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The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
Work from home, get spied on by your boss

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 18:45


A Gallup poll last fall found that 45% of full-time U.S. employees were still working from home at least some of their hours. A full quarter of them exclusively work from home. Because of this, companies are increasingly using technology to monitor the activities of their workers while they're on the clock, wherever they are. Today, we examine how and why companies are spying on their workers at home… and whether there's a backlash coming.More reading: Is your company secretly monitoring your work at home? Since COVID, the practice has surged How your employer can keep track of your work at home So your employer is monitoring you. What you should know

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Is your leadership style genuine and sincere? Do you have empathy where your team is concerned? Do your clients display empathy for their end-users? When Lonn Shulkin first started working at Bam Strategy, they had just lost their biggest client and were in the process of pivoting and taking the opportunity to shift their focus to find their ideal customer. Eleven years later, Lonn is now the CEO  at Bam Strategy and is dedicated to motivating consumer behavior through strategy, media, platforms, and creative initiatives. He sat down with Jason to discuss how they went from losing their biggest client to getting to eight figures, how they started building their sales team, and how empathy has helped them increase client and employee retention. 3 Golden Nuggets Building their sales team. Losing a client that represented 70% of their business meant the agency had to find a way to pivot and use that experience with a global client to diversify. After realizing what they were great at, they got specific on who their perfect audience was and then focused on the business development side to build the sales team around that. Investing in leadership. This agency has been able to improve its employee retention by understanding that each individual employee needed the time and attention and the effort from them to understand their role in the company. They worked to create an honest relationship where an employee could go to them if they had other job offers and give them a chance to discuss why they should stay. They also started doing more social activities as a group to create bonds and created leadership programs to start building up their leadership practice. Putting in that work results in a culture fit that permeates to all employees. Teaching their clients empathy. Just like they built employee retention and loyalty by implementing empathy into their company culture, Lonn says they now try to extend that concept to clients to teach them how to care about their customers in the same way. It's been a big driver of growth and success caring about the end-user in the same way because that's what creates brand loyalty today. Sponsors and Resources Verblio: Today's episode of the Smart Agency Masterclass is sponsored by Verblio. Check out Verblio.com/smartagency and get 50% off your first month of content creation. Our team loves using Verblio because of the ease in their process and their large pool of crowd-sourced writers. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Grow Your Agency & Increase Employee Retention Through Empathy {These transcripts have been auto-generated. While largely accurate, they may contain some errors.} Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here, and I have another amazing guest who has grown an eight-figure agency, very, very profitable. Done it through amazing team, amazing systems and done it with empathy. And so let's go ahead and get into the show. Hey, Lonn. Welcome to the show. Lonn: [00:00:28] How's it going? Great to be here. Thank you for having me. Jason: [00:00:31] Yeah, man. Uh, so tell us who you are and what do you do? Lonn: [00:00:34] Uh, so Lonn Shulkin. I am CEO at Bam Strategy. Been with the agency for 11 or so years, and just very passionate about growing teams and certainly what we do, which is working as an agency with pretty large customers bring brands that you would know that really focuses on digital experience. So not necessarily the UX stuff, but how we can actually engage customers and communicate with them on a one-to-one basis. Jason: [00:01:05] Awesome. Tell us kind of the progression or the different cycles that Bam has actually gone through in the past… I guess two decades. Lonn: [00:01:14] Yeah, it's quite the ride. I'm sure it's a common ride as a, as I've heard from other guests on your show. But, um, when I joined 11 or so years ago, we had that, that one really big flagship client was taken up 60 or 70% of the business and… yeah it was pretty scary times. And I think at the moment they had actually told us they were, they were a global brand and they had told us that they were going to consolidate all of their marketing in the US and we're based in Montreal in Canada. So that was a moment where I had just joined the company and we had to figure out how we were going to, um… Luckily, we had a bit of a runway from the client, so they gave us a couple of years notice there, but usually you don't get that in my experience. Um, but we had to figure out, you know, how we were going to pivot and shift and how we're going to use a lot of our experience with this big global brand to diversify. And so that was probably phase one coming in… the agency is actually 25 years old so coming in as sort of the new guy, there was a lot of work to do as far as aligning teams. And, and for me as a new leader, just sort of figuring out who are my people who share my vision and who buys into that and who can help me craft the company that we, we want it to be and grow it, because at the time growth was not always in an upwards sort of direction. So lots of up and down. And then we had that big client and so really shifted to focus on those leaders in the company. And that's when I'd say we started shifting into phase two, which is more focused on biz dev, not a ton of RFPs, I would say, although we won a few. But a really big focus on when we had opportunities going all in and choosing those right opportunities cause we started to understand a little bit of what we were great at at the time. And just putting our all into the pitches that made sense and throwing away the ones that didn't, and I think that was really key for us. And that's when we started winning a few and got a little bit of diversification. Jason: [00:03:25] I like that you got specific on who your perfect audience is. It sounds like. And then you built the sales team around that. Too many people go, oh my God, I'm gonna lose my biggest client. And my gosh, that was so nice of them to give you a huge runway. And that doesn't happen. I've seen so many agencies go in there. They give you a good runway. And I liked that you focused on the sales team because a lot of times people just say, hey, sales, go find business, but they don't give them direction. So let's talk a little bit more about the sales team that you guys created. Were these hunters? Were these farmers? Talk about the makeup of what you guys did. Lonn: [00:04:09] So we've tried everything, as a joke between my partner and I, I mean, we played with the concept of telemarketing having hundreds of calls going out. We had a junior or mid-level salesperson. We had a software sales guy at one point who was more senior and, but it was still outbound calls. And what we found time and time again is that, and it's still like this today as we've grown to be much bigger, we have our core what I'll call farmers who are really good at client relationships and growing those relationships. And as I guess, leaders of the organization, what we need to do is leverage those farmers to develop leads as well as our own networks, because the blind pitches, while we've won some, and they are, you know, if I listed our clients, they would be some of them, the longest standing most meaningful relationships we've had have not been what I call formal pitch clients. Or formal RFP that goes out to 20 agencies. So we don't have this Biz Dev person sitting here who just, all they do is call people and try and get opportunities for us. We've just not seen that deliver the kind of results we want. And we find that it, um, we still get the word of mouth leads that we would get, and we still get the blind RFPs that, that we might get, but we tend to just build on those relationships we have and get referred and find leads that way. And that's, that's, what's worked for us. Jason: [00:05:49] Do you know, there's two winners to every RFP? Lonn: [00:05:53] I'm sure. Jason: [00:05:55] There's the one that wins the project and the first one out. Like, I always hated RFPs and I actually always turned them down. I just realized that RFP stands for like requests for punishment, real fucking problem. Like it was just like, I hated RFPs because just like you were saying, unless I had someone on the inside or we wrote the damn RFP because that's usually who wins the RFP. Lonn: [00:06:23] Yeah. I mean, listen, you can, you can sell your soul to the devil in an RFP and maybe get a pretty serious look on price, but then you're not happy that you have the business. Jason: [00:06:33] I was chatting with a guest not too long ago, and he was telling me after the show… I wish I recorded after the show. I think maybe that should be a whole new segment because that's when a lot of the good stuff comes up, but he was telling me he on a lot of pitches, sometimes they'll spend a million dollars on a pitch. And I'm like, holy cow, like that's a huge gamble. He's like, well that'll win like 3 million for the year. I'm like, that's not a gamble I would do. And I do a lot of dumb stuff. Lonn: [00:07:03] No. I mean, even if you're a really great agency, I can understand the margins on that would not work. So I think we need to be able to show in the pitch that we care. And if they don't give us an opportunity to do that, we're out of the pitch for sure. Like that's, it's just either, it's going to be so easy that I can just send a spreadsheet in an hour with, with some sort of price and I'll just take a shot at it. Or I really need to be able to show who we are and showing who we are comes as you know, from a lot more than some document. Jason: [00:07:33] So now that you started building the sales team that are farmers, what was the other part of the teams that you actually your leadership that you started putting together in order to really kind of take the agency to the next level? Lonn: [00:07:47] So Chris, our founder, had always created this… I joined a company that had an incredible culture. Let me, let me start with that. And there was, I'd say for the size of the agency at the time we had more of an investment in HR and leadership, than other companies I had been at. And so my background previous to them had actually been at a company that sold HR solutions specifically around motivating and engaging people. And so I would say that with me coming in, we, we doubled down on that. We doubled down on the concept of having more HR investment than other agencies. We figured out that if we could get really awesome people in and keep them here, because that's a huge problem for agencies, that alone would allow us to have sustained relationships with customers. And that has proven time and time again, to be an awesome investment for us. Jason: [00:08:43] Give us some examples of what you doubled down on in HR. Lonn: [00:08:48] So at first we thought, uh, and this it sounds funny and COVID times, but at first we thought that ping pong tables and fruit and all those things were important. And they were. We quickly shifted to understanding that each individual employee needed the time and attention and the effort from us to understand their role here, what they actually were going to do and how they were actually going to grow. That was critical. And so every single employee had a performance discussion. And so HR would get very involved in creating those forms and making sure that every person had those discussions. And we would do those multiple times for per year. And we still do those. We, we changed them from very formal and like scoring based to much more conversational, getting to that human side of things and actually understand what makes the person tick. And with the ultimate goal of, of course having great people and them being happy, but ultimately knowing the market that we're in and how much people get poached and move around to, to make more money we wanted, I guess that goal was to have a chance when someone was poached, we wanted them to either say no, or give us the first chance. That was sort of my, always the, the goal I put out there is that I want it to be so good that someone would even with a big paycheck in front of them, someone would come to us and give us a chance, basically. Jason: [00:10:21] Are you looking for a content creation solution for your agency and or clients? Verblio can help you with everything from blogs, EBooks, to video scripts and a lot more. Verblio is a crowdsource solution to content creation with the pool of more than 3000 highly vetted writers who produce custom SEO-rich content. In fact, my team has been using Verblio, and we love the ease of their process. With Verblio, we set the criteria for the style and the tone, and then they match you with the writers that have the expertise in your subject matter. Verblio is a platform specifically designed for agency, and that's why for a limited time they're offering my listeners 50% off the first month of content. Just go to verblio.com/smartagency to learn more. That's Verblio, V-E-R-B-L-I-O.com/smartagency. Yeah, I was going to say in our mastermind, one of our members, he always does this and I always preach this to the mastermind. He always said to his employees, if I do anything or anything happens in the agency that you don't like that demotivates you, or you're not happy with where you think "I need to go take an interview", or "I need to get my resume ready", come to me right away and let's chat about it. And there's been so many people, so many mastermind members that have saved great employees from literally just starting the interview process, because once someone gets an offer somewhere else and then they tell someone about it, dude, they're gone. Lonn: [00:11:57] Yeah. It's tough. It's tough at that point. So we started recognition programs. We started doing a lot more social activities as a group, so to create bonds, to create… There's a great book actually called, um, 12, which is by the Gallup organization. That's just about the 12 reasons, 12 things that motivate employees that are non-compensation based. And we started doing that with all our managers. We started doing a leadership program internally with our managers, where we would go through personality types and conflict types and all the classic leadership programs to start building up our leadership practice so that, that could trickle down to people. And that retention, I think is a huge driver of client retention. Jason: [00:12:43] Yeah, I think that's huge because you know, I look at there's six stages an agency goes through and the last stage is really building the leaders in the organization. It's kind of like, you know, in the very beginning, it's kind of getting leads. Having a sales system and then the owner gets to a certain level, but, and then a lot of times people stop there. But if the leader that one leader is smart, they'll try to build multiple leaders where they're not the toll booth. And that's, that's really pretty smart about figuring out what works because everyone's different. But the people you hire, I find if you hire on values, they're going to be very similar in their values, but different in skill set, different in everything else. Lonn: [00:13:31] Yeah. And so that culture fit, we always emphasize that and we call it being a Bammer, but that's critical. And there's been a big shift in that permeating from me and our leadership team to now everyone knowing what that feels like. And we can't necessarily articulate it, but it feels like something. It's very cool to see that permeate down to, to everyone, even a new person who comes in and they're like, oh wow I, I feel it too. And we're on zoom every day right now, so it's, it's very cool to see that start to happen. And the other thing I'll say that I think is really interesting is that as we've grown those people, we invested in as leaders, 10 years ago, our, our leadership today and so that's really cool. They've been with us for 10 years and even if they were leaders back then they are much more mature and awesome leaders that I would be happy to give the keys to the car. Jason: [00:14:30] Yeah. The one thing I learned about selling the first agency was when I turned into an employee, you don't have to motivate the good employee. But you have to worry about de-motivating them. And I was de-motivated by a number of different actions. That's the biggest thing I worry about with my team and I tell the mastermind members, I'm like, if you have to motivate an employee, you hired the wrong employee. I'd tell them like, like, get rid of that person. Lonn: [00:15:01] A hundred percent. Yeah. If they're not happy here, they, the writings on the wall, right? Like that's… We want them to go because they can be happier somewhere else. And I think that's the other concept of empathy is I would rather them be somewhere else and be happy than be unhappy here. Jason: [00:15:15] from someone that's been fired from almost every job that is totally true. Some people held onto me too long. Wendy's fired me the first day. So they, they had no empathy. I appreciate them because I wouldn't be where I was without them firing me and telling me I can't work at fast food anymore. So thank you, Wendy's. I've never publicly thanked them before. Well, awesome. Um, this has all been amazing. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Lonn: [00:15:48] No. I mean, listen, we're working a lot on extending that concept to our end customers and trying to teach them how to actually care about their customers in the same way as we care about our employees. And I think, you know, that's for us been a big driver growth and success now is how we actually sit with our customers and say, you, you need to care about that end person buying your product in the same way you care about your employee because that's what creates brand loyalty today. And that's to me, the joy of, you know, the cookie going away and all those things that people are scared of is actually, we have to actually show a value now. And to me, that's exciting. And if you're an agency who can deliver value to customers and help your customers figure that out, it's a bit of a holy grail, I guess. Jason: [00:16:31] Awesome. Well, what's the website people go and check out the agency? Lonn: [00:16:34] bamstrategy.com. B-A-M strategy. Jason: [00:16:37] Awesome. Well, Lonn, thanks so much for coming on the show. You did amazing. Make sure you guys go to their website, check it out. And if you guys want to be around amazing agency owners on a consistent basis, that can see the stuff that you're not able to see and be able to hear the strategies that are currently working, not strategies from 10 years ago. But are currently working right now. And just have a lot of fun and connect with amazing people. I want you guys to go to digitalagencyelite.com and fill out an application. If we feel that you'll be right, we'll have a conversation and we'll chat about it. And then we'll start introducing you to all the other amazing members all over the world that run agencies that can help you grow and scale faster and have a lot of fun. So until next time, have a Swenk day.

Midnight Train Podcast
What happened to the Jeff Davis/Jennings 8?

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 86:15


www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com  Hello, you crazy, beautiful bastards. And happy new year. We hope your Christmas or whatever holiday you chose to celebrate was a great one. As you probably know, we took the week off to be with our families, and this week we're back with another banger, as the cool kids say. We are hopping back into the dark, twisted world of UNSOLVED true crime—the best and only way to serve that horrible cold dish. We know you guys love that shit, and so do we. Of course, not in a weird "sitting alone in front of my computer masturbating to unsolved terrible crimes" sort of way, but in more of a "gee-whiz Mr. Wilson, that's interesting, I'd like to learn more" kind of way. And with that out of the way, let's get into today's episode on the Jennings 8!   The Jennings 8, sometimes also referred to as the Jeff Davis 8, is a series of unsolved murders in Jefferson Davis Parish in Louisiana between 2005- 2009. And for those of you wondering, no, Moody wasn't living there yet. So he's been cleared of this one. This one.  Two of the victims had their throats slit; the other six were in such a bad state of decay that a cause of death could not be determined, but asphyxiation is thought to be the cause. Law enforcement would have you believe a serial killer was on the loose but is that really what happened? Or was something crazier going down?  Let's take a look at the unfortunate victims first.    The first body found was that of Loretta Lynn Chaisson Lewis. She was 28 and last seen on 05/17/05 in Jennings, Louisiana. Her body was found in the Grand Marais Canal 05/20/05 and floating in Grand Marais Canal's east fork, a few miles southwest of Jennings. She was partially clothed and shoeless. The advanced decomposition caused difficulty identifying and collecting evidence, and an autopsy found Loretta had no physical injuries. A toxicology report showed "high levels of drugs and alcohol" in her system, but no cause of death was determined. Investigators believe she may have been in the canal for three to four days.    The second victim, Ernestine Patterson, was a mother of four and a lifelong Jennings resident. The 30-year-old was last seen on June 16, 2005. On June 18, her body was discovered in a drainage canal off LA Highway 102. She was partially clothed, and her throat had been slit. The death was ruled a homicide, and two people were arrested and charged with 2nd-degree murder but were later released due to "lack of evidence." She worked at Iota State University.   The third victim was Kristen Elizabeth Gary-Lopez. Kristen was last seen alive by friends and family on March 6, 2007. By all published accounts, Kristen was involved in a high-risk lifestyle of drugs and prostitution. Because it was not unusual to not hear from her for extended amounts of time, she was not reported missing until ten days later.   On March 18, a fisherman discovered Lopez's utterly nude body in the Petitjean Canal, a rural area near Cherokee Road right off LA 99, about 10 miles south of the town of Welsh. Investigators felt her body had been placed in that location but killed elsewhere. According to autopsy results, the cause of death for Kristen Gary Lopez is undetermined. However, toxicology results showed elevated levels of drugs and alcohol in Lopez's system. In May 2007, Frankie Richard and his niece, Hannah Conner, were arrested in connection with Lopez's death. Richard and Conner were also questioned about the other deaths before Lopez's body was found. Richard was reportedly seen with three of the victims in the last days of their lives. Charges were eventually dropped due to insufficient evidence and conflicting witness statements.   Also arrested in May 2007 was Tracee L. Chaisson. The police booked her on Accessory After the Fact charges. Chaisson was the person who reported Kristen missing. Investigators believed she knew where the body was when she made the report. Like Richard and Conner, charges were dropped against Tracee Chaisson due to lack of evidence and conflicting statements.       Whitnei Charlene Dubois, 26, was last seen on 05/10/07. Her remains were found 05/12/07 at the intersection of Bobby and Earl Duhon Roads, approximately five miles outside of Jennings, Louisiana.   According to the family, "Whitnei enjoyed listening to music, absolutely adored her daughter, was tough on the outside despite her vulnerabilities within, and left a lasting impression on all those who knew and loved her."   The nude body of Whitnei Dubois was found 05/12/07 near the intersection of Bobby and Earl Duhon Roads, approximately five miles outside of Jennings. Investigators believe she had been dead "a couple of days." Officials never determined the cause of death, but high levels of alcohol and drugs were found in her body.    Her family has doubts about the investigation into her death. Whitnei's sister Brittney Jones wonders, "why haven't we been questioned? Why haven't we been asked when was the last time we saw our sister? Where her whereabouts was? Why haven't we been asked about the evidence? Why haven't we been contacted?"   Lolita Doucet, her aunt, believes Whitnei and the other victims were dismissed as women who lived high-risk lifestyles involving drugs and prostitution.   23-year-old LaConia Shontel "Muggy" Brown was last seen on May 27, 2008. Around 2 am on May 29, a Jennings police officer discovered her body lying on Racca Road, leading to the police firing range. Although in a rural area, Brown's body was the first found within the city limits of Jennings. She would become the 5th victim of the Jennings 8. LaConia was clothed but had no shoes on. Her throat had been slit, and someone had doused her body with bleach. Brown was wearing a white, tank-top style shirt stained from white to pink. Police believed the stain to be blood and that some type of liquid had diluted it from red to pink. They discovered more evidence and potential leads in this case than in any of the previous deaths since Brown's body was found about six hours after it was left on the road.   LaConia's family stated that she may have known something horrible was about to happen to her and that she was living in fear just days before her death. She was a lifelong resident of Jennings and attended Jennings High School.   Crystal 'Shay' Benoit Zeno, 23, was last seen 08/29/08. Her remains were found on 09/11/08 near a dry irrigation canal a few miles from Jennings, Louisiana.   Crystal was employed with Sonic in Lake Arthur until May 2008, when she moved to Jennings. She enjoyed spending time with her daughter, fishing, singing, and listening to music. She was a people-person, who also enjoyed spending time with friends.   According to her parents, Shay was diagnosed with bipolar at 12 and started using drugs early to cope with the illness.   On 09/11/08, hunters reported a foul smell in a wooded area to authorities. The remains of Crystal Shay were found around 3:00 pm on the LaCour Road levee, off LA Highway 1126, a few miles southeast of Jennings. Due to the advanced state of decomposition, she was not identified with DNA until nearly two months later, on 11/07/08. Her death was ruled a homicide, although the cause of death and toxicology reports have not been released to the public.   Crystal, who went by "Shay," was married and had a young daughter. She also knew many of the other victims, including Brittney Gary.   17-year-old Brittney Gary became the 7th and youngest victim. Brittney walked out of the Family Dollar Store in Jennings, never to be seen alive again; sometime after 5:30 pm that day, she was abducted. Thirteen days passed as her family, and a concerned public held out hope that Brittney was safe and would be located soon. Sadly, on November 15, 2008, her deceased body was found in a grassy area outside Jennings. According to her family, Brittney loved to swim, hang out with her friends, and listen to music. She enjoyed spending time with her friends and family and was a friendly and loving person. She was also trusted by the third victim Kristine Gary Lopez. She also knew several of the other victims. Necole Jean Guillory, 26, was last seen on 08/16/09. Her remains were discovered on 08/19/09 near the westbound I-10 exit in Egan, Louisiana.   She was a resident of Lake Arthur, and according to her family, enjoyed listening to music and loved being outdoors.   Necole's remains were discovered on 08/19/09 by a highway worker mowing grass. She was left between mile markers 72 & 73, near the westbound I-10 Egan exit (between Crowley and Jennings) in Acadia Parish. Mark Dawson, Acadia Parish Coroner, ruled the death of Necole murder by probable asphyxia.    According to Necole's mother, shortly before her daughter's disappearance, she'd asked her what kind of icing she wanted for her birthday cake. Necole replied it didn't matter because she wouldn't see her birthday. Unfortunately, her premonition was correct: her body was found just days before her birthday. She also confided in her Mom that police killed the other young women, and it would only be a matter of time before she ended up dead too. Holy shit! What the hell is going on down there?   Ok, so those are the unfortunate victims in the case. Did a serial killer kill them? In December 2008, Officials formed a multi-agency investigative team (MAIT) of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies to solve the killings. At the time, there were seven dead women, and the reward for information leading to the guilty party's arrest was increased from $35,000 to $85,000. From the outset, the task force was searching for a serial killer. "It is the collective opinion of all agencies involved in this investigation," said then Jefferson Davis Parish Sheriff Ricky Edwards, who was flanked by FBI agents, Louisiana State Police, and sheriffs from neighboring parishes at a press conference announcing the task force's inception, "that these murders may have been committed by a common offender."    In 2012 the new Jefferson Davis sheriff claimed they still had no evidence that these deaths were all related or even homicides. Now, he may be technically correct, but most find this incredibly hard to believe, given the evidence and connections. At the time, most people chalked this up to the work of a serial killer preying on sex workers. If you're interested in serial killers, you'll know that this is not unusual. Many serial killers get started by killing sex workers as they are viewed as less important and less likely to be missed. Killers believe they can easily get away with murders of women who partake in this work line because nobody cares about them. As far as suspects go, some were arrested and released, as we've mentioned earlier.     However, one man believes that this was not the work of a serial killer. Writer Ethan Brown spent several years investigating this case and had discovered some interesting things in the process.    Buckle up bitches. This is about to be a crazy ride!   In one article he wrote for medium.com, Brown says, "Over the past two years, I have obtained and reviewed hundreds of pages of task force witness interviews, the homicide case files on several of the victims, the Jeff Davis Parish sheriff's office's and Jeff Davis Parish district attorney's files on all of the victims, federal and state court records, and the complete personnel files of the cops and sheriff's deputies at the center of the case. I have interviewed friends and family of all eight victims, as well as some of the possible suspects.   The details of the Jeff Davis 8 case can be murky; the connections between victims, suspects, and police tangled. My investigation, however, casts serious doubt on the theory that the Jeff Davis 8 is the work of a serial killer."   Brown goes on to say, "One fact is clear: local law enforcement is far too steeped in misconduct and corruption—and this extends to the task force, which is dominated by detectives and deputies from the sheriff's office—to run an investigation with the integrity that the murdered women and their families deserve after nearly a decade in which no one has been brought to justice."   One reason Brown doesn't believe this was the work of a serial killer is the connections between all of the victims. Generally, serial killers kill victims who have no relation to other victims. However, the women themselves all knew one another intimately. Some were related by blood (such as cousins Kristen Gary Lopez and Brittney Gary) or lived together (Gary bunked down with Crystal Benoit in South Jennings just before being killed in 2008). They solicited prostitution at the Boudreaux Inn, a now-shuttered motel in Jennings that, with its sloping blue metal roof and nondescript white façade, could be mistaken for a storage facility. The inn was ideally situated in Jennings's heady drugs and sex trade—just off a 400-mile stretch of Interstate 10 connecting Houston to New Orleans, favored by marijuana and cocaine traffickers and prescription-pill "doctor shoppers"—and cops were there on a near-nightly basis for busts. Loretta Lewis, the first victim, was the subject of several complaints to the police based on her activity at the inn.   Brown also says, "It wasn't simply that they traded their bodies at the same address. According to my reporting, all but one of the victims—Ernestine Patterson—were associated with the same fixture of the Jennings underworld: a 58-year-old oil-rig worker turned strip-club owner named Frankie Richard. "We shared something," he said of the murdered women, his voice so raspy it sounded as though he had been gargling rocks. "When we were at the lowest point of our life, and no one wanted to have anything to do with us, we had something to do with each other. And that means something to me. Them girls were my friends no matter how fucking low my life was. And I was their friend no matter how fuckin' low their life was."   Richard described the city of Jennings when the killings began: "It was wide open… The drugs, the prostitution, the bars, the crooked cops." Since the early 1990s, there have been nearly 20 unsolved homicides, including the slain eight women, in Jefferson Davis Parish, a statistic any competent sheriff's department would regard as both a shallow clearance rate and an astonishingly high murder rate for a small area.   As for suspects, Brown had found several while going through the reports from the task force and interviewing witnesses. In 2007, Frankie Richard himself was briefly charged in the Lopez killing, but those charges were dropped after witnesses provided conflicting statements and an essential piece of physical evidence was mishandled. Richard died in 2020.    Byron Chad Jones and Lawrence Nixon (a cousin of the fifth victim, Laconia Brown) were briefly charged with second-degree murder in the Ernestine Patterson case. But despite several witnesses implicating them, the sheriff's office did not test the alleged crime scene until 15 months after Patterson's murder and found it "failed to demonstrate the presence of blood." That messed-up crime scene work contributed, in part, to the collapse of the case against the two men. According to case files, Jennings street hustlers with connections to Richard were suspected in the deaths of some of the other women.    Brown claims no credible suspects outside the Jennings drug circle have been found, yet the official narrative is still that of a serial killer.    Another strange connection is that the murdered women of the Jeff Davis 8 (aka, the Jennings 8) provided information to law enforcement about other Jeff Davis 8 victims—and then turned up dead themselves. For example, Laconia Brown (the fifth victim) was interrogated about the 2005 killing of Ernestine Patterson (the second victim). Brown, the article author, obtained by a task force report in which one witness claims that Brown, the murder victim, spotted the body of Loretta Lewis (the first victim) floating in the Grand Marais Canal before Jerry Jackson discovered her there in May 2005. In 2006, detectives investigating Lewis's murder interrogated Kristen Gary Lopez (the third victim).   "She knew what was going on," Melissa Daigle, Lopez's mother, told Brown. She trailed off, tearing up at the memory. "They were scared, them girls. I think she knew about it and was too scared to say."   Brown also claims that he discovered that all of the women at one point had been informants for local law enforcement regarding the Jennings drug trade.    When Brown confronted Sheriff Edwards with the allegation that the Jeff Davis 8 were informants, the sheriff stammered a non-denial. "I wouldn't respond," he told me. "If they were informants, I would still continue to protect their anonymity. I don't know that's the truth. I won't comment on it."   Brown writes that at the end of 2008, a Jennings prostitute warned task force investigators that Necole Guillory "might be the next victim."   Guillory was known for her street savviness, and in 2006, when she was 24, she savagely attacked a sex customer with the handle of a sledgehammer.    Brown says of Guillory," I've reviewed the parish district attorney office's case files on Guillory, and in at least six cases, the charges against her ended in a nolle prosequi (a legal term meaning "be unwilling to pursue" on the district attorney's part). Though there is no record of Guillory's cooperation—excluding a theft case in which she agreed to testify against her codefendant—snitches routinely have charges nolle prossed in exchange for their off-the-record cooperation."   "Necole knew a whole lot," said Frankie Richard, "about a whole lot."   Necoles mother Barbara would tell Brown, "She was always paranoid," "It got to the point where she did not want to go anywhere by herself," she said. "I think she could feel that they were closing in on her." With her 27th birthday approaching, Guillory refused even to entertain the idea of celebrating. "I bought some icing and cake for her birthday," Barbara recalled. "She said, 'Momma, it doesn't matter—I'm not gonna be here.'" Guillory also had her four kids placed with relatives. A task force witness supports the claim that in her final days, she "was scared of someone," but she would not say who and that she "knew who killed the girls."   Barbara believes that her daughter was murdered because she witnessed local law enforcement corruption or misconduct or worse. "She used to tell us all the time it was the police killing the girls," Barbara said. "We'd say, 'Necole, a name. Something. Write a letter and leave it somewhere. Let us know. We can help you.' No, momma. It's too far gone. It's too big. I'd rather y'all not know nothing, that way nothing can happen to y'all… She knew, she knew, she knew, and that's why they killed her."   Brown writes that several other families of victims have similar stories.    He says, "Gail Brown, a sister of the fifth victim, Laconia "Muggy" Brown, told me that just before Muggy was killed, she worriedly informed her family that "she was investigating a murder with a cop; the cop wanted to give her $500 to tell what happened." Gail put it as bluntly as Barbara Guillory: "She knew what was going on," she told me, referring to her sister's work as a cooperator. "I think it was a cop that killed my sister."   Taskforce witness interviews corroborate the Brown family accounts; one was noted as saying that "Laconia Brown told her that…three police officers were going to kill her."   According to Brown, the Jennings police force and Jeff Davis sheriff's offices have been plagued by misconduct for years.    Veterans of Jennings' streets trace the unwinding of local law enforcement back to the '70s when they say cops began getting involved in drug trafficking. But this is not merely street gossip. In March 1990, two local men burglarized the sheriff's office, making off with a staggering 300 pounds of marijuana. According to court documents, investigators interviewed one of the burglars. He named a surprising pair of accomplices—Frankie Richard and a man named Ted Gary, who was then chief deputy sheriff. (Officials brought no charges against Richard and Gary.)   From sheriff's using parish funds to purchase personal items illegally, to unlawfully and purposefully stopping cars with out-of-state plates, to improper dealings with inmates, and even the murder of one officer and his wife by another officer, things were getting pretty nuts.    In October 2003, eight female Jennings cops filed a civil rights lawsuit in federal court against Jennings police chief Donald "Lucky" DeLouche, a gaggle of male cops, and the City of Jennings, alleging widespread acts of sexual violence and harassment. Among the allegations in the complaint: a captain who shook his penis at female officers, saying, "You know I like to lick pussy, I can numb it all night," and forced oral sex on a female officer, as well as a lieutenant who waved a knife at a female officer, warning, "Girl, I'll cut you." In January 2013, former Jennings police chief Johnny Lassiter was hit with a battery of charges after a Louisiana State Police audit found $4,500 in cash, 1,800 pills, more than 380 grams of cocaine, and several pounds of marijuana missing from the department's evidence room.   In December 2007, Sergeant Jesse Ewing received word that two female inmates at the city jail wanted to talk about the unsolved homicides (at the time totaling four). He was stunned by what he heard: Ewing said both women told him that "higher-ranking officers" had been directly involved in covering up the murders.   Brown claims Ewing had long been wary of his fellow cops, and he feared that the audiotapes would simply vanish, just as drugs and cash had a way of disappearing from evidence. So Ewing handed the interview tapes over to a local private investigator named Kirk Menard, who rushed copies to the FBI's office in nearby Lake Charles.   Brown goes on to write, "Ewing's gambit to grab the attention of the feds backfired. The tapes ended up right back with the sheriff's office–dominated task force, and Ewing's fears of retaliation turned out to be justified. As a result, the parish district attorney charged Ewing with malfeasance in office and sexual misconduct. (One of the female inmates claimed that Ewing touched her inappropriately during the interview. Ewing denies it, and that charge was dismissed.)   Brown says, "Ewing and I sat in his trailer in the Paradise Park development in Jennings in July 2011. He is a short, wide-shouldered man with a cleanly shaved head, a graying goatee, and the bulky frame of a rugby player. Ewing decorated the trailer with little more than a TV set and a couch—a no-frills lifestyle that he blamed on employment troubles since his termination after 20 years on the job. "I felt screwed for doing the right thing," he said."   Although the tapes were never made public, Brown says he had listened to them in their entirety. He claims they provide highly specific information about the murders of two of the prostitutes—Whitnei Dubois and Kristen Gary Lopez—as well as local law enforcement's alleged role in covering up Frankie Richard's role in at least one of the killings.   The first inmate says that a prostitute named Tracee Chaisson had told her that she was there when Richard and his niece Hannah Conner killed Dubois. They'd all been getting high, and when Dubois refused Richard's sexual advances, he "got aggressive, he started fighting with her, and when she started fighting back he got on top of her and started punching her." According to the inmate, Chaisson then said that Hannah held her head back and drowned her.    The two inmates told another story about a truck and a conspiracy between Richard and a top sheriff's office investigator to destroy evidence in the Lopez case.   The second inmate said Richard put Lopez's body "in a barrel," and used a truck to transport it. The truck, she said, was later purchased by "an officer named Mr. Warren, I don't know his exact name, he bought the truck to discard the evidence."   By "Warren," the inmate meant the sheriff's office chief criminal investigator, Warren Gary. The first inmate had also spoken of Lopez's body, a truck, and an officer named Warren.   Public records would seem to corroborate the second witness' account. On March 29, 2007, Warren Gary purchased a 2006 Chevy Silverado truck for $8,748.90 from Connie Siler, a Richard associate who had just been hauled into the sheriff's office for questioning in the case of a bad check. On April 20, Gary resold Siler's Silverado for $15,500, a nearly 50 percent profit in less than one month. (Siler, in turn, used profits from the sale, $3,207.13, to pay the parish district attorney's office for the bad checks she had issued.) Gary's truck purchase was possibly illegal and definitely unethical—the Louisiana Board of Ethics fined him $10,000 in the incident. "What [Gary] did with that was wrong," former sheriff Ricky Edwards told Brown. "Buying from an inmate, that's what was ethically wrong." He insisted, however, that his office "had no clue that [the truck] was even part of evidence [in the Lopez case]. That didn't come out until way after the fact."   Brown says there is some reason to doubt this claim. According to their reports, investigators knew that Siler was one of the last to see Lopez alive. In addition, Paula Guillory, a former detective in the sheriff's office who was later investigated for her ties to the Jennings drug scene, recently spoke to Brown and told him, "We knew that Connie Siler's vehicle was probably involved."   In a town where everyone was related and where the atmosphere had the feeling of a vicious family feud, it was Paula's then-husband Terrie Guillory, the warden at the jail, who brokered the Siler truck deal, according to the ethics board report on Gary. (Note: That he shares a last name with one of the victims is not a coincidence: Necole Guillory was his cousin.)   Because of Warren Gary and Terrie Guillory, two members of law enforcement, the Lopez case lost an essential piece of physical evidence. Because of Terrie Guillory, one suspect found herself with an alibi. And because Conner refused to flip on Richard, and Chaisson had changed her story repeatedly, the charges against all of them were dropped.   Brown writes, "Put simply: The statements from the two female inmates portrayed Richard and his associates working with the sheriff's office to dispose of evidence in the Lopez case. Yet the sergeant who took the statements was forced out of his job, and the allegations were ignored by law enforcement."    A review of hundreds of pages of task force investigative reports by Brown reveals a series of witness interviews where local law enforcement was implicated in the murders. However, these allegations have never been made public.   Danny Barry, a 12-year veteran of the sheriff's office when he died in 2010 at the age of 63, was named a suspect by at least three separate task force witnesses in a single day of interrogations in November 2008. "Deputy Danny Barry would ride around on the south side with his wife," one witness said. "And they would try to pick up girls….[Barry's vehicle was] a small blue sports car…Barry would drop off his wife, Natalie, and she would get the girls. The couple would 'spike' a drink and then take the girls back to the Barrys' house…."   One witness even told investigators that "Danny Barry had a room in his trailer that had chains hanging from the ceiling and that a person could not see in or out of the room." What the fuck?   There was only one task force interview with Barry on February 25, 2009. He wasn't questioned about the abundance of allegations against him, and there hasn't been any substantive follow-up investigation.   Brown goes on to write, "As the murders in the parish crescendoed in 2009, Guillory participated in a raid on Frankie Richard's family home. This was part of a sprawling investigation by the sheriff's office into a drugs and theft ring that Richard, his mother, and Teresa Gary (the mother of the seventh victim, Brittney Gary) were later charged with running, in which guns, jewelry, and rare coins had been pilfered from residences across Jennings. Yet when Guillory turned over evidence, nearly $4,000 was missing. So the theft case collapsed under the weight of serious law enforcement misconduct."   "Guillory denies that she stole or disposed of evidence in the case. She told me that she realized the money was missing when she was cataloguing the evidence from the raid and immediately contacted her superiors. (Warren Gary, the former chief investigator who had purchased the truck allegedly used to dispose of Lopez's body, helped catalogue the evidence, which is another troubling coincidence.) She was sent home from work and, even though she offered to take a polygraph test regarding the missing money, she was promptly fired by Sheriff Edwards. "I never even gave my own side of the story," she told Brown.   Yet again, the charges against Richard were dropped. It was a break that he relishes to this day. "I'm not mad at that," Richard told Brown when he asked him about the missing evidence in his case. "In fact I thank her for doing that. If she had handled her business right, my momma would still be in jail."   Most of the murdered women seemed to know about the other prostitute killings. But at least one victim from the Jeff Davis 8 witnessed a killing at the hands of state and local law enforcement during a drug bust in Jennings that went awry.   During a drug bust brought on by a tip from a snitch, Leonard Crochet, a pill dealer, was shot and killed by Probation and Parole agent John Briggs Becton. Briggs Becton told Crochet to show his hands, and, according to a statement he gave later to investigators, Crochet "then made a sudden movement with his hands toward his belt line." Believing that Crochet was reaching for a weapon, Briggs Becton fired his departmentally issued Remington 870 12-gauge shotgun, with a single shot striking Crochet in the chest.    According to a later statement by a fellow Probation and Parole agent at the raid, Briggs Becton approached Crochet's body, muttering, "Oh shit." Briggs Becton called an ambulance to the scene, and the inhabitants at 610 Gallup were taken into custody and transported to the Jennings Police Department for questioning. Police investigators concluded that they were "unable to locate any items near Crochet's location in the residence which could have been construed as a weapon. Further, no persons inside the residence at the time of the shooting, whether law enforcement or civilian, could provide any evidence that Crochet had brandished a weapon." That July, a parish grand jury heard prosecutors make their case that Briggs Becton committed the crime of negligent homicide. However, they came back with a decision of "no true bill"—no probable cause or evidence to show that Briggs Becton had committed a crime.   Could this be the reason the Jennings 8 we're killed? It is one theory suggested by some in the parish. "The victims were being killed because they were present when Leonard Crochet was killed by the police," one witness told task force investigators. "The girls were being killed because they had seen something they were not supposed to see." Even Richard connected the Crochet killing to the murdered women: "Most of them girls was at a raid…when that Crochet boy got killed. Most of the girls that are dead today were there that night."   Brown obtained a witness list from the Louisiana State Police on the incident. He says, "it reads like a who's who of players in the Jeff Davis 8 case, including the third victim Kristen Gary Lopez, Alvin "Bootsy" Lewis (the boyfriend of the fourth victim, Whitnei Duboisi, and the brother-in-law of the first victim, Loretta Lewis), and Harvey "Bird Dog" Burleigh, who later told Dubois' older brother Mike that "I'm close to finding out who killed your sister" and was then found stabbed to death in his Jennings apartment. His murder, too, remains unsolved."   The slaying of witnesses appears to be a pattern in Jefferson Davis Parish. Soon after Crystal Shay Benoit Zeno (the sixth victim) was found in a wooded area in South Jennings in September 2008, a tip was called into the parish district attorney's office from a 43-year-old Lafayette man named Russell Carrier. Carrier said that he had seen three African-American men exiting the woods. Richard associate Eugene "Dog" Ivory, Ervin "Tyson" Mouton (who is named as another possible suspect in the Lopez homicide in the task force documents), and Ricardo "Tiger" Williams. On October 10, 2010, Carrier was struck and killed by a Burlington Northern Santa Fe Train in Jennings early in the morning. Police Chief Todd D'Albor said that "for whatever reason," Carrier laid on the tracks and was run over.   God damn, this shit is nuts!    Brown concludes his article with information about one of the leading players in the case, Frankie Richard, whom we've talked about a lot.    Brown writes of Frankie, "Though Richard was well aware that I was deeply investigating the Jeff Davis 8, he never turned me down for an interview and didn't flinch when I confronted him with my reporting—he has a knack for explaining away bad facts and constructing theories on alternative suspects." Deceased deputy Danny Barry is also a favorite. "All these girls or most of these girls was found within a three-mile radius of Danny Barry's house," Richard told Brown. "Since he been dead, nobody died. All these motherfuckers on the sheriff's department are some crooked sons of bitches."   Brown describes one interview with Frankie as follows "On an unusually warm and muggy late spring night in 2012, Richard sat shirtless, exposing his meaty upper body, on a pair of rockers on the front porch of his family home in Jennings. He has expressionless brown eyes, a thick head of black hair streaked with gray, and a salt-and-pepper goatee. He was trying very hard to project the image of a wrongly accused, down-on-his-luck, sobered-up former hustler. "I was a dope addict, a coke head, meth head, alcoholic, no-good sonofabitch," Richard told me. "But I'm determined to get my head on right. I'm one year clean from meth and 100 days clean from alcohol and cocaine after 42 years. That's a long fuckin' time for a motherfucker like me."    Brown continues, "Standing nearby, on the ground below, was an associate of Richard's, a towering African-American man in his 30s wearing baggy jeans and a white T-shirt. At one point, he interrupted the conversation to warn me that the story I'm working on will likely put me in the crosshairs of local law enforcement. "You a bold-ass little man, dog," he said. "Don't get caught in Jeff Davis Parish at night."   Brown continues about Frankie Richard:   "That Richard continues to sit atop what police files and my own reporting suggest is an empire of drugs and prostitution is no spectacular stroke of luck. He is a prized informant who, according to task force documents, has provided a steady stream of intel to investigators. (Richard was debriefed in 2008, which Brown says challenges another official narrative: that no one is talking to the multi-agency investigative team, and that all investigators have is a series of unhelpful dead ends.) He goes on to say, "Criminal activity sanctioned by high-level law enforcement is hardly uncommon; a 2011 FBI report concluded the agency gave its informants permission to break the law at least 5,658 times that year. Richard would push back against the snitch label vigorously. But, in May 2012, Kirk Menard, the private investigator, sent a pair of female witnesses who said they had tips in the killings related to Richard to the task force offices to be interrogated. "Do not worry about Frankie," one high-ranking task force investigator told the stunned women, "because he works for me." According to the witness account, the investigator added that Richard has a task force–issued cellphone. Menard forwarded me an e-mail he sent to the task force outlining his concerns about the interview. Nearly two years later, he has yet to receive a response."   Brown says that the possibility that Richard is just circumstantially connected to all of the eight murdered women has also been undermined again and again. Soon after charges against Richard in the 2007 Lopez slaying were dismissed, he and associate Eugene "Dog" Ivory—who is, according to task force witnesses, a suspect in the murder of Crystal Benoit—beat a rape case in which, according to case files, Richard allegedly told the victim, "If you tell anyone, bitch, you will end up like the others."   Brown also recounts another story relayed to him:    "One night, not long before Richard and I met, Beverly Crochet, the sister of slain drug dealer Leonard Crochet, was leaving Tina's Bar, a South Jennings haunt frequented by the Jeff Davis 8. Tracee Chaisson, the former prostitute who was once charged with being an accessory after the fact of second-degree murder in the slaying of Kristen Lopez, approached her in the parking lot. "When I was walking out with my ride," Crochet told me when we spoke several weeks later on the front porch of her home, which is just down the street from the Richard family home, "she was screaming out the car with some black people, 'You're gonna be number 9.'" Crochet said she reported the incident to the task force. She cleared her throat nervously. "I could tell you more," she said, "but I'm scared. I'm scared for my own life." The Jeff Davis 8 killings, she said, "started right after" her brother Leonard was killed. "Right after. All them girls were in there at one point. They were all in there for two days in and out."   Brown concludes his article by saying The Jeff Davis 8 case is begging for a takeover by the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division. They had intervened in a now-notorious New Orleans Police Department case from 2005, where cops shot and killed innocent bystanders on the Danziger Bridge in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. Brown claims his investigation raises several genuine questions about the prevailing serial-killer theory of these murders. It also indicates that local law enforcement is a hindrance, not a help, to a resolution being reached. Whatever the truth, these eight women, and their surviving families, deserve a fresh inquiry by an outside investigative body.   Holy shit! What seemed like a pretty clear-cut case on the outside; Serial killer preying on sex workers turned into THAT fucking crazy story. Wow. What do you all think? Fucking nuts, huh! The case remains unsolved, and if the things Brown uncovered are accurate, we will most likely never get to the bottom of this!    Movies:    Top ten drug horror movies, keeping with the drug theme    http://www.theblood-shed.com/top-10-drug-horror-movies/

Wieder was gelernt - Ein ntv-Podcast
Junge Menschen weltweit sind trotz Krisen optimistisch

Wieder was gelernt - Ein ntv-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 8:48


Klimawandel, Corona-Pandemie, Gewalt in Afghanistan - es gibt eine Menge Krisen auf der Welt. Trotzdem schauen die jungen Leute weltweit optimistisch in die Zukunft, zeigt eine aktuelle Studie von Unicef und Gallup. Darüber sprechen wir mit Ninja Charbonneau, Sprecherin von Unicef Deutschland und dem Zukunftsforscher Karlheinz Steinmüller, er lehrt an der der Freien Universität Berlin. Sie haben Fragen, Anmerkungen oder Ideen? Schreiben Sie eine E-Mail an podcasts@n-tv.de.

Crack The Behavior Code
Do Your Employees Have Buyer's Remorse?

Crack The Behavior Code

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 10:35


Unemployment in the USA is now at 3.7%. Great employees are harder to find than ever before—and if you're hiring, chances are really good that you're raiding another organization's rock stars. So once you get great hires on board, you need to keep them. In past blogs I've shared proven tools and techniques our clients use to recruit rock stars, to onboard them, to engage them and to identify the signs that they're considering quitting. Now let's focus on what's happening in their brain when the honeymoon phase is over after being a new hire. Honeymoons End—Then Your New Hire “Goes Native” Based on an informal poll of my leadership and culture coaching clients, reality sets in, and the new job honeymoon is over in the first 60-90 days, depending on the role. This is when a new hire, then, is most at risk of buyer's remorse, of regretting that they accepted a role at your organization. This is also when a new hire has “gone native”—they are now a part of the tribe and no longer have the fresh unbiased perspective of an outsider. Going native isn't a bad thing—it happens out of our deep need to belong with the tribe we've selected. But if the tribe is in a tricky state, buyer's remorse could become an epidemic. We've all seen influencers that leave the tribe—and take some of the top performers with them. Here's how to prevent this. Six Questions That Reveal Buyer's Remorse Think back to your dating history. Most of us have met someone we thought was really cool--until we got to know them better. Then disappointment set in because what was advertised, and what was reality, were different. Gallup recently released research on the six questions employers can ask to uncover remorse. The primary finding is that when certain policies are promised, but not honored or followed by the organization's leaders, remorse sets in. Ask yourself the following questions: #1 - Is flexibility consistent or dependent on the team manager? Per Gallup, 51% of employees say they would change jobs for flextime, and 35% say they would change jobs for a flexible working location. In today's workplace, flexibility matters. Flexibility for hours worked, location worked from, even flexibility in reporting and collaboration. Is it easy to duck out of work for a personal appointment? Does this apply to everyone in the organization? #2 - Are remote workers treated as equals?Remote workers are 30% less likely to strongly agree that they have discussed their development with their leader in the past six months. Are your remote workers treated the same as your onsite workers? Are they included in development and performance motivation programs? Are they included in recognition programs? Does their leader have the same number of one-on-one meetings with them (via webcam) as with onsite workers? #3 - Do leaders know how to manage in a matrixed environment? Per Gallup, 84% of U.S. employees today participate in matrixed teams. And the biggest challenges for workers are prioritizing work and excessive amounts of time in meetings (up to 1/3 of their day!). How are you helping your workers to prioritize? See a prior blog for a tool on this. See the meetings link above too for a technique our clients love to reduce meetings and those that attend. #4 - Do leaders understand gig workers? Per Gallup's recent gig economy perspective paper, 36% of all U.S. workers participate in a gig work arrangement in some capacity. With freelance workers its essential to ensure they click with your culture quickly. This is where a compelling and clear mission/purpose, vision and set of core values make all the difference. Gig workers must be brought into your tribe quickly and emotionally engage quickly too. And last, as a leader it's your job to ensure they are welcomed into the team and experience safety, belonging, mattering from the get-go. #5 - Are development programs personalized in a meaningful way? In a past blog on performance motivation and Individual Development Plans (IDPs) I provided a template to ensure your team feels that their growth is important to the organization. Are your leaders helping to co-create IDPs with their workers? Are they then having quarterly or worst case annual development check ins? Are they allocating time for workers to develop? #6 - Are employees offered and encouraged to participate in well-being programs and other benefits? A 2016 Society for Human Resource Management survey found a significant gap between the benefits companies actually offer and the benefits employees think their company offers. Why? I find two reasons in my executive coaching work. One: the onboarding process isn't effectively communicating the actual benefits, and two: annual benefits summaries are not being offered to refresh everyone's memory. The Net-Net Buyer's Remorse occurs when an employee experiences a disconnect and disappointment between what they understood a culture would be and what it actually is. Leaders can tackle and prevent this problem by ensuring the culture is clear, the policies are clear, the above six questions are addressed and the employee experience is consistent. How consistent is your employee experience? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

All Gallup Webcasts
How to Support Your Coaching Clients Effectively: An AMA -- S9E58

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 60:45


Learn from Gallup's Dean Jones how you can effectively support coaching clients who vary in their understanding of their strengths, along with the value of taking the CliftonStrengths assessment early in life and ways you can grow professionally and personally as a coach in 2022. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/358442/how-to-support-your-coaching-clients-effectively-ama.aspx Follow Us Facebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/ Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrength Pinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/ Learn More About CliftonStrengths Subscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It For Individuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular Products Assessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional Resources Articles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

Gallup Called to Coach
How to Support Your Coaching Clients Effectively: An AMA -- S9E58

Gallup Called to Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 60:45


Learn from Gallup's Dean Jones how you can effectively support coaching clients who vary in their understanding of their strengths, along with the value of taking the CliftonStrengths assessment early in life and ways you can grow professionally and personally as a coach in 2022. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/358442/how-to-support-your-coaching-clients-effectively-ama.aspxFollow UsFacebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrengthPinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/Learn More About CliftonStrengthsSubscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It ForIndividuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular ProductsAssessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional ResourcesArticles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

Doug Stephan presents the DJV Show
DJV Download - 12/28/21 – Counting Down the Most Popular People of 2021

Doug Stephan presents the DJV Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 18:37


Occasionally, some good products come out of the network show “Shark Tank,” but it's the Sharks who always steal the show. A lot of people are giving monetary gifts before the year is up, out of the goodness of their hearts but also because it's good for taxes. If you're looking to give and want to know that 100% of your donation is going to help others, check out pandemicoflove.com. The approvals and disapproval ratings from a recent Gallup poll shows the top three most approved officials are all appointed officials, not elected – U.S Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, and Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease Dr. Anthony Fauci. Sad news with the loss of an American hero – Richard Marcinko, AKA “The Rogue Warrior” and founding commander of SEAL Team 6 died on Christmas night at the age of 81. In entertainment news, director Jean-Marc Vallée's cause of death has been revealed to be a heart attack as more words of love and loss pour in from celebrities who've worked with him . . . A discussion of Kal Penn's art imitating life . . . Steve Harvey's judge show and the legitimacy of Judge Judy's rulings from her courtroom-show days . . . Amanda Seyfried's Christmas separation with daughter from husband and 1-year old son because of COVID-19 exposure . . . and IMDB's list of most popular stars of 2021. Follow us @DJVShow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. More information on DJVShow.com.

Dynasty Addicts Podcast Network
Dynasty Junkies Episode 77 - Listener Questions w/ Jay Felicio

Dynasty Addicts Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 87:15


Hosts Andrew & Rocky are joined by Jay Felicio (@GMenJay) to answer listener questions on a variety of topics including our offseason process for dynasty, how to handle draft order for non-playoff team, and questions on Michael Thomas, Gallup, Godwin, and more!  As always we finish up by finding some trades.

Dynasty Junkies Podcast
Dynasty Junkies Episode 77 - Listener Questions w/ Jay Felicio

Dynasty Junkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 87:15


Hosts Andrew & Rocky are joined by Jay Felicio (@GMenJay) to answer listener questions on a variety of topics including our offseason process for dynasty, how to handle draft order for non-playoff team, and questions on Michael Thomas, Gallup, Godwin, and more! As always we finish up by finding some trades.

Gallup Called to Coach
How Knowing Yourself via Your Strengths Can Fuel Change -- S9E57

Gallup Called to Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 59:43


Learn from Narinder Ahluwalia of Covalience about the broad impact for change that CliftonStrengths can have in your family, your organization, and society, and how this starts with change in you. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/358409/how-knowing-yourself-via-your-strengths-can-fuel-change.aspxFollow UsFacebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrengthPinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/Learn More About CliftonStrengthsSubscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It ForIndividuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular ProductsAssessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional ResourcesArticles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

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How Knowing Yourself via Your Strengths Can Fuel Change -- S9E57

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 59:43


Learn from Narinder Ahluwalia of Covalience about the broad impact for change that CliftonStrengths can have in your family, your organization, and society, and how this starts with change in you. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/358409/how-knowing-yourself-via-your-strengths-can-fuel-change.aspx Follow Us Facebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/ Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrength Pinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/ Learn More About CliftonStrengths Subscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It For Individuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular Products Assessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional Resources Articles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

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Talento Ativação – Pedro Penido e Yuri Trafane

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 57:05


Vamos falar nesse Called to Coach sobre o Talento Ativação com o convidado Pedro Penido. Pedro é casado com a Vivian desde 2013, pai do Benjamin e da Celeste. Publicitário por formação, Pedro tem especialização em Liderança, Cultura e Teologia pela Hillsong College (Austrália) e certificação em Accelerated Strengths Coaching pela Gallup. Tem experiência atuando em diversas áreas como Compras e Customer Service na IBM, Publicidade e Esportes pela Soccer de Brazil Academy, na Austrália. Desde 2017 empreende na área de Soluções para Pessoas com sua empresa People Business, oferecendo acompanhamentos e treinamentos para os temas de Cultura Organizacional, Liderança e Soft Skills, Pontos Fortes, e Comunicação. Atua também como professor na Escola Conquer, uma das maiores referências no que diz respeito à educação da nova economia, no Brasil. Através dessa e por sua organização, já treinou mais de 5500 pessoas em empresas como ABInBev, Roche, Nubank, Levi's, Ifood, sem contar o curso on-line sobre Inteligência Emocional, no qual foi professor em 3 das 7 aulas para mais de 700 mil alunos inscritos. TOP 05 Pedro Penido: Empatia, Conexão, Crença, Ativação, Desenvolvimento English: He has been married to Vivian since 2013, and has two children: Benjamin and Celeste. An advertiser by training, Pedro holds a specialization in Leadership, Culture and Theology from Hillsong College (Australia) and certification in Accelerated Strengths Coaching from Gallup. He has experience working in several areas such as Purchasing and Customer Service at IBM, Advertising and Sports at Soccer de Brazil Academy, in Australia. Since 2017 he has been working in the People Solutions area with his company People Business, offering follow-up and training on the themes of Organizational Culture, Leadership and Soft Skills, Strengths, and Communication. He also works as a teacher at Escola Conquer, one of the biggest references in terms of education for the new economy in Brazil. Through Conquer and his organization, he has trained more than 5500 people in companies such as ABInBev, Roche, Nubank, Levi's, Ifood, not counting the Conquer's online course on Emotional Intelligence, in which he taught in 3 of the 7 classes for more than 700 thousand students enrolled. Pedro´s Top 05: Empathy, Connectedness, Belief, Activator, Developer Yuri Trafane formou-se em Gestão de Marketing pela ESPM após ter cursado Química na UNICAMP. Possui dois MBAs, um pela USP e outro pela FGV, seguido de um pós-MBA pela FIA, uma certificação em coaching pela ATD USA e uma especialização em Strength Based Coaching pela Gallup USA. Com sólida formação acadêmica, construiu sua experiência profissional como executivo em empresas renomadas, como Johnson & Johnson, Unilever, Parmalat, Bauducco e Grupo Abril.Atualmente dirige a Ynner Treinamentos, empresa de treinamento e consultoria especializada em Gestão, Estratégia, Vendas e Marketing, onde teve o privilégio de formar executivos de empresas de destaque como Bayer, Nestlé, Bosch, Nívea, Walmart, 3M, Eaton , Emerson, Mercedes-Benz, FMC, Mary Kay, Sanofi, Saint Gobain e várias outras. Ynner é a representante oficial da Gallup no Brasil. Yuri's Top 5 CliftonStrengths: Input (Input), Estudioso (Learner), Ativação (Activator), Significância (Significance), Relacionamento (Relator) Learn more about Gallup's other resources for strengths-based coaching: • Articles & Videos • Webcasts • Guides & Reports • Subscribe to our Newsletter To learn about Gallup's other resources for strengths-based coaching, visit Gallup Access. Called to Coach is a Gallup Webcast (via YouTube) that allows current and prospective coaches to interact with strengths coaches who have found success in strengths-based development.

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Talento Futurista – Rafa Peixoto e Yuri Trafane

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 43:52


Vamos falar sobre o Talento Futurista nesse Called to Coach com nosso convidado especial Rafael Peixoto. Rafael, possui Mestrado em Marketing pela Université D'Angers na França, MBA em Executive Business Management, Pós-Graduação em Gestão de Projetos e Graduação em Tecnologia da Informação. Hoje, além de Mentor para executivos, Rafael, também, é Treinador de cursos de Liderança em grandes empresas Multinacionais. Paralelamente, exerce a função de Hipnoterapeuta, em seu Consultório Clínico, em Petrópolis-RJ. Recentemente, foi convidado para estrear como Apresentador no programa - A MENTE QUE APRENDE pela emissora TV PETRÓPOLIS, onde gera conteúdo sobre os assuntos: Desenvolvimento Humano Qualidade de Vida Neurociência e Saúde Mental Empreendedorismo e Marketing Rafa, como costuma ser chamado, é Coach de Pontos Fortes desde 2020, certificado pela Ynner Treinamentos, única parceira oficial da Gallup no Brasil. Nos mais de 26 anos de experiência profissional, Rafael já atuou como Analista de Redes de Computadores, Arquiteto de Infraestrutura de IT, Gestor de Projetos, Gestor de Produtos e Marketing e, hoje, é dono do seu próprio negócio, onde fundou à RP CONSULTORIA E TREINAMENTOS. Apaixonado pelo que faz, dedica sua vida para ajudar pessoas e empresas na busca do seu máximo potencial. Entre as suas principais certificações, então: Master Practitioner em PNL Master Professional Coach Trainer Gallup Global Strengths Coach Mentor de Mentores Master em Hipnoterapia Clínica Avançada Especialista em Neurociência Top 05 Rafael Peixoto: EXCELÊNCIA, FUTURISTA, ESTUDIOSO, FOCO e POSITIVO. English: Rafael has a Master's Degree in Marketing from Université D'Angers in France, MBA in Executive Business Management, a Postgraduate Diploma in Project Management, and a Graduation in Information Technology. Today, in addition to mentoring executives, Rafael is also a Leadership Course Coach in large multinational companies. At the same time, he performs the role of Hypnotherapist, in his Clinical Office, in Petrópolis, state of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. Recently, he was invited to be a TV SHOW HOST, where he generates content on the subjects: Human development Quality of life Neuroscience and Mental Health Entrepreneurship and Marketing With more than 26 years of professional experience, Rafael has already worked as a Computer Network Analyst, IT Infrastructure Architect, Project Manager, Product and Marketing Manager. Nowadays, he has been working in his own business, where he founded RP CONSULTORIA AND TRAININGS. Passionate about what he does, he dedicates his life to helping people and companies pursue their maximum potential. Rafa, as he is often called, has gotten a Strengths Coach Certification since 2020, by Ynner Treinamentos, the only official Gallup partner in Brazil. Among your main certifications, then: Master Practitioner in NLP - Neuro-Linguistic Programming Master Professional Coach Trainer Gallup Global Strengths Coach Mentor of Mentors Master in Advanced Clinical Hypnotherapy Neuroscience Specialist Rafael´s Top 05: MAXIMIZER, FUTURISTIC, LEARNER, FOCUS and POSITIVE. Yuri Trafane formou-se em Gestão de Marketing pela ESPM após ter cursado Química na UNICAMP. Possui dois MBAs, um pela USP e outro pela FGV, seguido de um pós-MBA pela FIA, uma certificação em coaching pela ATD USA e uma especialização em Strength Based Coaching pela Gallup USA. Com sólida formação acadêmica, construiu sua experiência profissional como executivo em empresas renomadas, como Johnson & Johnson, Unilever, Parmalat, Bauducco e Grupo Abril.Atualmente dirige a Ynner Treinamentos, empresa de treinamento e consultoria especializada em Gestão, Estratégia, Vendas e Marketing, onde teve o privilégio de formar executivos de empresas de destaque como Bayer, Nestlé, Bosch, Nívea, Walmart, 3M, Eaton , Emerson, Mercedes-Benz, FMC, Mary Kay, Sanofi, Saint Gobain e várias outras. Ynner é a representante oficial da Gallup no Brasil. Yuri's Top 5 CliftonStrengths: Input (Input), Estudioso (Learner), Ativação (Activator), Significância (Significance), Relacionamento (Relator) Learn more about Gallup's other resources for strengths-based coaching: • Articles & Videos • Webcasts • Guides & Reports • Subscribe to our Newsletter To learn about Gallup's other resources for strengths-based coaching, visit Gallup Access. Called to Coach is a Gallup Webcast (via YouTube) that allows current and prospective coaches to interact with strengths coaches who have found success in strengths-based development.

OneDigital Employer Advisory
Today's Health Care: Physical Wellbeing

OneDigital Employer Advisory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 30:36


The team continues the discussion on Gallup's five essential elements with the focus on physical wellbeing. Physical wellbeing does not mean looking like the epitome of physical fitness and being free of disease.  Rather, it can be boiled down to managing one's health that allows us to have energy to get through the day without undue fatigue or physical stress. The team discusses what incremental changes employees can make to foster better physical wellbeing.  

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Called to Coach avec Florence Hardy

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 43:31


Guest: Florence Hardy Diplômée de Sciences Po Paris, Florence démarre son parcours chez Andersen Consulting – aujourd'hui Accenture – où elle mène des missions de reengineering, gestion de projet et de changement. Elle rejoint ensuite les Editions Marshall Cavendish comme responsable marketing et développement. En 1997, elle prend la direction générale de la filiale française. Depuis 2004, elle accompagne des entreprises et leurs dirigeants d'abord comme consultante, puis en tant que coach et facilitatrice. Elle est l'une des premières coachs à être certifiée en Europe sur l'approche talents et l'assessment CliftonStrengths. Elle développe progressivement son expertise sur l'utilisation des talents comme point d'appui pour créer des collectifs solides. En 2017, elle fonde le Labo des Talents qui a pour mission de permettre à chacun d'identifier, de développer et de contribuer ses talents au service du projet collectif. Elle travaille aussi bien en anglais qu'en français, et souvent dans des contextes internationaux. Sa bonne connaissance des enjeux et de la réalité du business sont un atout souvent mentionné par ses clients. « Aujourd'hui, fonctionnement en silos, liens distendus, perte d'énergies, ralentissent la capacité à répondre aux évolutions des marchés. Nous avons des modèles mentaux basés sur des process et des demandes uniformes, alors que les individus sont différents, ont besoin d'être sollicités différemment pour donner le meilleur et, sur cette base, d'être véritablement invités à trouver les bonnes bases pour coopérer efficacement. Face à ces enjeux, nous accompagnons dirigeants, équipes et personnes sur le chemin d'une meilleure performance en mettant à profit les talents distinctifs de chacun ». Expertises Approche talents & CliftonStrengths : expertise approfondie de l'assessment CliftonStrengths et de la mobilisation des talents. Certifications Gallup, Strengths Strategies for Optimal Performance, Builder Profile. Conception de parcours de leadership, management et développement à partir des talents. Coaching d'équipe : spécialisation en coaching de dirigeants et d'équipes, à partir des talents et de l'approche systémique des équipes et des organisations. Intelligence collective : conception et facilitation de démarches collaboratives en émergence, permettant l'appropriation et le développement de votre autonomie. Le Top 5 Clifton Strengths de Florence : Input • Positivité • Connexion • Inclusion • Idéation • Futuriste Elle ajoute généralement son #6 qui est vraiment dominant pour elle ;) Pour en savoir davantage : www.labodestalents.fr Host: Olivier Grau Olivier Grau est Senior Consultant, Account Lead et ICF Coach Leadership chez Gallup, basé entre Londres et Paris. Ayant débuté sa carrière chez Gallup en tant qu'analyste en sélection et psychométrie, Olivier a une expertise dans le domaine de l'évaluation des talents ainsi que de l'engagement des collaborateurs. En conjonction avec de nombreuses années d'expérience dans le secteur du conseil en engagement avec différentes méthodologies et outils psychométriques, Olivier a également enrichi ses connaissances avec une expérience « in house », coté client, où il a dirigé et lancé un projet global d'engagement des collaborateurs pour une société multinationale de télécommunication ayant une empreinte globale. Le Top 5 des points forts d'Olivier : Individualisation, Studieux, Stratégique, Réalisateur, Idéation Called to Coach est un webcast (via Youtube) qui permet aux coaches ou futurs coaches à interagir avec des coaches certifiés pour lesquels le développement par les points forts a été un véritable facteur de succès.

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優勢播客 - Viya Chen 專訪 Cindy Lin

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 36:20


創造一個幸福企業的工作文化 Create a Culture that Inspires: Career Wellbeing 人們可能低估了工作對整體幸福感的影響。創造一個幸福企業,經理人的角色、家庭平衡以及工作的意義是至關重要的因素。無論您是經理人、學生、家長、志願者、退休人員,還是個人創業家,我們每天醒來,都需要做一些工作,最好是值得期待的事。整體幸福感和角色的識別息息相關,如果能從每天花時間做的事發現意義或產生成就感,欣欣向榮蓬勃發展的幸福感將增加兩倍之多,經理人如何為自己和夥伴創造工作幸福感? 受訪者:林茂生 Cindy Lin 前5項優勢:理念|交往|統帥|專注|學習 Gallup 蓋洛普認證 PCC 優勢教練,超過 20 年的營銷經驗,目前在台灣領先的金融控股公司擔任企業傳播主管。具可口可樂、摩根大通和匯豐銀行等國際公司全球廣告、媒體代理和高級營銷管理經驗。 Cindy 在團隊和職業教練方面擁有多年經驗。於 2019 年 8 月獲得了優勢教練證書,並開始在非營利組織擔任年輕人的職業顧問。 提供個人教練,1 到小組和課堂上的優勢領導力課程培訓。 主持人:Jim Collison + 陳薇雅 Viya Chen 前5項優勢:前瞻|完美|策略|行動|交往 StrengthsBusiness 優勢觀點學院台灣和新加坡創辦人,Gallup 蓋洛普全球優勢認證教練課程、華文區域企業培訓策略夥伴,大中華區首位認證 PCC 與新加坡白金優勢教練,優勢立基的前瞻策略家。結合財星五百大高管實務經驗,透過中英文教練與培訓,協助企業與經理人發揮優勢團隊凝聚、共創遠景看見並實踐及志未來。蓋洛普全球優勢認證課程:Training@StrengthsBusiness.com Viya Chen Top 5 Strengths: Futuristic, Maximizer, Strategic, Relator, Activator Viya is the founder of StrengthsBusiness Taiwan and Singapore, Gallup Global Strengths certified coach and licensed partner, ICF PCC and Fortune 500 ex-executive. She is a futuristic strategist whose passion is in using Strengths based coaching to deliver positive impacts to corporates and individuals. Called to Coach 優勢播客,是蓋洛普 Gallup (透過YouTube) 的直播訪談,為優勢教練和有志參與優勢運動的夥伴們,提供一個能與優勢立基卓越教練們互動的機會。 Called to Coach is a Gallup Webcast (via YouTube) that allows current and prospective coaches to interact with strengths coaches who have found success in strengths-based development.

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El Llamado del Coach Gallup con María Eugenia Gandara

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 47:14


María Eugenia (Maru) Gandara Con más de 20 años de experiencia en el desarrollo del talento humano, en diversos sectores empresariales y diferentes países, Maru es “una persona de personas” con foco en las personas, líderes, equipos, cultura, productividad y reconocimiento. Maru es Especialista en Dinámicas de grupos, Facultativa en Programación Neurolingüística y Coach de Desarrollo de Fortalezas por Gallup. Maru's CliftonStrengths Top 10: Individualización, Activador, Aprendedor, Responsabilidad, Coordinador, Conexión, Intelección, Coleccionador, Auto-confiaza y Enfoque. ---- El Llamado del Coach (vía You Tube) es un programa que permite, a los coaches actuales y a quienes quieren convertirse en coaches, interactuar con coaches en fortalezas que han encontrado el éxito en el desarrollo basado en fortalezas. Durante cada sesión, profundizaremos en estrategias y tácticas que puedes llevar a tu organización y ayudarán a ti y a tu equipo a lograr un mejor desempeño. Aprende más sobre otros recursos de coaching basado en fortalezas de Gallup: • Artículos & Videos • Programas en línea • Guías & Reportes • Inscríbete a nuestro boletín informativo en inglés (Newsletter) También visita Gallup Access.

It Starts With Attraction
The Importance of Focusing on Your Strengths with Austin Suellentrop

It Starts With Attraction

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 60:19


The Importance of Focusing on Your Strengths with Austin SuellentropThis week we are back with another exciting episode about personality styles. Today, Kimberly talks with Austin Suellentrop, CliftonStrengths Portfolio Manager for Gallup. (Also known as StrengthsFinder)You will learn why people learn differently and how to have conversations about each other's strengths to create better relationships. You'll also gain insight into when people are aware of their strengths, how it helps them identify and stick to their values.After you hear this episode, you will want to find out where you land with the StrengthsFinder assessment and share this episode with your friends and your spouse. Today's Speaker: Austin Suellentrop, CliftonStrengths Portfolio ManagerAustin Suellentrop, CliftonStrengths Portfolio Manager, leads Gallup's organizational strategy for growing CliftonStrengths worldwide. Through close partnership with our learning, technology, research, and client teams, he helps ensure we are staying true to the mission of CliftonStrengths while providing the tools needed to further the strengths-based approach to human development. He specializes in helping Gallup clients to bridge the gap between Gallup research and practical application in the workplace, particularly when leading through times of extraordinary change. His mission is to inspire others to action by telling stories with passion and excitement about what individuals and teams can accomplish when they have the opportunity to do what they do best.Before joining Gallup, Austin served in a variety of roles for a major regional bank, most recently as a member of its organizational and leadership development team. He supported associate engagement programs across the company, providing data analysis and reporting and coaching teams and leaders on how to use employee engagement as a strategy to drive performance.Austin has a passion for public speaking and that dates back as far as he can remember and has been featured as a keynote speaker for organizations across the country including TedxBirmingham. Austin is an Associate Certified Coach through the International Coach Federation and has been a guest speaker on the Gallup Called to Coach Webcast as well as an author on the Gallup Coaching Blog.Austin received a bachelor's degree in finance from Auburn University and a master's degree in family financial planning and counseling from The University of Alabama. Austin spends his free time entertaining friends and family with his wife, Janna, and three daughters, Noelle, Elise, and Audrey. If you don't find him in front of the smoker preparing BBQ for a crowd, he is likely at the softball field where he coaches a competitive youth team.Website: https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/253868/popular-cliftonstrengths-assessment-products.aspxAustin's TED TalkGet the Attraction Assessment by visiting PIESUniversity.comYou'll LearnThe importance of finding your strengthsHow to have better relationships knowing each other's strengthsUnderstanding your strengths to help live out your valuesEpisode 81: Austin Suellentrop, CliftonStrengths Portfolio Manager

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast

We talk about unspent CARES funds, the hot Cheetos shortage of 2021 (in Gallup), fetishes and much much more. Follow us on our socials:IG: yafpodFB: your aunties favorite Gmail: yafpodcast@gmail.com

Kolbecast
Episode 77: The Road Less Traveled

Kolbecast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 69:50


AMDG.  Today Celeste Cuellar rejoins the Kolbecast to discuss non-college paths—trades, military service, religious life discernment, and more.  Celeste, Bonnie, and Steven muse on how God doesn't require saints to have college degrees, how many of the activities and interests we're drawn to indicate our paths, and how the preparation for life is indirect.  Along with these profound and accessible topics, they touch on personality and skill assessments such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, what gap years are and aren't, and reckoning parents' experience within themselves as their children grow to the age of adventuring beyond the nest.   Celeste can be heard on these other Kolbecast episodes Ep 12 Phone a Friend Ep 68 Grace for the Nitty Gritty also with Ashley Massey Also referenced: Ep 59 The Secret Whiteboard with Everett Buyarski & Erica Treat Highlands Ability Battery The Myers & Briggs Foundation Labor Day Statement by Bishop John Barres of Rockville Center, NY Harmel School of the Trades in Grand Rapids, MI Kateri College of the Liberal and Practical Arts in Gallup, NM Vocations week Ep 32 Reflections of His Light with Sr. Margaret Mary & Sr. Anne Discerning a Path after High School section in Program Support Guide (in Welcome Packet)   Look for the Kolbecast in your favorite podcast app and subscribe for effortless episode delivery. Have a suggestion or question for the Kolbecast team? Write to us at podcast@kolbe.org. Interested in Kolbe Academy's offerings? Visit kolbe.org.    

All Gallup Webcasts
Investing in and Developing People Leaders at Vibrant -- S9E56

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 63:51


Learn how Vibrant Credit Union is investing in sustainable leadership through strengths and engagement and how that is changing its managers' approach to managing, as we talk to three people leaders at Vibrant. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/358079/investing-developing-people-leaders-vibrant.aspx Follow Us Facebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/ Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrength Pinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/ Learn More About CliftonStrengths Subscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It For Individuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular Products Assessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional Resources Articles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

Gallup Called to Coach
Investing in and Developing People Leaders at Vibrant -- S9E56

Gallup Called to Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 63:51


Learn how Vibrant Credit Union is investing in sustainable leadership through strengths and engagement and how that is changing its managers' approach to managing, as we talk to three people leaders at Vibrant. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/358079/investing-developing-people-leaders-vibrant.aspxFollow UsFacebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrengthPinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/Learn More About CliftonStrengthsSubscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It ForIndividuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular ProductsAssessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional ResourcesArticles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

Changing Lives Selling Knives
293: Danielle Posa - Personal & Workplace Wellbeing

Changing Lives Selling Knives

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 51:03


Danielle Posa is deeply passionate about the subject of wellbeing — what it means to live a full and meaningful life. As a workplace wellbeing advocate and advisor, she works with organizations to help them develop comprehensive, long-term wellbeing strategies. She has worked with the best thought leaders in this space, including being personally mentored by Deepak Chopra, and notably, she is a cancer survivor. Prior to starting her own business, Danielle was a management consultant for Gallup. According to the world's largest study on wellbeing, which Gallup produced, your work is the single biggest influence on your overall quality of life. Danielle Posa is committed to helping individuals and organizations prioritize wellbeing as the core measurement of real success. To get access to all episodes and free resources, visit  ChangingLivesPodcast.com.

Mi Tech Person
45. Determina el éxito o el fracaso de tu negocio al delegar

Mi Tech Person

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 11:28


Aprender a delegar es un arte y quienes no lo practican, están condenados a no escalar sus negocios. Un estudio de Gallup demuestra que “los directores ejecutivos que delegan con éxito generan un volumen de ingresos un 33% superior que aquellos que no lo hacen.” Es por esto que en este episodio te comparto 5 tácticas que te ayudarán a delegar de manera efectiva en tu negocio.    Recuerda que si has decidido delegar esas cargas innecesarias (aka tareas técnicas) que tanto te fastidian y te llevan a procrastinar en las verdaderas acciones que mueven tu negocio, don't worry déjamelo a mí.   Escríbeme a mitechperson@gmail.com o separa tu Reunión de descubrimiento AQUÍ, para que te liberes de esas cargas innecesarias, pero importantes para tu negocio.  Enlaces mencionados: Artículo: ¿Cómo delegar responsabilidades? 5 tácticas para hacerlo con eficacia en tu negocio Descarga la guía para automatizar tu negocio con Zapier en http://mitechperson.com/guia  Gracias por suscribirte a Mi Tech Person en tu aplicación de podcast favorita, para que no te pierdas ningún episodio. Cuando estés por allá, déjame tu valoración de cinco estrellas junto a tu reseña para ayudar a que más personas como tú descubran este espacio tan valioso… ¡además es mi inspiración!   iTunes Spotify Stitcher Google Podcast   Te espero el próximo martes en este espacio, pero mientras tanto conectemos a través de mi instagram @mitechperson ¡Hasta el próximo martes!

Dynasty Trade Calculator Podcast

The Dynasty Trade Calculator Podcast is the first and most trusted value-centric show in Dynasty fantasy football! Join host John-Paul Hurley and co-hosts Izzy Elkaffas for:   - Cheap buys for your playoff run. - Non-playoff team deep stashes. - D. Freeman, R. Penny, Big Ben, D. Foreman, A. St. Brown, M. Gallup, Juju.   Follow us on Twitter! Main Handle: (@FFDynastyTrades) Host: John-Paul Hurley (@FFHurcules) Co-Host: Izzy Elkaffas (@DTC_IzzyE) Producer: John Moeser (@DTC_JohnMoeser)   Please rate & review us! Find our Podcast Archive, Articles, and The Dynasty Trade Calculator at www.dynastytradecalculator.com

Plain Talk With Rob Port
273: Is America's religious decline good or bad?

Plain Talk With Rob Port

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 55:16


Religion has always been at the center of American life, but in recent years many Americans are turning away from faith. The polling firm Gallup has been tracking trends in religion since the 1930s when church membership among Americans hovered in the 70 percent region. It stayed that high through the late 1990s, but in the last couple of decades, it has plunged. In 2020, the percentage of Americans who said they belonged to a church, synagogue or mosque plunged to 47 percent. Is this a good thing? A bad thing? And why is it happening? Roxanne Salonen and Devyln Brooks are both Christians. The former is a Catholic; the latter a Lutheran pastor. They both write columns on spirituality, and they joined this episode of Plain Talk to discuss the decline of religion in America with the host, yours truly, who is an atheist.

The Daily
The Sunday Read: ‘How the Real Estate Boom Left Black Neighborhoods Behind'

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 44:13


In Memphis, as in America, the benefits of homeownership have not accrued equally across race.Housing policy in the United States has leaned heavily on homeownership as a driver of household wealth since the middle of the last century, and, for many white Americans, property ownership has indeed yielded significant wealth. But Black families have largely been left behind, either unable to buy in the first place or hampered by risks that come with owning property.Homeownership's limitations are especially apparent in Black neighborhoods. Owner-occupied homes in predominantly African American neighborhoods are worth, on average, half as much as those in neighborhoods with no Black residents, according to a 2018 Brookings Institution and Gallup report that examined metropolitan areas.For neighborhoods like Orange Mound in southeast Memphis, the solutions cannot come fast enough.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Narikbi LIVE
Ескендір Бестай: Үйрену өнері, кітап оқу және бала тәрбиесі

Narikbi LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 117:44


Салем тыңдарман,  Бүгін біз Ескендір Бестай ағамызбен керемет сұхбат жүргізуге тырыстық.  Біз үйнеруді үйнеру техникалары, кітап оқу, жеке даму, бала тәрбиесі және т.б. тақырыптарды ашуға тырыстық. Тыңдап, бағасын бересіздер деген ойдамын. 

The Career Change Maker Podcast
# 156 - The Real Cost Of Settling In Your Career

The Career Change Maker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 11:53


In this episode I discuss the cost of settling in your career. A recent Gallup survey revealed that 85% of people weren't happy in their jobs. 85%! Does this surprise you? Perhaps you are one of the 85%. Have you been venting how you feel frustrated and undervalued during discussions with the people close to you but not taking action? I want you to recognise that this is something that you can change. The fear of failure when it comes to making a career move is all too real, but essentially, you have two outcomes. You either win, or you learn. Both of these outcomes will strengthen your ability, but it takes overcoming fear to achieve them. You can't separate the impact that work has on your personal life, so it's important for you to be intentional about your career. I want to help you bid farewell to the days of having the same conversations time and time again. What you will learn: •      The personal, emotional and financial cost of settling in your career•      How you are viewing fear•      How to push past these fear hurdles and experience what's on the other side Other episodes you may enjoy:Episode155: How To Be More Confident In Your Career Change DecisionsEpisode 140: Why You Deserve A Better Role So That You Can Stop Feeling Unhappy In Your WorkTHIS EPISODE IS BOUGHT TO YOU BY THE CAREER CHANGE MAKER PROGRAMThis episode was brought to you by my signature program, the Career Change Maker Program. If you are looking for support with changing career direction, book a suitability call >> Career Clarity Call.

Tom Sullivan Show
Tom Sullivan Show, December 9th, Hour 2

Tom Sullivan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 37:38


A Gallup poll shows that socialism is gaining popularity among youth. A bill is introduced to allow non-citizens to vote in NYC.

The Gallup Podcast
Is Consumer 'Trust' the Right Metric for Media?

The Gallup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 22:58


Have the news media's shortcomings cost them the public's confidence? Is there a healthy level of distrust in media that provides for greater accountability? And are Americans more likely to detect misinformation in the media than they are given credit for? Sarah Fioroni, a research consultant at Gallup, joins the podcast to discuss.

All Gallup Webcasts
Is Consumer 'Trust' the Right Metric for Media?

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 22:58


Have the news media's shortcomings cost them the public's confidence? Is there a healthy level of distrust in media that provides for greater accountability? And are Americans more likely to detect misinformation in the media than they are given credit for? Sarah Fioroni, a research consultant at Gallup, joins the podcast to discuss.

Living Corporate
TAP In with Tristan : 3 Tips for Career Switchers

Living Corporate

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 3:27


Tristan talks about 3 tips, trends, and strategies for career switchers. According to a recent Gallup survey, 48% of employees are actively seeking new opportunities. But many job seekers are going to have to contend with the reality that careers and workplaces are rapidly changing. Here are a few tips, trends, and strategies that you need to know. Want to know more about our LinkedIn Learning courses? Check them out! https://bit.ly/3k4havy Have a topic suggestion? You can find our submission form here. http://bit.ly/tapintristan Check out Tristan's website to learn more about him or to book a free consultation. http://bit.ly/31HFzND Connect with Tristan on LinkedIn, IG, FB, and Twitter. http://bit.ly/2G7d6HK http://bit.ly/2XDcp3z http://bit.ly/2JEbg1R http://bit.ly/2JCmKTzv

Phone Calls With Clever People
Celebrating a year of the podcast with Shane Hatton and Rohan Dredge

Phone Calls With Clever People

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 48:59


We're doing something a little different for the final episode of 2021 As I look back and celebrate one year of the Phone Calls With Clever People Podcast I'm joined by my good friend Rohan Dredge from my first ever episode. Rohan joins me again to turn the tables and interview me for the show. In this episode we take time to reflect on where this all started, what's changed and what we're noticing in the world, what I've learned from over a year of interviews with clever people and what's next for me.  If you don't know me my name is Shane Michael Hatton and I'm the host of Phone Calls With Clever People. I'm a Queenslander by birth, Melbournian by choice, curious by nature and a creative at heart. I'm a leadership speaker, author, trainer and coach helping to develop Remarkable People Leaders. The kind of leaders that you talk about and remember. I love talking all things leadership, culture and communication. I'm a Gallup certified strengths coach, member of the Forbes Global Coaches Council, founder of the People Leaders Network and the author of ‘Lead The Room – Communicate a Message That Counts in Moments That Matter'. I also serve as director for the Asia Pacific Region Board of the International Association of Business Communicators (IABC). Let's Connect Connect with me on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/shanemhatton/ Learn more about what I do and sign up for my newsletter at https://www.shanemhatton.com Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/shanemhatton  Follow me on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/shanemhatton  Reach out and email me at contact@shanemhatton.com     

Reopening America
More Report Losing Trust in Their Doctors Over the Past Year, Especially Republicans

Reopening America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 10:41


According to Gallup's annual Health and Healthcare survey, among all U.S. adults, confidence in advice from doctors is down. More reported losing trust in their doctors over the past year and Republicans in particular had a 13% drop from a decade ago while Democrats' trust increased. Jeffrey Jones, senior editor at Gallup joins us for what to know as this data is consistent with changing attitudes of trust in science. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Daily Dive
More Report Losing Trust in Their Doctors Over the Past Year, Especially Republicans

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 26:42


According to Gallup's annual Health and Healthcare survey, among all U.S. adults, confidence in advice from doctors is down. More reported losing trust in their doctors over the past year and Republicans in particular had a 13% drop from a decade ago while Democrats' trust increased. Jeffrey Jones, senior editor at Gallup joins us for what to know as this data is consistent with changing attitudes of trust in science. Next, Amazon Web Services had a nine hour outage on Tuesday which led to website and streaming service disruptions, delays in package deliveries, and many smart home devices to stop working. In some cases people had to sweep their own floors or turn on their own lights, and it highlighted just how many internet-connected devices people have in their homes and the reliance on a connection to the cloud. Sarah Needleman, tech reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. Finally, before the pandemic, most people probably wouldn't let a scratchy throat or even a mild cold interfere with plans, now even the sniffles can derail plans. What happens now could be an over-explanation of symptoms to rationalize missing out on something, or even the simple “It might be Covid” to get out of plans. Allie Caren, reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for what to know. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Gallup Called to Coach
Beyond the Book: Applying Tips From the Appendices -- S9E55

Gallup Called to Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 53:17


Learn about some of the unique connections between your Top 5 strengths and your wellbeing, as well as how managers can enhance employee wellbeing via strengths, from Gallup's Dr. Jaclynn Robinson and Ryan Wolf. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/357923/beyond-book-applying-tips-from-appendices.aspxFollow UsFacebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrengthPinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/Learn More About CliftonStrengthsSubscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It ForIndividuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular ProductsAssessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional ResourcesArticles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

All Gallup Webcasts
Beyond the Book: Applying Tips From the Appendices -- S9E55

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 53:17


Learn about some of the unique connections between your Top 5 strengths and your wellbeing, as well as how managers can enhance employee wellbeing via strengths, from Gallup's Dr. Jaclynn Robinson and Ryan Wolf. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/357923/beyond-book-applying-tips-from-appendices.aspx Follow Us Facebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/ Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrength Pinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/ Learn More About CliftonStrengths Subscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It For Individuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular Products Assessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional Resources Articles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

Start With A Win
How to Make More Meaningful Contributions at Work and in Life

Start With A Win

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 24:05


In this episode of Start With A Win, Adam sits down with Tom Rath, an author and researcher who has spent the past two decades studying how work can improve human health and well-being. His 10 books have sold more than 10 million copies and made hundreds of appearances on global bestseller lists. Tom's first book, How Full Is Your Bucket?, was an instant #1 New York Times bestseller and led to a series of books that are used in classrooms around the world. His book StrengthsFinder 2.0 is Amazon's top selling non-fiction book of all time. His newest book, Life's Great Question: Discover How You Contribute to the World, released last year.During his 13 years at Gallup, Tom led the organization's strengths, employee engagement, wellbeing, and leadership consulting worldwide. Tom has served for the past five years as an external advisor and Gallup Senior Scientist.The conversation begins around the idea of making more meaningful contributions and work and in life. Tom shares that he typically starts each day by asking the question: What could I do today that will continue to grow and contribute to the people I know and love, and my community, that will continue when I'm gone? What am I going to do today that makes someone else's life better? These contributions can be big picture, but they can also be daily tasks or interactions that improve the lives of others in the long term. He believes that if we are spending a little time in our day making a contribution like that, we can accumulate those over time, and make our work more meaningful and more effective.Tom also shares about a rare condition that causes him to be more susceptible to many cancers, but for him, having the reminder of mortality is a very powerful force for good. It's something we've seen in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic—a sense of urgency to evaluate our daily routines, how we impact people around us in the immediate and the long-term, and our relationship with our work. Prior to the pandemic, the way we worked on a daily basis was a relic of an industrial era when work was just plain bad for our well-being. Tom believes that most people have had a dysfunctional relationship with work for too long.Organizations have been so structured around profits and productivity. So each individual needs to ask themselves: Are my relationships, family, community and life better off because I joined this organization?We went into pandemic with horribly low expectations of what we get out of our work. But it is possible to have a job where you feel like you help people every day and not just enrich the pockets of your employer. Tom would love to see a great restructuring of how we work, and explains how companies can play a part.Well-being in a job is key. Tom shares about his experience with big employers who spend tens of millions of dollars on employee wellness programs, but their leaders are the ones working around the clock and expecting their employees to always be on. But then they ask why the programs are not working; “When employees see the people they look to us leaders eating over their keyboard every day and not taking time to move around…and not talking about these things, no one in the organization even feels like they have the permission to take care of themselves or their own health.”Episode Links:https://www.tomrath.orgTwitter: https://twitter.com/TomCRath/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/authortomrathLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/trath/Order your copy of Start With A Win: Tools and Lessons to Create Personal and Business Success:https://www.startwithawin.com/bookConnect with Adam:https://www.startwithawin.com/https://www.facebook.com/REMAXAdamContoshttps://twitter.com/REMAXAdamContoshttps://www.instagram.com/REMAXadamcontos/ Leave us a voicemail:888-581-4430

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 12.07.21 - The Commercials You Hear On Talk Radio

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 37:34


Hour 1 -  Nick Reed talks about a variety of topics in the news, including: Nick talks about the recent charges against Chris King of Queen City Motors. A "Let's Go Brandon" Store is now open in Massachusetts. Gallup released new polling numbers Monday that gauge Americans' sentiment toward frequently used political terms such as "capitalism," "socialism," and more. Nick explains how commercials make their way on Springfield's Talk 104.1, and how trade spots work.

the artisan podcast
ep24 | the artisan podcast | jaime levy | ux strategist, author, speaker

the artisan podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 44:41


Jaime Levy, Ux Strategist, Speaker and author of UX Strategy: Product Strategy Techniques for Devising Innovative Digital Solutions available in 6 languages and now also on Audible You can find Jaime on LinkedIn and on jaimelevy.com   ----------------- Katty: I've been watching your career trajectory, and I was super excited to see that you had written a book, UX Strategy and that the audio version has just come out. So I wanted to have a conversation about you, about the book, and how you started your path. One thing that I've noticed is this trend of reinvention with you from a designer to a strategist to an author to a public speaker to a professor, and how all of that's going to come together for you. I just found that fascinating, so I'd love for you to talk about your origin story and what's steps you've taken to come here. Jaime: Let's see. Well, I guess it started even before the browser when I was creating my floppy disk magazines, and I was a graduate student at NYU, and just really interested in nonlinear storytelling.  And then trying to invent this new medium like it was just this total insane dreamer thing. And I guess because of the floppy disk I made, I actually finished it, and then I successfully brought the product to market by selling it. A floppy disk that opened into a HyperCard or Director presentation. I know for all the newbies, they're like, “What are you talking about?” Don't worry, you don't need to know this old-school stuff.  But you know it used to be really hard to make interactive presentations, but the upside of all of that was that you could be the first or you could do something that is only mediocre in design. But because it was the first it was like “yay.”  That was how I started out. I was a horrible interface designer and a horrible coder. But I just kept pounding on these floppy disks, and then, the short version of it is Billy Idol bought one, and then it got launched as a commercial endeavor and then I got my gigs at EMI records and Viacom. And it all just kept going from there you know to eventually, doing an online magazine, and then getting a creative director role and just constantly working.  I really believe that if you just keep working, and applying yourself, and learning new things, that eventually you'll connect and get whatever it is that you want. Some job, or some gig, or an opportunity. And I think that relentlessness to persevere was something that has stayed with me, and I actually need to kind of manifest it now as I'm starting the next chapter of my career.  Before UX, it was called interface design and then after interface design, then it was web design and then after web design, then we had information architecture and interaction design. And by the time I got back to LA after 9/11 and the dot com thing crashed in New York, as well as, San Francisco and LA, I came back here and it seemed at that point I needed to focus.  And I should mention early on as a result of the (floppy) disk I was asked to be a part-time professor at NYU, and I did get flown around the country and the world, to speak at conferences, and I think like when you have that success when you start out you think that's normal. And so for me, it's just been catching up with my old normal, and it's a curse and a blessing, and the blessing is obvious because you're like, oh, I just want to continue to be a public speaker, I want to continue being known or recognized for my work. But the negative consequences, it's an addiction, it's like a high that you set here and you think, Oh, I always have to be at this level of an overachiever. And so, you know, in that sense I feel like I didn't engage in my own personal life, you know because I sacrificed it for my career so much and didn't really like relax into it until my 30s when I got back to Los Angeles. Katty: Interesting. I saw you actually speak about it in one of your talks. I think was your Brazil talk about being an overachiever and what that means and constantly trying to do things, new things, or do things in a new way. I found that fascinating, it went through that same reinvention theme that I recognized in what you were talking about. So thanks for sharing that. So you mentioned, the new chapter, a new iteration of Jaime. Jaime: New? It's in progress. So, you know, I did my first book and I did really well with the first book. I was insane to write a book. That was so crazy. But I just felt like UX strategy was so interesting and even though nobody was paying me to write it, you certainly don't make money off of the book. I just was like okay I'll take a year and a half and spend my savings and write a book and sit in the library. And it was really rewarding.  And so then when it came time to do a second edition, if I want to be current I did that. And I did it during the lockdown so that was kind of a good thing to do when you can't really go teach in a classroom or go run workshops in a public space. But basically, my book is now out in the second edition and is being translated into languages, and I just found out it's in German and Italian, and Portuguese this time, you know, on top of the other six languages and that's really exciting.  But the thing with the book is you need to promote it, and you know and you need to go do things to market it. Whenever you make anything whether it be a floppy disk or a website or an app or a book or you're marketing yourself as a public speaker, it's one thing that you do it, but the other half of it is in order to be successful, you just got to market yourself or your product. And it's fine when I get paid to do growth design and markets and run experiments to market other people's products. But I think, I'm kind of at least right now, I feel I'm just kind of over-marketing myself. All of a sudden I feel like, ah, can't life just be simple again? Let me just get a job ideally as a UX strategist and, you know, and that's it, let things quiet down.  And so you can say it's an existential post-midlife crisis, or maybe it's a phase but I just had a job interview with a company that I hope I get, and they were telling me that they just had written an article related to this subject about so many people basically looking at their careers and saying, “Do I even want to do this?”  I feel like COVID Hit the reset button for a ton of people and so now I'm less killing myself about, “Oh wow, I'm really not going to go crazy promoting this book because I don't feel like it? Is there something wrong with me? Or is it just like maybe I just have to accept to let people read the book. I hope they like it.” And if people ask me to speak fine, but you know, I think it's like at a certain point you have to say okay where's friction and friction is trying to go tour and do workshops at what we hope might be the end of the pandemic but isn't. You know, it's like I suffered the same fate as people who, you know we're in an orchestra, you know, or who had movies that came out. So I'm in great company of people who made their money by doing things for the public and in person and now that you know, there's no UX conferences really planned. I'm speaking at the one in Estonia, one, this year, zero last year zero the year before, you know. So it makes you say what am I going to do now? Katty: You're right, it definitely has been a reset button on many fronts. We've seen this so much with so many other candidates that we work with who are re-evaluating “I've been doing XYZ until now, do I still want to do it, do I still want to live here?” Just really evaluating everything, but I totally hear you about the book because I also wrote a book during this pandemic. I had been working on it for three years, which was far too long but that's just the length of time that it took. The circumstances where we found ourselves allowed me to finish it, so I am grateful for that. That was the silver lining in this crazy year and t it allowed me to finish it and get it out. But it's just sitting there and it's nowhere near where it needs to be... but it is what it is. It's a story I needed to get out. I got it out. Now, if people find it, awesome, and if they don't then we'll cross that bridge.  Jaime: What's your book called? Katty: It's called The Butterfly Years, and it's just my personal story dealing with grief and has nothing to do with Artisan Creative and it has everything to do with me. Obviously, as somebody who's running a company, it is going to have to come to grips with having to manage grief and make that work otherwise it permeates everything. Katty: If it helps people out there, it's there. If somebody is going through it and they need to hear somebody else's story who's been in the same boat. Then I've done my job.  Katty: Yeah, So when I heard that you had done your second edition and you had just done an audiobook. I thought you know I want to talk to her and see how that whole process was for her.  Katty: Congratulations on your interview and I hope that it ends up being the right next thing. Jaime: I hope so too. That would be great if my first interview turned into a job offer. Katty: Putting out the good vibes. Jaime: They were very surprised because it was a UX strategy position and I didn't have anywhere in my portfolio that I wrote it. I didn't want to say that I literally wrote the book on UX strategy because then they think oh she's not humble or she's too experienced so I didn't mention it. They saw something in there and I'm like, “Oh yeah, I wrote a book kind of related to UX strategy.” and they're like what's it called, I'm like, UX Strategy. I can't even own it. I can't even own it, you know, I'm just like, ahh so shocking. Yeah, you know, I want the opportunity to practice what I preach. Enough, running around with the same lectures and enough training.  I've done so much training in the last year, I think sometimes we just need to go back and forth and be okay with it. I'm not saying I'll never do workshops again, I just need to take a break from that part of it or and pursue it. So yeah hopefully something will come up for me that is enjoyable. Because I think it's important to have a job if you like and what I was shocked by when I looked at the job market this time was, oh my god there's 8,624 UX jobs in this country and 30 or 40% of them are remote, and there's actually jobs advertised for UX strategist title. It used to just be me and two other people. I don't know if my book helped define the industry but it seems like when I read the job description, it had everything that I wrote about in my book so it's a really exciting time that there's so much opportunity out there. Katty: Yeah, for sure. I'd love for you to maybe help define that a little bit, because obviously, we hear you know there's on the design side of it, UX there's XD. Now it's customer experience, employee experience. Can you talk a little bit about that I know for just what I've heard you talk about before, it's really the research and the strategy is the precursor before you even get into the design part of it. And I learned that thinking time is so important to be able to do that? Can you talk a little bit about that? Katty: A little bit of both, actually. Jaime: Sure. So I basically define UX strategy as the intersection between product design and business strategy. So business strategy is the top-level vision of an organization. How do we make money, who are our customers? You know business is defined, ultimately by their customers.  So they have a vision and the vision might be a platform, multiple products, a suite of products, or one product. And then it's like how do you really elevate that product, and bring it to market? So that when people have that first whiff of it, they're like, smells awesome. And so when I started doing discovery phases back in 2008, 2009 for Schematic and for Huge, I really fell in love with it. Because I love doing competitive research. So interesting, I mean who doesn't want to get paid to research the marketplace? And I loved the idea of finally getting to do user research. And so that was when I really became interested in it and realized that there was nothing out there that told us how to do it. I would just make things up as I went along and as I moved from different organizations, I would clean up my deliverables and take them to the next level.  And then when Lean Startup came out--People don't think of Lean Startup, as a product strategy methodology but I certainly do. It's this idea to build the smallest version of your product, get it in front of your target customer, learn from it, whether it be an alpha or prototype, extract data from these learnings and learn from it, and then iterate.  All of a sudden the discovery phase became not something like Waterfall; first, we do discovery, then we do the implementation, then we do usability testing and find out at the very end that not only does our product suck but nobody wants it. It was insane. And now all of a sudden, the discovery phase became something that can be iterative and cross into the implementation phase, and you can start building products and doing strategy, and testing it and validating it in much smaller loops all along the way. So that's what's really exciting is an opportunity to run some kind of experiments to knock out, to do rapid prototyping, to use whatever it is like sketch XD, other prototyping tools to get business concepts in front of the target users, and start doing user research that's more focused on validating a value proposition, versus, you know, is this thing usable? Even if it's really usable, but nobody wants it, then who cares if it's usable, right? Katty: Yep. Very good, and with plenty of products out there with great usability but they're sitting on the shelf. I probably have a few of them. Katty: Fantastic. You talked a little bit about this but I think, given where you are going, pivoting, and where you see the future to be for you at this juncture. What can you share with people who are either just starting out in their career path? And/or because of this past year, lost their positions, and they have to reinvent themselves. Where is it that you dig down deep to find that inspiration and that determination to just say you know what, this isn't working, let me figure out where it is that I want to go? Jaime: Yeah, I think just to be honest it's very different for someone like me with two to three decades in the industry versus somebody who's starting out. So I wouldn't give someone the same advice I would give myself, there's definitely different things going on. I can remember very well when I was starting out and the same feelings that I have now are similar. My dad gave me this great advice. When you're looking for a job, or when you're starting on your career, and when you interview with people, you want to be careful that you don't have this flashing L on your head. Loser, loser, loser.  Because people will spot this lack of confidence or low self-esteem, you know, and it doesn't matter how successful you are, or have been, like me. Because you can still have low self-esteem or imposter syndrome, and so, it's like you need to somehow put all of these fears of I suck;. I'm not gonna make it; I'm an imposter;I am so crazy that I thought I could do this film, to begin with. I'm too old or I'm too young or my portfolio doesn't have X, X, X.  I have to constantly work on this, to this minute, which is spinning a much more positive narrative in my head that, “No, no, I have something of value to give”. And then putting that negative energy into therapy, exercise, whatever you need to do to take care of yourself, but I still to this day, put it into how can I showcase my work, what's missing? You know, look at my portfolio. Okay, it has all this but it's missing, you know, this one deliverable. Well, I better make it, fake it till you make it, you know, and figure out a way to like get it in there.  And the funny thing is is they may not even ask for it on that job interview, but if it's like this thing that you think is missing, then it's going to be flashing the L on your forehead and so to me, it's like puffing yourself up and what is it going to do to make you confident for these interviews and if showing your portfolio and getting excited around the storytelling of your UX design which, it still is for me, then get that into your portfolio and any missing things.  Don't spend eight hours a day looking for a job, spend four hours and the other four hours teaching yourself a new tool because there's always going to be new things to learn. And if you're not open to learning new things, up until, you know, your 50s and 60s, then whenever that is where you're not open to new things, you better be at that last job that you're going to station yourself at, because the industry, I promise you, just keeps on changing. You know it's amazing. Katty: Gosh. Great advice. I think for all levels of career and years in the industry and also not even to have to do with business. I think for anything where we tend to sometimes focus in on the thing we don't have versus on the things that we do have it's just such a great lesson to say you know what to say we have to reshift that mindset.  There's a great book that I read a couple of years ago by this woman called Sally Helgason, and it's called How Women Rise, and she talks a lot about specifically women and how we get into this mindset of, oh, but you know what, let me work harder because I'm missing this 10% thing and not focus on the 90% that I have and it's just crazy. I see it all the time. I see it, not just in candidates I see it in myself. And putting myself out for a conversation or a talk or something and if I don't get it's like, oh, that's because I didn't talk about this. You know what, maybe just wasn't the right thing. So, yeah, great lesson. And I think also that that whole thing also speaks of desperation, and I think that that comes through, so loud and clear, it erodes the confidence that would naturally be there if somebody has worked on their craft. Jaime: Yeah and we need to in this field of product design or research, ultimately we're making something that we need to upsell, at the very end, even if it's to our boss and say yeah this is awesome, you know, and it's like, oh my gosh if we come to it from this place of fear, we're never going to sell it.  So I think it's easy to focus on the negatives for a lot of us, and we can't afford to do that in our field because we're always upselling our work. Katty: Yeah. Have you ever taken the StrengthsFinder assessment? Have you ever done that?  Jaime: No, I don't even know what that is. Katty: It's similar to a DISC or Myers-Briggs. But it focuses on your strengths. The reason I like it, we do it for our company and we talk about our strengths all the time. Its created by Don Clifton, and is now as part of Gallup and it's a personality assessment. The reason for him creating this was that he felt people focused on their weaknesses, and not on their strengths. The whole thing is about what are your top five strengths and let's lead with your strengths and not focus on a thing that is number 30 something for you, let's focus on the things that you're really good at and then find someone else who your bottom five is their top five and then collaborate. So it sounds like it's just human nature that we go there. If we could learn not to go there, it would be less, I think less of a headache for all of us. Katty: Crazy. So, I know you're teaching, you're doing online courses, you mentioned that you're doing a talk in Estonia. Are you doing that in person, are you doing that virtually? How are you managing your time and all the different places you need to be, or how did you manage your time and all the different places you need to be? Jaime: Yeah, I don't know how I'm managing my time right now yet. I'm still waiting to see where a bunch of things land. But the Estonia conference is the first onsite conference since COVID, since March of 2020. Well, basically there's very few conferences in the beginning of the year for the first quarter anyway.  So, anyway, it's Web Usability Day I think is their legacy name. But it's a one-day conference and then there's workshops, three days prior to it. It's in Estonia, it's very affordable, it's gonna bring in like a massive crowd of UX professionals. A lot of new ones but people mid-level and all over the place. And they're coming from Estonia, but they're also coming across the Baltic from Finland, and a couple of other Baltic states. So, I'm closing the conference, I guess I'm kind of headlining it, and then my workshop is one day right before that. So November 25th,iis my UX Strategy Workshop and then November 26th is the conference. It's a Thursday, Friday, so but I'll be in Berlin back in November, and then I'm doing a couple of talks, just private ones where I'm flying in. And then going back to Berlin and then I'm going to do this thing in Estonia.  I am so over this idea of more online workshops. I think they're a joke, sorry guys, but the whole point of conferences was to get people together physically in a space to network and touch base with other people and build relationships. And it seems I've done a bunch of these fake conferences, and it doesn't feel the same, they never pay and it's a joke. So I'm not into those anymore.  I'm really stoked that these people you know, the COVID cases are extremely low [in Estonia]. I've had my third vaccine. already so I'm totally going. I won't be taking too much risk but definitely, I'm really excited to be around humans and doing my thing. Katty: Yeah, humans, human connection. I'm traveling internationally for the first time since March of last year as well, and I'm going to Mexico and then to Dubai. But, I have to navigate the whole PCR test thing because I'm not going to be in the States for three days before I go so I got to figure that part out. Jaime: Yeah. It's a crazy time. I can't believe really what happened. How much the pandemic just changed everything, it's just, it's shocking. Katty: Are you seeing that in the world of products, are you seeing what's happened with a pandemic impact, whether it be design thinking or about how people are approaching research. I would imagine that it's changed how people are looking at how they go forward. Jaime: Yeah well, everything's online now. When I left Huge back in 2009, 2010. It was because I didn't want to drive in my car in rush hour to agency land in Culver City, and I didn't want to work in person, I wanted to work from home. So I've been working remote since 2010 and it's not new to me, and Cisco Systems when I worked for them as a UX strategist, everybody was a remote workforce. So finally, the rest of the world is catching up with us and learning that it is possible, and even outside of product so I think it's opening up opportunities in many ways. But, the negative consequence, and I felt this when I taught my last course at Claremont University, was that my students who were graduating, were just getting internships, but they're online.  At Facebook or wherever, and at any point in your life where you need human contact, and you need the nuance of someone kind of seeing that you're confused, and you need mentoring or you need to get the confidence to ask for help, we need that to be in person. I feel like the people that are getting the worst end of the deal is the college graduates, the people who are just starting their career who have to start it by themselves in Zoom rooms. Hopefully, there's going to be some way that it isn't just this experience of online collaboration, because I just feel even when I had my second or third cat life of getting into the UX world, I can't even imagine that I would have had the trust and camaraderie that I had with people at Schematic who came over and showed me how to wireframe when nobody was looking. So hopefully maybe there's some way that people can reach out and have people to connect with for that kind of support since they can't get it in person. Katty: The whole mentoring piece of it. Yeah, taking somebody under your wing. It's harder to do it this way. Yeah, you're absolutely right. I have some nieces and nephews who started their first year in college last year. You've worked really hard to get into the school of your choice, but you don't get a chance to really experience that. So now as a sophomore, they're getting to experience it for the first time because now some other classes are in person. So really interesting to kind of watch this new generation of those who are starting and those who are graduating, it's just a very different world, for sure. Jaime: Yeah it's crazy. It's really crazy and maybe five years from now we'll look back on that and go, Oh man, it was so great, why didn't we just do all that remote work and it was so easy. But it is weird, I just got off the phone with a client and he's just saying that he's not leaving the house and he doesn't want to get the vaccine because he almost died from a vaccine from something else a long time ago, so he's just like staying in his house for his whole life. And I just, I feel in our field where we're designing products for customers and users, it's like, “Nah, we need to have human contact and get out there.” When I'm feeling really low, I reach out to a friend and I have to dump, and say “Ugh”, and have them tell me. I just hope we don't lose everything as a result of this, online world that we live in now. Katty: I don't think so. I mean I certainly hope not. I do feel that there's a hybrid version of it that's going to be more pronounced. I mean we went to such an extreme this past year, I do think there's going to be a hybrid world in front of us. I haven't quite figured it out yet, but little by little I think we'll fall into place. Let's end on a couple of inspiration pieces. Where do you get your inspiration? Jaime: My inspiration now is probably-- I consume a lot of film. I like to have a big impact. I actually went to the movie theater, on Sunday, by myself, bought a ticket to go see Ich bin dein Mensch, I'm Your Man, a German film about a man robot who was built to learn on what a woman wants and then they program him to be the perfect partner. It was amusing, to walk into it, to have it open up and see all of Mitte Berlin and see the TV tower and see the food and see inside the flat. I miss Berlin so much right now, I felt like when I got out of there  I had just gone to Berlin. It just reminded me of all these tiny little things. So I get a lot of inspiration from being able to transport myself into different realities physically and through film, and right now, traveling is limited,but I definitely get my inspiration from seeing other cultures, other ways to live.  I lived in Berlin for most of the pandemic, and it took months, but after being there and away from here for so many months it really-- when you experience other cultures, it makes you appreciate and also find things you don't like about your own culture. But I feel like having perspective is what inspires me. Katty: Love that, and for creativity to bloom, do you need that spark of inspiration for creativity to happen, or is there another thing you tap into when you sit down to write or to do another wireframe or to create, what would you tap into for that? Jaime: I don't know, I wish I could answer that. I don't know. I spend my days at the computer then I go and walk on a trail. It's extremely important for me to get out and walk in nature and I do that every day and I listen to the same 3 podcasts. The New York Times Day thing, The Berlin Briefing, and then Doug Rushkoff's Team Human And that stuff, while I'm like in nature and walking around listening to these podcasts, again, I guess I feel transported and I feel immersed. I think that when I leave the house, and when I come back, whether I'm jogging or listening to music and weird experimental atonal music that nobody would like unless they're into weird music. That helps me really reset the crazy stuff we're telling ourselves in our head or just like being in a mundane moment. I think sitting at a computer for more than four hours, not healthy for me.   Katty: I love that. Both for creativity and inspiration, it's not going to happen nine to five necessarily looking at a little screen. To be able to get out of this and just get other influences. I find nature so healing in so many ways and my ideation just goes off the roof when I'm out and about. Jaime: Where do you go, where do you get your nature?  Katty: My favorite place is Point Doom in Malibu. It's a very easy little hike, but you are at eye level of the pelicans flying by. It's just the most incredible sensation sitting there and you see these majestic birds flying right at your eye level. So whenever I can, whether it's a birthday or an anniversary or something special, that's where I like to go.    Jaime: Nice. Yeah.   Katty: Well Jamie where can people find you?   Jaime: People can find me on LinkedIn, @Jaimerlevy. I'm on Twitter, I'm not tweeting so much. I was told I need to get on Instagram but I'm like, “What?”. And then Jaimelevy.com and then the book userexperiencestrategy.com. I'd love to just mention if people don't like to go walk in nature. I recorded my audible book at this great studio in the valley, where I grew up, and it's me reading my book and doing some impressions of myself, and it's a lot of stories and so far the reviews have been really favorable. And so if you're not a big reader like me I hate it, I don't really like reading. I can read an article but long-format, not so good. Check out my audible book if you're not sure go to userexperiencestrategy.com and listen to the first two chapters and try it on. But I'm really excited about the audible, you know for my book I self-produced it, paid for it, and it's mine. So that was important to me, you know.      

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How to Get Over Trust Issues and Retain Agency Clients Longer

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 20:08


Do your clients have trust issues with your agency? How can you go about creating an honest rapport to build trust? Working at a larger agency Bob Bailey started to notice a trust problem. Clients are losing trust in their agencies. This trend has actually increased over time, with clients moving to in-house services. This is the opportunity he and his partners saw when they created their agency Truth Collective. They wondered "wouldn't it be great if a marketing agency could thrive by just telling the truth?" Then they set out to have honest conversations about strategy, creativity, and relationships. In his conversation with Jason, Bob spoke about all-time low trust levels in agencies, how he tries to build trust with potential clients from the first meeting, how he has built leadership teams in his agency, and why agency owners must themselves from being the fixer to empower their teams. 3 Golden Nuggets Honest rapport with clients. Trust in agencies has hit all-time lows, according to Bob. That's not a place any of us would want to be. So how to gain back client trust in agencies? Especially in a time when more and more clients are moving to in-house many services. Bob believes the key to building trust starts with the initial conversation. He makes it a point to treat it as a conversation, not a pitch, and makes it about them. “I feel like squaring the meeting centrally right on their business and what they need is the place to be,” he assured. Also, he's seen the positive effect of knowing who you are as a business and how you can help their business, instead of trying to do everything, which comes across as just wanting more money. Building leadership. As we always say, you can get to the million-dollar mark almost by accident. But to be a multi-million-dollar agency you'll need to start building a structure, starting with your leadership team. Bob didn't always get that right, in some cases because the people weren't quite right. But also because they weren't quite ready as new owners to really understand what that meant. They really had to look themselves in the mirror when the company hit a cap at $3.8 million and start to get serious about leadership. They needed more structure, so they selected a group and shared everything about the business with them. “If these guys are going to lead, they need all the information to become leaders too,” he acknowledges. Try to not be a fixer. How can you help your leadership team grow? Prepare them to solve issues and trust them. Bob and his partners started organizing weekly meetings with their leadership team to discuss new business leads and prospects, financial forecasts, what they call remarkable creative briefs and opportunities, they also talk about employees or client issues and possible solutions. This way, they started to prepare the leadership team and shared the information and metrics they may need to do their jobs. Ultimately, it is always about trusting that they are capable to face any issues that may come up. Agency owners normally get to where they are because they are very good at solving problems, but at some point it should be your team's responsibility to do so. Sponsors and Resources Sharpspring: Today's episode is sponsored by Sharpspring, an all-in-one revenue growth platform that provides all of the marketing automation, CRM, & sales features you need to support your entire customer lifecycle. Partner with an affordable marketing automation provider that you can trust. Head over to sharpspring.com/smartagency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Creating an Honest Rapport With Your Clients to Address Low Trust Levels in Agencies Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here. I have another great episode and we're not going to talk about frou-frou shit. We're going to talk about rebuilding trust in our industry, and we're going to go over some really cool things. And I didn't know, he was telling me in the pre-show Bob was telling me that agency trust is ranked between Congress and I think something else. He'll tell us, I can't remember, but like it's pathetic. So we're going to talk about what you can do in order to build trust. And if you have that trust, you can make more money, scale faster. and have the life that you want, where you have the freedom. So let's go ahead and get into the show. Hey, Bob. Welcome to show. Bob: [00:00:49] Hey, Jason. What's up, man? Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:51] I almost forgot which buttons to hit. We were talking about frou-frou stuff before. I'm so messed up. Bob: [00:00:58] I'm just going for the ride. Jason: [00:00:59] Yeah. Tell us who you are and what you do. Bob: [00:01:02] Jason, my name is Bob Bailey. I am one of the three founding partners of a creative company called Truth Collective. And my role here is the CEO, which I have sort of reframed from chief executive officer to the chief everyone officer. And I don't know if that's frou frou stuff to you or not. But for me, it sort of keeps me focused on, you know, my most important thing and that's my team. So thanks for having me. Jason: [00:01:27] Yeah. As long as you're having fun and you guys are doing impact, I don't care what you call it. So how'd, you guys get started in this crazy industry that we're in? Bob: [00:01:38] It's a good question. I've been listening to some of your shows and you know, a lot of folks, they tend to see a, a problem or a gap out there and they feel like they can fill that. And it was, it was similar with us. We were working together at a, at a larger agency. And at the time, like there was just getting hard. Like it was, it was getting really, really hard. And we started seeing these patterns where consumers were trusting brands less. Agencies… clients were trusting their agencies less. And even like inside the agencies, people trusting each other less. And so we said, man, like… Wouldn't it be just really easy and wouldn't it be awesome if a marketing agency could thrive by just telling the truth? Like, what if you were just honest about everything? What if you weren't like out there inflating case studies, inflating agency credentials presentations? What if you could just go out there and like be yourself and tell people the information that's going to really help them? And it was a really like novel, like silly idea at the moment. But we really got behind it and, um, we've built, we built a business on that. And so it's been really fun. Jason: [00:02:47] Well, how do you separate yourself? Because there's lots of agencies out there that are full of shit and they're not truthful. But they say they are. So how do you guys do that? Like, tell me about the stat that you were talking about in the pre-show. And I kind of teased in the intro, like the agency industry is between Congress and what for…? Bob: [00:03:12] Yeah. It's, Gallup does this annual survey on like trusted industries and they go through all of them and there is like pretty far down the list used car salespeople, advertising industry, Congress. So we're sandwiched between those two, those two industries. And like, I don't, if like, for me, like that's not a place that I want to live and after eight years or so, it, hasn't not only as it hasn't gotten better. I think it's actually probably getting a little bit worse. I mean, especially when you look at how clients are responding to it and in housing, everything. And it's really, it's a pretty interesting situation. And so I think we have some stuff to fix. Jason: [00:03:55] Well, you know, when, when we chat and we interview agencies to join our mastermind, we ask lots of questions around their delivery and the results that they give to their clients. And you'll be so surprised about how many that they don't know it. And they started by accident. They took a Facebook course on ads, and then they started like, they were really good marketers, but they could never deliver their own service efficiently. And like, it just blows me out of the water that, and people always ask me, what's the one thing you have to do to scale your agency? I'm like, well, you have to do something really well for your clients. Bob: [00:04:34] Yeah, for sure. I think that the work that we tend to do tends to focus on something we actually changed during COVID. But we got really focused in, on the stuff that we love to do and the stuff that we're truly like sort of brilliant at: creative strategy, insights, and big idea platforms. And we really tend to focus on like high-impact tactics, like the stuff that's going to really like move the brand forward. Sort of gradually moving away from a lot of the activation kind of things. But, um, for us, it's really important that, you know, we're setting up. How are we going to know if this works? How are we going to be happy? Like, yeah, there's the qualitative stuff. But a lot of times there's not business metrics in place. There's not foundational stuff in place on the client-side. And so we do all that we can to build those baselines so that we know for if we're helping them improve their business brand and in the behaviors of the customers. It's all we care about. Jason: [00:05:32] What are some keys in order to build trust with your clients? Bob: [00:05:37] I think it starts from the initial conversation. And I think that that conversation has to be different than anything that they felt from other agencies. I don't have a PowerPoint that I use to introduce me or my agency to clients. I have a conversation. I feel like if you show up with your deck, then the meeting is about me and not them. And so I feel like squaring the meeting centrally right on their business and what they need is the place to be. And you'd be surprised how different that actually is. So I think it starts there and, you know, it sort of quickly goes into the things that we do and the things that we will not do. And so, you know, I think that's also been a disarming thing where clients will, they'll say, you know, well, I know, you know, as the owner, like you want to do all my stuff. Uh, because you know, you're money motivated and I'm like, well, actually, no, like I don't want to do a thousand banner ads. I don't want to do all, I don't want to do your emails. I don't want to do those things. Like I want to help your internal team be successful with that stuff. I think there's just like those sort… of known who we are and being okay with just like being okay with having a conversation about that. But I think it really just sets a tone for this is the kind of partnership that we're after, and this is how we're going to help you be most successful and help the other agencies in your network be more successful too. Jason: [00:07:03] Yeah. You know, I always use the analogy of the creepy guy in the conference. Like, do you have the creepy guy in the conference come up to you and they just start throwing up on you about how cool their company is and how amazing he is. All that. You're like, you're the creepy dude. Get away from me. The other guy comes up to you and starts asking you questions. And by asking questions, the whole attention is on them. People are going to like that conversation because it's about them. And that's what we always liked when we would come and have initial calls with our prospects. We were the same way. And I, and I always hate when agencies are like, well, we don't have our portfolio or our deck ready. What is that…? I'm like, you don't need that shit. The companies that want that, that means you're going to be doing an RFP, which really stands for request for fucking punishment. You shouldn't be doing that. So I love that approach. Let's kind of switch focus a little bit and talk about because you have over 30 people, um, you know, multimillion dollar agency. A lot of people can hit the million mark by accident. But when you start getting in the multiple millions, you have to get a lot of things right. I mean, you still haven't figured out everything. I don't have everything figured out. No one does. If they do, you should shoot them with a water gun and be like, you're lying. But how are you building better leaders? Because I feel that in order to get to the level that you're at, you have to build a really amazing team, which it starts with the leadership. Bob: [00:08:43] Totally. You're right, man. Like we, gosh… We've been in business for eight years now and you know, I always think about us like a version. You know, the current version of Truth Collective, and you know, we've been through, we've been through a few and we've tried some things and we didn't get it exactly right. Whether it was, you know, you talked about the leaders and the leadership team. I think in some cases like the people weren't quite right. But then also we weren't quite ready as sort of new owners to really understand what that even meant. We were very much in a mindset of like we're modeling the behaviors we expect and why don't you just understand that stuff? And that's not fair to anybody. And it also, you know, to your point, like you'll hit a cap and the cap… Our cap was like right around like three and a half to 3.8 million where… We can do that. Like kind of with any team, with any set of clients, like that's, that was what we were. And we, you know, we did that and we said, geez, you know, it's us. Like we looked in the mirror and said, okay, like we got to get out of the way here. And we got to get really serious about the leaders on the team, but how we going to do it? And it was about the people, but we also just needed some real structure and we were growing and growing rapidly, but we weren't growing in like an organized way. We started as an account guy, a strategist and a creative guy. And as we grew, like, we just hired more people like us. But what we weren't doing is growing from the standpoint of like the functions of the business. Like I wasn't, we weren't thinking about, okay, how are we going to staff new business growth? How are we going to staff client service? How are we going to staff creative? How are we going to staff the administrative stuff? And, you know, people just looked at all three of us all the time for decisions. And we were just, we just became the bottleneck that was holding it back. Jason: [00:10:50] Is your agency struggling to deliver real revenue growth results to your clients. You know, agency marketers can consolidate data and align marketing and sales teams goals to achieve real results for your agency and clients asing revenue growth platforms. SharpSpring is an all-in-one platform built for agencies like yours to optimize digital marketing strategies with simple, powerful automation. Manage your entire funnel all in Sharpspring. Now for a limited time, my smart agency listeners will receive your first month free and half off onboarding with SharpSpring. Just visit sharpspring.com/smart agency to schedule your demo and grab this offer. That's sharpspring.com/smart agency. Yeah, you were the toll booth. I always like to kind of say. Bob: [00:11:43] Yes, you've talked about that before. Jason: [00:11:44] Yeah, and you kept mentioning a keyword: how? You're like, how do we do this? How do we do this? When did you start realizing who? And giving them the power in order to make the decision? Bob: [00:11:58] Yeah. It was actually in the fall of 2019. So we, we decided we needed to try the leadership team again. We selected people, you know, not by title. But by, like, if you run a function in the agency, you're on the team, like that's how we made the decision. So it was very clear and specific. We got that group together, we got super transparent. We shared everything about the business. All the numbers. So no more like close to the vest ownership. If these guys are going to lead, like they need to know stuff and they need all the information so that they can also learn how to become leaders too. So we started sharing that we met weekly every Monday, same agenda for 90 minutes and we just, we got into a cadence. And thankfully we did because, you know, we all know like what happened in March, you know? So we had made about six months, five months worth of momentum together as a team when, uh, when COVID hit and sort of through everything… Um, hit the brakes on everything. And so we had to respond to that. Jason: [00:13:05] You said you meet once a week on Mondays for 90 minutes and the same structure. And what was that structure of that meeting? Bob: [00:13:12] The structure was, it was actually, are you familiar with a organization called EOS? Jason: [00:13:18] Yep. There's lots of mastermind members and I've had Gino on, on the show a number of times. Bob: [00:13:24] Yeah. We adopted that, that framework in the beginning, just because we needed a consistent framework. And that seemed to be, it seemed to make a lot of sense. It was pretty straightforward and simple. And so it's you come in and you talk about like, what are the key? You know, you have a scorecard and so our scorecard is new business leads and prospects. It's how are we doing on our financial forecast today? You know, month and quarter, how are we doing? Um, we measure our, we call like remarkable creative briefs and opportunities, like of all the work in the shop how many of those have the potential to be really remarkable? And then we, um, there's some, some accounting metrics that we measure. And so we sort of quickly hit those. We talk about any employees, uh, or client issues that are going on. And then we devote about an hour of it to like issue, discussion and resolution. And so some weeks there's a handful of stuff that you have to move through some weeks. There's one thing. But the whole point is to use that brainpower in a really concentrated focused way to, to keep us moving in the right direction. Jason: [00:14:32] I love it. I love how, you know, and thanks for going over some of the KPIs or I guess what they call rocks or, or, um, I don't know what they call it. But I get the gist of it because there's a lot of people that don't really know what to measure and they just go into a meeting. Hey, how's it going? And, uh, really kind of it. I's like none of them, what's the agenda that you have for the week and let's, let's rock and roll. So… Bob: [00:14:59] We went from having no sort of across-the-board KPIs to implementing way too many. Jason: [00:15:07] Yeah, yeah. Bob: [00:15:10] To getting it down to like now there's like five, that really matter. You know what I mean? Like, and if you get enough insight from those five to, to hit like 90% of the business. So we're, we're learning as we go, like, it gets you really hands-on. But now we've especially with COVID like, I think when she had the right team and the right sort of flow… I think letting go is actually been like a key and helping us grow and scale. You were talking about that a few minutes ago. Jason: [00:15:38] Yeah. It's very challenging. We had our digital agency experience at my house in Colorado, a couple, uh, two weeks ago. And a lot of the agencies here, multimillion, they have a hard time letting go on stuff. I'm like, you just got to trust your team! Like, it's kinda like your baby, like let the baby fall and then they'll learn to walk. If you're going to be the crutch and you're always going to catch them, well, expect to catch them for the rest of your life. Bob: [00:16:09] It's true. You know, a lot of people, and I think a lot of agency owners, you know, you start an agency because you were really good in another agency or like maybe you were the fixer. And you know how to fix it and you know how to move on, but that only gets you so far, right? You can't be the fixer, like you have to, to your point, like you got to like help him walk. You got to coach them, not do. You got to direct, not fix. And so that's, that's been a real, it seems really subtle and it seems really obvious, but it's not so easy. Um, but it's been a real game-changer, like you said. Jason: [00:16:43] Yeah. And when it happens too you get depressed, cause then they're doing the decisions and doing all the stuff without you, they don't need you anymore. And then you're like, what do I do? And you're like, well now you're the CEO, dummy. This is your new role. And this is what you're doing. Bob: [00:16:57] Yeah, figure out what's next. Jason: [00:17:00] Yeah, exactly. So I went through that and I always make fun of my mastermind members when they go through that. I'm like, hey, dummy, this is what you wanted now. Let's, let's do it this way. Life will be better. Bob: [00:17:15] It is, you know, I love it when people bring stuff that I would've never done or couldn't have done. My whole goal is I want Truth to be something that I couldn't make. I want it to outgrow me personally. And I, like, I think that's when you're really into some exciting, like durable stuff as a business. So it's fun when that happens. It is intimidating though, sometimes. Jason: [00:17:39] Oh yeah. Well, Bob, this has all been amazing. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Bob: [00:17:45] I think agency owners like... You put out a LinkedIn post the other day about you made a game out of it, but like, there was like… Jason: [00:17:53] Yeah. Never have I ever? Bob: [00:17:56] Yeah, yeah, yeah. And like, I've done all that. Every one of them I've done… Jason: [00:18:00] Multiple times. Bob: [00:18:02] Right. Habitually, right? I think like a key to happiness as an agency owner and the growth is like just, you know the answer. You know the answer is not to chase that stupid thing. You know the answer, you know what I mean? But the industry wants you to do that. Like there's so much crazy industry inertia out there. I think follow your gut. You know, I just, I think have the courage to follow your gut because you're going to be way happier. You're going to make room for the stuff that you really want to be doing instead of falling into those old traps. And you're going to wind up differentiating your agency as results. So your post got me really thinking about that. And I think that's helpful for it's been helpful for me. Jason: [00:18:48] Goog. Well, that's what it was designed for. What's the agency website URL people can go and check out the agency? Bob: [00:18:55] Sure it's truthcollective.com. All one word is until the truth. It's not like some weird UFO tracking organization. It's not some church, you know, we, we'd get all kinds of crazy stuff, but truthcollective.com and we're all over social. Jason: [00:19:13] Awesome. Well, thanks so much, Bob, for coming on the show, we really enjoyed it. If you guys liked that episode, make sure you like subscribe, tell a friend, tell a fellow agency owner that you'll help them out because look, we all know we're struggling a lot of the times they will help out. And if you want to be around amazing agency owners on a consistent basis and really what they're doing in order for you to scale faster. And you know, sometimes it's a shrink session. Sometimes it's a fun session. Sometimes it's like, oh my God, this is the best strategy I've ever heard. I'd like for all of you to go to digitalagencyelite.com and check out the mastermind. See if it's right for you. If you feel it is, apply. We'll have a conversation and we'll go from there. And, uh, so go to digitalagencyelite.com. And until next time have a Swenk day.

Transformative Principal
Ego and Humility with Scott Schuette Transformative Principal 458

Transformative Principal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 35:27


Learning Executive and coach for 30 years. Fabulous Learning Nerds podcast Why everyone should have a blog, podcast, newsletter. Ego is at the root of all adult learning excuses. Here's my idea, will you poke holes in it? Extreme Ownership Vulnerability podcast nerdiness How to be transformative principal? It goes back to your people. Gallup 12 pyramid - Recognize everyone this week. Sponsors InControl SEL for Middle School In Control created an effortless social and emotional, character development video curriculum for your students that's ZERO-TEACHER-PREP AND it's so cool looking- it feels like a Youtube or Netflix Series- and that's purposeful, they meet students right where they're at. The videos are 5–6 minutes, kids love them, teachers love them, and you will too. There's no guesswork in the program because there's a 21-video progression for each grade level. They've thought of everything– because it's a group of award winning counselors, teachers, and principals that came up with this thing. It'll help you save tons of time and headaches. Take it from me, it's time to check that social-emotional learning box, the empty one that's been keeping you up at night–and it's time to do it in a meaningful, measurable, magnetic way. If you go to www.InControlSEL.com/jethro you can check out some of the videos and even receive 20% off if you pre-order for next school year John Catt Today's Transformative Principal sponsor, John Catt Educational, amplifies world-class voices on timeless topics, with a list of authors recognized globally for their fresh perspectives and proven strategies to drive success in modern schools and classrooms. John Catt's mission is to support high-quality teaching and learning by ensuring every educator has access to professional development materials that are research-based, practical, and focused on the key topics proven essential in today's and tomorrow's schools. Learn more about professional development publications that are easy to implement for your entire faculty, and are both quickly digestible and rigorous, by visiting https://us.johncattbookshop.com/. Learn more about some of the newest titles: - The Coach's Guide to Teaching by Doug Lemov The Feedback Pendulum: A manifesto for enhancing feedback in education by Michael Chiles Putting Staff First: A blueprint for revitalising our schools by John Tomsett and Jonny Uttley 10 Things Schools Get Wrong (And How We Can Get Them Right) by Jared Cooney Horvath and David Bott Let's Talk About Flex: Flipping the flexible working narrative for education by Emma Turner A Parent's Guide to Powerful Teaching by Patrice Bain John Catt is also proud publisher of the new book from Transformative Principal host Jethro Jones: SchoolX: How principals can design a transformative school experience for students, teachers, parents – and themselves Visit this page to learn more about bulk orders and how to bring John Catt's research-based materials to your school: https://us.johncattbookshop.com/pages/agents-and-distributors

The Gallup Podcast
Economics and Politics of Inflation

The Gallup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 20:42


Inflation in the U.S. is creating financial hardships for nearly half of Americans. What is driving up the cost of goods and services right now -- and how much is it related to supply and demand? Dr. Jonathan Rothwell, Gallup's principal economist, joins the podcast to untangle these questions and more.

Gallup Called to Coach
Confident and Competent: A "Lift" for Struggling Coaches -- S9E54

Gallup Called to Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 56:47


Learn how to give your coaching and self-confidence a boost through your relationships and digging deeper into your own CliftonStrengths as Dani Grieveson joins the webcast. View the complete transcript for this webcast, along with audio and video, at https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/357800/confident-and-competent-lift-for-struggling-coaches.aspxFollow UsFacebook -- https://www.facebook.com/CliftonStrengths/ LinkedIn -- https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/cliftonstrengths/Instagram -- https://www.instagram.com/cliftonstrengths/ Twitter -- https://twitter.com/CliftonStrengthPinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/CliftonStrengths/Learn More About CliftonStrengthsSubscribe to the CliftonStrengths Newsletter -- https://bit.ly/30IjWMH How It Works -- https://bit.ly/36gD4mi 34 CliftonStrengths Themes -- https://bit.ly/30FyexO 4 CliftonStrengths Domains -- https://bit.ly/36eLvyx The History -- https://bit.ly/30OggZZ Who's It ForIndividuals -- https://bit.ly/2ukUNf1 Teams -- https://bit.ly/3axoASj Organizations -- https://bit.ly/38pj7Lm Schools -- https://bit.ly/37gPvjl Popular ProductsAssessments -- https://bit.ly/2Gi9Etf Materials and Tools -- https://bit.ly/3azKrZc Courses -- https://bit.ly/37ftuRP Books -- https://bit.ly/36jdfC2 Additional ResourcesArticles and Videos -- https://bit.ly/2TNAh19 Webcasts -- https://bit.ly/2GeKHip Guides and Reports -- https://bit.ly/37erWI0

Beyond The Lines
The Same 24 Hours: All Things Well-Being

Beyond The Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 65:59


Today's episode is packed full of everything Well-Being. We are speaking with Steven Trotter, who is the Associate Director of Wellness & Fitness here at Campus Recreation & Wellness. Steven is an ACE health coach, personal trainer, group fitness instructor, medical exercise specialist, ACSM certified exercise physiologist, and Gallup certified strengths coach. He is knowledgeable on all things well-being, and he is here today to share what he knows with you. We are discussing everything: fitness, mindset, holistic practices, health coaching, and using your strengths. Steven uses his Gallup strengths certification to help clients discover their unique strengths and better understand how to use them in all aspects of life. We also discuss the five elements of Well-Being and how to effectively manage each of them. If you are looking to expand your knowledge of all things Well-Being, be sure to listen in to today's episode. You don't want to miss it!

Mistaken Identity w/ David & Frank
Frank's Test Results

Mistaken Identity w/ David & Frank

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 53:11


During our Cultural Conversations Series, Beverly Griffith Bryant asked if she could give Frank Gallup's Strength Assessment. Well, the results are in!Check out our 24 hour tv channel at www.mistakenidentity.tvSign up to win some of the items featured on our shows for the holidays at www,patreon.com/mistakenidentitypodcast The baseball season is over, soon, but the the fall line up of movies, player sessions and On Demand content to watch is just beginning on our Podcast membership site, starting at just $1! Check it out at www.patreon.com/mistakenidentitypodcastSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/mistakenidentitypodcast)

Sinica Podcast
The Carter Center's survey on Chinese perception, with Yawei Liu and Michael Cerny

Sinica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 72:04


Recent polls conducted by organizations like Gallup and Pew have shown a precipitous decline in U.S. public opinion toward China. But how do the Chinese feel about the U.S.? This week on Sinica, Kaiser chats with Yawei Liu, senior China advisor at the Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia, and with Michael Cerny, associate editor of the Carter Center's China Perception Monitor, about a survey commissioned by the center on Chinese attitudes toward the United States and Chinese perceptions of global opinion on China.7:48 – The methodology behind the survey13:02 – The survey's central questions25:30 – The polarized 55-64 age group28:17 – The drivers of Chinese negative perceptions of the U.S.37:35 – Inflection points in Chinese perceptions of the U.S.45:31 – Generational effects on Chinese perceptions50:27 – The causal direction: Do negative perceptions of the U.S. boost Chinese notions about international perceptions of China?A transcript of this interview is available at SupChina.comRecommendations:Michael: Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner; and Causal Inference: The Mixtape by Scott CunninghamYawei: How the Red Sun Rose by Gao Hua;, translated by Stacey Mosher; and The Battle of Chosin, a documentary film from PBSKaiser: Y: The Last Man, a post-apocalyptic TV show from FX, available on HuluSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Armed American Radio
Wed AARDD 11-17-2021

Armed American Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 53:53


Network delay..apologies...Mark discusses Gallup handgun poll and continues the Rittenhouse case analysis as we near a verdict.