Podcasts about Agriculture

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Cultivation of plants and animals to provide useful products

  • 5,710PODCASTS
  • 33,382EPISODES
  • 29mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 18, 2022LATEST
Agriculture

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Best podcasts about Agriculture

Show all podcasts related to agriculture

Latest podcast episodes about Agriculture

Mongabay Newscast
Vandana Shiva on the agroecology solution for climate change, the biodiversity crisis, and hunger

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 61:10


Agroecology applies ecological principles to agriculture, and it's a key strategy for mitigating--and adapting to climate change--which also boosts biodiversity and food security--and it is the focus of a special series at Mongabay. Joining us first to discuss agroecology as a science, a practice, and a movement is Dr. Maywa Montenegro, an assistant professor of environmental studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Then host Mike G. speaks with iconic Indian scientist, activist and Right Livelihood Award winner Dr. Vandana Shiva, whose brand new book, Agroecology and Regenerative Agriculture: Sustainable Solutions for Hunger, Poverty, and Climate Change, synthesizes decades of agroecology research and implementation. She's also the founder of Navdanya, which is both an agroecology center and a global food sovereignty movement. Dr. Shiva shares how agroecology is an effective solution not just to climate change but also for a host of other ecological crises we're facing, such as water scarcity, land degradation, nutrition and biodiversity loss. Further reading: • ”From traditional practice to top climate solution, agroecology gets growing attention” by Anna Lappé  • "Transitioning to sustainable agriculture requires growing and sustaining an ecologically skilled workforce," Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, 96. doi:10.3389/fsufs.2019.00096 Episode artwork: Dr. Vandana Shiva, photo by Kartikey Shiva. If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Please share your thoughts and ideas! submissions@mongabay.com.

Agtech - So What?
Making Decisions in the Face of Uncertainty, with Hallie Shoffner

Agtech - So What?

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 35:34


It isn't surprising that most farmers have to be expert planners and investors. But getting an inside view into how a farmer plans for the future of their business is a rare opportunity.In this episode, you'll hear firsthand how Hallie Shoffner, a sixth-generation row crop farmer in the Mississippi Delta, makes decisions for her farm and company, SFR Seed. While Hallie is an enthusiastic adopter of new farming innovations, this conversation shows that every decision must be well supported by reliable data and the right incentives.Listen in to hear Hallie speak about:Investing in conservation practices as a tactic to mitigate financial and environmental riskWhat farmers like Hallie want to see from potential partners and vendors in agtechHow COVID-19 impacted a large project to electrify operations on the farmWhy many farmers are skeptical of participating in carbon programs and marketsFor more information and resources, visit our website.

The Commstock Report Podcast
05/18/22 Earth-Wind-Fire and Rain.... Something for Everyone

The Commstock Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 5:38


The Commstock Report: Wednesday, May 18th, 2022.  To get the full report, please sign up using the link below:   https://commstock.com/membership-account/membership-levels/

From Pot to Popular
Sam Andras: Providing turnkey solutions to cannabis cultivators

From Pot to Popular

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 25:25


The cannabis industry is nothing without its cultivators. With increasing demand around the country, it is more essential than ever to optimize cultivation operations and provide top-tier expansion capabilities. In this episode, Sam Andras, executive vice president of professional services at urban-gro, discusses how urban-gro sets itself apart in the Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) sector. Providing a spectrum of CEA offerings including facility design, engineering, integrated cultivation systems and more, urban-gro is a leader in cannabis cultivation support. Sam explains the importance of building a knowledgeable, experienced team in an evolving industry as well as the necessity of services like urban-gro in allowing cannabis cultivators to be flexible in their designs and collaborate with the client to bring their cultivation goals to fruition.

Winning at Work
How to Diversify from Agriculture into Direct to Consumer with Jeff Van Pevenage, CEO Columbia Grain International ~ introducing Balanced Bushel E118

Winning at Work

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 34:10


Hear the inside story of why the world's largest agricultural exporter of wheat, corn, soybean, lentils, peas, and dry beans transitioned into DTC (direct to consumer) by opening a massive supply line for more than 5,000 farmers.  Join me and Jeff Van Pevenage, the CEO of Columbia Grain International, with special guest host, Kevin Scott - the CPG expert, to learn the retail strategy behind Balanced Bushel and why Jeff is investing in this platform for growth (HINT - it's all about his farming partners and employees). From commodity trader to CEO Importance of farming in a small town Growing a business around a processing plant Opening up supply lines and creating markets for farmers Consumer sentiments steer decisions on the farm ~ you can thank hummus Co-Op is a bad word, as I found out! CGI is 100% a relationship business How to educate the next generation Strategic decisions behind Balanced Bushel New company logo Packaging choices Educating the consumer Why Montana is the perfect geography to launch the brand first Special shout out to https://christieand.co/ for branding and PR support Grocery expansion  Distributors Co-packing eCommerce Amazon platform CEO's have a responsibility to provide growth for employees Connect with Jeff Van Pevenage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeff-van-pevenage-00521a1ab/ Columbia Grain: https://www.columbiagrain.com/ Press release: https://www.columbiagrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/pr_01-22-1.pdf Balanced Bushel: http://balanced-bushel.com/   Connect with Kevin Scott - the CPG expert: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-scott-14b14b7/ About your Host Tony Moore and the Winning at Work podcast: Are you looking for a fun and light-hearted podcast to stay current on the trends shaping the $1.6 trillion food and beverage industry? My totally awesome brands featured here take us deep into the world of sustainability, plant-based, food tech, CBD, and good for you. Want to learn how to grow a brand? Scale a brand? I've got you covered.  Join me on my mission to discover what makes these companies different, better, and special. Episode 118 is sponsored by: Timpl Search - National Food and Beverage headhunters for sales, marketing, innovation, and operations. https://www.joynussearch.com/ Contact: Tony Moore. 404-904-9235. Follow me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/differentbetterspecialbrands/ Music from Uppbeat: https://uppbeat.io/t/soundroll/get-the-funk-in License code: SF3WUKBUJQULFHXE  

Grain Markets and Other Stuff
Russia/Ukraine Grain Deal?? United Nations Makes an Attempt

Grain Markets and Other Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 8:11


The Decibel
Why this year's avian flu is much deadlier than usual

The Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 18:46


As this year's deadly avian flu spreads from poultry to wild animals, there are reports of birds suffering from neurological symptoms, dropping dead from trees and twitching uncontrollably. Nearly two million birds have already died from the avian flu this year in Canada alone.Wildlife pathologist Dr. Brian Stevens joins us to explain how this strain is different, what experts are watching out for, and how to prevent further spread.

Earth Wise
Managing Pests With Cover Crops | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 2:00


The use of pesticides in global agriculture brings with it many problems including the killing of non-target, beneficial species as well as reversing pest-management gains from the use of conservation agriculture methods. In a newly published study by researchers at Penn State University, the use of plant cover, such as cover crops, was shown to […]

The Commstock Report Podcast
05/17/22 The Next to Surrender Should be Russia

The Commstock Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 5:32


The Commstock Report: Tuesday, May 17th, 2022.  To get the full report, please sign up using the link below:   https://commstock.com/membership-account/membership-levels/

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Is Glyphosate In The Rain And Atmosphere? - Stephanie Seneff, PhD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 10:07


Is Glyphosate In The Rain And Atmosphere? -  Stephanie Seneff, PhDStephanie Seneff, Ph.D. • https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/• Book - The Glyphosate Effect: How the World's Most Common Herbicide Is Undermining Your Health and What You Can Do About It Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She received the B.S. degree in Biophysics in 1968, the M.S. and E.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1980, and the Ph.D degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1985, all from MIT. For over three decades, her research interests have always been at the intersection of biology and computation: developing a computational model for the human auditory system, understanding human language so as to develop algorithms and systems for human computer interactions, as well as applying natural language processing (NLP) techniques to gene predictions. She has published over 170 refereed articles on these subjects, and has been invited to give keynote speeches at several international conferences. She has also supervised numerous Master's and PhD theses at MIT. In 2012, Dr. Seneff was elected Fellow of the International Speech and Communication Association (ISCA).In recent years, Dr. Seneff has focused her research interests back towards biology. She is concentrating mainly on the relationship between nutrition and health. Since 2011, she has published over two dozen papers in various medical and health-related journals on topics such as modern day diseases (e.g., Alzheimer, autism, cardiovascular diseases), analysis and search of databases of drug side effects using NLP techniques, and the impact of nutritional deficiencies and environmental toxins on human health.# StephanieSeneff #GMOs #GeneticallyModifiedFood #GMCrops #FoodSafety#TheRealTruthAboutHealth  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Rich Zeoli
Jeff Bartos: The Candidates Were Never Asked About Pennsylvania's Biggest Industry: Agriculture

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 9:04


Jeff Bartos, candidate for Senator of Pennsylvania, joined Rich to discuss the final day of the primary campaign today and the biggest ignored concern that was never addressed during debate: Agriculture in Pennsylvania.

Rich Zeoli
The Baby Formula Shortage Exemplifies The Incompetence of Government Regulations (Full Zeoli Show 05-17-22)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 185:25


6:04-NEWS 6:08-Expecting Mastriano to win the GOP nomination for PA Gubernatorial race; Senate race still too close to call  6:13-FDA will ease rules and allow Abbott to resume production of baby formula  6;27-New Jersey Assemblyman proposes a bill to regulate the size of cardboard boxes in the state 6:35-Clarice Schillinger, candidate for Lt. Governor of PA, joined Rich to discuss Election Day today and her motivation to run for Lt. Governor after fighting for parents and kids alike to get the education they deserve in public schools 6:45-Biden Administration puts cap on offshore drilling permits  7:01-NEWS 7:05- Dr. Oz joined Rich to discuss election day in Pennsylvania for the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate. Speaking on the key issues from gun rights to how to handle Russia war in Ukraine  7:23-Our senses change when we fly explaining why we hate food on planes 7:30-Due to police shortage in Chester, the PA State Trooper will assist in patrols of the city  7:35-Elon Musk Twitter acquisition may be done over amount of fake accounts  7:41-New Jersey 'box" police  7:45- CUT SHEET | Karine Jean-Pierre's first day as White House Press Secretary | Actor Ezra Miller threatens police arresting him for getting his pronouns wrong 8:07-The FDA appears to have known about how bad the baby formula shortage was going to get before acting  8:12-The incompetence of the FDA was on full display in the formula shortage  8:20-NEWS 8:26-The final polling numbers from the Trafalgar Group for PA Senate  8:38- Michelle Obama uses a new "woke" term when speaking on Roe v. Wade 9:02-NEWS 9:05-Jeff Bartos, candidate for Senator of Pennsylvania, joined Rich to discuss the final day of the primary campaign today and the biggest ignored concern that was never addressed during debate: Agriculture in Pennsylvania.  9:14-Congress holds hearings on the sighting of UFOs 9:40- CUT SHEET | MSNBC's Kornacki breaks down Biden's terrible polling | Amber Heard blames Johnny Depp dog for the poo incident | Hero passenger speaks out on his emergency landing after pilot loses consciousness  9:55-Final Thoughts Photo: Getty Images

Rich Zeoli
Congress Holds Hearings on UFOs for First Time in Over 4 Decades

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 47:00


9:02-NEWS 9:05-Jeff Bartos, candidate for Senator of Pennsylvania, joined Rich to discuss the final day of the primary campaign today and the biggest ignored concern that was never addressed during debate: Agriculture in Pennsylvania.  9:14-Congress holds hearings on the sighting of UFOs 9:40- CUT SHEET | MSNBC's Kornacki breaks down Biden's terrible polling | Amber Heard blames Johnny Depp dog for the poo incident | Hero passenger speaks out on his emergency landing after pilot loses consciousness  9:55-Final Thoughts Photo by: Getty Images

The Thriving Farmer Podcast
180. Paul Dorrance on Diving Into Farming and Creating a Successful Multi-Faceted Business

The Thriving Farmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 44:26


Have you ever left farm life, only to find yourself drawn back to it?    Today on the show we're pleased to be hosting Paul Dorrance, author, public speaker, consultant, and regenerative agriculture advocate. Paul was raised close to the land, growing up on a small self-sufficient homestead in upstate New York. After a career in the Air Force as a pilot, Paul's journey back to farming started in 2013 when he started Pastured Providence Farmstead - a successful pasture-based livestock operation marketing 100% grass-fed beef and lamb, as well as pastured non-GMO pork, poultry, and eggs directly to consumers in southern and central Ohio. Join us today to hear all about the unique, eclectic career of this regenerative agriculture expert! You'll hear:   Paul's experience growing up in a self-sufficient homestead in New York 1:37 Paul's initial career 3:32 What brought Paul back to farming 5:21 What truths writing his book dredged up for Paul 16:37 The major decision at the beginning that set Paul's farm up for success 20:38 What Paul considers the biggest mistakes new business owners can make 29:25 Where Paul plans to take his career next 34:04 How Paul markets and sells his products 38:12 Where you can find out more about Paul and his work 40:50   About the Guest   Paul Dorrance is an author, speaker, consultant and regenerative agriculture advocate. He was raised close to the land, growing up on a small self-sufficient homestead in upstate New York. His journey back to farming started in 2013 when he started Pastured Providence Farmstead – a successful pasture-based livestock operation, marketing 100% grass-fed beef and lamb, as well as pastured non-GMO pork, poultry, and eggs directly to consumers in southern and central Ohio. Paul now writes for Acres U.S.A., speaks at agricultural conferences around the country, and provides consulting services for dreaming, beginning, and transitioning farmers. Resources   Website: www.pasturedprovidence.com   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PasturedProvidence   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pasturedprovidence/  The Thriving Farmer Podcast Team would like to thank our amazing sponsors!   Rimol Greenhouse Systems has been supporting local growers since 1994.  Rimol Greenhouse offers superior strength and craftsmanship with their structures and product lines. We offer multiple sizes of gothic high tunnels, gutter-connected and free-standing greenhouses. Rimol Greenhouse manufactures their diverse product line in New Hampshire, using American Steel and Aluminum.    Our knowledgeable sales staff specialize in the technology you need and are located throughout the country to better serve you. Whether you are just getting started as a Greenhouse Grower, or looking to expand your operation, Rimol Greenhouse is your industry partner. To learn more and to get a quote on your next project, visit Rimol.com   At Agrigro, we know that in today's modern agriculture, our efforts can deplete life or add life. When you look for ways to add life, it's sustainable and makes everything work better. The result is enhanced plant and soil health for crops, gardens, and turf, as well as improved animal health and environment for livestock and wildlife. Our products are all-natural, easy to use, and friendly to the soil, the plant, as well as the grower. AgriGro's® formulations deliver essential plant nutrition along with an advanced prebiotic concentrate, which significantly increases the multitude of beneficial native microbial species already residing in the production environment. Through these environmentally sound technologies, we're adding life to crop production, livestock, home, turf, and wildlife markets. You don't have to be dependent on crop production efforts that deplete life… Just Add Life with AgriGro®.

The Hot Dish
What is Rural?

The Hot Dish

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 41:46


In this episode of the Hot Dish Podcast, Senator Heidi Heitkamp sits down with Dr. Glenda Humiston, President of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of California along with Rob Larew, President of the National Farmers Union. Together, they discuss lack of access to federal programs for those in rural areas, and the need to rethink notions of “urban” and “rural.”

SwineCast
SwineCast 1195, Update From The Swine Disease Reporting System Number 51 - Dr. Dustin Oedekoven

SwineCast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022


SwineCast 1195 Show Notes: The Swine Disease Reporting System team has a conversation with Dr. Dustin Oedekoven (Chief Veterinarian at National Pork Board and President of the United States Animal Health Association) about swine diseases and Dr. Oedekoven's role at the National Pork Board. This SwineCast episode shares the most recent report number 51, that can also be found at http://agtoday.us/swine-reports.

Market to Market - The MtoM Podcast
Turkeys get a new home for research and teaching - Gretta Irwin

Market to Market - The MtoM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 0:25


The Iowa turkey industry had a good week - first a center dedicated solely to the turkey industry and research was opened at Iowa State University. The state that's provided the official turkey of the White House now has a place to work at growing the industry both in and out of Iowa. Gretta Irwin, the executive director of the Iowa Turkey Federation discusses the differences between now and 2015 when it comes to HPAI and how fewer outbreaks of avian flu have been reported in the state in 2022.

Yara's Crop Nutrition podcast
The Future of Farming and Food Production

Yara's Crop Nutrition podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 17:42


Agriculture is a dynamic business.  Food security and farming sustainability are key for our growing population and issues with inputs. What should we be thinking about and how can we collaborate to find solutions?    

Real Organic Podcast
Amanda Starbuck: Corporate Consolidation + Our Food System

Real Organic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 64:40


#064:  Food and Water Watch Research Director and Policy Analyst Amanda Starbuck shares what it takes to get your products into the supermarket today: a lot of money and plenty of marketplace power. But what does this mean for those of us looking for real, nutritious, and climate-friendly foods?  Amanda Starbuck  is a Senior Research Director and Policy Analyst with Food and Water Watch in Washington, DC. She earned her Masters degree in Global Environmental Policy at American University and centers her work on family farms and regional food hubs. Originally from North Dakota, Amanda has farming ties on both sides of her family.To watch a video version of this podcast with access to the full transcript and links relevant to our conversation, please visit:https://www.realorganicproject.org/amanda-starbuck-corporate-consolidation-our-food-system-episode-sixty-fourThe Real Organic Podcast is hosted by Dave Chapman and Linley Dixon, engineered by Brandon StCyr, and edited and produced by Jenny Prince.The Real Organic Project is a farmer-led movement working towards certifying 1,000 farms across the United States this year. Our add-on food label distinguishes soil-grown fruits and vegetables from hydroponically-raised produce, and pasture-raised meat, milk, and eggs from products harvested from animals in horrific confinement (CAFOs - confined animal feeding operations).To find a Real Organic farm near you, please visit:https://www.realorganicproject.org/farmsWe believe that the organic standards, with their focus on soil health, biodiversity, and animal welfare were written as they should be, but that the current lack of enforcement of those standards is jeopardizing the ability for small farms who adhere to the law to stay in business. The lack of enforcement is also jeopardizing the overall health of the customers who support the organic movement; customers who are not getting what they pay for at market but still paying a premium price. And the lack of enforcement is jeopardizing the very cycles (water, air, nutrients) that Earth relies upon to provide us all with a place to live, by pushing extractive, chemical agriculture to the forefront.If you like what you hear and are feeling inspired, we would love for you to join our movement by becoming one of our 1,000  Real Friends:https://www.realorganicproject.org/real-organic-friends/To read our weekly newsletter (which might just be the most forwarded newsletter on the internet!) and get firsthand news about what's happening with organic food, farming and policy, please subscribe here:https://www.realorganicproject.org/email/

StarTalk Radio
Indigenous Science with Dr. Jessica Hernandez

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 49:26


Is Western science always the best science? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Marcia Belsky discuss Indigenous methods to combat climate change with Indigenous scientist and author Dr. Jessica Hernandez. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Thanks to our Patrons Jennifer E Carr, Ruben, Peter Kellner, Michele Bontemps, eric secrist, Zebulon C, Travis Ryan Otter, Matthew Young, SevereFLIPPER, and Cleo K for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Antonio Campoy, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

What Doesn't Kill You
Explosive Report on How the FDA Is Failing Our Food System

What Doesn't Kill You

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 51:59


Investigative reporter Helena Bottemiller-Evich digs deep into the many ways the FDA, supposedly monitoring our food supply, abjectly fails to adequately monitor and regulate basic products like baby formula, the water used to process vegetables and fruits, and forever chemicals in food packaging. Every year more than 128,000 people are made sick from food-borne illnesses, while over 3000 people die. The US lags far behind other developed nations in maintaining a safe, inspected food supply.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support What Doesn't Kill You by becoming a member!What Doesn't Kill You is Powered by Simplecast.

What Doesn't Kill You
Explosive Report on How the FDA Is Failing Our Food System

What Doesn't Kill You

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 51:59


Investigative reporter Helena Bottemiller-Evich digs deep into the many ways the FDA, supposedly monitoring our food supply, abjectly fails to adequately monitor and regulate basic products like baby formula, the water used to process vegetables and fruits, and forever chemicals in food packaging. Every year more than 128,000 people are made sick from food-borne illnesses, while over 3000 people die. The US lags far behind other developed nations in maintaining a safe, inspected food supply.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support What Doesn't Kill You by becoming a member!What Doesn't Kill You is Powered by Simplecast.

Plowtalk
Episode 131 - Don Bradley, Doc Shay, & Keith Bogan

Plowtalk

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 60:21


This episode showcases some of the veterans of Bane-Welker: Don Bradley, Doc Shay, and Keith Bogan. Phil, Jason, and Matt Bane talk with these gentlemen of Ohio and get their unique perspectives on over a long career in the agriculture equipment industry.

The Commstock Report Podcast
05/16/22 Soybeans are Still Cheap Compared To Pick-up Trucks

The Commstock Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 5:42


The Commstock Report: Monday, May 16th, 2022.  To get the full report, please sign up using the link below:   https://commstock.com/membership-account/membership-levels/

The Curious Farmer
A Vote for Science and Agriculture

The Curious Farmer

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:33


Dr Tomas Remenyi - Climate Research Fellow at the University of TasmaniaTIA -Tasmanian Institute of AgricultureProfessor David Bowman - Professor of Pyrogeography and Fire Science at the University of Tasmania.Farmers for Climate Action - reach out for more information about how you can join your local groupTo contact Kate, email thecuriousfarmer@gmail.com or follow @Leap Farm on Instagram or Facebook.

The Business of Agriculture Podcast
241 - Direct to Consumer Citrus to Boost Margins and Cope with California's Regulatory Cost

The Business of Agriculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 47:04


California's regulatory environment is prohibitive, especially for production Agriculture which uses a lot of water and works on historically slim margins. So, what's an enterprising California farm operator to do when faced with the challenge of preserving the family ranch in light of exploding regulatory costs? That's the question Eric Bream aims to answer with new ventures. His first venture: direct to consumer citrus sales with a hook. The hook: donating a matching portion of his direct sales crop to local homeless shelters and food pantries. Eric joins me to discuss California citrus and his new endeavor. Sponsored by Nori nori.com and Pattern Ag pattern.ag

The Anchor Point Podcast
Reprisal w/ Pedro Rios

The Anchor Point Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 115:16


There is a very legitimate fear when it comes to reprisal and retribution within the federal workplace. It may not be every wildland firefighter that may experience it, but many have...That's why we have wildland firefighter, Pedro Rios, stops by on the show today to tell his story about reprisal, the lawsuit, and the lengthy process to resolution...Keep in mind that this episode is HIS story along with some of the publicly available court documents that outline and support the content of this episode.These documents can be found here:"Rios v. Dept. of Agriculture" - https://acrobat.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:2f0349c0-b914-3eef-84b5-71d26c9b479e"Prohibited Personell Practices" - https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/5/2302If you have a story about reprisal, consider reaching out to: https://www.grassrootswildlandfirefighters.comYou know the drill...Stay safe, stay savage... Enjoy!..........................Updates!We launched a Patreon!!! If you guys would like to support us, head over to our Patreon Page!https://www.patreon.com/theanchorpointpodcast..........................Sponsors:The Anchor Point Podcast is supported by the following wonderful folks...Mystery RanchNeed badass packs? Then look no further than Mystery Ranch!https://www.mysteryranch.comHotshot BreweryWanna pick up our Anchor Point Podcast merch or need killer coffee? Hit up Hotshot Brewery!!!https://www.hotshotbrewing.comThe Smokey GenerationWanna get some history and knowledge on Wildland Fire? Hit up The Smokey Generation!http://wildfire-experience.orgNot a sponsor of The Anchor Point Podcast, but a great organization:The Wildland Firefighter FoundationAnd, as always, please consider supporting this great nonprofit organization - The Wildland Firefighter Foundation!https://wffoundation.org

Grain Markets and Other Stuff
Wheat LIMIT-UP...India Bans Exports

Grain Markets and Other Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 7:27


Ford Mustang The First Generation, The Early Years Podcast
Father Son Restomod Story, Niko Tatti Interview

Ford Mustang The First Generation, The Early Years Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 26:32


Today is a great father son project story and it started here as a message from today's guest: “I bought the car when it was a rolling painted body. It didn't have its engine in it, the trans, nor the driveshaft. The seats had been redone, but everything else in the interior still needed to be finished. For us, the car was a father/son restoration project in high school, and she's still my daily 5 years later. With the help of my dad, almost everything on the car has been redone” ~Niko Tatti. Ford Mustang, The Early Years Podcast -- Guest Interview Application============Do you own a early year Mustang?: yesIf you own a Mustang, how long have you owned your ride?: Almost 6 years now. What do you do for a living?:I work in the Agriculture industry in California's Central Valley. I am a quality control supervisor for a company that grows peaches, nectarines, & red/green grapes. If you own a Mustang or classic car, have you named your car? Never really named the car, but I do refer to it as a "her", "the Mustang", or "The '68".  About Niko's ponyUnder the hood, she's got a late 80's 5.0 from a Foxbody Mustang, backed by the stock C-4 trans.  The car was originally a C-code car, according to my Marti Report. She came with power steering,  Air Conditioning, and a few other appearance options. I have since upgraded to disc brakes in the front, LED head & tail lights, new power steering parts, aftermarket stereo, Vintage Air, new aluminum radiator, electric cooling fan, and a bigger 100 amp alternator. Recently, we dropped the rear of the car 1.5" with new leaf springs, and hopefully soon, we're gonna perform a Shelby style drop in the front with coilovers. What plans do you have for improvements/restoration/modification of your classic car?:I don't see it happening within the next 5 years, but eventually I would love to perform a Coyote swap on the car and change the paint color to either a gun-metal style gray, or a midnight blue. I'm all for preserving original cars, but since my car's original 289 is nowhere to be found, I don't feel bad hot-rodding it.  Please share your social media names/handles so we can tag you when promoting your episode.: Usually on Facebook under Niko Tatti, or Instagram @niko_tatti Promotional Partner:Bangin' Headlights - www.TheMustangPodcast.com/headlights  Get a discount, use the link Ford Mustang The Early Years Podcast (social media)The Facebook GroupTheMustangPodcast.com/facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/185146876036328Instagram@mustangpodcasthttps://www.instagram.com/mustangpodcast/An Expert's Guide to Maintaining Your Classic Mustangwww.TheMustangPodcast.com/repair Cover art photo credit: Niko Tatti https://www.instagram.com/niko_tatti/ Keep it safe, keep it rollin' and keep it on the road. Until next time! ~Doug Sandler

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast
Boris Johnson is travelling to northern Ireland today for crisis talks

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 10:00


The Taoiseach has called for the British Government to engage professionally and sincerely with the European Commission in relation to resolving issues around the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol.  Meanwhile British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is travelling to northern Ireland today for crisis talks. For more on this situation, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Charlie McConalogue spoke to Newstalk Breakfast this morning. Listen and subscribe to Newstalk Breakfast on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.     Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.    You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

TCIA Podcast
Continuing Education Leads to Continuous Safety with Joe Cordova and Matt Gleason

TCIA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 49:21


Episode SummaryIn this episode of the podcast, we sit down with Joe Cordova and Matt Gleason of ArborForce and discuss why education and safety go hand in hand.Joe Cordova is the owner of ArborForce. He has been working in commercial forestry for 20 years.  In April of 2008, he went out on his own with the launch of ArborForce.  ArborForce will celebrate its 14th anniversary on April 16, 2022.  From a single-person company back then they have grown to a “family” team 29 people strong.  Joe is an ISA certified arborist and licensed as a commercial applicator through the Department of Agriculture, as well as holding many other licenses and certifications.Matt Gleason, Is a project manager and safety coordinator at ArborForce. He has been working in commercial forestry for 4.5 years and has been in the industry for 6 years. Matt is an ISA Certified Arborist and holds a Class A CDL and other certs through the TCIA. Matt is married to his wife Samantha and they have a newborn baby girl! You can follow him on Instagram here.You can check out the ArborForce Instagram page here.Our sponsor for this episode is PlanIt Geo.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Agriculture gets $700m in Emissions Reduction Plan

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 3:46


Agriculture was a major winner in the Government's plan to cut emissions, despite farmers having yet to pay a cent into the pot of money set aside for climate spending. Industrial energy and transport were the other focus areas for the Emissions Reduction Plan, finally released today, which will see major shake ups in every sector of society. Our Climate Reporter Hamish Cardwell filed this report.

Midwest Farm Wives
#65 Mental health really does matter.

Midwest Farm Wives

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022


This episode is brought to you by Grasshopper Mowers, nothing stands in the way of #mowday. May is mental health month and we are both very passionate about sharing the ins and outs in Agriculture, including the really hard stuff too! We interviewed our friend and counselor, Ashley Machado on the importance and realities of mental health. She can be found at @byashleymachado on IG and that can lead you to her website, journal prompts and so much more on mental health.If you are struggling, please ask for help and seek out what you need, your mental health matters.For immediate mental health needs, please contact one of these national hotlines:Farm Aid Hotline800-FARM-AID (327-6243)Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. EasternNational Suicide Prevention Lifeline800-273-TALK (8255)24/7Contact your local Farm Bureau for additional help.

Viewpoints
The Future of Ethanol

Viewpoints

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 8:09


Each year, more than 91 million acres of corn are planted across the country. Currently, 40 percent of this harvest is refined into ethanol. This biofuel is a key additive in the gas that powers our cars and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. But with electric cars gaining popularity – how long will this massive ethanol market survive? How are producers making this process more environmentally friendly?   Learn more at: https://viewpointsradio.org/future-of-ethanol/

Ingrained
Episode 34: A Year Like No Other

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 16:45


California farmers are no strangers to drought, although the magnitude of this, a third straight dry year, has widespread and significant impacts in Sacramento Valley rice country and nearby communities. A lack of adequate rain above Shasta Dam has brought historic water cutbacks to growers on the west side of the Sacramento Valley, with a major reduction in rice plantings.  This contrasts the east side of the valley, where rice acreage is expected to be normal to potentially above normal. Full rice acreage won't be known until later this spring. “We're down to 25 percent of normal rice acreage,” said grower Kurt Richter, who farms in Colusa County. “For a westside operation, that figure is actually very high this year. I'm the only person I know who is on the west side who is even planting rice at all.” The sharp reduction in rice planting will have a ripple effect along the west side of the valley, including not only rice mills, dryers, ag pilots, supply companies and truckers, but virtually all people and businesses. “We have never seen a year like this,” remarked Rick Richter of Richter Aviation. Rick has aerially seeded rice fields since the 1970s. “We're basically one-seventh of what we normally do.” Other area businesses echo Richter's comments and concerns. “You talk to some of the guys that went through drought in the 1980s and this seems to be even worse,” said Jason Bowen, Pest Control Advisor at Colusa County Farm Supply. “This affects everyone. Every person you talk to. It doesn't matter where you work at, you're completely affected.” Bowen is among those who hope state and federal aid is forthcoming, to help during a time of significant economic hardship. “Any aid would benefit everyone,” he said. “Whoever the aid does go to, it's going to trickle down all the way through the local economies in any way, shape or form.” While faced with cutbacks not seen in decades, there remains a  persevering nature that is a hallmark characteristic of this region. “People here are tough. They are strong and have a way of working together to make this successful ,” said Jim Cook, Director of Research and Technology at Colusa County Farm Supply. “We know we're in for a tough go. The bottom line is we have no other place to go. This is like the Alamo for us. This is our place where we're going to make a stand and we are going to survive.” Jennifer Abel is General Manager of Luis Cairo's in Williams, a restaurant with a rich history in the valley. She said they, like so many restaurants, have had big challenges in recent years, from COVID-19 restrictions, the economic downturn and large fires in nearby areas. Drought impacts to nearby farms and ranches will likely impact their business, but she remained positive about their future. “We're really strong and united,” she said. “We have a solid foundation of families and people that have been here for a long time that have been farming and working in this community. They're going to come together, make a difference and make something happen.” Episode Transcript Jim Morris: This is normally a time of activity far and wide in the Sacramento Valley, rice planting season, including here in Glenn County. There's a disconcerting lack of tractors and airplanes working on the west side of the valley right now, as a third year of drought is impacting our region in an unprecedented way. With so much farmland idle, impacts will be strongly felt. This year will be a test like no other. Kurt Richter: There's going to be a lot of people that are not going to be able to find work this year. Rick Richter: Every person you talk to around the local community has been affected. Jim Cook: This is really like the Alamo for us. This is our place where we're going to make a stand and we are going to survive. Jim Morris: Welcome to Ingrained: The California Rice Podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers for more than 30 years to help tell their stories. Simply put, there is no year in memory compared to what's happening this year, especially for those who live and work along the Sacramento River. Pain will be real and widespread. We won't know the total acreage of rice planted in the state until later this spring. For now, it's clear that planting will be dramatically lower on the west side of the Sacramento Valley, and it appears to be normal to perhaps a bit greater on the east side. Kurt Richter, what's happening in your rice fields right now? Kurt Richter: We are currently wrapping up getting the 2022 crop into the ground. It has been kind of a short season for us because acres are scaled back so significantly. Our workforce is scaled back significantly too, but we're probably a week away from getting the final fields planted and in the ground. Jim Morris: One of the words that comes up a lot this year is unprecedented. Is that a good adjective to describe what you're seeing? What type of cutbacks are you having? Kurt Richter: Notable cutbacks, the worst that we've ever seen in our operation, and I'm sure that goes out industry-wide as well. We're down to 25 percent of normal, and for a west side operation like us, that's actually very high. I'm the only person I know on the west side who's even planting rice at all. But we're very fortunate, with some of the leases that we hold, where well water is available, very good river water rights are available. We're able to maximize that. However, 25 percent is still the lowest we've ever been by a large margin. Jim Morris: The impacts from that reduction extend well beyond your farm I imagine, so let's start with your farm. How does it impact you, your workforce, and then how does it impact the communities around you? Kurt Richter: Well, we're running a much leaner crew than we typically run. We just don't need the people that we normally need because we don't have the acres to necessitate it. So, a lot of the seasonal people that we typically hire this time of the year are not coming on board with us. We just don't have anything for them to do. We're getting by with our full-time guys for the most part. That's how we're scaled back. Kurt Richter: I've heard many similar stories from other growers, too. There's going to be a lot of people that are not going to be able to find work this year. And then when you extend that out to the rice dryers, the rice mills, I mean they're all going through budget cuts right now too, layoffs, paring down and trying to figure out how to survive a year where, in some areas, there is no rice at all. Jim Morris: That sound is Nick Richter seeding a rice field in Colusa County, an all too uncommon sight on the west side of the Sacramento valley this year. Rick Richter is Nick's dad, and he owns Richter Aviation in Maxwell. You've been seeding rice field since the late '70s. Rick, how different is this year compared to all of the past time you worked in rice? Rick Richter: We have never seen a year like this if you really want to know the truth. Back in the '70s, like '76, '77, I remember we were at 50 percent, and I don't recall any year quite like this. Jim Morris: For those not directly involved in farming, they may not understand that impacts from not being able to plant crops extend well beyond the farm level. How does this drought and the idled acreage impact businesses like yourself and other businesses on the west side of the Sacramento Valley in particular? Rick Richter: Well, this year as an example, Jim, last year we did 42,000 acres. This year we'll be lucky to do 6,000 acres. So, we're basically one-seventh of what we normally do. And last year was a 75 percent year, so we were even short at that following a few years of cutbacks. So, this is pretty hard to take. Jim Morris: You'd much rather be in an airplane right now? Rick Richter: Most definitely, and I've got four other pilots that aren't here would rather be flying. So, right now we just have Nick, my son, he's out flying and doing the work. And he'll be done. This is his only seeding job for the day. Jim Morris: You've been at this a long time. I imagine you don't do any of this without the thought that you have to persevere through tough years. Will you and will the region largely come through this okay? Rick Richter: Well it has to rain, Jim. We're here because of the drought, and we understand that, but we'll persevere. Jim Morris: Work is well underway to try to help third parties suffering from the drought, businesses like yourself, for the sake of this region. How helpful would that be? Rick Richter: Oh, Jim, that'd be a Godsend. If there's aid out there, we'll take it. We'd rather be working, granted. Jim Morris: How concerned are you for allied businesses? Everybody has a different structure and financial situation, but so many are being impacted so seriously this year. Rick Richter: Oh, the allied industries, I've talked to several of them so far. From the fuel suppliers, to the fertilizer companies, to the trucking companies. Every person you talk to around the local community has been affected. And it's just going to get worse. We're just hoping this is a one-year deal and we'll get some rain and come out of this. Jim Morris: I'm in the Williams area speaking with Jason Bowen, Pest Control Advisor for more than 20 years at Colusa County Farm Supply, a Chico State graduate just like myself. Jason, tell me about this unfolding year and drought impacts as you see them. Jason Bowen: Started out the winter with a lot of hope with the storms that we had in December. Progressing through the winter that kept on going down, and down, and down. And we're kind of where we're at right now. Being a PCA, and then also a rice farmer, everything we're seeing that nobody's ever seen. You talk to some of the guys that went through this in the '80s, and this seems to be even worse. On our side of it, it's nothing we've ever seen. Hopefully we'll never see it again. Jim Morris: I'm going to mention a quote I saw that you stated, and would like you to amplify that a little bit. Several years ago during an earlier time of drought you said, "California rice farmers are a special breed of people, great stewards of the land who create environmentally friendly habitat for migrating waterfowl and other species of birds. I am proud to be part of this industry, not only as a consultant, but as a farmer who instills a love of agriculture to my wife and two sons every chance I get." Awesome quote. I personally share those sentiments. So someone who does not know this Sacramento Valley area, how intertwined are rice growers with the environment and the local business community? Jason Bowen: Completely. Everything goes hand in hand from starting at the farmer going all the way down, all the businesses in one way or the other are affected. From the aerial applicators, to the ground applicators, to chemical and fertilizer distributors, mills, all the way down, trucking, grocery store. It's a trickle down to everyone. When the farmers are affected, the entire community's affected. I live in Maxwell, right in the heart of rice growing country, and I've never seen anything like it. I mean my house is surrounded by rice fields that are completely dried up, and not an acre around there is being planted besides a few fields here and there. So it affects everyone, every person you talk to. It doesn't matter where you work at, you're completely affected. Jim Morris: Not too far from Maxwell is Sites, and there is talk and hope to get a reservoir built. I know it's in the future, but how helpful would additional water storage be for the future of the valley down the road? Jason Bowen: Any additional water obviously would be completely helpful with the world that we live in. Everybody knows when the water projects were built they were managed in a way that it was for flood protection, for environment, for farming, for everything. That's obviously being pulled on a lot harder. Any shape or form where we can store more water when we do have those high water-flow years is a benefit for everybody in the Northern Sacramento Valley. Jim Morris: And looking at the here and now, it's obviously going to be a tremendously difficult year. If it does come through, how helpful would state and/or federal aid be for this region? Jason Bowen: Any aid would benefit everyone. Everyone in the communities, it's a trickle down. So whoever the aid does go to it's going to trickle down all the way through the local economies in any way, shape, or form. Jim Morris: Jim Cook is Director of Research and Technology at Colusa County Farm Supply. Jim, tell me about the drought impacts you're seeing and experiencing. Jim Cook: Well, one of the main things that we see is, being a support group for a support business like Colusa County Farm Supply, is our capacity to provide information and new products to our growers and fieldmen. The delay or the abbreviation of trying to get trials out, trying to get accurate information, and it has just changed the entire scheduling, our pace, the way our guys operate. Jim Cook: But also what it's done for us is, all of our information that we develop from a research standpoint is localized. So you can't take information let's say from the east side of the valley and bring it over here to the west side. So that's why it's important that we get our own information put together. So you have a drought, you have less fields to work with, it delays that information process which our guys need to move forward with new things. Jim Morris: Those new things will ultimately help the grower and then the consumer. This takes years to develop, so this year is significant in terms of the challenge to get this done. Correct? Jim Cook: That's absolutely right. You just interviewed with Jason, who is one of the top rice people I've ever worked with. But he has thrown at me more problems than I can shake a stick at. But it gives us an opportunity to test the new materials against the new resistance issues, cultural factors, things that we're operating against. And that is the direction of where his business and the business of our fieldmen are going, so we need to provide that information. Jim Morris: On the website for this company it says, "This region of California is also a treasured source of year-round natural beauty. We're proud to be a vital part of this area, its communities, and production agriculture. We know a lot of people in this region that are hurting." Comment on how resilient this region is. Jim Cook: All of us come from farming backgrounds and have been through tough times. One of the main comments my father made to me is, "Don't go into farming," because of these issues. People are tough. They're strong. They have a way of working together to make this successful, but they know they're in for a tough go. We all know with that. Bottom line is, we have no other place to go. We don't have the golden parachute. We don't have anything that's going to bail us out. This is it. So it is up to us to make this happen. Jim Morris: The dominoes from this year's drought will fall well beyond the obvious farms, mills, ag pilots, equipment, and inputs for crops. Communities with agriculture as our foundation are hurting and they're bracing for a summer like no other. Jennifer Abel is General Manager at Louis Cairo's, a place she's worked at for nearly 30 years. Louis Cairo's is a dining institution in Williams, a short drive off of Interstate 5, about an hour north of Sacramento. Jennifer, please tell me about your perspective and the impacts you're either seeing or fearing regarding the drought. Jennifer Abel: I feel that it's going to be detrimental to our community. Already, the people that come in at the end of the day, normally the farmers talking about their rice, and their water, and what it looks like, and what the ground looks like as they're sewing it up, and everything like that. You don't see a lot of that going on. You see them coming in and having these meetings, and they're nervous, and they're tense, and things are getting scary. And the west side is, from my understanding, which is where we're at, has the hardest hit compared to the east side. It's going to be a huge impact on not only our community, but the entire north state, the entire state, and nation. Jim Morris: The Cairo family immigrated from Italy in the early 1900s. They had little money, so the entire family worked in prune orchards. Louis loved Colusa County and opened up a hamburger stand in the 1930s. Louis Cairo's has been in operation for more than 75 years. If you haven't done it, you need to visit, and you have to try their Louie Bread. You won't forget it. Jennifer, how connected is this place, this community, with the farmers whose fields surround all the towns in the Sacramento Valley? Jennifer Abel: I'd say we're incredibly connected to the point that ... Well for instance, going through COVID and everything. And there was a time when we opened, closed, opened, closed, to-go only, outdoors only. Then we just had to close for a while because we weren't monetarily making it on just being open for to-go. Then we had the wildfires that were up this way and it was literally raining ash, so you couldn't eat outside. It was bad for your health. Jennifer Abel: All these farmers got together and singled me out and said, "What can we do to get Louis Cairo's open? We are desperate. We will do anything. We will make it work." That's the kind of people that's in this community. That's the kind of people that want to see us thrive. And those are the kind of people that we want to continue to be here for to make a difference in their lives. To have that place for them to come and talk about their rice, and talk about their trees, and talk about their families, and have a great time. Jim Morris: You made an interesting point, because it's been really tough for restaurants well before the drought, from any factor you can name, from the economy, you mentioned COVID, but what about the resilience not only from the Cairo family that as you've seen, but from these communities? How tough is this region? It's going to need to be tough to get through all of this. Jennifer Abel: It's going to need to be tough, but I think that we're really strong and united, and there's a really solid foundation of families and people that have been here for a long time that have been farming, that have been working in this community, families that have been here from the ground up that make our community. I think they're going to come together and they're going to make a difference, and they're going to make something happen. Jim Morris: As I look at my surroundings here in Maxwell at an unplanted rice field, this is a year where adjectives fail. Perseverance will be needed like never before for this unique, wonderful, and productive part of California. I want to thank our interviewees, Kurt Richter, Rick Richter, Jason Bowen, Jim Cook, and Jennifer Abel. I also want to say goodbye. I'm retiring from rice. Our family is following our son off to college elsewhere in the West to start a new chapter, and this is my final podcast. Jim Morris: It will continue under great direction of Katie Cahill, who is a phenomenal person, and she will do a great job telling the California rice story. So please keep listening, send in your questions and comments, leave a review, and subscribe. I am so grateful to have worked in this wonderful region telling a great story with tremendous people doing it. Thank you to all who've been so kind and supportive. It has been my honor.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Advancing Age Is The Most Important Risk Factor For Cancer Overall - Milton Mills, MD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 8:41


Advancing Age Is The Most Important Risk Factor For Cancer Overall -  Milton Mills, MDMilton Mills, M.D •           https://www.preventionofdisease.org/milton-mills Milton Mills, MD practices urgent care medicine in the Washington DC area, and has served previously as Associate Director of Preventive Medicine and as a member of the National Advisory Board, for Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM). He has been a major contributor to position papers presented by PCRM to the United States Department of Agriculture regarding Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and has been the lead plaintiff in PCRM's class action lawsuit that asks for warning labels on milk. Dr. Mills earned his medical degree at Stanford University School of Medicine, and completed an Internal Medicine residency at Georgetown University Hospital. He has published several research journal articles dealing with racial bias in federal nutrition policy. He frequently donates his time via practicing at free medical clinics, and travels widely, speaking at hospitals, churches and community centers throughout the country. He was featured in the recent attention-getting film “What the Health,” and will also appear in the upcoming film “The Silent Vegan.” #MiltonMills #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #WholeFood #Vegan #Vegetarian #PlantBasedNutrition  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Hoosier Ag Today Podcast
Hoosier Ag This Week Podcast for 5/14/22

Hoosier Ag Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 27:14


The Hoosier Ag This Week Podcast – Weekend of May 14-15, 2022: It's the week in farm news and markets in review – featuring Chief Meteorologist Ryan Martin and his up-to-date Indiana Farm Forecast. In today's podcast: Purdue's College of Agriculture is celebrating their updated US and global rankings. President Biden addressed farmers from an Illinois farm earlier this week, and why Farm Bureau is unhappy with the first WOTUS roundtable Bob Utterback with Utterback Marketing Services has market analysis and look at the USDA supply and demand report this week. That's all part of the Hoosier Ag This Week Podcast!

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Friday, May 13th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 21:43


Louisiana prolife bill, Rand Paul, Baby Formula, and guns …and more on today’s CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. My name is Toby Sumpter and today is Friday, May 6, 2022. We are just days away from the last stop of our CrossPolitic Liberty Tour in Phoenix, Arizona. I would love to meet you in person in Phoenix, on May 19th. I will be joined by Chocolate Knox, the Gabe Rench the Water Boy, Pastor Jeff Durbin of Apologia Church, and Political analyst Delano Squires, who’s made appearances on the Blaze, and the Tucker Carlson show. Tickets are only $20, and we’ll be talking about the Five Stones of True Liberty. Sign up now at crosspolitic.com/libertytour. https://www.dailywire.com/news/republican-led-louisiana-house-fails-to-pass-bill-abolishing-abortion Ben Zeisloft at the DailyWire reports: Members of the Louisiana House of Representatives failed to pass a bill that would have abolished abortion by applying homicide laws to women who procure the procedure. The Abolition of Abortion in Louisiana Act (HB813) — which has gained national and international media attention — recognizes “the right to life and equal protection of the laws to all unborn children from the moment of fertilization by protecting them by the same laws protecting other human beings.” Accordingly, it applied state laws about homicide to children in the womb. Last week, lawmakers on the Louisiana House’s criminal justice committee approved the bill by a 7 to 2 vote. However, after legislators approved an amendment on Thursday stating that “the pregnant female shall not be held responsible for the criminal consequences” of seeking an abortion by a 65 to 26 vote, State Rep. Danny McCormick — the Republican who sponsored HB813 — asked to pull the bill from the House floor. Louisiana Right to Life announced its opposition to HB813 ahead of the House vote because it applied criminal penalties to mothers who procure abortion. Likewise, Governor John Bel Edwards (D-LA) — remarking that his “Catholic Christian faith” teaches him to be pro-life — followed suit in opposing the legislation. “I felt I had to join my voice to the chorus of pro-life organizations against HB813,” he said in a statement. Pro-life activist Abby Johnson recently condemned Louisiana Right to Life for opposing HB813. “Either the preborn are fully human or they aren’t,” she saidon Twitter. “When abortion is illegal, people must pay the penalty for killing their children. These children deserve justice.” Replying to Edwards’ opposition to the bill, Johnson said, “Well, well, well. Look how many pro-aborts you have made happy!!” Brian Gunter — the senior pastor of First Baptist Church in Livingston, Louisiana, who was instrumental in organizing other Christians in the state to support the legislation — told The Daily Wire that Edwards “believes there are no circumstances under which a woman should be held accountable if she knowingly and intentionally kills her preborn child.” “HB813 protects a woman who is coerced into an abortion and prosecutes the person who forces her to have an abortion,” he said of the bill in its original form. “If Governor Edwards believes the preborn child is just as much a person as the born child, then it is absurd for him to suggest that the preborn child should be discriminated against and denied equal protection under law. No one should be allowed to murder preborn children without consequences.” Last week, Gunter remarked to The Daily Wire that Louisiana’s current pro-life trigger law — the “The Human Life Protection Act” — only penalizes abortionists with $1,000 fines, even though animal cruelty is fined at up to $25,000 in Louisiana. https://thehill.com/news/senate/3486654-rand-paul-objection-delays-40-billion-ukraine-aid-package/ Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) hit the brakes Thursday on bipartisan hopes that the Senate could quickly pass nearly $40 billion in Ukraine aid before leaving town for the week. Paul objected to a deal offered by Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer(D-N.Y.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) that would have set up votes on Thursday afternoon on the funding and on an amendment from Paul, who wanted to include language in the bill to expand an Afghanistan inspector general role to include oversight of the Ukraine funds. Paul blocked the votes because he wants his language inserted into the text of the bill instead of having to take his chance with an amendment vote, which could be blocked. The stalemate will delay the Senate’s passage of the Ukraine package until at least next week, and potentially beyond. “There is now only one thing holding us back, the junior senator from Kentucky is preventing swift passage of Ukraine aid because he wants to add, at the last minute, his own changes directly into the bill … He is not even asking for an amendment. He is simply saying my way or the highway,” Schumer said. “Ukraine is not asking us to fight this war. They’re only asking for the resources they need to defend themselves against this deranged invasion, and they need help right now,” McConnell said. Paul, however, warned about the pace of spending, arguing that “we cannot save Ukraine by dooming the U.S. economy.” “Americans are feeling the pain [from inflation] and Congress seems intent only on adding to that pain by shoveling more money out the door as fast as they can,” Paul said. Did you know that more than 75% of those raised in evangelical, Presbyterian, and Reformed churches don’t pursue any kind of Christian higher education? Surprising isn’t it. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute is seeking to provide a new, exciting, and affordable option for Christians. Their mission is to build Kingdom culture in the workplace by equipping their students in a Trinitarian worldview and vocational competencies. Their low-cost full-time program offers integrative course modules, internships, and mentoring so their students can finish debt-free with vocational preparation, a robust faith, and financial potential to build strong godly families and homes rooted in their communities and churches long-term. Visit their website at www.cornerstonework.org to find out more about enrolling. https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/05/baby-formula-shortage-abbott-recall/629828/ Derek Thompson at The Atlantic: America’s baby-formula shortage has gone from curious inconvenience to full-blown national crisis. In many states, including Texas and Tennessee, more than half of formula is sold out in stores. Nationwide, 40 percent of formula is out of stock—a twentyfold increase since the first half of 2021. As parents have started to stockpile formula, retailers such as Walgreens, CVS, and Target have all moved to limit purchases. Three factors are driving the U.S. baby-formula shortage: bacteria, a virus, and a trade policy. First, the bacteria. After the recent deaths of at least two infants from a rare infection, the Food and Drug Administration investigated Abbott, a major producer of infant formula, and discovered traces of the pathogen Cronobacter sakazakii in a Michigan plant. As a result, the FDA recalled several brands of formula, and parents were advised to not buy or use some formula tied to the plant. That brings us to the second cause: the virus. The pandemic has snarled all sorts of supply chains, but I can’t think of a market it’s yanked around more than infant formula. “During the spring of 2020, formula sales rocketed upwards as people stockpiled formula just like they stockpiled toilet paper,” Lyman Stone, the director of research at the consulting firm Demographic Intelligence, told me. Then, as “families worked through their stockpiles, sales fell a lot. This oscillation made planning for production extremely difficult. It was complicated to get an idea of the actual market size.” Meanwhile, Stone’s research has found that an uptick in births in early 2022 has corresponded with a “very dramatic decline in rates of breastfeeding” among new mothers, which pushed up demand for formula once again. In brief: Demand for formula surged as parents hoarded in 2020; then demand fell, leading suppliers to cut back production through 2021; and now, with more new mothers demanding more formula in 2022, orders are surging faster than supply is recovering. Finally, the third factor: America’s regulatory and trade policy. And while that might not sound as interesting to most people as bacteria and viruses, it might be the most important part of the story. FDA regulation of formula is so stringent that most of the stuff that comes out of Europe is illegal to buy here due to technicalities like labeling requirements. Nevertheless, one study found that many European formulas meet the FDA nutritional guidelines—and, in some ways, might even be better than American formula, because the European Union bans certain sugars, such as corn syrup, and requires formulas to have a higher share of lactose. Some parents who don’t care about the FDA’s imprimatur try to circumvent regulations by ordering formula from Europe through third-party vendors. But U.S. customs agents have been known to seize shipments at the border. U.S. policy also restricts the importation of formula that does meet FDA requirements. At high volumes, the tax on formula imports can exceed 17 percent. And under President Donald Trump, the U.S. entered into a new North American trade agreement that actively discourages formula imports from our largest trading partner, Canada. America’s formula policy warps the industry in one more way. The Department of Agriculture has a special group called WIC—short for Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children—that provides a variety of services to pregnant and breastfeeding women and their young children. It is also the largest purchaser of infant formula in the United States, awarding contracts to a small number of approved formula companies. As a result, the U.S. baby formula industry is minuscule, by design. A 2011 analysis by USDA reported that three companies accounted for practically all U.S. formula sales: Abbott, Mead Johnson, and Gerber. Look, it can be a real blessing to have baby formula for any number of legitimate reasons, but in general, there’s a God-given supply of baby formula ordinarily available through breast milk. Remember, we slaughter babies by the millions through abortion. This shouldn’t be a crisis. If women embraced motherhood, if men embraced fatherhood, if sex was reserved for the covenant of marriage, and if our culture celebrated the motherhood as the highest calling of a woman, sure it would be a blessing to have alternative nutrition in unusual circumstances, but if women were not so concerned about getting back to work, we wouldn’t be in this situation. Lies, Propaganda, Story Telling, and the Serrated Edge DNB: This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. The theme of this year’s conference is Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets will be available starting in the middle of March. Go to FLFNetwork.com and click on “Come to the Conference.” https://notthebee.com/article/a-federal-court-just-ruled-that-californias-under-21-prohibition-on-semiautomatic-firearms-is-unconstitutional-and-the-court-cited-the-revolutionary-war-as-precedent- California's ban on semiautomatic weapons sales to adults under 21 was ruled unconstitutional by a federal appeals court on Wednesday... The court agreed in a 2-1 decision with the argument of the Firearms Policy Coalition, which brought the case challenging the law that took effect last July, saying it infringed on the Second Amendment rights of adults between the ages of 18 and 20… "America would not exist without the heroism of the young adults who fought and died in our Revolutionary Army," Judge Ryan Nelson wrote for the appeals court. “Today we reaffirm that our Constitution still protects the right that enabled their sacrifice: the right of young adults to keep and bear arms.” The Psalm of the Day: Psalm 72 https://open.spotify.com/track/3tJNqzPNBKzIag3yQnLqG0?si=6b841d37db2141ba 0:00-0:43 Amen! This is Toby Sumpter with CrossPolitic News. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. Or find them on our App: just search “Fight Laugh Feast” in your favorite app store and never miss a show. If this content is helpful to you, would you please consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? We are building a cancel-proof Christian media platform, and we can’t do it without your help. Join today and get a $100 discount at the Fight Laugh Feast conference in Knoxville, TN Oct. 6-8, and have a great day.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, May 13th, 2022

Daily News Brief

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