Podcasts about congressman

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  • 2,256PODCASTS
  • 6,312EPISODES
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  • Dec 3, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about congressman

Show all podcasts related to congressman

Latest podcast episodes about congressman

Connections with Evan Dawson
Congressman Joe Morelle

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 51:13


This is hour one of "Connections with Evan Dawson" on December 3, 2021.

The Lisa Wexler Show
12/03/21 - Congressman Jim Himes

The Lisa Wexler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 47:34


12/03/21 - Congressman Jim Himes by The Lisa Wexler Show

The Pete Kaliner Show
Rep. Richard Hudson: "I Have A Message For Kamala Harris...The Wheels Are Coming OFF The Bus"

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 6:57


The Congressman from NC's 8th District joins Pete Kaliner to talk about what bothered him about Vice President Kamala Harris' stop in Charlotte this week to spread the word about the Biden infrastructure bill.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen
Breaking!!! Super Spreader Trump Might Have Killed Dozens + A Conversation with Congressman Steve Cohen

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 93:00


What a week! As we get back into the swing of things there's absolute madness coming from the GOP's extreme right flank. Boebert, Greene, Gaetz and the rest of the Y'All Qaeda Squad are gonna sink the Republican party every time they open their mouths. Roe V. Wade and a woman's right to choose is about to be struck down by Trump's SCOTUS Judges. Meadows says Trump was infected with Covid days before he admitted and could have infected and killed others. All this plus Congressman Steve Cohen. Tune in and we'll catch you up!!! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

White Flag with Joe Walsh
18. Bridging the Divide: Congressman Adam Kinzinger / Jane Lynch

White Flag with Joe Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 23:01


Politicians can (and often do) say horrible things. Joe Walsh is of the opinion that what isn't said can be even worse. Silence implies permission…and silence can doom us all. Joe explains and also reflects on his discussion with Congressman Adam Kinzinger and previews his conversation with Jane Lynch.

The Voice of Reason with Andy Hooser
The Voice of Reason Special Feature- Congressman Bob Latta

The Voice of Reason with Andy Hooser

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 19:50


Guest Congressman Bob Latta, 5th District Ohio, joins to discuss latest budget discussions, debt ceiling, oil and energy dependency, COVID mandates, and more. 

Zoomed In by MeidasTouch
First Gen Z Congressman, Maxwell Alejandro Frost

Zoomed In by MeidasTouch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 44:58


On today's episode of Zoomed In, Jack and Aaron (that's us!) talk about student debt relief and what Biden can do to help millions of students. We also discuss the implosion of the modern day GOP. Later, they interview Maxwell Alejandro Frost who is running to be the first Gen Z Congressman in our history. We finish off by discussing the tweets of the week! Tune in every Wednesday for new episodes of Zoomed In! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Activist #MMT - podcast
MMT candidate 04: Stephanie Gallardo for Washington state's ninth Congressional district

Activist #MMT - podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 58:07


Welcome to Activist #MMT candidate interview number four, hosted by Ramona Massachi (Twitter/@RamonaMassachi) and co-hosted by me. Today, we talk with Stephanie Gallardo, who is running to represent Washington state's ninth Congressional district. (Here's a list of all MMT candidate interviews.) Stephanie's a former high school history teacher and was in union leadership for more than a decade. Her catalyst for running for Congress was her concern about how her current Congressman treated union members during an in-person meeting. The ninth Congressional district is the state's only minority-majority district and, no coincidence, the location of the state's only immigrant detainment facility. As the wife of an undocumented immigrant, this is an especially disturbing an ever-present reality. Like so many of us, Stephanie and her husband are living paycheck-to-paycheck, and in a home they can only afford thanks to the money left from her father's passing. I'm also a new and first-time homeowner, and although the pandemic allowed us to accumulate (and not spend) a good chunk of money, there's no way we would be in the house we're in without the generous help of our families. Pre-COVID, I would'nt have been able to send my young boys to summer camp year after year without my father paying for it. I have another friend in exactly the same position. This is yet another thing about our society that is unsustainable. On a positive note, Stephanie's campaign is off to a great start, having already raised nearly a quarter of what she needs with more than nine months left to her August 2022 primary. She's also receiving the support and guidance of Sarah Smith, the progressive who ran by far the most successful campaign against Stephanie's opponent in 2018. Stephanie also has a small army of volunteers ready and waiting to be mobilized, which will begin knocking on doors in January. (A big thanks to Beyond the Spectrum for the "MMT Candidate" logo.) You can support Stephanie's candidacy by visiting electgallardo.com and ElectGallardo on Facebook and Twitter. You'll also find a link to donate to Stephanie's campaign in the show notes. There are three goals of this MMT candidate interview series: the first is to support and give a platform to candidates who care about all people, and because of this, are ignored by the so-called news outlets that are, in reality, news of, by, and for the rich. The second goal is to determine what these candidates need to beat corrupt opponents supported by a corrupt party in a corrupt campaign finance system, and especially, once in office, to avoid becoming corrupted themselves. Finally, the third goal is to create a community of like minded, MMT-aware candidates who can support each other through their campaigns, and especially once in office. The latter is in order to remain focused on what really matters, which is all their constituents, in an environment where there is overwhelming pressure to focus only on the needs, favors, promises, and especially money of big donors – both in and out of their district. If you're a candidate and would like to be interviewed by Ramona, please contact her directly on Twitter at @RamonaMassachi, or me at activistmmt@gmail.com. If there's a candidate you would like to see interviewed by Ramona, please let us know, and please recommend us to them! This candidate interview series is above and beyond Activist #MMT's regular episodes. If you like what you hear and would like to support this interview series and this podcast, please consider becoming a monthly patron at patreon.com/activistmmt. And now, onto our conversation with candidate for Washington state's ninth Congressional district, Stephanie Gallardo. Enjoy.

Rover's Morning Glory
Rover's wife thinks he is autistic, Texas man shot his partner's ex amid custody dispute, & more

Rover's Morning Glory

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 185:08


Rover's wife thinks he is autstic after two incidents. Congressman gets blasted for trying to hire someone for an unpaid internship. Rover thinks recycling is a scam. Scientists say vitamin and mineral pills don't actually work. Woman sues her mother's doctor, arguing she should never have been born. Duji can't say the word quirky. Texas man shot his partner's ex amid custody dispute. Tech Tuesday with Dan Costa.

White Flag with Joe Walsh
  17. Congressman Adam Kinzinger

White Flag with Joe Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 26:08


Joe Walsh and Adam Kinzinger are “brothers in arms”, having both served in congress representing Illinois.  However, since then, Walsh left the Republican Party and Kinzinger remains a member.  In this discussion, they describe what it feels like to be “politically homeless”, if the GOP actually has a future, and what is more dangerous:  Trump or Trumpism.

Tower Talks with Inside Towers
#96 - Wireless Water Cooler #7 - Congressman Bob Latta

Tower Talks with Inside Towers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 21:32


After a brief hiatus, The Wireless Water Cooler, a podcast hosted by Inside Towers Managing Editor, Jim Fryer, and WIA President and CEO Jonathan Adelstein, restocked and met with Congressman Bob Latta (R-OH). Latta is the Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology and has prioritized innovation in the telecommunications industry while pushing for increased access and deployment of high-speed broadband. He was first elected in 2007 to the same northwestern Ohio district his father once held for 30 years. Listen in on this candid half-hour conversation with the Congressman as he discusses his work on the Energy and Commerce Committee, where he and his colleagues introduced a comprehensive package of 28 bills aimed at improving the digital divide. Latta discusses how important it is to reduce unnecessary barriers to build out and to streamline siting. The recent actions by the FAA to delay the rollout of C-band was also on the agenda and the Congressman spoke frankly about actions that may be necessary to expedite the process. Support the show (https://insidetowers.com/subscription/)

The Bob Frantz Authority Podcast
Monday 11.29.21 Hour 1 with Congressman Jim Jordan Discussing New COVID Variant & Fauci is Science

The Bob Frantz Authority Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 43:13


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Mark Schneider, Amb. Pete Hoekstra and John McLaughlin

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 52:59


MARK SCHNEIDER, Senior Analyst, National Institute for Public Policy, Former Director, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Former Senior Foreign Service Officer, US Department of State What is the likelihood that China and/or Russia would use an EMP in a first strike? Mark Schneider: We are doing “very little” to counter the threats posed by China and Russia AMB. PETE HOEKSTRA, former Congressman (1993-2011), Michigan's 2nd Congressional District, former US Ambassador to the Netherlands (2017-2021), Fellow, Center for Security Policy, @Petehoekstra Amb. Pete Hoekstra: We are two and a half years into COVID and the Chinese are still not cooperating in helping the international community investigate the origins of the virus JOHN MCLAUGHLIN, CEO and Partner, McLaughlin & Associates, @jmclghln John McLaughlin talks about McLaughlin & Associates' November 2021 National Survey and whether respondents felt that the United States is headed in the right direction McLaughlin: The mainstream media is under polling Republicans in their national surveys How aware are Americans to the fact that the U.S. is “subsidizing” the Chinese threat?

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
Jim Jordan Has Had a Hand in Many of the Big Government Overreach Investigations: Dennis Prager with Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 10:56


Dennis Prager speaks with Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan about his new book "Do What You Said You Would Do: Fighting for Freedom in the Swamp." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

White Flag with Joe Walsh
16. Bridging the Divide: Cenk Uygur / Congressman Adam Kinzinger

White Flag with Joe Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 27:16


The Dom Giordano Program
Congressman Jim Jordan on Biden's Economy and Washington Politics

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:42


Today, Dom leads off the Dom Giordano Program by recapping the press conference held on guns and the rise in violence here in Philadelphia, with Mayor Kenney blaming greed, the media, guns and Coronavirus for the virus rather than accepting any accountability himself. Then, Giordano focuses on one particular victim of Mayor Kenney's flailing blame, that being the town of Oaks, PA, which hosts a monthly gun show. Kenney and President of City Council Darrell Clarke seemingly attempt to reframe the debate and blame away from Philadelphia, arguing in the press conference that State legislation is at fault for the rise in crime in Philadelphia, which Dom rebukes. Then, Congressman Jim Jordan returns to the Dom Giordano Program, a day after releasing his brand new book, Do What You Said You Would Do: Fighting For Freedom In The Swamp. In the new book, Jordan offers a first-hand account of Capitol Hill during the Trump presidency, after becoming one of the loudest and strongest conservative voices in Congress during the former President's time in office. Jordan reveals to Giordano the meaning behind the title of the book, in which Jordan explains that there are far too many in Washington who do not live by their word. Also, Jordan offers his thought on inflation under the Biden administration, and offers who he'd invite to his Thanksgiving dinner if given the choice of any person through history. (Photo by Susan Walsh-Pool/Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hugh Hewitt podcast
November 24th, 2021

Hugh Hewitt podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 52:21


Today's guests: Rep. Mike Gallagher, Congressman from Wisconsin. Zach Nunn, chair, Task Force Argo, IA-3 Congressional Candidate. Doug Lesmerises, sportswriter, producer, Cleveland.com Brian Wesbury, senior economist, First Trust Portfolios. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dale Jackson Show
Guest host Jeff Poor and fmr. Congressman Parker Griffith discuss the national economy and the Alabama Senate race - 11-24-21

The Dale Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 12:17


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Pete Kaliner Show
Pete Kaliner: Do You Trust Madison Cawthorn To Run NC-13 In 2022?

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:36


In the third hour of the program, NC-11 Congressman Madison Cawthorn joins Pete to talk about his decision to run for Mecklenburg County's new NC-13 District in 2022, and takes listener reaction throughout the hour after the interview. Pete talks about Cawthorn's reasons for switching districts and asks listeners how confident they are in the young Congressman potentially representing Charlotte in Washington.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fresh Take with Josh Dukelow
Parade Security, Congressman Grothman & Jessie Opoien

Fresh Take with Josh Dukelow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 91:58


(00:00) Local News Chat: Parade Prep & Library Cost (18:20) Your Take on Feeling Safe at Tonight's Parade (37:00) Congressman Glenn Grothman (55:00) Jessie Opoien, Capitol Reporter, CapTimes (85:30) The Takeaway: Take Time To Show Your Thanks

Matt & Aunie
M&V Morsel - Congressman Gary Palmer, PT 2 (11/23/21)

Matt & Aunie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:26


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Matt & Aunie
M&V Morsel - Congressman Gary Palmer, PT 1 (11/23/21)

Matt & Aunie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 15:26


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

O'Connor & Company
CONGRESSMAN MARK MEADOWS on O'Connor & Company Show-11232021

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 12:18


TUESDAY 11/23.   Listen as Larry and Amber Athey talk with Congressman Mark Meadows- - former chief of staff to President Donald Trump, former North Carolina congressman and author of new book "The Chief's Chief" Topic: origins of Covid, China accountability  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On The Chain - Blockchain and Cryptocurrency News + Opinion
Saving Crypto Innovation with Congressman Tom Emmer

On The Chain - Blockchain and Cryptocurrency News + Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 63:15


Saving Crypto Innovation with Congressman Tom Emmer Congressman Tom Emmer was sworn in for his first term in the U.S. House of Representatives on January 6, 2015. He is currently serving his fourth term. Tom was elected by his fellow Republican colleagues to join the House GOP Leadership team as the Chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee for the 116th Congress and again for the 117th Congress. Currently, he sits on the House Financial Services Committee. He is also a member of the Republican Deputy Whip Team and the House Republican Steering Committee. Born in 1961, Tom grew up in Minnesota and attended St. Thomas Academy. He received his BA in Political Science from the University of Alaska-Fairbanks and his JD from William Mitchell College of Law. After practicing law for several years, he opened his own law firm. The next 20 years were spent balancing family, business, coaching hockey, and serving on the city councils in Independence and Delano. Before coming to Congress, he served in the Minnesota House of Representatives from 2004-2008. He and his wife Jacquie have been married for over 30 years and have seven children. They reside in Delano. Follow Rep. Tom Emmer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RepTomEmmer Tom Emmer on the Web: https://emmer.house.gov Blockchain Regulatory Certainty Act https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/5045 Securities Clarity Act https://emmer.house.gov/the-securities-clarity-act ------ CHAPTERS Coming Soon Compiled by Hans Loaded https://twitter.com/hansloaded -------------- OTC MERCH https://onthechain.shop BUY US A COFFEE https://otc.one/buy-us-a-coffee -------------- SUBSCRIBE TO THE OTC PODCAST: https://otc.one/podcast -------------- FOLLOW ON THE CHAIN: Subscribe to our other Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/OnTheChain​ On The Web: https:/onthechain.io​ Follow OTC on Twitter: https://twitter.com/on_the_chain Join our FREE Telegram Roundtable channel: https://t.me/onthechain_roundtable -------------- JEFF Follow Jeff on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Jeff_OnTheChain -------------- CHIP Follow Chip on Twitter: https://twitter.com/stephenchip​ Listen to Chip's music http://nojoyyet.com​ -------------- DISCLAIMER: All opinions expressed by content contributors that appear on OTC are solely expressing their opinions and do not reflect the opinions of OTC, its affiliates, or sponsors. Content contributors may have previously disseminated information on a social media platform, website, or another medium such as a podcast, television, or radio. OTC, Content Contributors, Affiliates, or Sponsors are not obligated to update or correct any information. The content contributors are sharing the information which they believe to be reliable. OTC, its affiliates, or sponsors cannot guarantee the accuracy of the opinion shared, and viewers, readers, and listeners should not rely on it. Opinions expressed are not financial advice. Please consult a licensed financial advisor before making any financial decisions. It is imperative that before you invest in anything you research before investing. Do not invest based on what someone else is doing or not doing, or based on other people's opinions. #CongressmanTomEmmer #SecuritiesClarityACT #CryptoRegulation

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Monday 11/22 -Special Guest: Congressman, David Valadao

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 12:11


Congressman David Valadao (CA-21) joins the show to discuss the Biden Administration's failure to respond to requests for support in the valley's fight for water.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Source
San Antonio Congressman Joaquin Castro on Capitol Hill developments and the Texas impact

The Source

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 23:53


Congressional lawmakers are wrestling with major pieces of legislation amid the pandemic economy, and amongst themselves about the ongoing Jan. 6 investigation and recent censure of GOP Rep. Paul Gosar. What's the latest from Capitol Hill and what does it mean for Texans?

The Sean Hannity Show
Congressman Jim Jordan - November 22nd, Hour 2

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 33:19


 Congressman Jim Jordan of Ohio joins to discuss his new book, Do What You Said You Would Do: Fighting for Freedom in the Swamp, out tomorrow. Get an inside look at the detailed investigations of the United States Congress, the groundwork for Donald Trump's win in 2016, and the events that occurred during his successful four years as president. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

KQED's The California Report
Congressman Seeks to Restore Land to Karuk Tribe

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 18:15


1,000 acres of sacred land could be restored to the Karuk tribe living along the Klamath River in Humboldt and Siskiyou counties. That's if legislation introduced in Congress is passed. Reporter: Danielle Venton, KQED  Diablo Canyon in San Luis Obispo County is the state's last commercial nuclear power plant and is set to close in the coming years. But the planned closure is not without controversy. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report The DMV is expanding its capacity to administer commercial driving tests, by extending weekend hours and shifting examiners from other parts of the state to Southern California. The hope is that it can clear some of the backlog at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Reporter: Keith Mizuguchi, The California Report Universal preschool is coming to California in 2025. Yet not everyone is celebrating. In fact, some believe universal preschool could have disastrous consequences for child care centers and families seeking early care, with the impact falling hardest on communities of color.  Reporter: Deepa Fernandes, early childhood reporting fellow at Pacific Oaks College, which is funded in part by First 5 LA

Growing in God’s Word
Leadership is Essential with Former U.S. Congressman Bob McEwen

Growing in God’s Word

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 17:09


On today's Seek First, former U.S. Congressman Bob McEwen joins Rick Brown to discuss where the country is right now, why leadership is necessary, homeschooling, hope for America and the difference between spiritual and physical wisdom. Bob McEwen is a spectacular talent for explaining complicated issues in an easy-to-understand manner; he's an economics major, six-term member of the United States Congress, author and Execute Director, Council for National Policy. Don't miss this opportunity to listen in, friends. I know you'll be encouraged! Links to resources Check out Bob McEwen book here https://bobmcewen.com/products-page/books/ Tune in to watch Pastor Rick Brown live Saturdays at 6pm: pastorrickbrown.com Seek First with Rick Brown podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/6ryzHPLzLRxeUJqNNhGTOP pastorRickBrown rumble: https://rumble.com/user/pastorRickBrown Teaching: https://pastorrickbrown.com/teachings/ Anchored in the Word Bible reading plan: https://pastorrickbrown.com/reading-plan/ Check out Tammy Brown's book here: https://tammybrown.org

First Class Fatherhood
#559 Congressman Jim Jordan

First Class Fatherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 28:03


Episode 559 Congressman Jim Jordan is a First Class Father and United States representative for Ohio's 4th congressional district. He is the Ranking Member of the House Judiciary Committee and former Ranking Member of the House Oversight Committee. Congressman Jordan is also a founding member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus. Before he began his career in politics, Jim Jordan was a two-time NCAA Division I wrestling champion at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Prior to college he won state championships all four years he was in high school and compiled a 156–1 win-loss record. He went on to coach wrestling at the Ohio State University, while also earning a master's degree. Congressman Jordan is the author of a new book, Do What You Said You Would Do: Fighting for Freedom in the Swamp. In this Episode, Congressman Jordan shares his fatherhood journey which includes two sons and two daughters. He discusses the Fatherless Crisis and the need for more positive father and father-figures in America. He describes how we can keep the younger generation engaged in debating the issues of the day despite the toxic environment surrounding politics in America today. He talks about his new book, Do What You Said You Would Do: Fighting for Freedom in the Swamp. He offers some great advice for new or about to be Dads and more! Do What You Said You Would Do: Fighting for Freedom in the Swamp - https://www.amazon.com/Do-What-You-Said-Would/dp/1637581459 Subscribe to First Class Fatherhood and watch on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCD6cjYptutjJWYlM0Kk6cQ?sub_confirmation=1 SPONSORS: SeatGeek - https://seatgeek.com Promo Code: FirstClass Save: $20 off tickets MY PILLOW - https://www.mypillow.com Promo Code: Fatherhood Save Up To 66% Off 1-800-875-0219 More Ways To Listen - https://linktr.ee/alec_lace Follow me on instagram - https://instagram.com/alec_lace?igshid=ebfecg0yvbap For information about becoming a Sponsor of First Class Fatherhood please hit me with an email: FirstClassFatherhood@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alec-lace/support

Cyber Security Inside
67. Thanksgiving Special: From AI to Data Security, Some Essential Lessons

Cyber Security Inside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:46


In the spirit of Thanksgiving Tom and Camille highlight the work their guests are doing that they are thankful for — including ethical considerations of AI, why the race for AI is one of most important for humankind, and how academia and the cyber security industry can work together.    The conversation covers: -  Leading thoughts on AI -  Ethical considerations of AI -  Cyber security and digital manufacturing technologies  -  Why the relationship between academics and the cyber security industry matters ...and more. Don't miss it!   The views and opinions expressed are those of the guests and author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Intel Corporation.   Here are some key take-aways: -  AI is one of the most important races in humankind right now, coming second will not be an option.   -  Human ethics needs to be taken into consideration when developing AI. AI is built on systems and structures in society. These systems have racist structures which means we need to be careful AI doesn't perpetuate inequality.  -  Digital manufacturers are working on the ability to detect data hacks as they transmit data all over the world.  -  Academics and the data security industry need to make sure they are engaging with each other to understand future trends.    Some interesting quotes from today's episode: “When it comes to certain technologies like Artificial Intelligence, coming in second place can't happen. You know, there's such a first mover's advantage. This is one of the reasons why Vladmir Putin said “whoever masters AI's gonna master the world.”  So that race, yes, brings out the best in us, but in some cases, if we don't win, it's going to have an impact on our economy.” Will Hurd,  former Congressman and undercover CIA officer   “When we ask or think about, you know, who is this responsible to?  I think the first question is really where is the greatest impact going to be felt?  And to figure that out, I always start by asking or thinking about, you know, in which context will this technology we use be deployed? And who are the communities and users who might be impacted?.” Chloe Autio, Intel alumni and Advisor and Senior Manager, the Cantellus Group    “The data security issues, the ability to sort of get in there and, and hack any of that and modify any of that is just sort of stop and stop and step back and think about that and you're like, “Holy cow! There's so many places this could go wrong now. Right. And how do I secure all of this?” Tim Simpson, Paul Morrow Professor of Engineering Design and Manufacturing at Penn State    Links to full episodes with each guest: Will Hurd: A Former CIA Officer and Congressman's Thoughts on Cybersecurity, AI and More (Part 1) Chloe Autio: What That Means with Camille: Responsible AI  Tim Simpson: Ensuring Security in 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing  Jason Fung: What That Means with Camille: Offensive Research, aka Hacking  

The Larry Kudlow Show
Congressman Kevin Brady (R-TX) | 11-20-2021

The Larry Kudlow Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 21:00


How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 41:53


Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This episode and next, we tackle one of the most intimidating poets in the American Canon- Walt Whitman.  He is the generally accepted and almost uncontested greatest contribution America has made to the great canon of World Literature- the ones comprised of those that really intimidate- William Shakespeare,  James Joyce, Gustave Flaubert, Vladimir Nabokov, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Ovid, Goethe, Neitche-, Dante- people like that- there are not too many Americans that make that list.    And he does intimidate me- truly.  And honestly he baffles me.  The things he says seem easy to understand except I don't actually understand them.  They are beautiful and interesting but also uncomfortable.  People love his writing and always have, but he's also very offensive- and he offends all equally- the prude and the religious, but also the secular and intellectual- he offends the socialist as well as the capitalist.  Name an identity- he references it and somewhat dismantles it.  Primarily because he absolutely rejects group identities as we think of them today- even in terms of nations but in every sense.  To use his words, “I am large; I contains multitudes” that's a paraphrase from my favorite selection of his work which we'll read today.      For me he's such a curious person in part because of the time he emerged in what was called then the American experiment- and I honestly think his perspective has a lot to do from this unique time period, of course this is not different than how I feel about all of the writers we discuss.  But being born in 1819, the United States of America is only 36 years older than he is.  His parents were present during the Revolutionary War and have a real respect for what people were trying to do here, and how unusual and fragile democratic government actually was or really is.  We, at least we here in the United States, live with the feeling that this country just always has been- that democracy just happens.  That elections are just things that have always happened.  Most students today in this country don't even think about it. Democracy is the normal order in how things occur; equality and liberty are just virtues that everyone agrees are important- by one definition or another.  But None of this was reality and common understanding in 1819 in almost any part of the planet Earth.  And most of the world looked at the United States with contempt- a bunch of non-educated hillbillies living in some weird schemata that wouldn't stand the test of time.  There was no culture in this country, by international standards.  We had no great art, no history to speak of, we weren't writing great philosophies or composing great music.  We had not produced a Voltaire, or a Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  We had no Catherine the Great or Cosimo De Medici sponsoring great artistic ventures.        And so enters Walt Whitman- to which he would say, and did say- whoopdeedoo Europe- you are correct- we have none of that, and I celebrate that we don't.      I want to begin with this famous poem by Whitman.  Of course, it's from Leaves of Grass which we'll introduce in a second, but if you are reading the Death bed edition which is the one I have- again I'll explain all that later, it's in the beginning, that very first part called “Inscriptions”.  Let me read Whitman's famous words on America.     I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,  Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,  The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,  The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,  The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,  The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands,  The wood-cutter's song, the ploughboy's on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,  The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing,  Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,  The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.      Garry, I want to hear your first thoughts when you read this poem.  Let me start by saying, notice how celebratory it is.  America is singing carols- not dirges- and the song of the American is the song of hard work- not the Vienna Philharmonic- which by the way was founded in 1842.  America was not building art, as commonly understood- we were building lives- free lives- lives where people lived with the choices they made, but they got to make their own choices.  This is very different than anywhere else- places more cultured, more sophisticated, more idealized.  We don't have serfs working for great lords or ladies.  We have no jet-setters so to speak- or people of privilege or high cultural standing- In America we work hard,  but we work for ourselves-and everyone does it- and that is something we're proud of.  There is no shame in labor.  There's a song to that.      Yes, it's very much about homestead.  It's about individualism and taking responsibility to create it- About creating your own little corner of the world.  This is exactly the idea that Alexis DeToqueville referenced in his important work Democracy in America.  As a Frenchman, he was totally surprised and impressed with this very thing that Whitman is talking about.  This poem is a complete refutation of the English feudal system and that's what Northerners loved about it.  In the South, and what was so offensive to Whitman when he spent time in New Orleans was that they were trying to recreate that hierarchal system where some people outrank others to the point of claiming they weren't even human- and that, to Whitman, was the complete opposite of what the entire American Experiment was about.      His parents were clearly on team America- he had one brother named George Washington Whitman, another named Thomas Jefferson Whitman and a third named Andrew Jackson Whitman.       Ha- I guess that IS a statement.  This unique time of history in which he lived allowed Whitman to see such great contrasts in America- he saw democracy and success found in personal effort.  He saw vast amounts of unpolluted natural beauty, but he also saw evil at its most deranged, and pain and loneliness at its most intense.  We have to remember that his parents lived through the glorious revolutionary war, but he lived during the treacherous Civil War- and his perspective and life experience is very different. He admired the expanse of the West. He loved the natural beauty of this continent, but he also was horrified and despised to its core – the. National plague that has defined and still defines so much of the American story- this legacy of slavery- his views on such, btw- got him fired by more than one employer, btw.  At this time, newspapers were owned and operated by political parties, and he was always slipping in views that the political operatives didn't like- so he got fired.       HA!  Well, I guess some things never change.    One thing that baffles and almost offends most academics is Whitman's absolute nothing of an academic background.  His parents were basically illiterate, his family was excessively large and chaotic; today we would say dysfunctional.  He had one sibling that actually had to be committed to an insane asylum.   His formal education was inadequate because his father sent him out to work.  It's so ironic that the greatest American poet had no formal tutelage to except what he scrounged up for himself in his own self-taught way by reading in libraries and attending operas.  He didn't have that option.  His father was also pretty much a financial failure.  He was a carpenter by trade, but had also had a little property.  His father speculated in real estate after moving to Brooklyn, NY, but wasn't all that great at business and ended up losing most of it.      And of course, that's the problem with the land of opportunity- you are kind of out there on your own to make it or break it.  And people were very aware of this.  There was no guarantee, at all, that America would even survive as a country.  It was still an experiment.  No one else was living like this.  Europeans had monarchies; the South American countries were colonies.  Our neighbors to the East were living in empires.  Only this little backward nation in a corner of North America was trying to do this weird thing.    And Whitman loved it.  He really did.  He loved the land.  He loved the cities.  He loved the people.  He spent the first 36 years of his life walking around and observing life, mostly in New York City and Long Island (which was NOT a suburb of New York at that time).    He loved the libraries and spent tons of time there reading.  He loved music, especially opera, which we'll notice has a strong influence on how he writes.  He loved learning, listening and observing, and this is what he wrote about.  I heard one lecturer say that he was the first non-blind poet- which I thought was weird and what made it stand out.  But what the professor meant was that most poets were writing about their inner life, things from their imagination- think Edgar Allan Poe and “The Raven”, but Whitman, in many cases, was transcribing things that he was seeing and hearing in urban life- and this was very different.  He would catalogue it- to use a word that is often used to describe this thing that we just saw him do in the poem we just read, make these long lists of details in these long sentences.         I also want to point out that it was this desire to self-educate that led him, like many of his day, to be influenced and challenged by the great Ralph Waldo Emerson. We'll do an entire episode or more than one of him, but Emerson's non-conventional ideas about nature and the soul and our inter-connectedness, although ideas that were commonly accepted in the far East, were new on this continent.      True- well, In 1855, something happened.  Whitman self-publishes the book Leaves of Grass.  This first version was only 95 pages long- that's compared to the death bed one which has 415 in my copy.   There was no author's name on the cover.  Instead, on the first page there was this image of a man in laborer's clothes.  Whitman only reveals that he's the author through one of the first unnamed poems calling himself, “Walt Whitman, an American, one of the roughs, a kosmos.”    If you look up the word Kosmos in the dictionary it will tell you that that word means- a complex orderly self-inclusive system- which is interesting to think about someone describing themselves as- but it's a Greek word.  It's also a Biblical word- which is how I believe Whitman would know it.  It is used in the New Testament to mean the universe or the creation as a whole- that's how Whitman defines himself in this poem “Song of Myself”  and the context of how he wants us to understand his work and who we are as individuals.  We too are kosmos.      Well, it didn't start out very cosmic- that's for sure.  It's a miracle Leaves of Grass came to be read by anyone.  He self-published it, literally type-setting it himself.  He printed 795 copies and sold almost none of them.     Don't you wish you had one of those originals?    I know right, well, people do.  In case you're in the market, there are 200 that are still around, and in 2014, one sold at Christie's for $305,000.  It's so ironic- Whitman struggled financially until the day he died and celebrated working people in everything he wrote.  What do you think he would think of that, Christy?    I have zero doubt, he would love it.  Totally.  Beyond being the book's publisher, he also was the book's publicist.  He sent copies to the leading poets of the day trying to drum up some good reviews.  Whittier was said to thrown his copy into the fire he was so offended and outraged- the homoerotic imagery was more than he could handle, but Ralph Waldo Emerson saw it for what it was and wrote Whitman back an amazing letter of encouragement.  Let me quote Emerson, “I am not blind to the worth of the wonderful gift of Leaves of Grass. I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed.”  And of course, to this day, many world class literary scholars still think this about Whitman.       What I find humorous about Whitman is that he wrote glowing reviews of his book himself secretly and published them as if they were written by other people.       Yeah, he was working the influencer thing way back before that was a thing- He also, printed Emerson's actual glowing review when he reprinted the book in 1856, except he didn't get Emerson's permission to do so.  He put Emerson's words, “I greet you at the beginning of a great career” on the spine of the book and he published the entire letter with a long reply andress to Dear Master.”  It was NOT received well by Emerson.      I can see that as being slightly presumptuous.      Of course it was, but I would be tempted as well.  He really admired Emerson, in fact this is what he said about Emerson's influence on his writing.  “I was simmering, simmering, simmering; Emerson brought me to a boil.”    I want us to read the very first part of Song of Myself which was the first poem    I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  This is what I mean when I say, it seems like it's very simple to understand except I've read this poem hundreds of times and am still slightly confused as to what he means.  The term for this is ambiguous- he makes you, as a reader, put your own interpretation, put yourself into the lines to force the meaning out of it.      True, and if you take it at face value just superficially, it may seem that this is a narcissist celebrating egotism, but it clearly doesn't.  It also could be misunderstood to mean he celebrates idleness and laziness, but that doesn't seem to be right either.    Exactly- I love these first lines.  First of all, they are so iconic.  One thing Whitman is known for besides the cataloguing which I mentioned when we read I Hear America Singing, is this thing that today we call Free Verse. Whitman is often given credit for inventing the concept, although that is debatable.  But what is obvious is that there is no rhyme or meter of any kind at all and there isn't supposed to be.  He doesn't want anything to rhyme.  Instead, he wants to write in these really long sentences.  Every stanza is a single sentence, and he is going to do that through the entire poem.  Whitman felt you couldn't get your idea out in these little short phrases of iambic tetrameter like his Whittier, the guy who threw his book in the fire, was doing.  Whitman wanted, above all else, to create a sense of intimacy between himself and the person reading- and so he wanted to make sure you could follow his idea- from idea to idea.  He got this idea from two places- first he copied the idea from the one book he had been familiar with since his childhood- the King James Version of the Bible.  He copied the style like you see in the Psalms or even the Sermon on the Mount.  He also got the idea from the opera- if you think about opera- you also have these long phrases- that end with things like figaro figaro fiiiigaro-     Is that your impression of the opera?    Well, as you know, I enjoy the opera.  I haven't always, to be honest.  A few years ago, my good friend, I've mentioned her on the podcast before, Millington AP Literature/ Lang teacher Amy Nolette, coerced me to attend with her- and I did.  She is an accomplished musician so she really taught me how to admire what was going on- and we went every year for several years until Covid hit.  But, having said that, I'm fairly sure, that's my best attempt at singing opera.      But back to Whitman, so one of the first things that Whitman is famous for today is this concept of Free Verse- it was innovative then, but now, it doesn't seem that big of a deal.  That was a big deal, but a bigger deal to Whitman were the ideas he was putting out there.    I celebrate myself- not because I'm so important- not because I have all this amazing heritage or skill or anything- I celebrate myself because I have an essence that is 100% unique to me.  Let's read it again.     I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  It's not accidental that he throws in there that scientific language.  And this is where he will offend the capitalist or competitive side of us.  He makes this bold assertion- in this poetic way- to say- what, do you think you're that much better than me- you are made of the exact same material I am- we're both made of atoms- science teaches us that- and for every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.      In some sense it's the I'm okay- you're okay attitude, but taking it up a notch- I celebrate myself- you celebrate yourself.      For sure, and something we all give lip-service to today but no one actually really believes.  I have a creative writing assignment that I ask my students to do every year.  We take another Whitman poem called “There was a Child Went Forth” that talks about identity and the physical objects and places that influence who you are- it's a wonderful poem, anyway, I ask my students to write a poem using Whitman's style and technique about THEIR lives.  I tell them we're going to read them in small groups, and if they like what they wrote and feel comfortable,  we are going to print them and put them outside my door in the hallway for everything to read.  At first they are very very resistant to the idea.  They all hate it- first because it's writing, secondly because it's poetry- but mostly because they don't think they want their lives sprawled on the hallway of the school.  I had a sweet darling child, actually a quiet student, raise her hand in protest and literallty say, I don't want to do this.  I can't do this.  All I do is go to school and work- there is nothing interesting at all about my life.      Ha!  She seems to have missed the point.  She didn't want to celebrate herself and she's exactly the kind of person Whitman loved celebrating.    Exactly- and lots of my kids are like that- they work at Sonic, Chick-Fila- the mall- mowing lawns- but in her case, it turns out she is way more interesting and her poem is on the wall right now.  I may take a picture and post it on our website, so you can see them all.  I'm very proud of my kiddos- not just because they produced good poems but because lots of them are hardworking.       I will say, that next phrase leads us to think that Whitman is a lazy person.  He extols the virtue of loafing.  But of course, what I know about his biography which we'll get more into next week when we talk about his experiences in the Civil War and all of that, but Whitman was the very opposite of lazy.  He was an extremely physical hard worker.      True- Let's read the lines you're talking about..    I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  When he says I loaf and invite my soul- he's getting into the philosopher side of him that is so complex and we really don't even have time to go there today, but it's that old idea of contemplating- today what we call mindfulness.  And I have to admit, I'm not good at this.        He really believes in mindfulness although he didn't know we renamed his concept for him.  Loafe- meaning chill out- turn off the phone, turn off the tv, turn off the computer and invite your soul into yourself.  Chill out!!!  Stop and observe a spear of grass.  Just look at it- let your mind go there- let it focus on something small- it's the kind of thing the yoga instructors keep telling us to do, that we rarely heed but we all know we should.      Exactly- attention and silence- he things they are indispensable to a sane existence- and two things I'm not all that good at.  And then we get to these last two sentences in this opening little poem-    My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  There's a lot to say- but he's going to say- I'm proud to be from this place- my parents are from this place.  I'm 37- that is not young.  He is not a child prodigy- he's writing his first book late in life, relatively- he knows that- but he says I'm in good health and I begin- and I'm not going to stop until death- I'm going to live well all the way til the end- I'm not going to give up on myself.  Ever.      I can see why he's inspiring.  And I to get back to this idea of origins.  You know being an American today is something lots of people are proud of (although it is very American to trash our own country) but that's part of our national ethos- but even these same people proudly display their passport.  America is a powerful country and a rich country.  At that time it was a new country- and new countries don't have the safety of heritage and sometimes the people who come from them have trouble taking pride in their heritage.    I totally know what you're talking about.  There was a listener who connected with us through our Instagram page and showed us some beautiful pictures he had taken.  They were truly amazing- not only were the mountains breathtakingly gorgeous in their own right, but his eye for framing was genius.  I messaged him back and told him what I thought of his art.  We went back and forth and I finally asked him.  Where are you from? And he would never tell me.  He said he was from Central Asia and so fort which I eventually gathered he is from one of the new countries formally part of the USSR.   I'm not saying he was ashamed of where he was from, I didn't get that sense, but he seemed intimated that we were from America- a place that seems so far away and idealized from his point of view.  Whitman would tell this young man- you're from that wonderful air,  from wonderful heritage, from atoms just like ours- not just accept it celebrate it.    Because, as I read onward, he seems to imply, this is the attitude that breeds great things that breeds beautiful things but if it doesn't- that's okay as well- keep going all the way til death- compete not with others but with yourself- as he goes to self- publish the same book 8 more times until he does .    Ha!  I guess that's true.      I want to read the last sentence again of that opening because he sets up a lot of the rest of his writings with something of a warning-    Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  Again- that language seems simple but at the same time I have to really work at what he's going to say.  But I have an interpretation- he's going to say this- put away your school learning and your religious training when you read this.  Sit back because I'm going to say some really hard things- that's what he means with that word “hazard”- but they are not mean- they are natural- it's about the energy of being alive.  It's the beauty of being you, of being a physical body, of being an inter-connected spirit with connections to other people and part of this physical space.      And of course, it's that celebration of the physical body that kept getting him censored. Even Ralph Waldo Emerson later when he was reproducing his book begged him to self-censor what was thinly veiled homo-erotic passages, but he just wouldn't.  He didn't see them as erotic- he didn't even see sex like that.  For him sexuality and the physical body had a self-evidence important place in our lives and had to be brought out in the open- be it a hazard or not.  And again, it kind of was a hazard, he lost a really good job in Washington at one point because his boss found a copy of leaves of Grass in his desk and found it obscene.      Poor guy- well, that takes us to the title- Leaves of Grass- and what that even means.  I mentioned that Whitman was famous for his style or innovative literary technique, he has been increasingly praised for his innovative ideas about the body, the self, consciousness- he was one of the first America poets to even write about consciousness- the other one btw is Emily Dickinson.  But probably the thing I like the best about Whitman, and this is me, personally, is his ability to really capture a wonderful metaphor.  He could just say things in an understandable and pretty way- and this is what poetry really is all about- for my money.    This phrase that is the title – Leaves of Grass- it means something.  First let's read the first part of Song of Myself that talks about grass- I'd ask you to read all of it but I think we might get lost. Song of Myself number 6.      A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;  How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.  I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.    Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,  A scented gift and remembrancer designedly dropt,  Bearing the owner's name someway in the corners, that we may see and remark, and say Whose?    Or I guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of the vegetation.    Or I guess it is a uniform hieroglyphic,  And it means, Sprouting alike in broad zones and narrow zones,  Growing among black folks as among white,  Kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congressman, Cuff, I give them the same, I receive them the same.  And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves.  When Whitman loafs around and stares at grass- he sees a picture of America- or a picture of any democracy any group of people that understand that they are one poeple- of which America was the example he knew, but he's not exclusionary by any means.  He says, look, every single blade of grass is totally different and yet in some sense the same.  He calls it a uniform hieroglyphic- what an interesting turn of phrase.  It's and I use his words here “black folks as among white, kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congreeman, Cuff, I give to me the same, I receive them the same.”    For Whitman, the picture of America was a field of grass.  If we look at it, we see hopeful green woven stuff. The handkerchief of the Lord- but if we look at it closely we're all so different- and both things are truly beautiful.  It's a paradox.   He goes on to say, it's from the land, it's made up of the dust that is made up of the people of the land- I know it gets philosophical- and you can take it as far deep as you want to plunge with him.   But you don't have to get all that deep or esoteric if you don't want to.  You can just lay on the grass, and smell it and enjoy it- loaf on it- to use his words.    You know what I like about that entire image and about Whitman's entire philosophy.  He absolutely spoke of diversity, but he did not celebrate diversity- not like we think of doing that today.  He celebrates unity- and that's why this metaphor is the title.  Whitman had a very refined understanding of how easy we can rip each other apart- there is not more divisive time in American history than the 1850s and of course the 1860s- which are the war years.   He lived through the most divided time in American history and he could see it coming even in 1855.  But during his life time, he would see 2.5% of America's population die killing each other that was 750,000 people- if we would compare it to the population of America today- that would be over 7 million people.  Next week we will see how much he admired Lincoln and what he stood for, but as he understood the American experiment,  he believed in admiring differences and loving them, but identifying as a single group- first and foremost.  The dominant image here is of a single landscape- beautiful and united across time and space respecting the past not judging or condemning it- allowing ourselves to spring from it renewed and refreshed.   And I think that's where the universal appeal comes from.  If Whitman was just about American patriotism, maybe we'd like him in this country, but it would feel propagandistic.  His ideals are universal and apply to any group of people- anywhere.  And he's not afraid to admit-some of thing may be self-contradictory.  The first time I ever read Whitman was in college.  I went to school studying political science, but in my junior year I decided I didn't want to do that anymore and I was going to get an English major, well this meant I had to take almost exclusively classes that demanded intense reading- and all at the same time.  I read so much that they all ran together and my grades were not as good as they could have been had I had a healthier pace.  And in all that reading, not a whole lot stood out- but this little poem by Whitman actually did- I underlined it, and I kept the trade book I purchased at the time.  I actually still have it after all these years and so many moves.  In this little section, Whitman is talking in that intimate way that he talks to his reader- it's personal- it's in the second person- and at that time of my life- it was a very chaotic time to be honest- I had no idea what I was doing in my life, my mother had recently died, I had very little idea what I should do in the future- I had changed directions at the last moment- and these famous words just stood out.  Will you read them?  51  The past and present wilt—I have fill'd them, emptied them.  And proceed to fill my next fold of the future.  Listener up there! what have you to confide to me?  Look in my face while I snuff the sidle of evening,  (Talk honestly, no one else hears you, and I stay only a minute longer.)  Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict myself,  (I am large, I contain multitudes.)  I concentrate toward them that are nigh, I wait on the door-slab.  Who has done his day's work? who will soonest be through with his supper?  Who wishes to walk with me?  Will you speak before I am gone? will you prove already too late?  Christy- what did that mean to you.      I really have no idea.  I think the line that I liked is the line everyone likes, “Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict. Myself.”   It just made me feel better.  I knew I was full of inconsistencies. And Whitman just seemed to be saying- of course you are- everyone is- to understand that is just being honest.  Let it go.  Just concentrate on what is near- what you're doing today, supper- that sort of thing.  If you're successful- that's great- if you're a failure- what difference does it make- we're all the same atoms, we're all just leaves of grass.   He just made me feel okay.    Which I guess that would probably have made him happy- the bard of democracy- known as the good gray poet- speaking across time and space about what it means to be a human- to be a leaf of grass.  Thanks for listeninging- next episode- we will delve a little more into his adult life, read some of his most famous poems – those tributes to Abraham Lincoln- and finish our discussion of this amazing American.  AS always, please share about us with a friend or colleague- push out an episode on your social media feed, text an episode to a friend.  Connect with us on our social media at howtolovelitpodcast on facebook, Instagram, twitter, or Linkedin.  If you are a teacher, visit our website for teaching materials that provide ideas scaffolding for using our podcasts as instructional pieces in your classroom.      Peace out.      

WUNCPolitics
NC gets a budget, and longtime congressman won't seek re-election

WUNCPolitics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 24:41


After three years without one, North Carolina finally got a two-year spending plan this week. In our review of the week's politics, host Jeff Tiberii talks about the budget with Becki Gray and Rob Schofield. They also discuss what's behind Eastern North Carolina Democratic Congressman G.K. Butterfield's decision not to seek another term.

The Steve Gruber Show
Congressman Tim Walberg, National Debt Keeps Increasing

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 11:00


Congressman Tim Walberg Michigan's 7th congressional district. Walberg, Bipartisan Colleagues Introduce POW Priority Care Act

KJZZ's The Show: Friday Newscap
Why Congressman Paul Gosar 'hasn't learned anything'

KJZZ's The Show: Friday Newscap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:14


Jaime Molera of Molera Alvarez and attorney Tom Ryan joined The Show to talk about the censure of Congressman Paul Gosar, the gubernatorial race in Arizona and more.

Nate Shelman Show
Congressman Mike Simpson

Nate Shelman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:16


Congressman Mike Simpson joined Nate to discuss the House vote on the Build Back Better Plan and what the implications of that plan might be. (11/18/21)

John Solomon Reports
DOJ gone rogue? Congressman introduces articles of impeachment against AG Garland following targeting of parents

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 40:19


Congressman Scott Perry (R-PA) discusses his ‘calling for and introducing of articles of impeachment' against Attorney General Merrick Garland following the ‘overly politicized use of the Justice Department on political adversaries'. This comes after emerging allegations by a whistleblower this week, stating that the Attorney General instructed the DOJ to use counterterrorism tools against parents voicing their disapproval of school curriculums at local school boards.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Annie Frey Show Podcast
AFS: Congressman Mike Bost on DOJ whistleblower, Build Back Better & more

The Annie Frey Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 15:06


Could Nancy Pelosi really be on her way out? © 2021 KFTK (Audacy). All rights reserved. | Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Annie Frey Show Podcast
AFS: Congressman Mike Bost says he is hearing Nancy Pelosi may leave before the midterm elections

The Annie Frey Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 0:40


Congressman Mike Bost says the rumor is the BBB is her “big last stand” and then she will retire. © 2021 KFTK (Audacy). All rights reserved. | Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rapid Fire
Does Justice Exist Or Just Mob Rule?

Rapid Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 63:56


Well, we still haven't gotten a verdict from the Rittenhouse trial, the mob outside of the courthouse has made sure to scare the jury out of that. Congressman, Paul Gosar, is facing extreme punishment for posting a meme of AOC. Dr. Fauci has been tied to more horrific animal experimentation and we have more updates on surging COVID cases from the most vaccinated places in the world. __________________________________________________________________ SPONSOR: ORGANIC DARLINGS: If you're tired of the chemcial-filled products being peddled to us by big corporations, check out Organic Darlings. They have the best all natural, organic, American made shampoos, lotions & toothpastes that are healthy and safe! Use code "Darling Sav" to let them know I sent you! CLICK HERE: https://organicdarlings.com/discount/... __________________________________________________________________ FOLLOW ME: LOCALS: https://savsays.locals.com/ YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/savsays ODYSEE: https://odysee.com/@SavSays:7?r=7q7r9... TWITTER: https://twitter.com/RapidFire_Pod INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/savwith1n/ WEBSITE: https://www.savsaysofficial.com/ __________________________________________________________________ SUPPORT MY WORK: PAYPAL: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/savsays  

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
November 17, 2021:  John Rothmann - Is it ever ok to threaten the life of a Congressman?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:34


The House voted today to censure Paul Gosar. The Arizona Republican is the first member of the House to be formally rebuked in more than a decade. He was also removed from two committees. The vote was 223 to 207, with just two Republicans, Representatives Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, joining Democrats in favor. One other Republican, Representative David Joyce of Ohio, voted “present.” The vote, and the incendiary, emotional and personal debate leading up to it, laid bare the divisions of the moment, when Democrats say they must speak out against vicious threats and imagery that could give rise to the kind of violence that unfolded during the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. That attack hung heavily over Wednesday's debate. “When a member uses his or her national platform to encourage violence, tragically, people listen,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California said, adding that “depictions of violence can foment actual violence, as witnessed by this chamber on Jan. 6, 2021.”   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

John Solomon Reports
Congressman says security exemptions for illegal aliens, creating situation ‘worse since 9/11'

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:51


Congressman Lance Gooden (R-TX) discusses his recent unearthing of documents that show that Lutheran, Catholic, and Jewish Charities by way of ‘corporate and Federal sponsors' are trafficking illegal migrants from the Southern border to interior states in the US. The Congressman commented that he is working on legislation now to to outlaw ‘corporate, Federal sponsors' from receiving tax breaks for trafficking of illegals by way of NGO donations. He comments that the border ‘is a disaster', and ‘the fact that someone could actually get a tax break for helping someone who has broken the law by entering our nation' is ‘stunning'. Gooden goes on to say, a message needs to be sent ‘to these charities that if they're going to engage in illegal actions, then they no longer need to be in the business of providing charity.'See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Hugh Hewitt podcast
November 17th, 2021

Hugh Hewitt podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 52:39


Today's guests: Senator Marsha Blackburn from Tennessee. Senator James Lankford from Oklahoma. Senator Tom Cotton from Arkansas. Rep. Mike Gallagher, Congressman from Wisconsin. Brian Wesbury, senior economist, First Trust Portfolios. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bob Frantz Authority Podcast
Wednesday 11.17.21 Hour 1 Discussing Rittenhouse Case, Homeland Security Hearing , & Congressman Jim Jordan

The Bob Frantz Authority Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 44:54


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

O'Connor & Company
O'Connor & Company Interview - CONGRESSMAN JIM JORDAN - 11.17.21

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 7:21


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Politics Done Right
An economic system we must understand to demand what is ours. Congressman dings Trump & GOP.

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 55:05


We are being played by Republicans and neoliberals. We must understand our economic system to make the right choices. WOW! Republican Rep. destroys Trump: ENORMOUS POLITICAL LOSER who led us into a ditch, & much more!: Republican Congressman Anthony Gonzalez destroyed Donald Trump and the Republican Party as he told inconvenient truths. Inflation & Supply Chain problems are failures of private-sector profiteering, not the government: GOP and mainstream media would have you believe that the government is at fault for inflation and supply-chain failures. It is private-sector greed. Larry Summers's support for Build Back Better after complaining about Rescue Plan is telling. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

The David Knight Show
Thur 11Nov21 “Family Privilege”: Parental Rights, Marxists' Next Target

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 181:40


* Marxists and other statists have long targeted the family. Now they are explicitly targeting “Family Privilege” and Parental Rights * India's Aadhaar system for population control, a biometric ID system that preceded China's social credit system* Pablo Escobar's hippos given “personhood” status by US court to protect them — something they refuse to do for human babies; abortionists refuse to answer Congressman's questions about where they draw the line on killing babies — there is NO line* Davos' “Great Narrative” the power of propaganda in stories* Doctors threatened with losing their license for getting parental input about children's healthcare* Biden references “I, Pencil” — he KNOWS, he's deliberately destroying the supply chain4:00 “Family Privilege”? Parental Rights, Marxists' Next Target. Marxists and other statists have long targeted the family.  Now they are explicitly targeting “Family Privilege” and Parental Rights.  CRT & gender gaslighting are canaries in the coal mine48:04 US Courts say Hippos Are Persons, Human Babies Are NOT.  Illinois repeals a law protecting religious conscience, Congressman Mike Johnson questions abortionists about when they believe babies are persons and they make it clear that they don't have any limits, yet a court gives personhood protection to Pablo Escobar's hippos in Columbia to protect their lives1:05:55 Matt McConaughey tries to please everyone on vaccines, (just like Trump — they're great I got it but no mandates, not for kids) so Biden's “Surgeon General” comes after him1:16:17 Rittenhouse trial gets even more amazing 1:30:53 Dallas and Atlanta police departments have been secretly surveilling people with military grade equipment, able to see through thin walls as hackers release the found video1:34:52 DAD-SS: How “Breathalyzer” Mandate Will Work. Corporations have partnered with government once again to use technology to surveil you and control you.  This is how the expensive, mandated tech will work to constrict car ownership1:45:00 Is the economy about to make the leap in hyperinflation?  Everything is up significantly,  here's a breakdown.  Biden references “I, Pencil” by Leonard Reed but completely misses the point about a FREE MARKET being able to provide what a centralized, command/control economic order can NOT2:12:58 Gates' Plan for Global ID is Being Rapidly Put in Place. “The vaccine certificates will actually drive the whole field of digital ID in the future”, CEO of a Homeland Security contractor2:46:54 Did Gavin Newsom have a reaction to his jabs?  Observers and several anonymous sources say he did.  But here are several victims who've had severe reactions — including deathFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Politicology
Winners Take All with Congressman Steve Israel

Politicology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 52:24


To unlock exclusive content, visit: https://politicology.com/plus Former Congressman and former Chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Steve Israel sits down with Ron Steslow to discuss what Democrats must learn from the 2020 election and what they must do to have a shot at maintaining their majorities in 2022. (01:59)The balance between local and national interest in races (06:54) What we learned from the 2020 down ticket races (20:23) The ideological diversity within the Democratic party and how it shapes campaigns and governing (30:10) Keeping campaigns and messaging local (33:26) What the driving topics of the midterms might be Politicology is supported by listeners like you. Can you pitch in right now at https://politicology.com/donate? Follow Steve and Ron on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RepSteveIsrael https://twitter.com/RonSteslow