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Resources that exist without actions of humankind

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Latest podcast episodes about natural resources

FAR OUT: Adventures in Unconventional Living
FAR OUT #152 - Learning From Our Plant Relatives

FAR OUT: Adventures in Unconventional Living

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:58


Listen and explore:What does it mean to be in right relationship with plants?The plants we are relating to these daysThe dose makes the poisonWho is in control ---the plants or us?Did plants terraform our planet? Have they evolved mechanisms to access other dimensions of reality?Learning from our plant relativesWhen we don't remember our plant friends they disappearThe irreplaceable value of being around embodied teachersMentioned on this episode:Neverwhere: A Novel by Neil GaimanBraiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall KimmererThis is Your Mind on Plants by Michael PollanConnect with us:Website: www.thefarout.lifeEmail us at info@thefarout.lifeWild Within @ www.thewildwithin.orgSupport this podcast:Discount link to purchase organic, raw ceremonial-grade cacao ethically sourced in Guatemala (a portion of proceeds support this podcast)Become a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/thefaroutcoupleMake one-time donation with PayPal (our account is aplambeck22@gmail.com)Leave a review on iTunes!Share this episode with a friend! :DCredits:Intro music: "Complicate ya" by Otis McDonaldOutro music: "Running with wise fools" written & performed by Krackatoa (www.krackatoa.com)

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 605 (11-29-21): Preparing for the Season of Freezing Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:17).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-26-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 29, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~10 sec – instrumental. That excerpt of “Mid-winter Etude,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., opens our annual episode on winter preparedness.  This coincides with Virginia Winter Weather Awareness Week, which is being observed this year from November 29 to December 3, according to the Wakefield, Va., National Weather Service office. In 2021, winter astronomically begins in Virginia on December 21 at 10:59 a.m.  That's the Eastern Standard time of the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, when that hemisphere is at its maximum annual tilt away from the sun. At its beginning, middle, or end, winter can bring cold temperatures, hazardous roads, power outages, and fire hazards.  To help you be prepared, here are 10 tips compiled from information provided by the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC.1. Avoid traveling in winter-storm conditions if you can. If you must travel, get road conditions from the Virginia 511 telephone system, Web site, or app.   And have an emergency kit for your vehicle, including jumper cables, water, non-perishable food, blankets, a flashlight, and other items.2. Have battery-powered sources of lighting and information, particularly weather information, along with enough batteries to last through a power outage of several days.  Whenever possible, use flashlights and not candles during power outages.  If you do use candles, put them in safe holders away from anything combustible, and don't leave a burning candle unattended.3.  Make a family emergency plan that covers sheltering; evacuation from your area; escape from a home fire; emergency meeting places; communications; a supply of food, water, and medications; and other factors specific to your circumstances; and practice your plan. 4.  Get fireplaces, wood stoves, and chimneys inspected and cleaned.5.  Install a smoke detector in every bedroom and on every floor level, test them monthly, and replace the batteries at least annually. 6.  Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home and check or replace the battery every six months.7.  If you use space heaters, make sure they'll switch off automatically if the heater falls over; plug them into wall outlets, not extension cords; keep them at least three feet from combustible objects; don't leave heaters unattended; and check for cracked or damaged wires or plugs. 8.  Generators, camp stoves, and other devices that burn gasoline or charcoal should be used outdoors only.9.  Learn where to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. And 10.  Be careful of overexertion during snow shoveling. More information on preparing for winter weather, fires, and other emergencies is available online from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, at vaemergency.gov.Next time the forecast calls for snow, freezing rain, or other wintry weather, here's hoping that you can stay warm, dry, and safe.Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “Mid-winter Etude.”  MUSIC – ~28 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Midwinter Etude,” from the 1996 album “Incarnation,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 561, 1-25-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com.IMAGESSnow and ice on a seasonal pond at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Snow along Toms Creek at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Ice hanging from tree twigs at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., February 20, 2021.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WINTER WEATHER PREPAREDNESS AND FIRE SAFETY On Winter Weather Preparedness The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Winter Weather,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/winter-weather/, accessed 11/29/21.Winter storms can range from freezing rain or ice, to a few hours of moderate snowfall, to a blizzard that lasts for several days.  Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures, power outages and unpredictable road conditions.  Before, during, and after a winter storm, roads and walkways may become extremely dangerous or impassable.  Access to critical community services such as public transportation, child care, healthcare providers and schools may be limited.  Preparing your home, car and family before cold weather and a winter storm arrives is critical. Overview for Dealing with a Winter Storm*During a winter storm, stay off the roads as much as possible and only drive when absolutely necessary.  Always give snow plows the right of way. *Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning device inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any other partially enclosed area. *Snow shoveling is a known trigger for heart attacks!  Always avoid overexertion when shoveling. *When severe weather occurs, plan to check on elderly or disabled neighbors and relatives. *If you must travel, know road conditions before you leave home.  Visit 511Virginia.org or call 511 for road condition updates. *Protect yourself from frostbite!  Hands, feet and face are the most commonly affected areas so wear a hat, mittens (which are warmer than gloves) and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss. *Keep dry!  Change out of wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. *Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer or heavy clothing.Prepare Your Home *Make sure your home is properly insulated. *Check the weather stripping around your windows and doors. *Learn how to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. *Have additional heat sources on hand in case of a power outages. *Keep a fire extinguisher accessible. *Replace the batteries in your carbon monoxide detector annually. Prepare Your Car *Batteries lose power as temperatures drop, be sure to have yours tested. *Check your car's antifreeze level. *Have your radiator system serviced. *Replace your car's windshield wiper fluid with a wintertime mix. *Proactively replace your car's worn tires and wiper blades. *To help with visibility, clean [snow or ice] off your car entirely, including your trunk, roof, windows and headlights. Did You Know?*Dehydration can make you more susceptible to hypothermia.*If it's too cold for you, it's too cold for your pet!  Don't leave pets outside for prolonged periods of time and have plenty of fresh, unfrozen water on hand.*Each year, snow, sleet, slush and/or ice on the road leads to approximately, 537,000 crashes, 136,000 injuries, and 1,800 deaths.*It can snow at temperatures well above freezing*Temperatures do not have to be below zero degrees to cause harmOn Fire SafetyThe following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Fires,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/fires/, accessed 11/29/21. In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening.  In just five minutes, a home can be engulfed in flames. Learn About Fires *Fire is FAST!  In less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house or for it to be engulfed in flames.*Fire is HOT!  Heat is more threatening than flames. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this super-hot air will scorch your lungs and melt clothes to your skin.*Fire is DARK!  Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness.*Fire is DEADLY!  Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Asphyxiation is the leading cause of fire deaths, exceeding burns by a three-to-one ratio. Create and Practice a Fire Escape Plan*In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared.  Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly.*Twice each year, practice your home fire escape plan.  Some tips to consider when preparing this plan include:*Find two ways to get out of each room in the event the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke.*A secondary route might be a window onto a neighboring roof or a collapsible ladder for escape from upper story windows.*Make sure that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly, and that security bars can be properly opened.*Practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.*Teach children not to hide from firefighters.  Smoke Alarms*A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.*Install both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors.*Test batteries monthly.*Replace batteries in battery-powered and hard-wired smoke alarms at least once a year (except non-replaceable 10-year lithium batteries).*Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, both inside and outside of sleeping areas.*Replace the entire smoke alarm unit every 8-10 years or according to manufacturer's instructions.*Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking – it can be a deadly mistake. Smoke Alarm Safety for People with Access or Functional Needs*Audible alarms for visually impaired people should pause with a small window of silence between each successive cycle so that they can listen to instructions or voices of others.*Smoke alarms with a vibrating pad or flashing light are available for the hearing impaired. Contact your local fire department for information about obtaining a flashing or vibrating smoke alarm.*Smoke alarms with a strobe light outside the home to catch the attention of neighbors, and emergency call systems for summoning help, are also available. During a Fire*Crawl low under any smoke to your exit – heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.*Before opening a door, feel the doorknob and door. If either is hot, or if there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.*If you open a door, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.*If you can't get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 9-1-1 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.*If pets are trapped inside your home, tell firefighters right away.*If you can't get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out.  Call 9-1-1 or your fire department. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.*If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll – stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover your face with your hands.  Roll over and over or back and forth until the fire is out.  If you or someone else cannot stop, drop, and roll, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.  Use cool water to treat the burn immediately for 3 to 5 minutes.  Cover with a clean, dry cloth.  Get medical help right away by calling 9-1-1 or the fire department. Fire Escape Planning for Older Adults and People with Access or Functional Needs*Live near an exit. You'll be safest on the ground floor if you live in an apartment building. If you live in a multi-story home, arrange to sleep on the ground floor, and near an exit.*If you use a walker or wheelchair, check all exits to be sure you get through the doorways.*Make any necessary accommodations, such as providing exit ramps and widening doorways, to facilitate an emergency escape.*Speak to your family members, building manager, or neighbors about your fire safety plan and practice it with them.*Contact your local fire department's non-emergency line and explain your special needs. Ask emergency providers to keep your special needs information on file.*Keep a phone near your bed and be ready to call 911 or your local emergency number if a fire occurs. After a Fire – The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.*Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.*If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies.  If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.*Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.  The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site.  DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.*Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items.  Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.  Try to locate valuable documents and records.*Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss.  The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.*Notify your mortgage company of the fire. Cooking*Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.*Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking.*Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a “kid-free zone” of 3 feet around the stove.*Position barbecue grills at least 10 feet away from siding and deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. Smoking*Smoke outside and completely stub out butts in an ashtray or a can filled with sand.*Soak cigarette butts and ashes in water before throwing them away. Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash can.*Never smoke in a home where oxygen is used, even if it is turned off. Oxygen can be explosive and makes fire burn hotter and faster.*Be alert – don't smoke in bed! If you are sleepy, have been drinking, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy, put your cigarette out first. Electrical and Appliance Safety*Frayed wires can cause fires. Replace all worn, old or damaged appliance cords immediately and do not run

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Eat Y'all
56 - The Andy Griffith of the South Alabama Waters: Colonel Scott Bannon / Marine Resources Division Director, The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources | Live from EATYALL Chef Camp with Andy Chapman

Eat Y'all

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 24:12


Who watches over the seafood-rich waters of South Alabama? Meet Colonel Scott Bannon, the man who polices the seas - though at EATYALL Chef Camp, the nickname “Andy Griffith” caught on for good reason: Scott knows and cares about the people who fish under his protection. In part 2 of our 4-episode seafood series from EATYALL Chef Camp, Scott offers his unique perspective on the seafood industry: the hard work of his Marine Resources Division, the gear and grit behind fishing and shrimping, and his unforgettable first taste of seafood in the Coast Guard. Tune in and give kudos to Scott and Andy: they pulled off this episode while surrounded by freshly cooked seafood!  Protecting The Water And Wildlife of South Alabama Colonel, Director, Seafoodie. Having served with Alabama's Marine Resources Division since the 1990's, Scott is in charge of every vessel across 1,300 square miles - but the community is just as important to him as his duties. Listen as he breaks down his daily tasks, and praises the enforcement officers and scientists who monitor and protect the local seafood industry.  Fishing And Shrimping 101. Scott asserts that no one works harder than the seafood industry, and it's tough to argue. From million dollar boats and gear to spending a month or more at sea, Scott highlights the commercial fishermen who toil to process and deliver fresh seafood to your local market. A Career At Sea. Growing up in Appalachian Kentucky, Scott had never tried seafood until he joined the Coast Guard - but after his first fish taco, he's been hooked ever since. Hear Scott muse about his favorite seafood experiences, from enjoying oyster po boys washed down with sweet tea, to looking after the South Alabama waters and the people there who catch, eat, sell, and cook seafood. Andy joked that he made it through a whole interview with a law enforcement officer without being cuffed! But despite his title, Scott sees his role as a calling, not a job. Soak up more of his humble outlook in today's podcast, and watch for upcoming episodes from EATYALL Chef Camp for more of what Scott calls the greatness of South Alabama. Today's Guest  Scott Bannon, Marine Resources Division Director - https://www.outdooralabama.com/about-us/marine-resources-division Since his childhood in Louisville, Kentucky, Scott Bannon has served as a policeman and conservation enforcement officer, before joining the Coast Guard and achieving the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer. Since 2017, Scott has served as Director of Alabama's Marine Resources Division - managing the professionals and resources that sustain South Alabama's seafood industry.   Show Sponsors:  Alabama Gulf Seafood https://eatalabamaseafood.com Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/alseafood Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AlabamaSeafood   Gulf Shores and Orange Beach Tourism https://www.gulfshores.com Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/VisitALBeaches Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GulfShoresOrangeBeachTourism   Connect With Our Guest Scott Bannon Marine Resources Division - Alabama Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/alabamamarineresources Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AlabamaMarineResourcesDivision   Connect With EATYALL: https://eatyall.com Instagram - https://instagram.com/letseatyall Facebook - https://facebook.com/letseatyall Twitter - https://twitter.com/letseatyall LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/letseatyall YouTube - https://youtube.com/letseatyall   Show Credits: Hosts are Andy & Marianna Chapman Graphic Design by Tyler Castleman Production provided by Bryan Murphy Copywriting by Sean Sousa   The EATYALL Podcast is hosted by Andy Chapman, CEO and founder of EATYALL. EATYALL serves the food and farm community with effective chef outreach services.

Action and Ambition
Severence MacLaughlin Addresses Business and Economic Challenges for Large Fortune 500 Companies by Building Sentient and Semi-sentient Systems of Intelligence

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:03


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today is Severence MacLaughlin, Founder, and CEO at DeLorean Artificial Intelligence, which produces sentient and semi-sentient systems of intelligence for Sales, CPG, Financial Services, Healthcare, Life sciences, and Natural Resources markets. DAI has successfully submitted and holds Patent Pending rights on a number of Predictive and Interventive AI capabilities. Dr. MacLaughlin is one of the top-ranked Life Sciences/Healthcare Data Scientists globally (Ranked top 20 Life Sciences Data Scientists.) He has delivered over 40 new disruptive technologies and implemented systems of intelligence resulting in over $1.8B in net present value to customers and an estimated $8B ROI over the next five years. Tune in to learn more on this!

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 604 (11-22-21): Canvasbacks Come Back to the Chesapeake as Winter Approaches

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-19-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 22, 2021.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That's the landing sound of a large, distinctive duck that can be found in winter on Virginia's coastal waters.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to some more of this species' sounds, and see if you know this bird.  And here's a hint: the bird's name, and the male's beautiful color, may remind you of a painting.SOUND – ~12 secIf you guessed a Canvasback, you're right!  Canvasbacks breed on water bodies in the prairies of Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in large sections of the U.S. and Mexico, with one concentration in the Chesapeake Bay area.  According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, at one time almost half of North America's Canvasbacks wintered around the Chesapeake, but that number has decreased to about 20 percent because of reductions in Bay submerged aquatic vegetation, or Bay grasses, a valuable winter food for this species.  Canvasbacks are diving ducks, meaning they typically go completely underwater to obtain food and avoid predators.  In winter, Canvasbacks feed largely on plant roots and buds, while in summer they'll add to their plant diet a variety of aquatic insects and other animals.  Predators on adult and young Canvasbacks include mink, coyotes, foxes, owls and other birds, some reptiles and fish, and human hunters, while Canvasback eggs are eaten by various mammals and birds. The Canvasback is considered one of the most distinctive North American ducks.  The following quote from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's “Birds of the World” Web site describes how the bird stands out.  Quote: “This exclusively North American species is considered the ‘aristocrat of ducks.'  The male's striking appearance—rich chestnut-red head and neck, black chest, white back, and long, sloping, blackish bill—along with its large size distinguish it in the field.”  Unquote. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  We close with about 50 seconds of music appropriate for the Canvasback's Chesapeake Bay connection.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 197, 1-20-14, and the sounds segment of Episode 50, 1-24-11. Emily Whitesell helped write this original script for this episode during a Virginia Tech English Department internship in Spring 2011 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. The Canvasback sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 565, 2-22-21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21, on connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – used in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESMale Canvasback (location and date not identified).  Photo by Lee Karney, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/1645/rec/2), as of 11/22/21.Female Canvasback in Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in May 2005.  Photo by Donna A. Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14/rec/9), as of 11/22/21.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CANVASBACK DUCKS The scientific name of the Canvasback is Aythya valisineria. Here are some points about Canvasbacks, excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Canvasback,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949.Physical Description “The adult male has a head that is rusty red, shading to almost black near the bill.  The breast is grayish-black and the sides and back are light gray to white.  The wings and speculum are gray, and the eye is red.  The bill is long and sloping, black, with decidedly long sloping profile that clearly distinguishes it from the redhead. …The adult female head is light brown.  The sides and breast are olive-brown to gray-brown, and the underparts are light gray. The back is gray, finely barred with darker gray, and the wings are grayish brown.  …They have short wings, and a rapid wingbeat.  This species has difficulty leaving the water.  It is one of the fastest flying ducks.  …It is one of the largest ducks.”Breeding “The breeding season is from May to June… This species breeds in Alaska, western Canada, northwest United States, western North America from the prairie provinces of Canada, south into the central and western states and occasionally as far east as Hudson Bay with a few as far north as Alaska.  Spring and early summer they are found in marshes with shallow waters [and in] flooded farmland.  In mid-summer they frequent large marshes and lakes, sloughs, and swampy areas.” Migration and Winter Habitat and Behavior “During migration, they fly in large ‘V' shaped flocks at high altitudes. … They are also associated with larger bodies of water.  …Late migration is in the fall, and early migration in the spring.  This species migrates cross country from the northwestern United States to the Atlantic Coast, principally the Chesapeake Bay.  The migration corridors shift annually, and they have a strong tendency to return to the same breeding ground.  … The heaviest flight is from the Canada pothole country to the Chesapeake Bay. … They arrive at Chesapeake Bay later than most other ducks.  The Chesapeake Bay fall migration is from October 15 to December 15, with a peak from November 15 to December 15.  The spring migration is from February 20 to May 1, with the peak from March 1 to March 30.  They occupy specific and traditional rivers, lakes, and marshes on migratory areas.  … This species winters to Mexico [and to the] Atlantic and Gulf Coast.  ...Virginia is one of best areas for canvasbacks.  …  They are found in lakes, salt bays and estuaries, brackish and alkaline waters near the coast, estuaries and shallow bays, [and] rarely on the open sea. … The optimum in Chesapeake Bay areas is in fresh and brackish estuarine bays with extensive beds of submerged plants or abundant invertebrates, primarily in brackish rather than salt or freshwater areas. … There has been a 53% decline in wintering populations in the United States.  There has also been a decrease in the Atlantic flyway.”  [Population decreases have been caused by several factors, including drainage of breeding marshland, food supplies being depleted by carp and swan, pollution of wintering areas, disappearance of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay, droughts on breeding grounds, oil spills, and illegal hunting and trapping.] Diet “This species dives and obtains food from the bottoms of ponds, lakes, large rivers, open marshes, and muddy bottoms.  Plants are uprooted and the roots are eaten.  This species dives to 20-30 feet. … Important foods include…aquatic plants…, molluscs, insects, caddisfly and midge larvae, dragonflies, [and] small fish.  Chesapeake Bay foods include wild celery, widgeon grass, eelgrass, pondweed, clams and mud crabs.  Juvenile foods include caddisfly larvae, midge larvae, and mayfly nymphs.” SOURCES Used for Audio Mike Burke, “The big, beautiful canvasback: What's not to love?”  Bay Journal, November 2021, available online at https://www.bayjournal.com/eedition/page-43/page_136f4325-b978-5e55-bcec-907f0a04b1fc.html. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all; the Canvasback entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/canvasback. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/.  The Canvasback entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription may be required).  The Canvasback entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/canvas/cur/introduction. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Canvasback entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disas

new york canada society bay university agency mexico guide music ice photo natural halloween earth state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving sound accent animals cd dark north american tech water xeno web index fall land rain alaska united states pond press research ocean weather government education diet birds behavior plants foundation chesapeake bay native baltimore spring ohio fish chesapeake snow environment images green oberlin college cambridge dewhurst migration adaptations msonormal new year commonwealth atlantic important stream menu robbins normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial predators environmental dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading population biology gulf coast conservatory teal comeback grade special olympics oberlin colorful md brant yale school signature bio breeding wild turkey manhattan school scales freezing watershed transcript ornithology approaches virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes zoology minn taxonomy msohyperlink juveniles wildlife resources relyonvml bay journal lang elliot runoff audubon society all about birds sections life sciences birdsongs stormwater canvasback hudson bay lang elliott loons policymakers bmp new standard acknowledgment atlantic coast virginia department michigan museum cornell lab robert l cripple creek johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols unquote tmdl virginia society polar plunge torrin inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Closer Look with Rose Scott
Atlanta Airport Expecting To See Millions of Travelers This Week; Atlanta Neighborhoods Experiencing An Increase In Coyote Sightings

Closer Look with Rose Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 43:05


Andrew Gobeil, the director of communications and public affairs for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, talks about the airport's ongoing response amid the pandemic and how the airport is gearing up for holiday travel. Kaitlin Goode, the urban wildlife program manager for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, talks about the increase of coyote sightings in multiple Atlanta neighborhoods and what residents should do if they spot one in their community. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Story of Nitrogen
Episode 5- A Legacy of Salts

The Story of Nitrogen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:59


Related content:How does water (and things like nitrate) move through bedrock?Great video on water movement through soilsTo learn more:Chloride in freshwater lakesIntegrating water management practices to remove nitrateWetlands, bioreactors and other ways to remove nitrate from waterGroundwater flow in southeastern Minnesota

Learn English with Bob the Canadian
Free English Class! Topic: Natural Resources!

Learn English with Bob the Canadian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 55:21


Our planet has a lot of natural resources. In this English lesson I will introduce you to the vocabulary and phrases that you need to learn in order to talk about natural resources in English. Natural resources are materials or substances such as metals, forests, water, and fertile land that occur in nature that we buy, sell, trade or use to manufacture things.In this free English class you'll learn words and phrases like mine, export, raw materials, refinery, precious metals, and more!I hope you enjoy this English lesson about natural resources!Note: This is the audio portion of a Youtube English lesson which you can watch right here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwrdeQOKlNg or find by searching Youtube for, "Bob the Canadian Natural Resources"Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bobthecanadian)

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Lynette Rice and Collin O'Mara

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 47:19


Lynette Rice's HOW TO SAVE A LIFE (St. Martin's Hardcover) takes a totally unauthorized deep dive into the show's humble start, while offering exclusive intel on the behind-the-scenes culture, the most heartbreaking departures and the more polarizing plotlines. This exhaustively enthusiastic book is one that no Grey's Anatomy fan should be without.She's currently an editor-at-large at Entertainment Weekly and was the only journalist to secure an exclusive interview with Patrick Dempsey after his 2015 departure from Grey's Anatomy. She previously wrote about the TV industry for The Hollywood Reporter. A native of Redlands, California, How to Save a Life is her first book. She lives in Sherman Oaks, California.Collin O'Mara serves as President and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation, America's largest wildlife conservation organization with 52 state and territorial affiliates and nearly six million hunters, anglers, birders, gardeners, hikers, paddlers, and wildlife enthusiasts. Under O'Mara's leadership, the National Wildlife Federation is focused on recovering America's wildlife ranging from bison and bighorn sheep to pollinators like monarch butterflies and native bees, improving management of and access to public lands, restoring America's water bodies, advancing environmental education (including publishing Ranger Rick® magazines), and connecting every American child with the great outdoors.Prior to the National Wildlife Federation, O'Mara led the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control as Cabinet Secretary from 2009 through 2014. In that position, Secretary O'Mara served as the state's top natural resource official, and led the state's efforts to conserve and restore wildlife and fishery habitat, improve air quality and public health, ensure access to clean water, expand outdoor recreation and environmental education opportunities, and enhance the state's resilience to extreme weather and other climate impacts.When O'Mara was appointed in 2009, he was the youngest state cabinet official in the nation. He spearheaded a range of initiatives, including Delaware's "No Child Left Inside"/ Children In Nature campaign, a comprehensive strategy to introduce children to the outdoors; the First State Trails and Pathways Plan, a multi-year initiative to expand and connect the state's trail system; and the Delaware Bayshore Initiative, an effort to establish the region as a world-class conservation and outdoor recreation destination for hunting, birding, fishing, hiking, canoeing, and kayaking.O'Mara lives in Delaware and spends every possible moment in nature fishing, hunting, hiking, and birding with his wife Krishanti and daughters Riley and Alana.http://nwf.orgThe Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. We also offer advertising. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

What Really Happened with Michael Rivero
What Really Happened with Michael Rivero, November 16, 2021 Hour 2

What Really Happened with Michael Rivero

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 60:00


INFLATION & ECONOMY, RITTENHOUSE TRIAL & SELF-DEFENSE, PROPAGANDA & PROGRAMMING, RACE / POLITICS / CULTURE, FAUCI & COVID, INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT & NATURAL RESOURCES

projectupland.com On The Go
The Future of Conservation: Interagency Partners Work in Tandem to Protect Multiple Species

projectupland.com On The Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 9:39


A West Virginia University wildlife and fisheries student joins experts from the U.S. Forest Service, Ruffed Grouse Society, and West Virginia Division of Natural Resources on an interagency project outside of Elkins, West Virginia. Through this visit to the worksite, it's clear that multispecies management via interagency collaboration is a successful model to bolster successful conservation practices.

World Ocean Radio
Backwash

World Ocean Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 4:57


This week on World Ocean Radio we're defining "backwash" as the movement of water for filtration, for desalination, and for clearing of debris and toxins, and we're discussing methods that clean and protect Nature, using the strategies of bio-remediation to detoxify and cleanse against the human-caused destruction of natural systems.Peter Neill, Director of the World Ocean Observatory and host of World Ocean Radio, provides coverage of a broad spectrum of ocean issues from science and education to advocacy and exemplary projects. World Ocean Radio, a project of the World Ocean Observatory, is a weekly series of five-minute audio essays available for syndicated use at no cost by college and community radio stations worldwide.World Ocean Radio is produced in association with WERU-FM in Blue Hill, Maine and is distributed by the Public Radio Exchange and the Pacifica Network.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

new york society bay university agency guide music ice broad natural earth fire state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving map accent animals cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain pond press research ocean weather government education birds plants foundation voice chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment images green va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices hawk environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k observatory name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries harrisonburg ar sa eastern shore zoology minn taxonomy cosgrove msohyperlink wildlife resources audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback delmarva peninsula lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols kevin mcguire northampton county tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
Forest Products Industry Adapts

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 9:50


Forestry is a major employer statewide. In 10 counties, forestry is the No. 1 employer. So any mill closures or change in markets and management has a major impact on the economy. For example, the Verso and Park Falls mill closures impact the workers, the suppliers and the forests themselves, explains Collin Buntrock, a forest products team leader for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Wisconsin landowners account for 60 percent of the state's forest owners. So any change in market dynamics impacts private landowners, too. The county forest system is also robust. So timber sale revenue has a big impact on municipality budgets.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Steve Gruber Show
Scot Bertram, Firearm deer hunting season opens today.  The two-week hunt runs from today until November 30th.

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 11:00


Live—from the campus of Hillsdale College in beautiful Hillsdale Michigan— this is Scot Bertram in for Steve on the Steve Gruber Show for –Monday November 15th 2021—   —Here are 3 big things you need to know—   Three— The White House is planning a big celebration as President Biden signs his infrastructure bill Monday.  He calls it the biggest investment in roads, bridges, ports, water and rail in decades.  He chose a former mayor of New Orleans to oversee how the money will be spent.     Two—Firearm deer hunting season opens today.  The two-week hunt runs from today until November 30th.  The Department of Natural Resources is reminding hunters to treat every firearm as if it's loaded, obey no trespassing signs, get landowner permission to retrieve game that has wandered onto private property, and wear as much hunter orange as possible to increase visibility to other hunters.   And number one— Inflation is expected to continue until at least the start of next summer.  That word from Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen.  She told CBS's Face The Nation it all depends on the pandemic, saying continued progress will cause inflation to go down along with prices for some products.  

The Story of Nitrogen
Episode 4- The Soil Bank Account

The Story of Nitrogen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 57:17


Related content:To learn more:Nitrogen, organic matter decomposition, and corn yields Earthworm invasion into previously earthworm-free forests

Bill Whittle Network
A Single Great Unused Natural Resource Can Reverse the Education Disaster: Will We Use It?

Bill Whittle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 6:45


These highlights from Bill Whittle's Moving Back to America series includes... An 1895 test for pre-teens shows that modern high school and college protect youth from reality and produce the "most poorly educated group in American history." There remains a "single great unused natural resource" to remedy this, but will we tap it? An historical review of three major battles which provide a template for restoring America to her Constitutional conservative roots. Enjoy the full archive of Moving Back to America at https://billwhittle.com/category/shows/mb2a/

Louisiana Considered Podcast
Louisiana Considered: What is “blue hydrogen?”

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 24:30


We speak with two environmental resource experts about an effort to produce green energy in Louisiana. Adam Voshosted this Thursday's episode of Louisiana Considered. The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources' Patrick Courregesexplains the process of “carbon sequestration,” or removing carbon during chemical processing and pumping it underground instead of releasing it into the atmosphere. In October, industrial gas supplier Air Products announced a $4.5 billion facility will be built in the state incorporating carbon sequestration technology. The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice's Monique Hardenexplains why Air Products' plant may not be able to fulfill the company's promises, and how its effects could harm Louisiana communities. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Blunt Force Truth
They Just Don't Care - an interview with Dr. Bonner Cohen

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 69:30


Today's show rundown: The left says that America is back so much, that Americans are buying too much. But if you look at the sales figures, we have the same amount of consuming going on at this time last year. But the hallmarks of socialism is - a lack of goods and services, hyperinflation, and the loss of personal freedoms...sound anything like what we have going on here? All CNN can talk about is Trump, and how ineffective he was as a President, and STILL talking about the Insurrection. They aren't covering anything on what the Biden Administration I doing. Chuck talks a bit about how the Biden / Obama administration launched a non-military coup on President Trump. A man who came along, and was concerned about the American people. So what is it that the Left is all about, that they give each other awards every day...what do they actually are about. These people actually despise the American People. Kamala Harris is at a 20 percent approval rating / all time recorded record for being disliked. Her and Biden's approval ratings, in under a year are under 30 Percent. Why is this not being talked about? All we hear is "they aren't Trump". 9 out of 10 Scientists...funded by the government...agree with the government on climate change. Imagine that...people who benefit from agreeing with the government...agree with the government. We meet the show guest Bonner Cohen, who says we accomplished nothing during this Glasgow Climate Change Conference (COP26). The global elites have determined we are experience a "Climate Crisis" that is caused by us. Because it is said that man made emissions, are heat trapping, we are causing the Earth to warm, and that it will be dangerous for life, that we have a human induced climate crisis. The people setting this all up who stand to benefit from all these climate change policies strongly...are all for it. BIO – Bonner R. Cohen is a senior fellow at the National Center for Public Policy Research, where he concentrates on energy, natural resources, and international relations. He also serves as a senior policy adviser with the Heartland Institute, senior policy analyst with the Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow, and as adjunct scholar at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. Articles by Dr. Cohen have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Investor's Business Daily, New York Post, Washington Times, National Review, Philadelphia Inquirer, Detroit News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Miami Herald, and dozens of other newspapers in the U.S. and Canada. He has been interviewed on Fox News, CNN, Fox Business Channel, BBC, BBC Worldwide Television, NBC, NPR, N 24 (German language news channel), Voice of Russia, and scores of radio stations in the U.S. Dr. Cohen has testified before the U.S. Senate committees on Energy & Natural Resources and Environment & Public Works as well as the U.S. House committees on Natural Resources and Judiciary. He has spoken at conferences in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, and Bangladesh. Dr. Cohen is the author of two books, The Green Wave: Environmentalism and its Consequences (Washington: Capital Research Center, 2006) and Marshall, Mao und Chiang: Die amerikanischen Vermittlungsbemuehungen im chinesischen Buergerkrieg (Marshall, Mao and Chiang: The American Mediations Effort in the Chinese Civil War) (Munich: Tuduv Verlag, 1984). Dr. Cohen received his B.A. from the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. – summa cum laude – from the University of Munich. bcohen@nationalcenter.org

Fish Untamed
Ep 62: Georgia Mountain Brookies, with Palmer Henson and Sarah Baker

Fish Untamed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 64:02


Palmer Henson is an avid angler from Georgia (also appearing in episode 3), who has spent the last few years trying to hunt down as many brook trout streams as he can in Georgia. Sarah Baker is a fisheries biologist with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources who focuses on trout. Palmer and Sarah have been working together on a sort of “citizen science” project, in which Palmer's personal passion for finding remote brook trout streams assists the DNR with their surveys. In this episode, Palmer and Sarah discuss how they got connected, how they've been working together to uncover new brook trout streams, and a few ways the DNR will be able to use the data to protect this iconic species. Palmer's Instagram: @lost_angel_fly_fishing Sarah's email: sarah.baker@dnr.ga.gov

What Really Happened with Michael Rivero
What Really Happened with Michael Rivero, November 10, 2021 Hour 2

What Really Happened with Michael Rivero

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 59:59


BIDEN ADMINISTRATION, IMMIGRATION, ECONOMY & INFLATION, SPACE EXPLORATION, NATURAL RESOURCES, CULTURE, RBN UPDATES

Getting Unstuck - Shift For Impact
194: Treating Students as a Natural Resource

Getting Unstuck - Shift For Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 37:33


As today's guest observed, “Many kids fall through the cracks somewhere.” Maybe they've experienced trauma outside of school, and as a result, they don't fit in inside of school. But Jeff Rivero, veteran history teacher at Yosemite High School in Merced California, knows how to reach them and help them uncover their passion. How? He treats them like the natural resources they are.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 602 (11-8-21): Photosynthesis Fun, Fundamentals, and Confluence with Climate Change

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:26).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-5-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 8, 2021. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Racing the Sun,” by The Faux Paws, on that group's 2021 self-titled album, from Great Bear Records.  It opens a revised episode from November 2013, where we explore a sun-driven process that's fundamental to life on earth: photosynthesis, the process where green plants and algae make food, using the energy in sunlight to store chemical energy in the form of glucose.  Photosynthesis is also… VOICES IN SKIT - ~1 min./57 sec. REPORTER: We break into this show to bring you exclusive audio from the Virginia Tech campus, where a shadowy team of scientists are tinkering with the process underlying all life on earth.  They haven't yet revealed their possibly nefarious plans, so let's listen in... SCIENTIST 1: With this terrarium, we have a model system to test our carbon dioxide-manipulation scheme, and soon we'll be ready to control earth's fundamental food-producing process... SCIENTISTS 1 and 2: Photosynthesis! SCIENTIST 2: Are all the components of the system ready?  Green plants with chlorophyll? SCIENTIST 1: Check! SCIENTIST 2: Soil with proper nutrients? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2. Light? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Water? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Air with CO2? SCIENTIST 1.  CO2? SCIENTIST 2.  That's carbon dioxide! SCIENTIST 1.  Oh...right...I mean, check! SCIENTIST 2.  Let the photosynthesis start!  Engage monitoring device! SCIENTIST 1.  CO2 taken in from the air...water and nutrients being absorbed through roots...light falling on leaves.  All systems go!  Light energy is driving CO2 and water to combine and form glucose, the chemical-energy form, while releasing oxygen. SCIENTIST 2.  Apply the CO2 inhibitor! SCIENTIST 1.  Lid applied!  CO2 source blocked...system CO2 levels dropping rapidly...plants responding as expected, using up available CO2. SCIENTIST 2.  Reverse manipulation!  Apply the CO2 increaser! SCIENTIST 1. Lid removed!  CO2 added...plants responding.  Wait, they're responding too fast!  They're growing beyond the walls!  One has me...aieeeeeeee! SCIENTIST 2.  Now it's got me, too!  Noooooooo..... REPORTER: Well, this might be a good time for us to return to our regular show.  Back to you.... END VOICES IN SKIT Unlike this skit, with its far-fetched human-eating plants, there's nothing make-believe about Earth life's reliance on photosynthesis using sunlight, chlorophyll, nutrients, water, and carbon dioxide to make food.  Moreover, photosynthesis is a fundamental aspect of understanding and responding to climate change.  Photosynthesis millions of years ago created the hydrocarbon compounds that constitute today's fossil fuels, and photosynthesis now—absorbing and storing some of the carbon dioxide released in fossil fuel burning—has an important role in reducing Earth's carbon dioxide levels, warming, and other climate-change impacts.  For example, the capacity for photosynthesizing trees to take up atmospheric carbon dioxide was one aspect of the “Declaration on Forests and Land Use” at the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties, or COP26, in Glasgow, Scotland, from October 31 to November 12, 2021. Thanks to Eli Heilker and John Kidd for participating in this episode.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use part of “Racing the Sun.”  We close with another musical selection appropriate for the climate challenges facing the COP26 meeting and all of us.  Here's about 25 seconds of “On a Ship,” by Blacksburg, Va., musician Kat Mills. MUSIC - ~ 24 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship,” then instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 186, 11-4-13. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 517, 3-23-20. Virginia Water Radio thanks John Kidd, formerly of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, and Eli Heilker, a graduate of Virginia Tech in English who served an internship in Fall 2013 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, for their participation in this episode.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation demonstration of plant uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) during photosynthesis.  A terrarium (left) is attached via gas-transporting tubing to a CO2 monitor at right.  Photo taken in Blacksburg, Va., October 2013.  Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.Red Maple leaves in Blacksburg, Va., on October 30, 2013, in which green chlorophyll pigment was breaking down as photosynthesis and chlorophyll production in the leaves were stopping with the approach of winter.  The breakdown of chlorophyll in the fall allows pigments of other colors in the leaves to be revealed.  More information on fall leaf-color change is available in “The Miracle of Fall,” University of Illinois Extension, online at https://web.extension.illinois.edu/fallcolor/default.cfm. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Rick Groleau, “Illuminating Photosynthesis,” Public Broadcasting System (PBS) and WGBH-Boston, “NOVA” program, November 1, 2001, online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/photosynthesis.html. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, “Global Climate Change” Website, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/.  Specific pages used were the following:“A breathing planet, off balance,” by Kate Ramsayer and Carol Rasmussen, November 11, 2015, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2364/a-breathing-planet-off-balance/; and“Frequently Asked Questions,” online at https://climate.nasa.gov/faq/. John Seiler, John Groninger, and John Peterson, Forest Biology and Dendrology, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, Blacksburg, Va., 2009.Smithsonian Institution, “Ocean—Find Your Blue/What Are Fossil Fuels?”; online at https://ocean.si.edu/conservation/gulf-oil-spill/what-are-fossil-fuels. 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), October 31—November 12, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/.  [October 31-November 12, 2021]; for information on photosynthesizing forests serving as “sinks” for carbon dioxide and other “greenhouse gases,” see particularly “Glasgow Leaders' Declaration on Forests and Land Use,” November 2, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/glasgow-leaders-declaration-on-forests-and-land-use/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants,” “Science,” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes related to climate change. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Exploring Climate Change Basics, with Examples from Assateague Island National Seashore and Shenandoah National Park.Episode 312, 4-18-16 – Student's Research Digs into Streamside Soils, Rainfall Rates, and Greenhouse Gases. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.6 – Soil is important in ecosystems.3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.5.9 – Conservation of energy resources is important. Grade 66.4 – There are basic sources of energy and that energy can be transformed.6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life.LS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6     – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations.ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life. BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.  2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States, including government protecting rights and property of individuals. Virginia Studies CourseVS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at th

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Life with Fire
All Things Cultural Burning with Karuk Tribal Member Bill Tripp

Life with Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 47:42


In this episode, we explore one of the topics that is most requested by Life with Fire listeners—cultural burning. We spoke with Karuk tribal member Bill Tripp about his early experiences of cultural burning, and how those experiences reflect in his current work as Director of Natural Resources and Environmental Policy for the Karuk Tribe. We spoke at length about California's Senate Bill 332 (which was signed into law by Gavin Newsom just after Bill and I spoke back in September) and how it would benefit cultural burning practices, as well as how the Karuk Tribe is engaging its youth to return to traditional tribal practices like burning. Information about California Senate Bill 332 and what it means for cultural burners can be found here: https://www.siskiyoudaily.com/story/news/2021/09/16/these-two-new-california-bills-help-tribes-complete-prescribed-burn-projects/8363483002/ For those interested in donating to the podcast, the Life with Fire Patreon can be found here: https://www.patreon.com/lifewithfirepod

Investing in Impact
Allocating Capital Into Regenerative Natural Resource Investments - Adrian Rodrigues // Co-Founder of Provenance Capital Group

Investing in Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 45:54


In episode 35 of the Investing in Impact podcast, I speak with Adrian Rodrigues, Co-Founder of Provenance Capital Group, on allocating capital into regenerative natural resource investments through blended capital structures.Adrian is a Co-Founder and a Managing Director of Provenance Capital Group where he helps develop blended capital structures that catalyze resilient biological systems and businesses. Before Provenance, Adrian co-founded the boutique consulting firm Hyphae Partners where he helped companies finance and build regenerative business models. Additionally, he worked at Patagonia within its Venture Capital arm Tin Shed Ventures, helping author a standard for Regenerative Organic Agriculture and exploring Regenerative Organic Land Funds. He is an experienced asset allocator, fundraiser, and business model innovator.Adrian spent six years at Morgan Stanley helping long time horizon investors manage their asset allocations and diligence investment opportunities across asset classes and sectors. He has also lectured on food innovation at the University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business and designed and taught an entrepreneurship intensive for farmers at the Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture.Adrian is a graduate of Berkeley Haas' full-time MBA program. At Haas, Adrian was a Portfolio Manager of the Haas Socially Responsible Investment Fund and a Member of the Center for Responsible Business' Student Advisory Board. He also serves as an inaugural advisor for the Investor Resource Council of J.E.D.I. Collaborative, which aims to frame the business case for embedding equity, justice, diversity and inclusion into our entire food ecosystem. He received a B.A. in English from Williams College, studied English literature at Exeter College, Oxford University, and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.Also mentioned in the podcast:Soil Wealth Report - Croatan InstituteSponsors for Educational OpportunityManagement Leadership for Tomorrow (MLT)About Provenance Capital GroupPCG is a financial services firm focused on allocating capital into regenerative natural resource investments. We offer our clients deep expertise, superior guidance,  bespoke access, and trusted partnership in the transition to an economy that is focused on people, planet, and profit.Listen to more Causeartist podcasts here.Check out the Impact Investor platform here - Discover Impact Investors from around the world.Partner with us - Learn moreWe are powered by:Podcast Made with TransistorPodcast cover design Made with CanvaBuild amazing web platforms with Webflow

The Story of Nitrogen
Episode 3- Winners and Losers

The Story of Nitrogen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 51:07


Related content:The "I Love Lucy" chocolate factory conveyor beltTo learn more:How changes in nitrogen impact nitrogen-"burning" (nitrifying) microbesDNRA and nitrogen cycling microbes in agricultural soils

Nature's Archive
#33: Dr. Andrew Farnsworth - Predicting Bird Migrations with BirdCast

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 62:25


My guest in this episode is Dr. Andrew Farnsworth. Andrew is a Senior Research Associate in the Center for Avian Population Studies at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and has a BS in Natural Resources from Cornell University, MS in Zoology from Clemson University, and PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Cornell.Andrew started birding at age 5 and quickly developed a fascination with bird migration, which continues to this day. His research advances the use and application of multiple technologies to study bird movements on continental scales. This includes the use of weather surveillance radar, audio and video recording and monitoring tools, citizen science datasets, and machine learning techniques.Today we discuss one of his primary projects, BirdCast. BirdCast presents near real time bird migration status, provides migration forecasts up to three days out, and provides local migration alerts to inform conservation action.Creating BirdCast has required decades of research and a combination of many disciplines.  Andrew discusses how ground-truth observations, acoustics, and radar data are correlated to weather data to produce a predictive model that accurately forecasts migration days in advance. Andrew discusses how advances in computing technology and machine learning have dramatically advanced model accuracy and accelerated progress.We get into the details of the model, including why temperature is the most important factor in bird migration prediction, how tropical storms impact migration, and why migration and monitoring in the western USA is different from the eastern USA.We also discuss how birders can use BirdCast for their interests, and the many ways that migration prediction helps with conservation efforts, such as Lights Out Texas.You can see the forecasts and a lot of research and technical data at birdcast.info, or follow the team @DrBirdCast, on twitter.Full Show NotesLinks to People and Topics DiscussedThe Academy of Natural SciencesAdriaan Doktor, Benjamin Van Doren and Kyle Horton from the birdcast teamDr. Sidney Gauthreaux - Dr. Farnsworth's advisor at Clemson University, and a pioneer in the field.How radar detects birds (from birdcast.info) Lights Out Texas from Texan By NatureWSR 88D (aka NexRAD) - the US National Weather Service overview of the technologyLinks to Related EpisodesBrian Sullivan - Brian is a former project lead for eBird, also from the Cornell Lab. This episode discusses that, as well are many technological opportunities to better understand birdsProject Terra - learn more about bird telemetry, nocturnal flight calls, and associated tracking technologies 

The Mel K Show
Mel K & Dr. Joel S. Hirshhorn Discuss the Pandemic Blunder & The Ugly Truth About The Vax 11-6-21

The Mel K Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 40:50


Mel is joined by Professor Dr. Joel S. Hirschhorn, author of Pandemic Blunder on Covid & Dr. Fauci which lays out the facts about the disease the architect, and cures for Covid.   Like the other frontline doctors, Dr. Hirschhorn has one desire, to save patients and prevent sickness. None of this needed to happen! Thank you to all our brave & outspoken medical warriors. About Dr. Hirschhorn: Joel S. Hirschhorn is a writer focusing on health issues, especially the COVID pandemic, as well as US politics, government, and culture. He was formerly a full professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, a senior official for the U.S. Congress (Office of Technology Assessment), head of an environmental consulting company, and Director of Environment, Energy and Natural Resources at the National Governors Association. His latest book is Pandemic Blunder - Fauci and Public Health Blocked Early Home COVID Treatment. Please check out his books: Pandemic Blunder by Dr. Joel S. Hirschhorn https://www.amazon.com/Joel-S-Hirschhorn/e/B002BMHJ9A/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1 Mel's upcoming live in person speaking events:   Patriot Streetfighter Scott McKay Tix at www.PatriotStreetfighter.com  (Other dates to come) Winston-Salem, NC - November 7 Scott McKay Tix at www.PatriotStreetfighter.com Golden Lakes, FL - November 11  wethepeopleglv@yahoo.com for info   San Antonio, Texas - November 11 – 13 (Reawaken America Tour) Dallas, Texas - December 10 - 12 (Reawaken America Tour) Phoenix AZ - January 14-15 (Reawaken America Tour) See our website events page and follow the link to the events. Remember to mention Mel K for great discounts on all these fun and informative events. See you there! Important Update To Those That Support us: A certain company that sounds like FayGal has deemed The Mel K Show against their acceptable use policy.  Please use free speech friendly Align Pay for donations at https://themelkshow.com/donate/   or support us in others ways such as our partners or TheMelKShow.TV        We love what we do and are working hard to keep on top of everything to help this transition along peacefully and with love. Please support our work in any way you can. Like, Share, Comment and If you value our work and have the resources please support us through www.the melkshow.com partners or donation pages.  https://themelkshow.com/donate/ Website (Main Coms Hub) WWW.TheMelKShow.com Video Platform - Subscription https://www.themelkshow.tv Video Platform  Bitchute Melk.News/Bitchute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/Iw2kiviwZpwx/ Video Platform Rumble - The Mel K Show https://rumble.com/c/TheMelKShow Telegram  The Mel K Show Group - https://t.me/themelkshow The Mel K Show Channel - https://t.me/themelkshowchannel Mailing Address 1040 First Avenue #367 New York, NY 10022 If you are interested to explore investing in precious metals please contact below and mention MelK for special offers: https://bit.ly/BeverlyHillsPreciousMetals Andrew Sorchini telephone   866-346-5325 Beverly Hills Precious Metals Website   www.BH-PM.com Support us with MyPillow MyPillow is under attack by cancel culture. The bots are busy getting MyPillow removed from retailers nationwide. Go to www.MyPillow.com and use offer code “MelK” to support both MyPillow and The Mel K Show- We will NEVER surrender to cancel culture! Mel K Superfoods www.MelKSuperfoods.com HempWorx The #1 selling CBD brand. https://bit.ly/MDC-HempWorx    https://themelkshow.com/my-daily-choice/ Mantra Essential Oils Highest quality essential oils and essential oil blends. https://bit.ly/MDC-Mantra-Essential-Oils My Daily Sprays Portable easy to use sprays made with only the best clinically proven ingredients that support healthy daily activity, including superfruits and natural antioxidants. https://bit.ly/MDC-My-Daily-Sprays Great Offers on Satellite Phones www.melkphone.com Take care of your health with Dr. Mark Sherwood and his team at Functional Medical Institute www.Sherwood.tv/melk – download the free e-book to develop physical and emotional resiliency Thank you amazing patriots for joining us on this journey, for your support of our work and for your faith in this biblical transition to greatness. God Wins! Power to the People!

Curiosity Daily
Jungles' Impact on Climate Change and a Music-Epidemic Link

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 14:47


Learn about the link between music download trends and epidemics; and how losing jungles contributes to climate change.  Music download patterns found to resemble infectious disease epidemic curves by Cameron Duke Rosati, D., Woolhouse, M., Bolker, B., & Earn, D. (2021). Modelling song popularity as a contagious process | Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. Proceedings of the Royal Society A. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspa.2021.0457 Smith, D., & Moore, L. (2020). The SIR Model for Spread of Disease - The Differential Equation Model | Mathematical Association of America. Maa.org. https://www.maa.org/press/periodicals/loci/joma/the-sir-model-for-spread-of-disease-the-differential-equation-model Yirka, B. (2021, September 22). Music download patterns found to resemble infectious disease epidemic curves. Phys.org; Phys.org. https://phys.org/news/2021-09-music-download-patterns-resemble-infectious.html More from archaeologist Patrick Roberts: Pick up "Jungle: How Tropical Forests Shaped the World — and Us": https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/patrick-roberts/jungle/9781541600096/  Website: https://www.patrickjroberts.com/   Follow @palaeotropics on Twitter: https://twitter.com/palaeotropics  Cheyenne Mountain Zoo Sustainable Palm Oil Shopping Guide app: https://www.cmzoo.org/conservation/orangutans-palm-oil/sustainable-palm-oil-shopping-app/  WWF Palm Oil Buyers Scorecard: http://palmoilscorecard.panda.org/  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Michigan Runner Girl
#230: A Transformative Trip: Paige Lackey shares her Project Rustic experience

Michigan Runner Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 76:53


“At first it was hard because I felt like I was in this snowglobe that had been shaken up. And all of a sudden I had space, and then all the snowflakes were falling around me, and I was like, there's that thing I ignored for six months, and there's that thing I don't want to think about because it stresses me out. But the more I was out there, the more the snowflakes, the glitter, settled and the better I felt. And that, I think, is just a testament to how important it is to make space in this life to think about things, or to process things, to just breathe. Because we don't get it naturally in our lives. You have to be very intentional about that.”  Paige Lackey returns to the MRG show to talk about her 5-month-long adventure exploring Michigan's state forest campgrounds — this solo trip took Paige (and her dog Willow) to more than 75 Michigan Department of Natural Resources locations in both the lower and upper peninsulas between April and September. Project Rustic, as it was named, was an effort to collect information for the state's Recreation Search database.  Paige previously was a guest on the show (episode #213) just before leaving on this trip. During that conversation, she talked about coming up with this idea as a Huron Pines AmeriCorps service member serving with the Michigan DNR, and how it all came to fruition. In this most recent episode, Paige is honest about what it truly was like to travel alone with Willow in an RV, the places she got to see and know, the people she met along the way, the highlights and challenges, and how the experience changed her. Her quote of the summer, she shares during her conversation with Heather: “What will be, will be transformative.”

World Ocean Radio
The Future of Aquaculture, part four

World Ocean Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 4:30


In this brief series we have explored technologies, initiatives and other advancements for aquaculture with the power to improve efficiency and safety as a positive contribution to our future food supply and global health. This week represents the fourth and final installment of the series, focusing on the broader view of the word "aquaculture"—Water plus Culture—the universal source and guiding influence for our lives that will nurture and sustain us into the future if we can recognize and protect its significance for every aspect of our being.

Indianz.Com
H.R.2088 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Historic Lands Reacquisition Act

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 10:44


The U.S. House of Representatives considers H.R.2088, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Historic Lands Reacquisition Act, on November 1, 2021. The bill places about 76 acres in Tennessee into trust for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The lands include significant cultural and historic properties that are currently managed by the federal government. H.R.2088 was approved by the House Committee on Natural Resources during a markup on October 13. A prior version of the bill passed the House during the 116th Congress but did not advance in the U.S. Senate.

Indianz.Com
H.R.4881 - Old Pascua Community Land Acquisition Act

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 9:49


The U.S. House of Representatives considers H.R.4881, the Old Pascua Community Land Acquisition Act, on November 1, 2021. The bill places land into trust for the Pascua Yaqui Tribe and declares it to be part of the tribe's reservation. The land is located in Tucson, Arizona, and will be eligible for gaming purposes. A hearing on H.R.4881 took place before the House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States on October 5. The bill was approved by the House Committee on Natural Resources during a markup on October 13.

Indianz.Com
H.R.5221 - Urban Indian Health Confer Act

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 11:50


The U.S. House of Representatives considers H.R.5221, the Urban Indian Health Confer Act, on November 1, 2021. The bill amends the Indian Health Care Improvement Act to require the Indian Health Service and other agencies within the Department of Health and Human Services to “confer, to the maximum extent practicable, with urban Indian organizations.” A hearing on H.R.5221 took place before the House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States on October 5. The bill was approved by the House Committee on Natural Resources during a markup on October 13.

Indianz.Com
H.R.1975 - Pala Band of Mission Indians Land Transfer Act

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 9:14


The U.S. House of Representatives considers H.R.1975, the Pala Band of Mission Indians Land Transfer Act, on November 1, 2021. The bill places about 721 acres in California into trust for the Pala Band of Mission Indians. The land includes sacred and culturally sensitive areas. H.R.1975 was approved by the House Committee on Natural Resources during a markup on October 13.

Indianz.Com
H.R.1619 - Catawba Indian Nation Lands Act

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 15:47


The U.S. House of Representatives considers H.R.1619, the Catawba Indian Nation Lands Act, on November 1, 2021. The bill affirms the acquisition of 17 acres in North Carolina into trust for the Catawba Nation and ensures that those lands can be used for gaming purposes. The tribe is headquartered in neighboring South Carolina. The bill was approved by the House Committee on Natural Resources during a markup on May 26.

Here by the Owl
Episode 92 - PVC Tress, April Davis

Here by the Owl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 38:56


In this episode we chat with April Davis about the PVC Tree project her and her students completed with a community partner. Looking for a great Natural Resources activity, April explains how you can implement this in your program. Resources for this episode can be found here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1jE9psZzd8bn_fDjD2_fjWCbcVPAyLStJ?usp=sharing Like Here by the Owl Podcast on Facebook and Instagram. Have a future topic idea or wish to be a guest? Message Here by the Owl Podcast on social media.

smallfarmsustainability's podcast
Hunting From a Landowner's Perspective

smallfarmsustainability's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 24:07


In this I interview Kevin Andersen, Private Lands Biologist for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, and talk about hunting from a landowner's perspective!

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 601 (10-31-21): Halloween, Water, and the Human Body

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for Halloween 2021.  Besides focusing on autumn's festival of fun and fright, this episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND – ~9 sec That eerie sound of a tree creaking in October wind sets a seasonal stage for a Halloween challenge: exploring how Halloween, water, and human biology all connect.  Sound like quite a trick?  Well, have a listen to some Halloween music for about 50 seconds, and then we'll treat you to some examples. MUSIC - ~50 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “A Little Fright Music,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  And here are six matches of Halloween creatures or images with water in the human body. 1.  Skeleton images rattle around everywhere for Halloween, and in living skeletons water is a significant component of bones and cartilage.  2.  Pretend blood covers many-a Halloween costume, and over half of the volume of blood is plasma, which in turn is over 90 percent water, and water is also a major component of blood cells. 3.  A muscular costume is part of pretending to be a super-strong character like Wonder Woman or Superman; and water plays a significant role in muscle structure and function; in turn, muscle is an important water-storage area for the body. 4.  The monster in movie versions of “Frankenstein” was brought to life by electricity, and the cells of our nervous system transmit messages though electrochemical impulses, using sodium and potassium ions in a water-based solution. 5.  If fiery or icy creatures need some temperature regulation, water's the body fluid that does it. And 6.  Flashing and watching from many creatures on Halloween night are eyes, either scary, suspenseful, or super-powered; and eyes have chambers containing aqueous humor and vitreous humour, two fluids that consist mostly of water and that maintain the shape of the eyes. This Halloween, imagine being a creature that's about 60 percent composed of an amazing substance with unique powers to dissolve other substances, absorb and release heat, and withstand being compressed.  What would you be?  Why, the water-based human being that you are! Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last few seconds of “A Little Fright Music.” MUSIC - ~13 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The wind and creaking tree sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on October 5, 2014.  “A Little Fright Music” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was previously used in Episode 548, 10-26-20. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Flow Stopper – used in Episode 599, 10-28-21, on the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE Water uses in the human body.  Illustration from the U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,”  https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. SOURCES Used for Audio Peter Abrahams, ed., How the Body Works: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Encyclopedia of Anatomy, Metro Books, New York, 2007. American Red Cross, “Blood Components,” online at https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/types-of-blood-donations/blood-components.html. Erin Blakemore, “How Twitching Frog Legs Helped Inspire ‘Frankenstein,'” Smithsonian Magazine, December 4, 2015, online at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-twitching-frog-legs-helped-inspire-frankenstein-180957457/. Fandom, “Monster Wiki/Frankenstein's Monster,” online at https://monster.fandom.com/wiki/Frankenstein%27s_Monster. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Science Direct:“Aqueous Humor,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/aqueous-humor;“Vitreous Humour,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/veterinary-science-and-veterinary-medicine/vitreous-humour. University of Michigan Health, “Eye Anatomy and Function,” as of August 31, 2020, online at https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw121946. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Composition of the Blood,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/leukemia/anatomy/composition.html;“Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. For More Information about Human Biology, Including Water Aspects American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics.Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic:“Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body;“Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system. Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. The Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html;“Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/;“Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology (much of the information in this week's episode was taken from these previous episodes). Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 393, 11-6-17.Disease: viruses – Episode 600, 10-25-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21.Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water (with a Halloween theme) – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Following are links to other Halloween-themed episodes. Episode 238, 10-31-14 – focusing on the plant Witch-hazel.Episode 548, 10-26-20 – focusing on water-related readings that are supernatural, mysterious, or imaginative. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals h

kids new york science bay university agency music natural halloween state audio college sound composition materials accent dark tech water frankenstein superman web cells index rain pond research ocean government education plants fandom wonder woman vol school illustration philadelphia netherlands chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow penn environment neuroscience skeleton heart witch oberlin college va disease anatomy amsterdam monster msonormal new year blood atlantic stream flashing normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental american society times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology chemical conservatory grade nutrients oberlin colorful national institutes yale school signature bio wild turkey manhattan school human body watershed transcript nervous system virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean natural resources grades k function pretend erin blakemore name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes medical science circulation smithsonian magazine textbooks bristol england blacksburg american red cross franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center cosgrove msohyperlink hematology runoff sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers elsevier human biology blood vessels bmp acknowledgment muscular virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl michigan health geological survey mayo clinic health system lymphatic system peter abrahams torrin circulatory blood cells living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
Natural Resources Make Countries Rich – DEBUNKED

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 5:12


https://youtu.be/NUjIIBjxQAE Indeed, even the capacity to discover natural resources depends upon institutions; countries with market-oriented institutions are far better at discovering their natural resources than countries with non-market institutions. Jason Brennan, Ph.D., Why It's OK to Want to Be Rich (2021, Routledge) p. 115 Jason Brennan, Ph.D., is the Robert J. and Elizabeth Flanagan Family Professor of Strategy, Economics, Ethics, and Public Policy at the McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University, USA. He is the author of 14 books, including In Defense of Openness (2018) and Why Not Capitalism? (2014). I highly recommend buying this book: Why It's OK to Want to Be Rich Odysee BitChute Spotify Minds Flote Archive

KQED's The California Report
State Senate Holds First Hearing on Orange County Oil Spill

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 16:23


The state Natural Resources and Water Committee held its first hearing Thursday on the massive oil spill off the coast of Orange County. The cause of the spill remains under investigation. Central Valley farmworkers and their families are calling on state and local officials to restrict the use of 13 pesticides that have been linked to childhood cancers. They also want to be warned ahead of time when these pesticides are used. Reporter: Keith Mizuguchi, The California Report Facebook has changed its company name to Meta. The social media company has been under fire for spreading misinformation and other things. And the new name led to plenty of snarky Twitter comments.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 3 - Vote to protect your community

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 38:48


The Monologue: Inslee is looking at King County before a statewide vaccine mandate. The Interview: Cliff Mass explains the nonstop rain we're about to get. The Monologue: A new poll shows trouble for Dems in Virginia. The Interview: Dennis Ellis is running for Redmond City Council on a platform of public safety. // LongForm: Former KING 5 reporter and now former Dept. of Natural Resources communications specialist Alison Morrow was fired for posting YouTube content the state disagreed with. // The Quick Hit: Remember when Teresa Mosqueda defended a man threatening to murder cops? The Last Rantz: Time to vote like your community depends on it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Keith Knight - Don't Tread on Anyone
Natural Resources Make Countries Rich - DEBUNKED

Keith Knight - Don't Tread on Anyone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 5:11


Jason Brennan is the Robert J. and Elizabeth Flanagan Family Professor of Strategy, Economics, Ethics, and Public Policy at the McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University, USA. He is the author of 14 books, including In Defense of Openness (2018) and Why Not Capitalism? (2014). Book Discussed: https://www.amazon.com/Why-Its-OK-Want-Rich/dp/1138389021 ------------------ If you find value in the content, please consider donating to my PayPal KeithKnight590@gmail.com LBRY: https://lbry.tv/@KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone:b BitChute: KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone https://www.bitchute.com/channel/keithknightdonttreadonanyone/ Minds: https://www.minds.com/KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone/ MeWe: mewe.com/i/keithknight25 Flote: https://flote.app/VoluntaryistKeith Gab: https://gab.com/Voluntarykeith Twitter: @an_capitalist The Libertarian Institute: https://libertarianinstitute.org/dont-tread-on-anyone/ One Great Work Network: https://www.onegreatworknetwork.com/keith-knight

I'll Call You Right Back
I'll Call You Right Back #183 - Insect Mother

I'll Call You Right Back

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 103:25


This week, I sit down with Marinea Heindel to talk all about the cool things she does with Insect Mother. Marinea is a great artist. She specializes in creating unique jewelry and art pieces using dead (natural causes) insects and other beautiful things from nature. She stops by the studio and we talk about where her love for insects and the outdoors came from, going to school for a unique major called Natural Resources and Wildlife Technology, her introduction to jewelry making, where she gets her bugs, and so much more. We even slip into some nostalgic “emo kid” talk at the end. Another super fun episode learning about another creative soul doing cool things. I enjoyed our conversation and I think you will too. Insect Mother is currently running a HALLOWEEN SALE on her website until November 1st so run over to her page and check out her work. Enjoy.   Check out work!   - WWW.ILLCALLYOURIGHTBACK.COM - THIS PODCAST IS PROUDLY SPONSORED BY TURNER DAIRY FARMS - Intro Music created by Ryan Drish (@realdrish) Follow us on Instagram - @illcallyourightback Follow us on Twitter - @ICYRBpodcast Like us on Facebook - I'll Call You Right Back Podcast

World Ocean Radio
The Future of Aquaculture, part three

World Ocean Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 4:57


In this brief series we're exploring disruptive technologies for aquaculture, specific initiatives and other advancements to improve efficiency and safety as a positive contribution to out future food supply and global health. This week we are discussing the challenges to aquaculture, the perils of some new unmanned technologies on the horizon, the pros and cons of offshore systems, and the spectrum of alternative projects that could alleviate the typical pitfalls of offshore aquaculture. 

Here First
Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

Here First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021


Even as the Iowa Department of Natural Resources begins testing for “forever chemicals” in more than 50 public water systems across the state, the agency currently has no plans to test private wells. An Iowa organization will bring culturally-specific training for the first time to Latino service providers in the state. Plus, Iowans should book their year-end holiday travel plans as soon as possible.

Sporting Journal Radio Podcasts
SJR | Week 476: The Future of Our Ducks

Sporting Journal Radio Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 69:45


On this week's podcast, we have a special guest in the studio! Former Minnesota Department of Natural Resources commissioner Tom Landwehr took a break from hunting to come over and chat with the guys. John Devney from Delta Waterfowl also joined via the internet to talk about the current conditions of our ducks and geese, […]

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1: 4 people shot and killed in a Tacoma shooting on Thursday

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 38:00


 What's Trending: Rod Dembowski has been accused of verbal abuse amid conflict with King County Council official, at least 7 complaints filed against him, Rantz movie review: Ron's Gone Wrong, 4 people shot an killed in a Tacoma shooting on Thursday, suspect still at large, //  King County Board of Health postpones vote on bicycle helmet law and they are now going to repeal it, The ratio of tickets given by race is one sided // GUEST: Micheal Cuthbert, former aviation safety specialist, terminated over the vaccine mandate from Dept. of Natural Resources. He says DNR got hit especially hard but the department is trying to keep it quiet. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

What Really Happened with Michael Rivero
What Really Happened with Michael Rivero, October 21, 2021 Hour 2

What Really Happened with Michael Rivero

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 60:00


POLITICS, GOVERNMENT, POLICIES, PRODUCTS, RELIGION, NATURAL RESOURCES

The John Batchelor Show
1765: Mookie Sadr of Baghdad rises again. Bilal Wahab @BilalWahab , @WashInstitute. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 11:05


Photo: Mookie Sadr of Baghdad rises again.  Bilal Wahab @BilalWahab , @WashInstitute.  Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 https://www.ft.com/content/125939da-fbe6-436a-8f16-f87d0363624b Bilal Wahab is the Nathan and Esther K. Wagner Fellow at The Washington Institute, where he focuses on governance in the Iraqi Kurdish region and in Iraq as a whole. He has taught at the American University of Iraq in Sulaimani, where he established the Center for Development and Natural Resources, a research program on oil and development.