta.  #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews      -            -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.             Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline            Register Here for your essential digital news.          Email bgdoughnut22@gmailcom for your chance to win a $15 gift card from Dough in the Box https://www.chattahoocheetech.edu/ https://cuofga.org/ https://www.esogrepair.com/ https://www.drakerealty.com/ https://doughinthebox.com/         Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.             This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group   For more information be sure to visit https://www.bgpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

FCPA Compliance Report
Mary Inman on the Current State of Whistleblowing

FCPA Compliance Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 30:36


In this episode of the FCPA Compliance Report, I am joined by Mary Inman, partner at Constatine Cannon. We look at recent developments in whistleblowing and how the Ukraine War has increased the visibility of whistleblowers. Highlights of this podcast include: Whistleblower Reward Program at the US Treasury Department/FinCEN – what is its relevance to corruption, anti-money laundering and the Ukraine conflict. The House Committee on Financial Services voted to strengthen the U.S. Treasury's Anti-Money Laundering (AML) whistleblower program. What does this mean for this nascent program? How does a minimum whistleblower reward threshold, whistleblower incentives and injects more certainty into the Anti-Money Laundering whistleblower program. How has expanding AML whistleblower rewards to cover laws applicable to Russian sanctions, Congress enlisted the help of the private citizenry. Lisa Monaco recently spoke about the government relying on corporations to ID instances of money-laundering and other activities to help enforcement Russia economic sanctions and broader trade sanctions. Are private citizen or other whistleblowers as a key component of this fight? How has the Ukraine War raised the profile of whistleblowers and whistleblowing? Starting with SOX, then Dodd-Frank and the AML Law of 2020 has the US government began to understand whistleblowers as a key component in the fight against fraud, waste and abuse. Has the government embraced these same strategies and tactics in the wider fight against corruption? Tribute to Chuck Grassley for his advocacy of whistleblowers.  Resources Mary Inman on Constantine Cannon website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson
Mick Mulvaney Discusses His Testimony To The January 6th Committee

WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 33:09


Mick Mulvaney joins Good Morning BT to discuss his testimony to the January 6th House Committee, explain the process, and the DOJ investigation. He also gives insight on President Biden having covid.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Congressional Dish
CD256: Poisonous Pet Collars

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 81:32 Very Popular


Seresto Flea and Tick Collars for dogs and cats have been sold to Americans since 2013. During that time, the EPA has received approximately 100,000 reports of illnesses and 2,500 reports of deaths of animals that wore a Seresto Flea and Tick collar, by far the most reports received about any flea and tick treatment on the market. In this episode, hear testimony from scientists about the Environmental Protection Agency's disturbingly lax review processes for pesticides in pet products and learn why your vote in November is likely to determine if these popular but dangerous products will stay on American shelves. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Listen to the latest episode of Jen's new podcast with Andrew Heaton and Justin Robert Young — We're Not Wrong Episode 12: About The Never Ending Ukraine War, Biden's COVID and Mike Pence (LIVE FROM BERLIN) To report an incident directly to the EPA via email Report.Pesticide.Incident@epa.gov View the shownotes on our website at https://congressionaldish.com/cd256-poisonous-pet-collars Executive Producer Recommended Sources CD200: How to End Legal Bribes Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith. The Dictator's Handbook: Why Bad Behavior is Almost Always Good Politics. Public Affairs: 2011. Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD254: Baby Formula Shortage CD234: AWOL Recall: The Rock and Play Sleeper Reports on Seresto and Pesticides “Oversight Subcommittee Report Reveals EPA Failed to Protect Pets, Owners From Dangerous Flea and Tick Collar.” Jun 15, 2022. House Committee on Oversight and Reform. House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy. June 2022. “Staff Report: Seresto Flea and Tick Collars: Examining why a product linked to more than 2,500 pet deaths remains on the market.” Lauretta Joseph. May 19, 2022. “Notification of Evaluation: The EPA's Response to Reported Incidents of Unintended Effects from Pet Collar Pesticides, Project No. OSRE-FY22-0120” Johnathan Hettinger. Sept. 24, 2021. “Is your pet wearing a Seresto flea collar? Company reports thousands more adverse incidents.” USA Today. Jordan Liles. Mar 8, 2021. “Did Seresto Flea Collars Cause 1,698 Dog and Cat Deaths?” Snopes. Johnathan Hettinger. Mar 2, 2021. “Popular flea collar linked to almost 1,700 pet deaths. The EPA has issued no warning.” USA Today. Jen's highlighted copy Lawrence J. Dyckman et al. July 1995. “Pesticides: EPA's Efforts to Collect and Take Action on Exposure Incident Data, GAO/RCED-95-163.” U.S. Government Accountability Office. Lobbying “Lobbyist Profile: Ryan Canfield.” 2022. Open Secrets. “Employment History: Ryan Canfield.” Open Secrets. “Elanco Animal Health.” Open Secrets. The Hearing Seresto Flea and Tick Collars: Examining why a product linked to more than 2,500 pet deaths remains on the market June 15, 2022 Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy Witnesses: Faye Hemsley & Omarion Hemsley, Owners of Deceased Pet Thomas Maiorino, Owner of Deceased Pet Jeffrey Simmons, President and Chief Executive Officer, Elanco Animal Health Incorporated Nathan Donley, Ph.D, Environmental Health Science Director, Center for Biological Diversity Karen McCormack, Former Scientist, Policy Analyst, and Communications Officer (ret.), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency Carrie Sheffield (minority witness), Senior Policy Analyst, Independent Women's Voice Clips 1:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): As early as 2015, just a few years after the collar entered the US market, an EPA investigation found that among similar products, the Seresto collar “ranked number one” by a wide margin in terms of total incidents, major incidents and deaths, even after factoring in companies' relative sales. Those findings weren't enough to drive the makers of Seresto collar or the EPA to act. 1:50 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): In 2016, Canada's equivalent of the EPA known as the PMRA, concluded based on a review of the same American data available to the EPA that the collar posed too great a risk to pets and their owners to be ever sold in Canada. 2:10 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): Even as the death count rose, the EPA allowed Seresto to remain on the market here without even so much as requiring additional warning labels that regulators mandated in places ranging from Australia to Colombia to the European Union. 2:30 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): The companies that manufactured the Seresto collar first Bayer animal health and then later Elanco were also aware of the risks, the incidents and the deaths, but they too failed to act. Instead, they hired third party industry insiders to conduct so-called independent reviews of the incident data, which ended up protecting their $300 million a year market but ended up endangering pets. So the Seresto collar stayed the same and so did the consequences. 4:15 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): This particular collar has caused 100,000 incidents reported to the EPA and over 2500 pet deaths reported to the EPA. 4:30 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): The steps that we are asking for today are crucial, because it's important to protect our pets and our families, too. I now call upon my distinguished colleague, Mr. Cloud for his opening statement. Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Thank you, Chairman. This is the first hearing of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee this year, and we've been in session for 52 days this year. And our first hearing is on pet collars. And I do realize that our pets are a huge part of our lives, they enrich our families, they provide companionship for my kids, they've helped foster responsibility and compassion and care, important ethics we need in our society. Just recently, our family mourned the loss of our guinea pig, biscuit. And so pets are a huge part of our family lives. But I have to admit that when I saw that this was going to be on the agenda for this week, I cannot help but be concerned, especially coming from South Texas about the 1000s 10s of 1000s of human lives that have passed away due to fentanyl and due to an open border and due to the policies of this administration to continue to aid and abet cartels. And I realized that this is the economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee. And so I think about economic policy happening right now and where the minds of the American people are. Gas is now averaging $5 A gallon nationwide. For the first time in history. We have not had a hearing. Inflation is at a 40 year high. We have not had a hearing, the American people cannot find baby formula. We still haven't had a hearing. I've mentioned fentanyl is killing Americans, especially our teens at unprecedented rates. We have not had a hearing. Biden's systemic elimination of the safe and secure border he inherited has led to the worst humanitarian and national security crisis in this country's history. We have not had a hearing this term, we could talk about how inflation is affecting the cost of owning a pet, including the increased cost of food, toys, accessories, but we're not talking about that either. Instead, we're holding a hearing on the pet collar, which fights fleas and ticks. And as any pet owner knows fleas and tick management is an essential part of pet care. But I'm not sure it's an essential part of congressional oversight, especially when we take in mind where the American people are at. And frankly, I've talked to a number of people in my district and others who live in other parts of the country and they are really surprised that this has risen to one of the top priorities of commerce at this time in juncture. The subcommittee Republicans would rather explore efforts to help American consumers during these trying times, we would gladly have joined the chairman in holding a hearing on the shortage of baby formula. Moreover, we have welcomed the chance to explore TikTok's troubling practice of showing dangerous content to minors, an investigation you all started last year. In fact, it's now come to light that teenagers are using tick tock and other social media platforms to purchase illicit drugs including unknowingly in many cases, in most cases, fentanyl. Social media platforms are also using it to recruit young people into the gig economy of human trafficking. A hearing on that crisis could be incredibly important. And on the subject of our nation's youth, CDC bureaucrats have actively pursued an agenda to close schools during the pandemic instead of following the science damaging our children's financial, mental, physical, emotional, and also their learning for years to come. But we still have not had a hearing. Americans are facing incredible economic issues which require us as elected officials to listen and to respond. I do appreciate the fact that our pets play an important part of our lives. We should be kind to animals and we should teach our children to do the same. But I do care immensely more about the human lives that we were elected to serve. 10:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): A recorded vote has been requested — we will pause while the we will get the clerk out. 12:00 Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL): Mr. Chairman, it's already been about what? A minute and a half. Where's the clerk? Is the clerk on lunch and not here today? Rep. Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): I think the clerk is on the way Mr. Donalds, thank you. Rep. Donalds: Is the clerk sitting in the side office just hanging out? I mean, come on, Mr. Chairman. 21:20 Clerk: Mr. Cloud? Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Yes Clerk: Mr. Cloud votes yes. Mr. Keller? Rep. Fred Keller (R-PA): Yes Clerk: Mr. Keller votes yes. Mr. Franklin? Rep. C. Scott Franklin (R-FL): Yes Clerk: Mr. Franklin votes yes. Mr. Clyde? Rep. Andrew Clyde (R-GA): Yes. Clerk: Mr. Clyde votes yes. Mr. Donalds? Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL): Yes Clerk: Mr. Donalds votes yes. 26:31 Thomas Maiorino: My name is Thomas Maiorina. I reside in Mount Laurel, New Jersey with my wife Monica. I am the father of three boys. My youngest son, Robert turned 12 in 2011. After years of asking for a dog, he wore us down and we decided to rescue a dog from a southern shelter for my son's birthday. After researching online, we adopted a mixed breed mutt that Robbie and his two other brothers named Rooney. Rooney swiftly became a loved member of our family. A bit rambunctious, she was just what a 12 year old boy needed. She loved the run and chase anything the move in the yard. By all measures, we took great care to ensure Rooney had a healthy and happy life. We took her on daily walks, sometimes three a day, hikes on park trails. We monitor her diet and made sure she was seen by the veterinarian as needed, and she received all of her shots. Because she was a bit rambunctious and we lived in a wooded area where there's a lot of wildlife, we were constantly concerned about the problems of fleas and ticks. We consulted with a veterinarian after getting Rooney to determine the best way to protect her against this. We use a variety of prevention methods for the first few years and when we changed veterinarians in approximately 2013 or 14, the new veterinarian strongly recommended that we use the Seresto flea and tick collar, based on all of our options. We heeded that advice and purchased Seresto collars from our local PetSmart. The collars were intended to provide protection for up to eight months. We noticed that after fixing a collar to Rooney's neck, she began to itch and first had that treated and tested for allergies. We took her to the vet several times during 2018 seeking to find the cause for the ever increasing itching. After several visits and multielement medications, they were unable to determine the cause and we switched to a specialist in 2019 to seek further assistance, where they provided allergy shots and other medications to address the worsening itching and related symptoms. Rooney's behavior then became more erratic as the months wore on she began linking her paws so feverishly they would bleed. She also developed bleeding patches on her stomach. Ultimately, in October 2020, Rooney suffered horrendous grand mal seizure in the presence of myself and my wife. The damage done by the seizure was irreversible. She was a shell of her former self and ultimately, the family decided the most humane thing would be to put Rooney to sleep at the age of nine. In early March 2021, I read an article online about Seresto pet collars resulting in the deaths of 1700 Pets without any warnings from the EPA or the manufacturer. I sought out legal representation not because I wanted financial compensation, but because I took great pains to care for Rooney. The final 18 months of her life were agonizing to watch if I could help prevent another family from going through what my family went through. I wanted to act. I'm here today in furtherance of that effort. I appreciate the committee taking the time to investigate this matter. And thank you for your time. 33:30 Jeffrey Simmons: There are a few points I'd like to emphasize upfront. First, the EPA approved Seresto following more than 80 safety and toxicity studies, all of which show that Seresto and its ingredients have a strong safety profile. Second, more than 80 regulatory bodies around the world have approved Seresto. Seresto is widely used and more than 80 million collars worn over the past decade to protect dogs and cats from fleas and ticks around the world. 34:00 Jeffrey Simmons: Third, adverse event reports are not intended to be, and in fact are absolutely not, proof of causation. Reports require further investigation and analysis to determine cause. And after years of review, our pharmacovigilance team made up of veterinarians and other experts who study adverse event reports has not identified a single death caused by the active ingredients in the collar. 36:45 Jeffrey Simmons: No product is without risk. What matters is whether those risks are reasonable. And in light of the benefits and numerous studies and the incident report data for Seresto demonstrate the product does not pose an unreasonable risk and has a strong safety profile, which is why the American Veterinary Medical Association opposed canceling Seresto's EPA registration. 38:05 Nathan Donley: My name is Dr. Nathan Donley. I'm the science director for the Environmental Health Program at the Center for Biological Diversity. I have a PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology from Oregon Health and Sciences University. The last seven years of my professional life have been spent researching how pesticides impact people and the environment and the regulatory failures that can actually facilitate harm rather than prevent it. I published three peer reviewed scientific articles and five technical reports on this subject. I've authored over 100 technical scientific comments to the EPA on pesticide documents, including flumethrin and imidacloprid, the two active ingredients in the Seresto collar. I've read through 1000s of pages of FOIA documents I requested on matters related to the approval and continued use of Seresto. 39:40 Nathan Donley: While other agencies like the FDA have robust systems in place to surveil harms from products under their purview, EPA only requires minimal information be submitted four times a year and they delegate this responsibility to the pesticide industry itself. The limited information that is collected includes only the pesticide product name, where the incident occurred, and the severity of the incident. That's it. Oftentimes, the agency doesn't even know if the incident involves a dog or a cat. Even though the EPA determines what incident information it collects, it then turns around and laments that the incident data are insufficient to take regulatory action to protect public health, the environment and our pets. It's a system designed to achieve nothing other than maintaining the status quo. Worse yet, reported incidents significantly underestimate the true scope of harm. The EPA recently estimated that only one in 25 pesticide incidents involving another pesticide called Kamba was actually reported to the authorities. That's only a 4% reporting rate. Given that 100,000 people have reported their concerns about Seresto, this is very alarming because the true number of harmful incidents to pets could be potentially far higher. 41:05 Nathan Donley: The EPA's counterpart in Canada was so concerned about Seresto incidents and harms of pets and humans that it denied Seresto approval in 2016. Canada analyzed U incident data and determined that Seresto collars had an incident rate 50 times greater than the average flea collar and 36 times greater than Canada's trigger for review. 41:25 Nathan Donley: EPA has no trigger for review of any pesticide product, no matter how much harm is being reported. And because the agency has no mandated trigger for reviewing pesticides like Seresto, rather than choosing to use incident reporting data to inform a robust regulatory process and take dangerous products off the market, EPA routinely chooses to do nothing at all. And that's especially troubling when you consider that Seresto is just one of 18,000 pesticide products currently approved by the EPA. 42:40 Karen McCormack: My name is Karen McCormack. At the present time I am a retired government employee after working over 40 years at the Environmental Protection Agency. During my career at EPA, I first worked in an EPA laboratory as a research coordinator. And in that capacity, I conducted research on numerous pesticides. Later I transferred to EPA headquarters in Washington DC, and worked in various positions in the pesticide program as a scientist, policy analyst, and a communications officer. I also worked in a number of offices at EPA including the Office of the Assistant Administrator for Pesticides and Toxins. Although I'm retired from EPA, I'm still closely following a number of environmental topics and one of those topics of interest to me has been the impact of flea and tick pet products on cats and dogs. 43:30 Karen McCormack: The US Environmental Protection Agency is charged with regulating products that contain pesticides and in ensuring that all pesticide products are safe to use. Before 1996, EPA did not consistently require manufacturers to conduct animal safety studies for pet products containing pesticides. Because pet products with pesticides were available readily in commercial stores, consumers thought they must be safe. This is not necessarily the case. Flea and tick products are designed to kill insects, and they often contain poisonous chemicals. When combined with pesticides that are used outside the home and in the water and food that people drink and eat, the aggregate risks from all these sources of pesticides can be high, especially for children who are vulnerable to toxic chemicals -- much more vulnerable than adults. And it wasn't until the passage of the 1996 Food Quality Protection Act that EPA began to examine the risks from sources other than food, including risks from pet products containing pesticides. After the passage of FQPA, pesticide manufacturers were required to submit to EPA animal safety studies and incident reports showing harm to animals and humans exposed to pesticides and pet products. Between 2012 and the present time the EPA received an increasing number of incident reports related to the use of flea and tick pet collars for dogs and cats. The toxic effects that were described in these many incident reports from the use of certain pet collars ranged from mild effects, such as skin irritation to more severe effects such as intense tremors, seizures, paralysis, organ failure and death. The largest number of incident rate counts that EPA received during this period were from the use of pet collar called Seresto. 45:35 Karen McCormack: Between January 2012 and the present time, EPA has received over 100,000 incident reports, and these incident reports include human incidents as well as pet incidents. These reports also include at least 2300 reports of pet deaths. The number is most likely a very low estimate of the actual number of incidents that are occurring since many pet owners do not know that they can report incidents to EPA and they may not know how to correlate the adverse effects in their pets with a particular pet product. 46:30 Karen McCormack: There are no independent organizations that rank the safety of pet products. And the sales data which is needed to rank the safety of pet products is considered confidential business information by the manufacturers. EPA's risk assessments also do not tell the full story of what pet products are safe, as they rely heavily on industry generated studies that were conducted on mice and rats rather than dogs and cats. And EPA's risk assessments also are based mainly on studies that were conducted with only one pesticide in Seresto rather than the combined pesticides in this pet product. 47:10 Karen McCormack: Although the original manufacturers of Seresto, Bayer, did conduct a number of efficacy and safety studies in dogs and cats treated with Seresto, the company did not conduct two very critical studies that are important for determining the safety of a pet product. These tests include a pet transferable residue study, a petting study, to determine the exposure of humans to Seresto. And they did not conduct a study that measures the amount of pesticide that gets in the blood of treated dogs and cats. 48:45 Carrie Sheffield: My name is Carrie Sheffield and I'm a senior policy analyst at the Center for Economic Opportunity at Independent Women's Forum. We are a nonprofit organization committed to increasing the number of women who value free markets and personal liberty. 2:44:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): Let me just show you some analysis that was conducted by Elanco, which we would just refer to as well as the EPA, as well as the Canadian equivalent of the EPA, which is called the PMRA. Essentially, we look at this chart here, and we see that at the top Elanco computed that 0.51% of pet deaths were “possibly or probably” caused by the Seresto collar. The PMRA in Canada, looking at a sample of pet deaths concluded that 33% of those pet deaths were possibly or probably caused by Seresto collars. And the EPA here, concluded that 45% were possibly or probably caused by pet by the Seresto collar. Now, sir, I think originally, you said that there is no scientific evidence, no evidence of a causal link, this is clearly evidence, it was so compelling that the Canadian equivalent of the EPA never allowed for Seresto collars to be sold in Canada, correct? Jeffrey Simmons: Yes, I'm aware of that decision. I would also add that 80 other countries have approved this product, we've had over 80 million collars actually used. I'm not familiar with this data comparison, but what I can say is following the EPA regulatory process around the oversight, that we have pharmacovigilance, close to 200 veterinarians and staff on our team, looking at the data through the way the EPA wants us to we have not seen a linkage from the active ingredients. Rep. Krishnamoorthi: I understand that sir, I understand you haven't seen the linkage, although other authorities have and their scientists who are not paid by you have done so. 2:46:25 Nathan Donley: This is what we commonly see, quite frankly, when the regulated industry is doing their own research. It commonly finds that their products are safer than when government agencies or academic scientists take on a similar analysis. 2:46:55 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): We have FOIA documents from the EPA, and emails internal to the EPA talking about the Seresto collar. Here's just one of them. This is from an employee who basically voiced their opinion about recent coverage of the Seresto controversy, he said, “looks like the sh*t has hit the fan….will be interesting seeing where this goes. I hope there is a FOIA for all communications on this so that our emails are made public. We have been screaming about Seresto for many years.” I presume that you've heard some of these screams and concerns, correct, Ms. McCormack? Karen McCormack: That's correct. A number of EPA employees have contacted me and given me detailed descriptions about what's happening with Seresto and they were very upset that EPA refused to do anything about it. 2:48:25 Karen McCormack: A number of the scientists, and this is not unusual, feel that the decision makers are not considering the science and they're making decisions based on political reasons. I don't know if I have time to talk about this, but I did look at the science that the Canadian government did, the causality analysis. They looked at the consistency and toxicity of effects from exposure of pets to Seresto. And what they found was very disturbing. It was so disturbing that they decided the risks were too high to approve Seresto and they could not be mitigated by putting a label statement on the product or by issuing warning labels, so they refused to approve Seresto. 2:49:25 Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Thank you, Ms. McCormack, for acknowledging that the EPA sometimes makes political decisions, so that's something we'll definitely be coming back to next term. 2:55:05 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Are the active ingredients for Seresto in the United States different from the active ingredients for Seresto collars in other countries? Jeffrey Simmons: No, I do not believe they're any different than the other 80 countries. Rep. Porter: In other countries like in Colombia and Australia, the warning labels for Seresto collars classify the collar as highly toxic and as poison. 2:55:50 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Does the label in the United States have language? Like highly toxic or poison? Yes or no? Jeffrey Simmons: It does not. Rep. Porter: Okay. So the warning label here in the United States, though does say that mild reactions may occur and mentions hair loss, scratching and redness. The most severe symptoms listed are eczema and lesions. This is the warning label: does it mention the potential for death? Jeffrey Simmons: It does not. Rep. Porter: So a pet owner looking at this label that we're looking at would have absolutely no reason, no way to know that Seresto may have caused roughly 100 pet deaths. That's what both the Canadian Pest Management Agency, the PMRA, and the EPA found. Will you change this label, so that it includes deaths as a possible side effect? Jeffrey Simmons: Congresswoman, we do not believe the scientific data warrants a label change. And again, that is not just the 80 studies were submitted. There's been 20 additional added studies since and all of the oversight data that's been done on the 33 million pets over the 10 years. So again, following an EPA regulated process, we're always open if a data warranted, some need for a change, we would do that. 2:57:30 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): The EPA encouraged both your predecessor, Bayer, and your company, Elanco, to update the warning label. Yet, you just said that you never have. So the federal government did in fact advise you to update the label and you failed to do so. Is that correct? Jeffrey Simmons: I do not believe that is correct. We are in regular engagement with EPA. We have not received any formal…there's no data that warrants that and there's been no formal engagement on that. 2:58:15 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): The EPA asked Bayer, the predecessor here, in 2019 to help the agency collect data on adverse incidents for cats and dogs using the Seresto collar. EPA asked Bayer to split the registration for cats and dogs, so the agency could better understand and evaluate the risks for each type of pet. They refused, saying that change might have, “an adverse impact on sales” and they also said, “it would be a substantial increase in work.” Mr. Simmons, are you willing to make that change and split the registration for cats and dogs as the EPA requested? Or do you believe it's too much work? Jeffrey Simmons: I am willing to engage with the EPA on anything that the scientific data and the engagement under the regulatory body of the EPA merits the right thing to do. We believe the 80 studies and all of the pharmacovigilance data that we've submitted to them stands that this is a safe product. 3:00:10 Rep. Andrew Clyde (R-GA): I feel obligated to begin by stating the obvious this afternoon. Today's hearing is a colossal waste of time and resources. 3:13:25 Rep. Henry Johnson (D-GA): And the only reason that the public knew about the harm caused by this pesticide is because the Center for Biological Diversity publicly petitioned the EPA to cancel registration for Seresto flea collars. If they had not bought this to light, do you think we would even know of the dangers presented by these collars? Nathan Donley: No, we wouldn't. You know, the investigation that came out in USA Today in 2021 really brought this to the public attention. And if there wasn't that amount of pressure from the public, this would just still be completely unknown. EPA, for the last 10 years, has not done anything to alert consumers to the harms associated with this product or any other pesticide products where there are a very high number of incidents. 3:15:10 Karen McCormack: I think some of the people at EPA are programmed to go along with whatever industry says. It makes life easier for you, you can go home earlier and you can also get promoted easier if you go along with what industry says. It's unfortunate a problem there. And I've seen it over the years and it's very hard to do something about it. 3:15:40 Karen McCormack: Canada's analysis was very scientific. It was not only based on incident data and sales data, it was based on the toxicity of the two pesticides in Seresto. And they looked at the consistency and what happened eventually with the pets that were exposed to Seresto. 3:19:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): And so because of the tremendous number of pet incidents, the tremendous number of deaths, even when factoring in sales, I sadly have no choice but to recommend that the EPA commence a notice of intent to cancel proceedings and to fully investigate what's going on with the Seresto collar, and I respectfully request Elanco to voluntarily recall these collars at this time, pending this further investigation. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

Rumble in the Morning
Sports with Rod 7-29-2022 …Cardinals QB, Kyler Murray is mad at the wrong people

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 12:49


Sports with Rod 7-29-2022 …Dan Snyder finally appears before the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform …Tom Brady burns Max Kellerman …Cardinals QB, Kyler Murray is mad at the wrong people

Morning Announcements
Thursday, July 28th, 2022

Morning Announcements

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 5:56


Today's headlines: The DOJ has confirmed that it is investigating Trump himself in their January 6th criminal probe, while also investigating numerous arms of criminality, including the pressure campaign against Pence. The House Committee on Oversight and Reform committee found that gun manufacturers that sell assault style rifles have purposely employed ethically questionable tactics. Instagram head Adam Mosseri stated that the company does not intend to take predominant feedback from users into account. Senator Joe Manchin announced yesterday that he plans to support a deficit reduction package that will address climate change and prescription drug reform. Meanwhile, WNBA star Brittney Griner testified in Russian court yesterday, and Secretary of State Antony Blinken announced that the administration has made an offer to the Kremlin to exchange Griner and American Paul Whelan for convicted Russian arms trafficker Viktor Bout. Finally, Dr. Oz failed to report his ownership of a Garden State apartment, home to friends tied to groups involved in Armenian genocide denial. Resources/Articles mentioned this episode: NBC: Merrick Garland calls Justice Department's Jan. 6 probe the ‘most wide-ranging investigation in its history' Washington Post: Justice Dept. investigating Trump's actions in Jan. 6 criminal probe CNN: 'The gun industry has flooded our neighborhoods': House hearing highlights assault-style weapons Washington Post: Instagram knows you don't like its changes. It doesn't care. Axios: Manchin announces support for climate, tax, health care deal CNN: Brittney Griner testifies she signed documents without understanding what they said after being stopped at Moscow airport Daily Beast: Dr. Oz's Turkish Nationalist Pals Living in His Secret N.J. Condo

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Gun manufacturers testify, Georgians respond to abortion law, Ossoff investigation

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 51:24


Thursday on Political Rewind: The CEO of Daniel Defense claimed his company bore no responsibility for its use in the Uvalde shooting. Instead, he blamed an "erosion of personal responsibility." Plus, a majority of Georgians oppose the new abortion law and say they'll vote accordingly. The panel John Bailey, @gearfocused, editor, The Rome News-Tribune Kevin Riley, @ajceditor, editor, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Riley Bunch, @ribunchreports, public policy and politics reporter, Georgia Public Broadcasting Tammy Greer, assistant professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00- Introductions 3:04- U.S. House Committee hears testimony from gun manufacturers including Daniel Defense 21:35- Prof. Tammy Greer talks about debates at Clark Atlanta. 22:18- AJC polling reveals more data on what Georgians think about Roe v. Wade 39:01- John Bailey updates us on Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene's district 46:20- Sen. Jon Ossoff leads charge on review of prisons Please be sure to download our newsletter: www.gpb.org/newsletters. And subscribe, follow and rate this show wherever podcasts are found.

C-SPAN Radio - Washington Today
Fed Chair raises interest rate 0.75%, says U.S. is not in recession

C-SPAN Radio - Washington Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 49:37


Federal Reserve raises interest rates 0.75%, interview with MarketWatch's Gregg Robb (5), President Biden out of COVID-19 isolation, CHIPS bill passes Senate, gun makers testify before a House Committee on assault weapons and U.S. makes offer to free Americans held in Russia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KGO 810 Podcast
Nikki Medoro - White House downplays recession fears, and gun manufacturers targeted

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 13:20


Inflation continues and the Federal Reserve will probably raise interest rates again today so the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro speaks with ABC White House Correspondent Karen Travers to outline how the Biden Administration is trying to manage the economy. Also, ABC Senior Investigative Reporter Aaron Katersky talks about the House Committee grilling gun manufacturer CEOs today.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast
Nikki Medoro - White House downplays recession fears, and gun manufacturers targeted

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 13:20


Inflation continues and the Federal Reserve will probably raise interest rates again today so the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro speaks with ABC White House Correspondent Karen Travers to outline how the Biden Administration is trying to manage the economy. Also, ABC Senior Investigative Reporter Aaron Katersky talks about the House Committee grilling gun manufacturer CEOs today.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A New Morning
House committee to speak with gun manufacturer - Aaron Katersky

A New Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 2:11


Pratt on Texas
Episode 2997: More review of House report on Uvalde school massacre with Matt Crow – Pratt on Texas 7/25/2022

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 43:29


The news of Texas covered today includes:Our Lone Star story of the day:  Matt Crow, who worked for the House Committee on the Robb Elementary School massacre in Uvalde and assisted in its fact-finding investigation and report, joins me for the full hour to discuss the contents of the report which was release one week ago. Read the report yourself here: https://www.house.texas.gov/_media/pdf/committees/reports/87interim/Robb-Elementary-Investigative-Committee-Report.pdfOur Lone Star story of the day is sponsored by Allied Compliance Services providing the best service in DOT, business and personal drug and alcohol testing since 1995.On Monday, 18 July 2022, I covered other aspects of the report – listen to that show here.Listen on the radio, or station stream, at 5pm Central. Click for our affiliates.www.PrattonTexas.com 

The John Fugelsang Podcast
More Review of the Latest January 6th Committee Hearing

The John Fugelsang Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 53:54


During this episode, John discusses the latest January 6th House Committee hearing with Brown University Constitutional Law professor and author Corey Brettschneider. Next he interviews stand-up comedian, actress, and writer Wanda Sykes. In this segment - Chris Hauselt joins John to talk about Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin and gun control in Congress. Then finally, John takes a call from Todd in Wisconsin.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Steak for Breakfast Podcast

The Steak for Breakfast Podcast is closing out a busy news week with a full recap of all the major stories that have been developing. We are also talking everything from the January 6th Committee to the upcoming Midterm Elections and more with our two outstanding guests.   Former Assistant to the 45th President of the United States and top Trade Director, Dr. Peter Navarro was back on the show with us today. Dr. Navarro is discussing his new book, “Taking Back Trump's America” and how it lays out the blueprint starting with the 2022 midterm elections all the way through winning the presidency in two years. We learn about his recent brush up with the FBI regarding the January 6th Committee the start of the Steve Bannon trial.   In what was a big news week, we have come to learn that President Joe Biden might have cancer and caught Covid. The U.S. House Committee looking to craft a Bill that would eliminate “assault rifles” heats up in debate. The crisis down on the U.S. Southern Border continues to spiral out of control, so much that for a second podcast in a row we hear from a progressive, Sanctuary City Mayor asking that larger numbers of aliens stop being dumped in their neighborhoods. And we wrap by taking a closer look at the overall mental decline at the man who was once Joe Biden.   Journalist and Producer at One America News, Cynthia Kaui joins us for the first time today on the show. We jump right into some of the most major items occurring in the greater San Diego area before shifting gears to an emphasis on the upcoming Midterm Elections. We then chat about how successful OAN has been as an overall trusted news source and how it continually lands major interviews with President Trump, notably his most recent with Chanel Rion.   Subscribe to the show, rate it and leave a review before you download, listen, like follow and SHARE Steak for Breakfast content!   Steak for Breakfast:   website: https://steakforbreakfastpodcast.com   linktree: https://linktr.ee/steakforbreakfastpodcast   MyPillow: Promo Code: STEAK at checkout Website: https://www.mypillow.com/steak Via the Phone: 800-658-8045   Dr. Peter Navarro (Special Assistant to President Trump) •   Twitter: @RealPNavarro   Website: https://www.givesendgo.com/navarro   Newest Book: https://www.amazon.com › Taking-...Taking Back Trump's America: Why We Lost the White House and How We'll ...   Cynthia Kaui (Journalist & Producer, OAN)   Twitter: @CynthiaKaui   One America News: https://www.oann.com/?s=Cynthia+kaui

All Of It
Recapping The Jan. 6 Committee's Final Prime Time Hearing (For Now)

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 27:43


The House Committee investigating the January 6th insurrection held its final scheduled hearing last night in prime time, focusing on a minute-by-minute analysis of President Trump's actions during the Capitol riot. Karen Greenberg, the director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law, discusses what we learned last night, and what future steps the committee, and the Department of Justice, could take.

Nightside With Dan Rea
So, What Do You Think? - Part 1 (10 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 17:54


Following, WBZ NewsRadio's live coverage of the Jan 6th House Committee's 8th hearing Dan Rea did post hearing analysis and took listeners' calls on the latest information revealed on what went down on Jan. 6th.

KQED’s Forum
Jan. 6 House Committee Details Trump's Links to Insurrection

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 55:33


The Jan. 6 House Committee is wrapping up its summer hearings this week with testimony from two former Trump staffers who both resigned the day of the insurrection: Matthew Pottinger, former deputy national security adviser, and Sarah Matthews, a former White House deputy press secretary. The focus of recent hearings has been to detail former President Donald Trump's role in inciting the mob that attacked the U.S. Capitol and his repeated attempts to overthrow the results of the 2020 presidential election. We'll talk about the latest revelations from the committee hearing, what could happen next and the political implications of the hearings so far. Guests: Shanlon Wu, criminal defense attorney and CNN legal analyst, former federal prosecutor who also served as counsel to Attorney General Janet Reno. Grace Panetta, Senior Politics reporter, Business Insider. Clara Jeffery, editor in chief, Mother Jones - San Francisco-based national magazine specializing in investigative, political, and social justice reporting.

Nightside With Dan Rea
So, What Do You Think? - Part 2 (11 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 35:42


After WBZ NewsRadio's live coverage of the Jan. 6th House Committee's 8th hearing, Dan Rea did post hearing analysis and took listeners' calls on the latest information revealed on what went down on Jan. 6th.

Morning Air
Mary Hallan Fiorito, House Committee Hearings/ Fr. John Gordon, Value of Listening to the Lord

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 48:08


7/22/22 7am CT Hour Glen and Sarah chat about finding the right babysitter for date night. Mary clears up misconceptions about ectopic pregnancies and miscarriage after House Committee Hearings and Dobbs case decision. Fr. Gordon explains why it is important to listen to the word of God and how God might be talking to us in our everyday life. He notes the moment when in awe you realize that even with all your faults, you understand that God STILL wants you and has a plan for you.

Jacksonville's Morning News Interviews
7/21 - Tonya J. Powers, FOX News

Jacksonville's Morning News Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 2:34


Tonya reports on the January 6th House Committee hearing tonight. This will be the 2nd prime time hearing, with this session's focus on the "187 minutes" between the riot's start at 1:10pm through the 4:17pm recorded message from President Trump, and what was (and wasn't) happening during that time at the White House. Prime time coverage begins tonight at 8pm.

The Bob Frantz Authority Podcast
JIM JORDAN: House Committee Approves "Assault Weapons" Ban | 7/21/22

The Bob Frantz Authority Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 18:19


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Q as in Cucumber Podcast
The January 6th Hearings: Road to the Season Finale

Q as in Cucumber Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 85:14


Hey Q Crew! Sorry We've been AWOL for so long! We are plotting a return, but Tanya and I just HAD to record our recap of the January 6th House Committee hearings SO FAR. I am managing to get this out minutes before the primetime finale on 7/21. We will have another episode to recap that so stay tuned! I didn't do much cleaning up on this. I just let us rant. If you are a MAGA supporter that happens to listen to our show, this episode is not for you. Hopefully we will see you back for our normal episodes. WARNING: We can't help but curse even more than normal. Since we are talking about the attempted illegal overthrow of our government, it seems justified. Enjoy! Links referenced in episode: Who is Cassidy Hutchinson? https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/10/us/politics/cassidy-hutchinson-jan-6-testimony.html   Social Media Links: Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LaraMackPodcasts Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/QasinCucumber Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/qaic_lara/?hl=en       https://www.instagram.com/qaic_tanya/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/qaic_lara  https://twitter.com/qaic_tanya

The Dallas Morning News
7/19/22: The Texas House committee's report on the Uvalde shooting...and more news

The Dallas Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 3:46


the Texas House committee's report on the Uvalde shooting; Ted Cruz says 2015 Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage was ‘clearly wrong'; Dallas County shrinks as North Texas' population grows; Clear or mesh backpacks required for Dallas middle and high school students

WBEN Extras
Mayor Brown testifies before U.S. House Committee on Financial Services' hearing on mass shootings

WBEN Extras

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 4:42


KRLD All Local
Texas House committee releases detailed account of Uvalde mass shooting

KRLD All Local

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 7:11


Near record highs are expected over the first few days of this week. Today we could reach 110. That could also put the Texas grid under big pressure; The cause of a fatal plane crash in Burleson In December of 2020 is released. KRLD All Local - July 18, 2022

The Takeaway
Election Officials Are Being Targeted and Harassed

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 13:13


Since Donald Trump lost the presidential election in 2020, prominent Republican figures have continued to fuel the “Big Lie” of voter fraud and election rigging. The coordinated efforts around pushing this false information have included widespread targeting and harassment of election officials and poll workers. Many of these workers now feel unsafe at their jobs overseeing and certifying elections, and some are quitting to avoid the threats. In a recent poll from the Brennan Center of nearly 600 local election officials across the country, one in six repor­ted that they have experienced threats because of their job. Ruby Freeman is a former poll worker in the Atlanta area. Near the end of June, the January 6th House Committee showed a video of Freeman's testimony about the harassment. In a virtual hearing with GOP lawmakers in Georgia after the election, Rudy Guiliani accused Freeman and her daughter, Shaye Moss, of processing fake ballots for Joe Biden. He pointed to a surveillance video in which Moss hands her mother a small item, which he claimed was a USB drive. In reality, that item was a ginger mint. Strangers began leaving Freeman and Moss death threats on their voicemails, sending racist texts, and even showing up on their doorsteps. Freeman said that the threats were so violent and incessant that the FBI advised her to leave her home for 2 months. And Moss testified that she had to go into hiding, change her appearance, and leave her job due to the threats. Tina Barton, a former Republican City Clerk in Rochester Hills, Michigan faced some of this same harassment after the 2020 election. Tina and her colleagues had already been working late hours due to high voter turnout and the challenges of facilitating an election during a pandemic. And then there were the added pressures of political tensions and scrutiny over every part of the vote process. After a minor mistake with counting absentee ballots was fixed on the morning after the election, Tina, and her small town of less than 75,000 people, were thrust into the national spotlight, with some Republicans stating that the vote count was inaccurate. She received several voicemails with verbal harassment and death threats. Tina left her city clerk job in 2021 because she wanted to make a bigger impact on her fellow election officials who she saw needed help. She spent time working at the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and is now working as a senior elections expert at The Elections Group. But she still sees more work that needs to be done. We speak with Gowri Ramachandran, senior counsel in the Brennan Center's Elections & Government Team.

The Source
State Sen. Gutierrez reacts to Texas House committee's Uvalde school shooting report

The Source

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 32:22


The Texas House committee investigating law enforcement's failed response to the school shooting at Robb Elementary released their findings on Sunday.

Congressional Dish
CD255: Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs)

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 86:04 Very Popular


The recently signed gun law, S. 2938: Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, contained a surprise dingleberry postponing a regulation designed to save seniors money on their pharmaceutical drugs by prohibiting kickbacks to an industry few have heard of: Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs). This little-known but extremely powerful industry deserves much of the blame for ever rising prescription drugs costs in the United States. In this episode, Jen gives you the scoop on PBMs and how they make their money at the expense of Americans who are most dependent on medications. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! View the shownotes on our website at https://congressionaldish.com/cd255-pharmacy-benefit-managers-pbms We're Not Wrong Berlin Meetup Contact Justin at WereNotWrongPod@gmail.com Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD134: The EpiPen Hearing US Healthcare Landscape Jessi Jezewska Stevens. Apr 23, 2020. “A Brief History of the Great American Healthcare Scam.” Bookforum. Tanza Loudenback. Mar 7, 2019. “The average cost of healthcare in 21 different countries.” Insider. Chuck Grassley and Ron Wyden. 2019. “Insulin: Examining the Factors Driving the Rising Cost of a Century Old Drug [Staff Report].” U.S. Senate Finance Committee. “Health Insurance Coverage of the Total Population.” Kaiser Family Foundation. Sara R. Collins and David C. Radley. Dec 7, 2018. “The Cost of Employer Insurance Is a Growing Burden for Middle-Income Families.” The Commonwealth Fund. PBMs What are PBMs? JC Scott. Jun 30, 2022. “Drug manufacturers are root cause of high drug costs; PBMs drive costs down.” The Hill. Zach Freed. Jun 22, 2022. “The Pharmacy Benefit Mafia: The Secret Health Care Monopolies Jacking Up Drug Prices and Abusing Patients and Pharmacists.” American Economic Liberties Project. Adam J. Fein. Jun 22, 2021. “The Top Pharmacy Benefit Managers of 2020: Vertical Integration Drives Consolidation (rerun).” Drug Channels. “Flash finding: How drug money from sick people really works.” Nov 11, 2021. 46brooklyn. Adam J. Fein. Feb 3, 2019. “Don't Blame Drug Prices on ‘Big Pharma.'” The Wall Street Journal. How PBMs Make Money “DIR Fees.” National Association of Chain Drug Stores. “How PBMs Make Money: PBM Practices & Profits.” RxSafe. True North Political Solutions. Oct 25, 2017. “White Paper: DIR Fees Simply Explained.” Pharmacy Times. ACA “Vertical Integration” Loophole Peter High. Jul 8, 2019. “A View From Inside Cigna's $67 Billion Acquisition Of Express Scripts.” Forbes. Angelica LaVito. Nov 28, 2018. “CVS creates new health-care giant as $69 billion merger with Aetna officially closes.” CNBC. David Dayen. Oct 12, 2018. “Why the Aetna and CVS Merger Is So Dangerous.” The American Prospect. Jeff Byers. April 12, 2018. “Optum a step ahead in vertical integration frenzy.” Healthcare Dive. Graph: Optum opens up wider market for UnitedHealth Group Graph: Optum's pharmacy business contributes the majority of its revenue Susan Morse. May 10, 2017. “Secret weapon: UnitedHealth's Optum business is laying waste to old notions about how payers make money.” Healthcare Finance. Lobbying “Client Profile: Pharmaceutical Care Management Assn.” Open Secrets. The Demise of Independent Pharmacies Christine Blank. Oct 17, 2019. “Independents Prepare to Close Up Shop.” Drug Topics. Paulina Firozi. Aug 23, 2018. “The Health 202: Here's why rural independent pharmacies are closing their doors.” The Washington Post. What Is a Formulary? Ana Gascon Ivey. May 19, 2020. “A Guide to Medication Formularies.” GoodRx. Previous Delays in Rebate Regulation Paige Minemyer. Jan 29, 2021. “In a win for PBMs, Biden administration delays rebate rule.” Fierce Healthcare. Paige Minemyer. Jan 12, 2021. “PCMA sues Trump administration over rebate rule.” Fierce Healthcare. “Incorporating the Effects of the Proposed Rule on Safe Harbors for Pharmaceutical Rebates in CBO's Budget Projections—Supplemental Material for Updated Budget Projections: 2019 to 2029.” May 2019. Congressional Budget Office. The Gun Law Passage Process Office of the Clerk. May 18, 2022. “Roll Call 212 | Bill Number: S. 2938.” U.S. House of Representatives. Tampa Bay Times Editorial Board. May 12, 2022. “Republican lawmakers should be ashamed for failing to honor Justice Joseph Hatchett.” Miami Herald. Annie Karni. Apr 12, 2022. “House G.O.P., Banding Together, Kills Bid to Honor Pioneering Black Judge.” The New York Times. Background on Most Important Provisions Mary Katherine Wildeman. May 26, 2022. “Data show most school shootings carried out by young adults, teens.” CT Insider. Jeffrey Pierre. May 26, 2022. “Experts say we can prevent school shootings. Here's what the research says.” NPR. The Dingleberry Erik Sherman. Jun 30, 2022. “Gun Safety Bill Extends Drug Middlemen Protection From Anti-Kickback Measure.” Forbes. Molly Rutherford. Jun 28, 2022. “Gun legislation provision puts drug supply chain profits over patients.” The Hill. Marty Schladen. Jun 22, 2022. “Deep inside the gun bill: a break for prescription drug middlemen.” Iowa Capital Dispatch. Poland Train Station Taylor Popielarz, Maureen McManus and Justin Tasolides. Mar 25, 2022. “‘The help given is remarkable': Inside the Poland train station that's become a hub for Ukrainian refugees.” Spectrum News NY1. The Law and the Regulation S. 2938: Bipartisan Safer Communities Act Senate Vote: 65-33 (All Nos GOP) House Vote: 234-193 (All Nos GOP) Jen's Highlighted PDF of S. 2938: Bipartisan Safer Communities Act Fraud and Abuse; Removal of Safe Harbor Protection for Rebates Involving Prescription Pharmaceuticals and Creation of New Safe Harbor Protection for Certain Point-of-Sale Reductions in Price on Prescription Pharmaceuticals and Certain Pharmacy Benefit Manager Service Fees U.S. Health and Human Services Department November 30, 2020 Audio Sources The State of Competition in the Pharmacy Benefits Manager and Pharmacy Marketplaces November 17, 2015 House Committee on the Judiciary Witnesses: Bradley J. Arthur, R.Ph., Owner, Black Rock Pharmacy David Balto, Law Offices of David A. Balto PLLC Amy Bricker, R.Ph. Vice President of Retail Contracting & Strategy, Express Scripts Natalie A. Pons, Senior Vice President and Assistant General Counsel, CVS Health Clips 53:48 Bradley Arthur: The Big Three PBMs control almost 80% of the entire market and these PBMs have the upper hand both in negotiating the contract with the payer, as well as strongly influencing the actual plan design itself. The PBM industry typically states that they can use their economic power to harness enhanced market efficiencies, but for whom? However, the staggering annual revenues that continue to grow each year of the big three suggests that these efficiencies are going directly to their corporations' bottom lines. Small community pharmacies like mine are faced on a daily basis with the impact of the PBMs' disproportionate market power. Community pharmacies routinely must agree to take-it-or-leave-it contracts from the PBMs just to continue to serve our long-standing patients. As if that weren't enough, the PBMs also directly set the reimbursement rates for pharmacies, the very same pharmacies that stand in direct competition of some of these PBM-owned mail-order and specialty pharmacies. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that the PBMs present employer and government payers with carefully tailored suggested plans designs that steer beneficiaries to these PBM-owned entities. Drug Pricing in America: A Prescription for Change, Part I January 29, 2019 Senate Committee on Finance Witnesses: Kathy Sego, Mother of a Child with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Douglas Holtz-Eakin, Ph.D., President, American Action Forum Mark E. Miller, Ph.D., Vice President of Health Care, Laura and John Arnold Foundation Peter B. Bach, MD, MAPP, Director, Memorial Sloan Kettering Center for Health Policy and Outcomes Clips 1:57:30 Sen. John Cornyn (R - TX): Can anybody on the panel explain to me why we have a general prohibition against kickbacks — they call them rebates — under the Social Security Act, but we nevertheless allow it for prescription drug pricing? What's the sound public policy reason for excluding prescription drug pricing from the anti-kickback rule under federal law? Douglas Holtz-Eakin: I can't explain that and won't pretend to. [laughter] Sen. Cornyn: I thought I was the only one who didn't understand the wisdom of that. Well, it's not a transparent arrangement and it does produce upward pressure on drug prices. And obviously, the negotiations between the PBM and the pharma in terms of what the net cost is, is not transparent, nor is it delivered to the consumer. Is it Dr. Miller? Dr. Bach? Peter Bach: It's delivered to the consumer indirectly through the reduction of the total cost of the benefit, but it is not delivered to the actual consumer using the drug, and that is a disassociation, that is a problem. Because it essentially reverses the structure of insurance. Lowering the total costs are people who use it the least, and raising the costs are people who use it the most, relative to if you allowed the rebate to be used at the point of sale, including all discounts. 1:59:49 Douglas Holtz-Eakin: If we had the negotiation be about the upfront price, so instead of a high list price and a rebate, you just negotiate a lower price, that would be the price that Ms. Sego would pay and insurance companies would look at that and say, okay, she's not paying as much as she used to, we're going to have to make up that money somewhere else and they might raise premiums. That means that people who don't have extreme insulin drug costs would pay a little bit more in a premium every month, and people who have extremely devastating medical conditions and high health care costs would get less costs. That's exactly what insurance is supposed to do. And so the rebate system is more than giving strange incentives on pricing. It's undercutting the purpose of insurance in general. Drug Pricing in America: A Prescription for Change, Part II February 26, 2019 Senate Committee on Finance Witnesses: Richard A. Gonzalez, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, AbbVie Inc. Pascal Soriot, Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer, AstraZeneca Giovanni Caforio, M.D., Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. Jennifer Taubert, Executive Vice President, Worldwide Chairman, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson Kenneth C. Frazier, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co., Inc. Albert Bourla, DVM, Ph.D., Chief Executive Office, Pfizer Olivier Brandicourt, M.D., Former Chief Executive Officer, Sanofi Clips 1:22:03 Albert Bourla: Adverse incentives that favor higher cost biologics are keeping biosimilars from reaching patients. In many cases, insurance companies declined to include lower cost biosimilars in their formularies because they would risk losing the rebates from covering higher cost medicines. I can't think of a more concerning example of a broken system and we need to do something about it. 1:33:35 Sen. Chuck Grassley (R - IA): So many of you have voiced support for the recent rebate rule proposed by the administration. Should the administration finalized this rule, will you commit to lowering your drug prices? Richard Gonzalez [CEO, AbbVie]: Mr. Chairman, we are supportive of the rule. We'd like to see it in its final form, obviously, to make a final decision, but we are supportive of taking the discount to the patient at the point of sale. Sen Grassley: Okay. AstraZeneca? **Pascal Soriot [CEO, AstraZeneca]**The same for us Senator, I would go one step further: if the rebates were removed from the commercial sector as well, we will definitely reduce our list prices. Sen Grassley: Okay. And Bristol? Giovanni Caforio [CEO, Bristol-Myers Squibb]: We have the same positions. Sen Grassley: Okay. Johnson and Johnson? Jennifer Taubert [EVP, J&J]: Yes, we're supportive, and that definitely would be my goal. We would just need to see the final legislation, provided that there aren't additional fees that are added into the system to compensate for the rebates. Sen Grassley: Merck? **Kenneth C. Frazier: I would expect that our prices would go down if we change the system. Again, on the commercial side as well as the Medicare side. Sen Grassley: Okay, Pfizer? Albert Bourla [CEO, Pfizer]: It is a very clear intention that we will not keep a single dollar from these rebates. We will try to move every single penny to the patients and we think if this goes also to the commercial plants that will be even better for more patients. Sen Grassley: Okay. Sanofi? Olivier Brandicourt [Former CEO, Sanofi]: Lowering list price has to be linked to better access and affordability at the counter for the patients. 1:35:20 Sen. Ron Wyden (D - OR): Is it correct that your company, and nobody else, sets the starting price for all drugs sold by Pfizer? Yes or no? Albert Bourla: It is a negotiation with PBMs and they are very powerful. Sen. Wyden: But you still get to set the list price? Albert Bourla: Yes, but we set this price and the rebate limit(?). 1:35:40 Sen. Ron Wyden (D - OR): Is it correct, when a hypothetical patient, let's call her Mrs. Jones, goes to pay for her drug at the pharmacy counter, her coinsurance is based on the price of the drug you set? Albert Bourla: It is correct in many cases. Sen. Wyden: Okay. I just want you all to know that the number one reason consumers are getting hammered, is because these list prices, which you have the last word with respect to where they are, are unaffordable. And the high prices are tied to what the consumer pays at the pharmacy counter. And all this other stuff you talk about, the rebates and the discounts and the coupons, all this other stuff is window dressing, all of that. And the fact is on Part D, 40% of the drugs don't even have a rebate. So I want it understood, particularly because I've asked you, Mr. Borla, I think you and others in the industry are stonewalling on the key issue, which is actually lowering list prices. And reducing those list prices are the easiest way for American consumers to pay less at the pharmacy counter. 2:12:45 Sen. Thomas Carper (D-DE): First is eliminating rebates to PBMs. That's the first one, eliminating rebates to PBMs. The second is value based arrangements. And the third is increasing transparency industry-wide on how you set your prices. 2:13:20 Richard Gonzalez: We clearly support providing the discount at the patient level, eliminating rebates essentially. 2:14:10 Pascal Soriot: If the rebates, as I said earlier, were to be removed from Part D and the commercial sector, we would actually reduce our list prices. 2:15:10 Giovanni Caforio: I would say that not only do we support all three elements that you mentioned, but I do believe those three elements together with the continued effort to develop a generic and biosimilar market would mean significant change, and would clearly alleviate the concerns that patients have today. 2:14:44 Jennifer Taubert: We are very supportive of all three elements that you outlined 2:15:52 Kenneth Frazier: We too support all three. 2:15:55 Albert Bourla: All three elements are transformational for our industry, will disrupt it. However, we do agree that these are the three things that need to be done and also I believe that will have significant meaningful results if we do. 2:16:10 Olivier Brandicourt: We support the three Senator, but we want to keep in mind at the end of the chain the patient has to benefit, so if rebates are removed it has to be to the benefit of patients. Sen. Thomas Carper (D-DE): Good, thanks. 2:18:10 Albert Bourla: 50% of the American people are in commercial plans and these rebate rules apply to Medicare. If the rules apply to all, definitely the list price will go down. 2:18:30 Albert Bourla: The list price is not irrelevant, it's very relevant for a lot of people because they have to pay list price during the deductible period. However if the rebate rule is applied, then they become irrelevant because the patients will not be paying the list price at the purchase point. 2:19:10 Sen. John Thune (R-SD): How would manufacturers respond if the rebate rule were finalized for government programs? I mean, what does that what does that mean for the commercial market? Albert Bourla: Senator, as I said before, all these proposals that they're discussing, [undistinguishable], eliminating the rebate rule, are transformational and will disrupt the way we do business. I don't know exactly how the system will evolve, and I really don't favor a bifurcated system. I would like to have a transparent single system across both parts. So we need to see how the whole thing will evolve. 2:25:26 Johnny Isakson (R-GA): Who sets the discount and who sets the rebate? 2:26:20 Richard Gonzalez: We negotiate with payers, so managed care and PBMs— Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA): You're a supplier though, so you have to go negotiate with the PBMs and those people, is that right? Richard Gonzalez: Correct, and they negotiate aggressively. Sen. Isakson: Is that pretty much true with everybody, that they're the major component between the end retail consumer price and the origin of the product? Richard Gonzalez: Yes, Senator. Sen. Isakson: Well, that seems like that's someplace we ought to focus, because that's where the distorted numbers come in. Johnson & Johnson, Janssen, in your testimony, you talked about your average list price of 8.1%, up, but an average net price change of only 4.6%. So while your gross went up 8.6, your net went down 4.6 In the same pricing period. How does that happen? If you're setting the price, how does it not go up on the bottom? Jennifer Taubert: Yeah, and in fact, in 2018, our net price actually declined 8.6%, so even more than that. The intermediaries in the system are very, very effective negotiators— Sen. Isakson: Tell me who the intermediaries are. Jennifer Taubert: Those would be the PBMs and the insurers. Sen. Isakson: …and the insurance companies? Jennifer Taubert: Right, and they set the formularies for patients. Sen. Isakson: And they're not the same. They're two different people? Jennifer Taubert: Yes, correct. 2:40:45 James Lankford (R-OK): All of you have mentioned the rebate issue has been a problem and that insurance companies and PBMs are very effective negotiators. Part of the challenge of this is, health insurance companies pay their PBM based on the quality of their negotiation skills, cutting a price off the list price. And so if a list price is higher and a rebate is higher, that also gives preference to them. So the difficulty is, as you raise list price, and the rebate gets larger, the insurance company gives that preference, making it harder for biosimilars. Am I tracking this correctly? 2:43:00 Albert Bourla: Here in the US, the penetration of biosimilars is much lower than in other places, but it is disproportional to different parts of the US healthcare system. For example, in open systems, systems where the decision maker it is a PBM, the one biosimilar we have has a market share of 5% in the US. In closed systems, in systems like Kaiser, for example, integrated healthcare systems where the one who decides has the whole cost of the healthcare system in its interest, we have 73%. 5% and 73% for the same product. I agree with what Mr. Fraser said that we need to create incentives, but I would add also that we need to break this rebate trap that creates significant disincentives for providers, and the healthcare system, and insurance companies. 3:19:25 Kenneth Frazier: If you went back a few years ago, when we negotiated to get our drugs on formulary, our goal was to have the lowest copay by patients. Today the goal is to pay into the supply chain the biggest rebate, and so that actually puts the patient at a disadvantage since they're the only ones that are paying a portion of the list price. The list price is actually working against the patient. 3:19:50 Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT): Why do we have a system today? Where you all are setting, I'll just say very, very high list prices, which is the starting point for negotiation. Why? Olivier Brandicourt: Senator, we're trying to get formulary position. With those list prices. High list price, high rebates. It's a preferred position. Unfortunately the preferred position doesn't automatically ensure affordability at the end. Kenneth C. Frazier: Senator, If you bring a product to the market with a low list price in this system, you get punished financially and you get no uptake because everyone in the supply chain makes money as a result of a higher list price. Drug Pricing in America: A Prescription for Change, Part III April 9, 2019 Senate Committee on Finance Witnesses: Steve Miller, MD, Former Executive Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer, Cigna Corporation Derica Rice, Former Executive Vice President and President, CVS Health and CVS Caremark William Fleming, Pharm.D., Segment President, Healthcare Services, Humana Inc. John Prince, Chief Executive Officer, OptumRx Mike Kolar, JD, Interim President & CEO, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Prime Therapeutics LLC Clips Sen. Ron Wyden (D - OR): Pharmaceutical Benefit Managers first showed up decades ago, back when prescription drugs were being utilized more extensively. The PBMs told the insurance companies, “we're the ones who know drug pricing, we will handle the negotiations for you.” But there is little evidence that the pharmaceutical benefit managers have actually held down the prices in a meaningful way. In fact, most of the evidence shows just the opposite. Pharmaceutical Benefit Managers actually make more money when they pick a higher price drug over a lower price drug. Colleagues, let's remember that all the way through this discussion, benefit managers make more money when they pick a higher price drug over a lower price drug. The logic on this isn't exactly complicated, graduate-level economics. PBM profits are based on taking their slice of the prescription-drug pie. More expensive drugs means there's a bigger pie. When there's a bigger pie, [there are] bigger slices for the pharmaceutical benefit managers. 50:24 Mike Kolar: Rebates and the role they play have been key areas of focus in the drug cost debate. In our view, rebates are a powerful tool to offset high prices, which are set by pharmaceutical companies, and pharmaceutical companies alone. The fact that rebates are not offered on many of the highest cost drugs, and that studies show no correlation between prices and rebates underscore that rebates are a key to mitigating rather than causing high drug prices. We pass rebates through fully to our plans, and we believe our plans should be able to choose how to apply these rebates in ways that best serve their members and market needs by balancing premiums and cost sharing. 56:05 Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA): I'd like to talk about consolidation, including the recent integration of PBMs with insurance companies. Last year I wrote to the Justice Department on the issues, it reported that the three largest PBMs who are before us today now covers 71% of Medicaid, Medicare Part D enrollees and 86% of standalone Drug Plan enrollees. 57:45 Derica Rice: This is a highly competitive space. In addition to the three that you've pointed out here, CMS has noted there are over 60 PBMs across the US. Therefore, the competition, there's many options for the employers that are out there, government entities, as well as unions to choose from given their specific needs. 1:10:35 Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI): So when we look at Express Scripts has 100 million Americans covered, CVS 90 million, OptumRx 65 million, Prime Therapeutics 27 million, Humana 21 million, and yet Americans still pay the highest prices in the world. Even though you are negotiating for millions of people. The VA has its own pharmacy benefit manager service, they negotiate for 9 million veterans, and they pay, on average, 40% less for the same drugs that the rest of the healthcare system pays for. Despite greater volume, you are unable to secure these kinds of low prices. With all due respect, you guys are pretty bad negotiators. Given the fact that the VA can get 40% less. And so I'd like to know from each of you why that's the case. Dr. Miller? Steve Miller [Former EVP and Chief Clinical Officer, Cigna Corporation]: Yes. Part of the equation is giving patients choice. At the VA, they actually limit their formulary more than any of us at this table do. So oftentimes, they'll have one beta blocker, one ace inhibitor. And so if it's going to get to that level of choice, then we could get better prices also. Sen. Stabenow: Let me jump in, in the interest of time. I know you create nationwide drug formularies, you have pre-authorization, you give preferred status to certain medications. So you don't use any of those tools that the VA is using? Because you do. Steve Miller: We definitely use those tools, but we also give people choice. It's crucial for both physicians and patients to have the choice of the products they want to be able to access. Many of our plans want us to have broad formularies and when you have more products, it means you move less market share. Sen. Stabenow: So basically you're saying a 40% premium gives them more choice. 1:24:30 Sherrod Brown (D-OH): If the administration's rebate rule were finalized as proposed, would you in some way be required to change the way you do business? Mike Kolar: Yes, Senator we would. John Prince: Yes. William Fleming: Yes. Derica Rice: Yes. Steve Miller: Yes. Sen. Brown: Thank you. 1:25:05 Sherrod Brown (D-OH): What percentage of prescriptions that you fill across Part D actually receive a rebate? Roughly what percentage? Mike Kolar: So Senator, approximately 8% of the prescriptions that we cover in Part D are associated with a rebate. Sen. Brown: Okay, Mr. Prince? John Prince: Senator, I don't know the exact number, I know our overall business is about 7%. Sen. Brown: Okay, thank you. William Fleming: About 7-8%. Derica Rice: Senator, I do not know the exact number but we pass through 100% of all rebates and discounts. Sen. Brown: [Grunt] Steve Miller: 90% of the prescriptions will be generic. Of the 10% that are branded, about two-thirds have rebates. So it's about seven-- Sen. Brown: 7-8% like the others. Okay. To recap, PBMs do not set drug prices. Forcing you to change the way you do business -- as the administration's rule would — will not change that fact. And while the rule might impact a small percentage of drugs and Part D that receive a rebate, it does nothing to lower costs, as your answer suggests, for the other 90% of prescriptions you fill. Most importantly, absolutely nothing in the proposed rule would require Secretary Azar's former employer or any other pharma company to lower the price of insulin or any other drug. It's important to establish that, so thank you for that. 1:41:40 Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV): Let me ask you, Dr. Fleming, in your testimony, you say Humana's analysis of the rebate rule -- and we're talking about the administration's rebate rule now — found that approximately 17% of beneficiaries will see savings at the pharmacy counter as a result of this rule. Can you tell me a little bit more about who these people are? And what kind of conditions do they have? William Fleming: Senator, there will be a number of members who are taking brand drugs for which we get rebates and so it could vary all the way from the common chronic conditions, things like diabetes or hypertension or high cholesterol, all the way over to occasionally, not usually, but occasionally on the specialty drug side. When you think of some medications like treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, places where there's competition. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

united states american director community president donald trump health house mother secret guide law americans change new york times child deep joe biden ms executive director data board vice president owner guns price cost healthcare north forbes competition md va republicans washington post effects wall street journal flash npr abuse poland drug senators ukrainian pfizer senior vice president insider donations chief executive officer cnbc national association jd medicare bach astrazeneca fraser medicaid brief history humana removal cvs fleming incorporating big pharma cms demise pharmacists forcing general counsel justice department colleagues lowering johnson johnson roughly health policy janssen clerk miami herald law offices house committees cbo roll call dvm aetna sanofi senate committee hwy pharm congressional budget office chief clinical officer cvs health open secrets certain point part d american prospect mapp kaiser family foundation pbm chuck grassley health care services senate finance committee optum goodrx ron wyden pbms medicare part d drug pricing unitedhealth assistant general counsel david dayen proposed rule commonwealth fund express scripts bookforum congressional dish music alley pharmacy benefit managers social security act pcma isakson sego chief executive office janssen pharmaceuticals crestview formulary jeff byers former executive vice president borla health insurance coverage healthcare finance pharmacy times annie karni optumrx abbvie inc cover art design david ippolito marty schladen
Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies - The Beltway Briefing
Who will be on the Ballot in 2024?

Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies - The Beltway Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 40:28


Midway through the 2022 primary season, as the challenges facing the nation mount, there is growing speculation among both Democrats and Republicans that neither Biden nor Trump will be on the ballot in 2024. Meanwhile, the House Committee investigating the January 6, 2021 attack on the Capitol, during its prime-time televised hearings, continues to present evidence of a conspiracy to overturn a free and fair democratic election. Public Strategies' Howard Schweitzer, Mark Alderman, Towner French, and Kaitlyn Martin ponder whether Biden and Trump will run in 2024, discuss the impact, if any, the January 6 Committee hearings are having on the presidential race, and break down the most recent attempts to get the reconciliation bill across the finish line.

The Officer Tatum Show
AOC confronts troll calling her his 'favorite big booty Latina'; Anti-abortion activist says 10-year-old's abortion was not an abortion in bizarre House committee testimony; Video of Uvalde shooting scene captured cop checking phone after dying wife ca

The Officer Tatum Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 69:51


The Officer Tatum Show is now available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and SalemPodcastNetwork.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Power and Politics
A House committee calls on ministers to testify on the decision to send repaired pipeline turbines back to Russia despite sanctions

Power and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 45:15


Foreign Affairs Parliamentary Secretary Rob Oliphant and committee members Michael Chong and Heather McPherson weigh in. Fmr. Canadian Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Dennis Horak and Brett Bruen, President of the Global Situation Room on President Biden's visit to Saudi Arabia. Catharine Tunney on the latest testimony at the Nova Scotia Mass Casualty Commission. The Power Panel on quarterly federal carbon tax rebate cheques arriving in some Canadians bank accounts.

Texas Tribune Brief
House committee to release Uvalde shooting video to public on Sunday

Texas Tribune Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 4:14


State Rep. Dustin Burrows will lead a private briefing for victims' families in Uvalde on Sunday morning, allowing them to see the hallway video from a Robb Elementary School surveillance camera and discuss the committee's preliminary report. Later, the footage will be released for anyone to watch.

The Original Cast
Elliott Kalan / The Music Man - Original Broadway Cast (1957)

The Original Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 85:14


Emmy-winner and former The Daily Show head-writer Elliott Kalan is here for a musical running now about then but really about way back then which seems to have been lost now. Topics include: losing on Jeopardy!, adding jokes by Larry David, ethical use of a resurrection machine, Frank Loesser, the House Committee on “Shipoopi,” Broadway sets of the 50s & 60s, and (of course) is Winthrop Marion's son and does that matter? Elliott Kalan on Twitter The Flop House Podcast The Who Was? Podcast Featured recordings: The Music Man - Original Broadway Cast (1957) MERCH! Visit our Patreon for access to our monthly live stream The Original Cast at the Movies where this year we're talking musical sequels and musical biopics! Patreon • Twitter • Facebook • Email

The FOX News Rundown
Fox News Power Ranking Forecasts A Red Wave In 2022

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 33:58 Very Popular


The Fox News Power Rankings released on Monday revealed a forecast that the GOP will claim a majority in the House of Representatives, predicting the Republicans will potentially take as many as 225 to 255 seats. With redistricting and the majority of primaries in the rearview mirror, the Fox News Power Rankings estimated a likely victory for House Republicans however also showed a closer, competitive fight for the U.S. Senate in November. Fox News Decision Desk Director Arnon Mishkin and Decision Desk member and professor at UT-Austin Daron Shaw join the Rundown to break down the Fox News Power Rankings, where key voting demographics are leaning politically ahead of the midterms and important toss-up races to watch closely.   The Democrat-led House Committee is holding another televised hearing to investigate the January 6th Capitol riots. The Committee is focusing on the extremist groups who attacked the Capitol in order to prevent Congress from certifying the 2020 Presidential election. Former Assistant US Attorney for the Southern District of New York and FOX News Contributor Andy McCarthy joins the Rundown to discuss what audiences may learn from the latest hearing, Steve Bannon's upcoming trial, and whether or not the hearings will have any political impact on former President Trump and his potential presidential bid.   Plus, commentary by retired NYPD inspector Paul Mauro. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Loop
Afternoon Report: Tuesday, July 12, 2022

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 6:47


Today's hearing of the January 6th House Committee is over. A false alarm at the Seabrook nuclear plant leaves some rattled. Some in one of Boston's oldest neighborhoods throw shade at one of the newest. 5 minutes of news that will keep you in The Loop.

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Fox News Power Ranking Forecasts A Red Wave In 2022

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 33:58


The Fox News Power Rankings released on Monday revealed a forecast that the GOP will claim a majority in the House of Representatives, predicting the Republicans will potentially take as many as 225 to 255 seats. With redistricting and the majority of primaries in the rearview mirror, the Fox News Power Rankings estimated a likely victory for House Republicans however also showed a closer, competitive fight for the U.S. Senate in November. Fox News Decision Desk Director Arnon Mishkin and Decision Desk member and professor at UT-Austin Daron Shaw join the Rundown to break down the Fox News Power Rankings, where key voting demographics are leaning politically ahead of the midterms and important toss-up races to watch closely.   The Democrat-led House Committee is holding another televised hearing to investigate the January 6th Capitol riots. The Committee is focusing on the extremist groups who attacked the Capitol in order to prevent Congress from certifying the 2020 Presidential election. Former Assistant US Attorney for the Southern District of New York and FOX News Contributor Andy McCarthy joins the Rundown to discuss what audiences may learn from the latest hearing, Steve Bannon's upcoming trial, and whether or not the hearings will have any political impact on former President Trump and his potential presidential bid.   Plus, commentary by retired NYPD inspector Paul Mauro. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dom Giordano Program
PA Rep. Martina White: Will the Senate Remove DA Krasner?

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 14:13


Dom and PA State Representative Martina White talk about the organization of the Select Committee to investigate the impeachment of Philadelphia Distract Attorney Larry Krasner. If the House Committee finds for impeachment will the Senate remove Krasner from office?

Mornings on the Mall
7.11.22 - Hour 3: Congressman investigating Hunter, What does the left represent

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 35:12


In the third hour of The Vince Coglianese Show, Vince speaks with Ranking Member of the House Committee of Oversight and Reform, Congressman James Comer (KY-1) about Hunter Biden's spiraling out of control corruption.  Vince asks listeners to chime in as to what they think the left represents. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm. To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mornings on the Mall
Congressman James Comer Interview

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 14:25


Vince Coglianese speaks with Ranking Member of the House Committee of Oversight and Reform, Congressman James Comer (KY-1) For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm. To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis
Hour 1: LaVar, Brady & Jonas – Dan Snyder's Future Testimony, NFL's Flimsy Case? In Case You Missed It

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 39:52


In hour one on 2 Pros and a Cup of Joe, the guys put NFL owner Dan Snyder under a microscope as he gets ready to testify later this month in front of the House Committee regarding his club's workplace culture. No surprise, but there is some more news coming about Deshaun Watson that could lend to his case. Does the NFL have a weak case against Deshaun Watson? Plus, what's the best way to make s'mores? Then, some In Case You Missed It! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
House Reps Ask Investors: “Where Have All the Houses Gone?”

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 4:54


Members of Congress are taking a deep dive into the single-family housing market to find out “Where Have All the Houses Gone?” In this investigation, they took a close look at the business practices of the nation's largest landlords – the institutional landlords that buy huge lots of homes at one time. Although the results show an adverse impact on certain communities and potential homebuyers, housing experts argue that investor ownership of rental property is more of a symptom than a cause. (1)Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.This investigation began last fall when a subcommittee of the House Committee on Financial Services sent a survey to five of the largest single-family rental companies in the U.S. Asked to participate in this survey were Invitation Homes, American Homes4Rent, FirstKey Homes, Progress Residential and Amherst Residential. The survey dug into things like where they are buying homes, what they are paying, how much rent they are charging, etc. The final analysis used that information along with government data to come up with a few conclusions.Mass Predatory PurchasingThe subcommittee just held a hearing on the results last week. Subcommittee Chair, Representative Al Green, said during the hearing: “We have found that private equity companies have bought up hundreds of thousands of single-family homes and placed them on the rental market.” He referred to this practice as “mass predatory purchasing.” He also said:“These corporate buyers have tended to target lower-priced starter homes requiring limited renovation; these homes would likely have been bought by first-time buyers, low- to middle-income home-buyers, or both.” (2)The investigation also found that a disproportionate number of homes have been purchased in communities of color, and communities with a higher number of single mothers. An examination of the top 20 zip codes where institutional investors have purchased show that about 40% of the population is Black while just 13.4% of the overall population is Black. The number of single mothers is reportedly about 30% higher than average.Other findings include rents that are up 40% over three years from 2018 to 2021, and a doubling of the number of tenants who are behind on their rent. Lawmakers were also critical of automated property management, often used by institutional investors. They say if tenants can't get a hold of someone about a problem, they could be at risk of mismanagement and eviction when problems occur. (3)Investors as a Symptom, Not the CauseEven though the numbers have grown, Representative Tom Emmer sided with landlords, and reminded hearing attendees that 8.6% inflation is having a big impact on housing. He also said that institutional investors still account for a very small percentage of single-family rentals, which appears to mean that they couldn't possibly be a huge part of the problem.Jenny Schuetz of the Brookings Institution also testified that these big investors are not the cause of the housing gap. She says they are a symptom, because of the high demand for rentals and the critically low inventory of affordable homes. She says: “Private equity firms and other institutional investors benefit from tight housing supply, but they did not create the problem. Local governments across the U.S. have adopted policies that make it difficult to build more homes where people want to live.”The Executive Director of the National Rental Home Council, David Howard, also spoke out at the hearing. He answered the question about where all the houses have gone in a similar way – that they were never built. He also says that “single family rental home providers are not influencing local and national housing market dynamics.” In other words, they are “responding” to housing market dynamics. Collaboration to Find a Solution Howard says that these large landlords along with The National Rental Home Council have been working with the committee, and welcome the opportunity to continue with that collaboration to find meaningful solutions to this problem. In the meantime, landlords are needed to help fill the housing gap. You can find out more about the housing market, the rental market, and the economy by listening to one of my recent webinars. You'll find a replay for my Q2 2022 Housing Market Update at newsforinvestors.com under the “Learn” tab. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 - https://financialservices.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=4096112 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/institutional-investors-have-bought-hundreds-of-thousands-of-single-family-homes-many-in-black-communities-critics-say-its-creating-a-generation-of-renters-11656514935 3 - https://nationalmortgageprofessional.com/news/congressional-committee-exploring-where-have-all-houses-gone

In The Thick
ITT Sound Off: Havoc on Our Democracy

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 25:15


Maria and guest co-host Christina Greer, political scientist, professor at Fordham University and co-host of the FAQ NYC podcast, talk about the latest on the House Committee's January 6 hearings. They also discuss new details on the law enforcement's response to the mass shooting in Uvalde. Plus, Maria shares her thoughts on the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. ITT Staff Picks: For The 19th, reporter Shefali Luthra explains how the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will impact abortion rights around the country. Witnesses at the January 6th hearings are testifying about what it's like to be targeted by Trump's machine of hate-mongering and harassment, writes Evan Osnos for The New Yorker. “Now, after a long procession of funerals, the collective grief here is turning into collective rage,” write Silvia Foster-Frau and Teo Armus in this piece on a group of mothers and activists in Uvalde, for The Washington Post Photo credit: AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 342: Dan Snyder is being subpoenaed, more major reveals in Commanders' scandal and more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 76:08 Very Popular


11:24 - Commanders: breakdown of a wild day for the Commanders in their workplace-misconduct scandal that featured major reveals by Congress' House Committee on Oversight and Reform, a congressional hearing at which it was announced that Dan Snyder is being subpoenaed, a letter from Dan and Tanya Snyder and Jason Wright to Commanders employees and a statement from Ron Rivera 38:43 - Guest: Neal Mollen, a lawyer who practiced labor and employment law for three-plus decades and is an adjunct professor at George Mason's Antonin Scalia Law School, on what now for Dan Snyder now that he is being subpoenaed and much more off the second congressional hearing on the Commanders' workplace-misconduct scandal 01:02:43 - Nationals and Orioles: analysis of the Nats' 7-0 rain-shortened six-inning loss at the O's from each team's perspective, including a monster game for Austin Hays, another bad game for Patrick Corbin and another good game for Tyler Wells https://HelloFresh.com/Galdi16 and use the promo code Galdi16 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

FOX News Radio Newscast
The House Committee investigating the January 6th Capitol Riot heard from former Justice Department officials who talked about efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

FOX News Radio Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 5:13


The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 340: deep dive on Dan Snyder vs. Congress with sports-law attorney Stephanie Weissenburger and more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 70:11


Guest: Stephanie Weissenburger, a sports-law, entertainment-law and intellectual-property attorney and contributor to the sports-law podcast Conduct Detrimental, on Dan Snyder twice denying the request of Congress' House Committee on Oversight and Reform for Dan to testify at a hearing on June 22, 2022, on the Commanders' workplace-misconduct scandal Guest: Jeff Barker, reporter for The Baltimore Sun, on the Orioles' ownership situation now featuring an ugly rift within the Angelos family, whether the O's are on the verge of being sold, what that could mean for the Nationals and Orioles in the MASN dispute, whether MLB would allow for the Nats and O's to be sold at the same time and more Wizards: analysis of two key realities for the Wizards as they prepare for the 2022 NBA Draft and thoughts on comments from Tommy Sheppard in a pre-draft press conference https://HelloFresh.com/Galdi16 and use the promo code Galdi16 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices