Podcasts about Arkansas

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State in the United States

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    Best podcasts about Arkansas

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    Latest podcast episodes about Arkansas

    Business Leadership Series
    Episode 1194: BLS Minute - Arthur Theotis Matthews

    Business Leadership Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 4:49


    Arthur Theotis Matthews J.D is a university lecturer at institutions such as NYU, Cornell, and the University of Arkansas. Moreover, he is a bilateral-preneur of a firm titled conscioustrainers.com with his partner Evelyne where he serves as the COO and Chief Playmaker. Arthur talks about the importance having people with different backgrounds, and perspectives, on your bench to help mentor you. 

    The Italian American Podcast
    IAP 243: Where Redneck Meets Red Sauce... A Trip to Tontitown, Arkansas's Italian Village

    The Italian American Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 65:52


    We spent last week filming in one of the most overlooked (and criminally underappreciated) corners of Italian America… deep in the Ozarks in a little Italian village called Tontitown, Arkansas! In this week's episode of The Italian American Podcast, we're sitting down with two of the new paesani we met during our travels, Heather Ranalli Peachee and Kara Jo Engle. Both of these proud Tontitown Italians can trace their roots to the founding families of this unique Italian agricultural colony, and today they are both part of the Tontitown Winery, which is the last commercial winery in a town that once cultivated more than 14,000 acres of commercial grapes! We'll share the people and places we found while visiting this incredible “Little Italy in the Ozarks” for its annual Grape Festival, which began in 1898 in celebration of the colony's first good harvest, and even predates some of Italian America's largest Italian feasts in places like New York and Boston. We'll also reveal how these 45 northern Italian families ended up in Arkansas in the first place, from a scam that brought them to the southeastern corner of the state to a once-famous Italian priest who led them on a life-changing trek to Northwest Arkansas for a chance at a life better suited to their Italian habits. We're sharing stories and recipes that have been lovingly passed down through generations of Tontitown's citizens as we celebrate this proud Italian community that had such an impact on us during our few days there. If you want to know the little slice of America where Redneck meets Red Sauce, join us as we discover the Italian American wonder that is Tontitown, Arkansas! This episode is sponsored by Mediaset Italia.

    Stuff They Don't Want You To Know
    The Clintons and Corruption, Part I: Origins and Body Counts

    Stuff They Don't Want You To Know

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 50:40


    From the politics of Arkansas to the heights of Presidential power, Bill and Hillary Clinton have become one of the world's most influential political power couples -- and, along the way, they've garnered a ton of allegations and accusations. But how many of these are true, and how many are smear campaigns and conspiracy theories? In part one of this two-part series, the guys dive into the world of Clinton conspiracies.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Aaron Torres Sports Podcast
    How the Big Ten's massive TV deal changes the future of college football, overrated/underrated teams in the Coaches Poll + Mailbag

    Aaron Torres Sports Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 69:07


    On today's show, Aaron explains what the Big Ten's new TV deal tells us about the future of Notre Dame, the Pac-12 and College Football Playoff. He also gives us five overrated and underrated teams in the first Coaches Poll and shares a mailbag on Arkansas' NIL, a different NCAA Tourney and more. Here's a full rundown: How the Big Ten's massive TV deal changes the future of college football (2:00): Aaron opens the show discussing the ripple effects of the Big Ten's massive new TV deal, and how we learned about the future of Notre Dame, the Pac-12 and College Football Playoff based on Monday's news. Coaches Poll overreaction (23:30): Next, the first coaches poll of the season is out - and Aaron shares the five teams he believes are overrated and underrated. Also, how the heck did Texas get a first place vote? Mailbag (46:00): Finally, he answers your mail bag questions, discussing Arkansas' new NIL program and reports that the NCAA Tournament could one day remove automatic bids. Also, Aaron shares his thoughts on the Brooklyn Nets turning down Kevin Durant's trade request. This episode is sponsored by Pristine Auction! Register at https://www.pristineauction.com/register and get $10 off your first item won when you use code: Torres Today's episode is also brought to you by DraftKings Sportsbook - new users in Kansas can sign up and automatically get $100 in free bets when sports betting goes live in their state! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Cover 3 College Football Podcast
    2022 College Football Win Totals: SEC West (08/10)

    Cover 3 College Football Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 73:45


    The Cover 3 crew picks win totals for Alabama, Texas A&M, LSU and more. First, whether the Crimson Tide will show up in Atlanta on the first Saturday in December with 12 regular season wins (1:45), what to expect from a Texas A&M team that's shown the ability to hang with Alabama (11:18) and whether Ole Miss can maintain a high win count after notable turnover on the field and on the sideline (20:49). Then, Arkansas' chances against some tough non-conference foes (31:59), expectations for LSU in year one with Brian Kelly (40:09), whether Mississippi State is ready for a jump in year three with Mike Leach (47:02) and Bryan Harsin's on-field response to the off-field turnover as Auburn heads into a pivotal year (52:55). Plus, reacting to major injury news at Wake Forest (1:02:44) and Florida (1:07:20).  Cover 3 is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Nominate the Cover 3 Podcast in the “Sports” category of the The People's Choice Podcast Awards! http://podcastawards.com/app/signup Get 20% off Cover 3 merch in the CBS Sports Store:  https://store.cbssports.com/collections/cover-3?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=cover-3-collection Watch Cover 3 on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/cover3 Follow our hosts on Twitter: @Chip_Patterson, @TomFornelli, @DannyKanell, @BudElliott3 For more college football coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/college-football/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Salad With a Side of Fries
    Microdosing, Mega Impact (feat. Peter Reitano & Daniel Sanders)

    Salad With a Side of Fries

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 67:02


    The Salad With a Side of Fries podcast is hosted by Jenn Trepeck, and discusses wellness and weight loss for real life, clearing up the myths, misinformation, bad science & marketing surrounding our nutrition knowledge and the food industry. Let's dive into wellness and weight loss for real life, including drinking, eating out, and skipping the grocery store.On Today's episode of Salad With A Side Of Fries, Jenn is joined by Peter Reitano & Daniel Sanders, creators of MOJO and founders of Gwella. MOJO is a microdose mushroom soft chew that helps with day-to-day health and focus. During this episode, we discuss what microdosing is, how it works in the body, the benefits of microdosing, and how to get started. We dive deeper into psychedelics and how the different amounts affect our bodies differently. Tune in to learn some valuable and interesting information about microdosing and a bit about macrodosing.IN THIS EPISODE:●   [6:35] How did Peter and Daniel get started in the microdosing area?●   [12:00] How Peter and Daniel define psychedelics and microdosing. ●   [15:09] What is legal and what's not legal?●   [20:05] What would make someone want to try microdosing?●   [23:10] What dosage qualifies as microdosing? ●   [32:30] How microdosing affects the body. ●   [40:01] Ketamine and Mescaline - What should we know?●   [41:30] What does everyone need to know to experiment for themselves?KEY TAKEAWAYS:●   Psychedelics allow you to build new tracks in your brain and, through the process, a way to think differently. Microdosing is more of a therapeutic dose allowing one to defrag their mind, a reset. Psychedelic support allows you to feel the issue but not re-experience it as you do through typical therapy. ●   There are many regulated drugs that we don't understand how they affect our brains or how they work, but we know they do work. There is still a lot to be learned in the psychedelic space, but it's been shown time and time again to be valuable. ●   Start low and slow with microdosing to find your best dose. And determine your best frequency, typically it's a cycle of days on and off. ●   If experimenting with macrodosing/psychedelics, do it with safe people, who have experienced it before, and that you genuinely like. Ensure that you are controlling the environment. Before using psychedelics: think about what's going on in your life, journal, receive advice from others, clean up your diet, and do a digital detox. Clear yourself of the garbage beforehand. After,  process what you learned and how you will apply it to your life.QUOTES:“We wanted to create a company that instead of focusing on a minus six to zero bringing people up to baseline, we wanted to create a company that focused on the zero to six. How do we elevate, how do we improve, and how do we give people the tools to optimize their day-to-day health and wellness? We call it the betterment of the well.”  - Peter Reitano “We looked at why people are microdosing which I talked about starting with mood, energy, focus, clarity, creativity, cognitive enhancements and we wanted to replicate that in a form that was legal.” - Daniel Sanders “If purity wasn't an issue, to be honest, I think that MDMA is the easiest first step into “psychedelics” it's an entactogen that generates this incredible feeling of oneness and communion and empathy with others, but it doesn't have heavy hallucinations, it's quite tough to have negative thoughts” - Peter ReitanoRESOURCES:Become A Member of Salad with a Side of FriesJenn's Free Menu PlanA Salad With a Side of FriesA Salad With a Side of Fries InstagramGUEST RESOURCES: MOJO Website COUPON CODE: WFRIES20 for 20% offGwella Mushrooms WebsitePeter Reitano's TwitterDaniel Sanders' LinkedInBIO:Peter Reitano:Peter is an award-winning entrepreneur and CEO of Gwella, a brand house and life sciences company on a mission to make psychedelics more accessible and help people use them safely and effectively. He's an active participant and early mover in emerging and highly regulated industries, including both cannabis and psychedelics. Stemming from his early personal experiences with entheogens, he's become a passionate advocate for cognitive liberty and the right of every human to experiment with their own consciousness. They recently launched Mojo in the USA; an innovative patent-pending product that mimics the benefits of microdosing, in a completely legal platform. Peter is also a regular speaker at conferences and industry panels around the world. He has been invited to speak at Google, Facebook, DX3, Porsche, Rogers, University of Toronto, Johnson and Johnson, Haste and Hustle, General Assembly, and InfluenceThis, just to name a few.Daniel Sanders:Daniel is a proponent for the evolution of humanity through medicinal and technological advancements; he attributes much of this pursuit towards a deep relationship with consciousness exploration and expansion. Having a decade of experience researching medicinal mushrooms, biohacking, and botanical extraction this has helped support his current role as Chief Scientific Officer and co-founder of Gwella Mushrooms Inc. Originally graduating from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock for molecular biotechnology with an emphasis in genetics, Daniel then helped found and pioneer Marygold Laboratories as chief operating officer for the analytical testing of scheduled substances and currently sits as principal investigator for KRN101- poly-tryptamine - psilocybin based treatment for clinical depression in cancer patients.

    The SoJo Files
    SHREEVE: Billy Freeman Interview (November 8th 2018)

    The SoJo Files

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 19:51


    On this episode you will be hearing the interview between detective Perry & Billy Freeman, the friend that Jordan Shreeve took home that day.  This interview was conducted on November 8th 2018 at the Van Buren, Arkansas police department.To watch this video click >>> HERE

    The Blacksmith Chronicles Podcast
    170. Supernatural Anointing for End-Time Revival (w/Annette Capps)

    The Blacksmith Chronicles Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 48:09


    Annette Capps is the President and CEO of Capps Ministries, an ordained minister, businesswoman, and licensed airplane pilot. A diversity of experiences created her unique and practical approach to ministry. She brings a balanced message of the supernatural and the natural. This combination of the practical and the prophetic stirs faith in the hearts of audiences. A lifelong student of the Bible, she has ministered across the nation and she has authored seven books,  Reverse the Curse in Your Body and Emotions, Removing the Roadblocks to Health and Healing, Overcoming Persecution, Angels, God's Creative Power® for Finances, her best seller Quantum Faith® and newest release The Spirit of Prophecy.    Along with continuing the radio ministry of her father, Charles Capps, she is now the host of the Concepts of Faith television program which broadcasts on many independent stations and networks including Daystar, TCT Network, and The Victory Channel. Coming from a long family history of farming, Annette maintains this close connection with the land by managing her family's farmland in Arkansas. She and her husband live in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma where the ministry is now located.    For More Info, Please Visit: www.cappsministries.com   LISTEN NOW AT: Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-blacksmith-chronicles-podcast/id1485445641   Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4OmhF96FBZ7wz6umnfiMnT   Destiny Image:  https://destinyimagepodcastnetwork.squarespace.com/#/the-blacksmith-chronicles/   Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/84241b46-96c3-4aed-a483-a003fd5ea74c/the-blacksmith-chronicles-podcast   Ryan Johnson — www.ryanjohnson.us RJM YouTube Channel — https://bit.ly/34Vxbgl Ryan Johnson Ministries Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/officialryanjohnsonministries The Blacksmith Chronicles Podcast Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/RJMinistries Twitter — https://twitter.com/ryanbjohnson278 Instagram — ryanjohnsonministries EMAIL — info@ryanjohnson.us TikTok — @officialrjm

    PodcastDX
    Caregiving for TBI

    PodcastDX

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 55:03


    This week we have the honor of speaking with  Brenda and Aaron Luter.  They have been married 23 years and live in St. Louis with their 2 sons, Josh and Alex.  Josh was in a motorcycle accident his freshman year of college at SIU Carbondale in April of 2021.  Alex just completed his freshman year at University of Arkansas.  Josh recently came home from the hospital in February of 2022. Josh has a severe traumatic brain injury, including several strokes.  Josh is unable to care for himself and is completely dependent on others for his daily care.  Brenda is a former substitute teacher and Aaron is a sales engineer.  If you would like to help this family in their recovery:  https://bit.ly/3SBrsn6

    That SEC Football Podcast
    Mike back on Paul Finebaum Show, preseason Coaches Poll released, Kentucky, Texas A&M, Alabama, Arkansas & LSU camp updates

    That SEC Football Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 54:24


    SEC Mike Bratton (@MichaelWBratton) and his Cousin Shane (@BigOrangeVolz) discuss the latest news around the league! Reacting to the debut 2022 Coaches Poll (11:30), Kentucky defensive back enters the portal a week into camp (17:45), Texas A&M coaches love the weapons they have to work with this season (19:30), Bill O'Brien thinks we may not have seen the best yet from Bryce Young while Pete Golding revealing the secrets to his elite recruiting (27:30), Sam Pittman on what it's going to take for Arkansas to take the next step in the SEC (35:15), LSU offensive coordinator Mike Denbrock discusses the camp QB competition (39:30) All show music comes via Nashville band Crimson Calamity; check out their work by clicking the link below:  https://open.spotify.com/artist/29HGeJEcYHBJlyt4xIcLBw?si=GJoEOr0YSoeqWkrjhCc0Ug Advertising inquiries: thatsecpodcast@gmail.com Donate to cousin Shane's beer fund via CashApp: $thatSECpodcast Show call-in number: 615-800-5683 We have t-shirts for sale! Check out our merchandise store featuring shirts, hoodies, stickers, coffee mugs, pillows, phone cases and more: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/thatsecpodcast?ref_id=19055 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The Razorback Daily
    Arkansas Is No. 23 in Coaches Poll + a First Look at Cincinnati

    The Razorback Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 36:24


    Arkansas is ranked No. 23 in the preseason Coaches Poll, and Q & Z are reacting to the ranking. Then, the guys are joined by Justin Williams of The Athletic for a first look at Cincinnati.

    GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast
    2022 Euros Preview with Pauline Tratz

    GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 84:38


    LIVE SHOW WITH JORDYN WEIBER! Who: Jordyn Freakin' Wieber! Olympic Gold medalist, all-around World Champion, Arkansas head coach… national treasure! When: August 19th, Friday--festivities will begin at 11:30 a.m. (EDT) Where: At Nationals in Tampa, FL Tickets now on sale! The theater is half the size as our last show, so we expect the in-person seats to sell out. So don't wait. BUY NOW! Club Gym Nerd members can watch the podcast being recorded and see some of the gymnastics we discuss, plus get access to all of our exclusive interviews and Behind The Scenes episodes. Club members get 8 extra episodes in August with live coverage from Euros and US Championships. Please login to your Club Gym Nerd account to listen and/or watch this episode. Not a member? Join here. European Championships Preview The women's competition begins Thursday. Pauline, Kensley, and Deanna will be in the arena bringing you all the details with Behind the Scenes member shows on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Pauline fills us in on the significance of competing at the European Championships and what she thinks of this year's arena The team competition: Previewing the medal frontrunners and the bubble teams fighting to qualify to worlds, including the budding rivalry between Great Britain and Italy, the Ukraine question, and what we're going to see from the Scandinavians Event finals: Pauline tells us which athlete's progression makes her proud, and we discuss the wide open vault field, the loaded bars field, the Pauline Schäfer of it all, and who broke the floor this week. Plus, gymternet news about Indiana and the presence of USAG and the NCAA in the state and NIL deals, and then we make Jessica talk about the soccer a little bit. Feedback: Is having a second vault like training a fifth event? Pauline gives us her take and reveals which event in the scariest for her. JOIN CLUB GYM NERD Join Club Gym Nerd (or give it as a gift!) for access to Behind the Scenes episodes. Buy our awesome clothing and gifts here. We have a Ukraine Fundraiser design, all proceeds go to the CARE Ukraine Crisis fund. RELATED EPISODES & RESOURCES Donate grips and tape for Ukrainian gymnasts Donate to family of Alabama volunteer assistant coach in Ukraine To follow the effects of the Russian invasion to Ukraine on gymnastics, go to Gymnovosti 2022 US Classic Debrief Angular and Strange: The 2022 US Classic Preview The Brazil Era Farewell, All-Around Standings Olga The Judges Go Off The New Era: Alicia Sacramone Quinn and Chellsie Memmel lead USAG TV's Biggest Gymnastics Fails GYMKATA The Leotard Episode: Part Deux

    Inside the Gamecocks: A South Carolina football podcast
    The Show Episode 4: The Pigskin Dominates

    Inside the Gamecocks: A South Carolina football podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 119:37


    South Carolina is 25 days away from kicking off an anticipated 2022 football season against Georgia State. We bring in Ben Moore of PantherTalk.com to answer some questions (apologies for the audio quality there), plus Brad Crawford of 247Sports is kind enough to take some time with us today and talk about the new TV deal in the B1G, if Arkansas or UGA is a better matchup for South Carolina, his thoughts on N.C. State and who could be a surprise team that could pull some upsets this season. It's all pigskin today on The Show. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    PBS NewsHour - Segments
    Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on why the FBI raid on Trump's estate is 'alarming'

    PBS NewsHour - Segments

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 6:58


    Questions are swirling after the FBI searched former President Trump's Florida home. Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, who served as U.S. attorney for the Western District of Arkansas under President Reagan, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the political implications. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Dumb, Gay Politics
    Arkansas Live Show!

    Dumb, Gay Politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 67:04


    This week, after lots of drinking & drugs, Julie & Brandy did the podcast LIVE in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. Julie performed a half hour of stand up before the live podcast, and then Brandy performed alcoholism! The girls had so much fun and they loved Eureka Springs, but live shows never translate well as podcast episodes. So skip this one, and listen to the free episode of their Patreon podcast. (link down below). *** Click the link to listen to a FREE episode of our Patreon Podcast!! *No Politics! No ads! *** https://www.patreon.com/posts/windows-up-sing-42013006?utm_medium=clipboard_copy&utm_source=copy_to_clipboard&utm_campaign=postshare   **CHECK OUT OUR T-SHIRTS! ** https://www.julieandbrandy.com/shop---4   DEALS FROM OUR SPONSORS! ** BETTER HELP:  Get 10% off your first month at www.BetterHelp.com/DumbGay  ** ** EVERLYWELL: Get 20'% off any at-home lab test. Go to www.Everlywell.com/DGP ** ** THIRD LOVE: Get 20% off your first order at www.thirdlove.com/dumbgay **  ** SHOPIFY: Get a free 14 day trial at www.shopify.com/dumbgay ** *** Dumb Gay Politics with Julie & Brandy **** Julie Goldman **** Brandy Howard **** Julie and Brandy *** The People's Couch *** DGP *** Gay Podcast *** Political Podcast *** Lesbian *** Bravo *** Housewives *** Queer *** Pride **** LGBTQ **** Starburns Audio  **** Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Destination Marketing Podcast
    209: Taking Ownership of your Destination's Assets with Molly Rawn

    Destination Marketing Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 36:21


    Adam continues his trip to Arkansas in this week's episode of the Destination Marketing Podcast. In this episode, he talks with Molly Rawn, CEO of Experience Fayetteville, about how her organization pulled off the Cyclo-Cross World Championships and why her destination is so bike friendly. They also discuss Explore Fayetteville's relationship to the University of Arkansas and how they collaborate to achieve success. “We act like tourism is just in this silo and we're our own thing but we are a part of the community. Get engaged on the city side of things.” -Molly Rawn Experience Fayetteville Destination Marketing Podcast Relic Agency The Destination Marketing Podcast is a part of the Destination Marketing Podcast Network. It is hosted by Adam Stoker and produced by Relic. If you are interested in any of Relic's services,  please email adam@relicagency.com or visit https://www.relicagency.com/ To learn more about the Destination Marketing Podcast network and to listen to our other shows, please visit https://thedmpn.com/. If you are interested in becoming a part of the network, please email adam@relicagency.com.

    The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
    Girls Gone Gravel - Kathryn Taylor

    The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 44:48


    This week on the podcast, Randall sits down with Kathryn Taylor, co-host of the Girls Gone Gravel Podcast and Chief of Staff at Feisty Media. Looking at inclusion in the sport of gravel cycling and how Feisty Media is looking to build a brand centered around helping active, performance-minded women find the resources they need to do the things they love.  Episode Sponsor: Bike Index, a free, non-profit bicycle registry and stolen bike recovery platform.  Girls Gone Gravel Podcast Fiesty Media Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Girls Gone Gravel [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the podcast, my co-host Randall Jacobs is gonna take the reins. Randall did an interview with Catherine Taylor of feisty media and a co-host of the girls gone gravel podcast, Catherine. And the team at feisty media are helping active performance minded women find the resources they need to do the things they love. Many of you may be familiar with Catherine's work with Christie Mon on the girls gone gravel podcast. Christie is also a former guest of this podcast, and you can refer to that episode. We did about the big sugar gravel event. If you scroll back a little while in your feed, before we jump into the conversation I wanted to thank this week's sponsor bike index bike index is a nonprofit bicycle registry and stolen bike recovery platform. In fact, take a moment, hit pause, and go register your bike. It takes five to 10 minutes. The hardest part is locating your serial number, but once it's in the system, it's a free resource. Bike index has no business talking to you. They're hoping to just sit there in the background as a utility, but God forbid your bike goes missing and gets stolen. Bike indexes. One of the only resources you're gonna find online to help coordinate the efforts of recovering your bicycle. They're a nonprofit. Everything they do. Any donation you make is tax deductible. Registration is free, so you really don't have any excuse other than time to register your bikes. Go on, hit up bike index.org and get your bike registered with that said, let's jump on over to Randall's conversation with Katherine. [00:02:05] Randall: Katherine, thank you for coming on the gravel ride podcast. It's great to have this conversation. It seems like we have a lot of alignment in terms of the types of community building projects that we're most interested in and obviously our shared love of this particular sport. So, would just love to start with what's. What's your background with the sport? How did you end up doing a podcast called girls gone gravel . [00:02:26] Kathryn: Well, it's funny. I'm as many of the guests that we've actually had in our podcast, I've learned there's a lot of burnt out triathletes that end up in gravel. And that was definitely me. So I was really involved in triathlon for about 10 years. I raced coached. I even worked at a triathlon store. That was one of the top triathlon online retailers in the company. And I got really burned out from it because it's all about checking your power and your wants and. A lot of training all the time. And a friend of mine that was in the tri club was doing this race at the time called dirty cancer. And sh because she had heard this woman named Alison Terick on a podcast and she had never rid her bike more than 20 miles, but she signed up for the 200 mile event and was training through the company that I coached with. So I wasn't her coach, but one of my coworkers was her coach. And so I just heard all about this journey to this crazy gravel. Race. And I was like, oh, this sounds kind of fun. I think I'm gonna get a gravel bike instead of a traveling bike. And so I got a gravel bike and I would go out, she would go be doing like five laps of this local 20 mile loop. And I would go out and do one lap with her and just started to love it and love the adventure. And then started hosting some rides on the weekends for local community women. And Got into that. And then it's actually a funny story. So I was working at a bike shop at the time. And when I bought the bike, the bike shop owner was like, well, I don't think you're gonna like gravel because it's hard. And that made me really mad yeah. [00:04:00] Randall: oh [00:04:01] Kathryn: yeah. And so I had way too much wine one night and I woke up at two in the morning and I was like, I'm gonna start an Instagram account. It was when Instagram was. Starting to grow. And I was like, girl's gonna gravel, that's it. So I got the handle at two in the morning and I just started sharing like community pictures and it grew. And that ended up eventually turning into a podcast and now has become a whole brand where we have events. We have a little team, we, you know, go do cover, live events. We're done a few other things in the future, so yeah, that's, that's how it got started. [00:04:34] Randall: And I'm curious, where were you living at the time and what timeframe are we talking here? [00:04:38] Kathryn: So it was 2019. It wasn't that long ago. And I was living in Atlanta, Georgia. So, and, and there's not a ton of gravel around Atlanta. You really have to drive. So it was really in the Southeast the gravel scene. Was much behind kind of the Midwest Northwest, Northeast gravel. It was really just starting to come onto the scene. And the, and people didn't know about things like, you know, Unbound or, or any of those things at the time. My friend Lauren was the first person that any of us ever knew that had gone and done, you know, at the time it was dirty Kansas. So, so yeah. That's, that's where I was living. [00:05:15] Randall: One of the obvious questions that, that, you know, came up to me prior to us recording today was, you know, what was your inspiration? And I kind of feel like I got a little bit of a taste of it when you're talking about that bike shop person. I think that the industry has catered to a particular audience that mostly looks like me, frankly for a very long time. And there is a dire need for more accessible on ramps to other people who wanna participate. And it seems like you, you feel a niche And half the population. It's not really a niche I'd love to hear more about that inspiration and how you've gone about it. [00:05:49] Kathryn: Yeah. So I had been a part of Atlanta tri club, which is the. Probably the third largest triathlon club in the country. And I was one of the coaches for Atlanta tri club. I also was on the regional board for USA triathlon. And we were doing a lot of initiatives in the women's space at the time. And so I, I started to see, there were a few things, if you could do, you could really increase women's participation in the sport. And I had a, a good friend that we were doing. A lot of these things kind of side by side in that. And she, she actually passed away very unexpectedly in 2019 and. [00:06:27] Randall: to hear that. [00:06:29] Kathryn: Thank you. It was yeah, she, it was a, a brain aneurysm. So just out of the blue and I kind of looked back at her legacy and I was. I wanna continue this, but the triathlon space, isn't where I feel the passion anymore. At the same, I was starting to get into gravel. And at the same time I had another friend that was an ultra endurance cyclist. Her name is Danny Gable, and she's done all these crazy ultra endurance adventures. And I started hearing her stories about cycling and how male dominated it was and started looking into it. And I was like, oh, I think there are some things that we could do. That will really bring women to the forefront that are really simple things like telling women stories, giving women a place to connect with each other giving them a space and, and everything just happened to come together right around the time of the pandemic. That's when Christ and I started the podcast and we started a private Facebook group. The, I was like, oh, a couple hundred people. And within, I don't know, two months, it was like 5,000 people. And we were doing, you know, all kinds of webinars and stuff. Over the summer, cuz everybody was stuck at home. Laura King actually had connected with me and she said, Hey, we were gonna do this, this camp or this weekend with rooted, but we can't do it because of the pandemic. But do you wanna do it like just a virtual DIY gravel? Summer thing. And so we did like every Friday we would do a webinar where women could come on and learn for free. And, and so it just, everything started to come together and the community really naturally formed. And it it's really cool because now I go to races and people will say, oh, I heard the podcast. Or I followed your stuff or I'm in the Facebook group. And that's the reason I decided to come do this event or, you know, This inspired me or so. And so story inspired me. So, I think I started rambling, but that's kind of my, my very long answer to your question. It was really [00:08:18] Randall: is entirely the point. [00:08:20] Kathryn: Yeah, but, but I it's been driven by what the community wanted all along. You know, so. [00:08:25] Randall: Well, and I was sharing before we started recording that I actually heard about you and your work from one of our listeners who, who came up to me at rooted Vermont, her name escapes me is actually two women. So if you're listening please drop me a note and remind me your name and just thank you for the introduction. And I asked them, who should we be bringing onto the podcast to talk about community and to elevate their work. And you were the first person that they mentioned. So, there's clearly a deep resonance with what you do. So you have a background having worked in shops, you've been a pretty serious triathlete. You had your own journey into the sport. I'm curious to unpack that a bit. What was it like when you were first getting into cycling or endurance athletics generally? How far back does that go? And what aspects of that experience do you think were different as a consequence of being a woman versus a man coming into it . [00:09:16] Kathryn: Yeah. I actually got into triathlon when I moved to Atlanta. So it was like 2010, I think, 2009, 2010, somewhere right around there. And had lived a lot of places. I had moved there. I was living with my parents and I'd always wanted to do a triathlon. I was a swimmer growing up. I was a really bad runner, but I'd never, like, I'd only ridden my Walmart bike around town. I'd never ridden like a real bike. And so I Googled triathlon. Atlanta and team and training was actually having a info session for their summer training program. So the options were like, sit at home with my parents and watch wheel of fortune, or go meet a bunch of strangers and maybe raise money to do an event. So I ended up signing up for team and training and, and that experience really informed everything I did from then on out. The, the team in training chapter in, in Georgia is, is one of the strongest team in training chapters. At that time was one of the strongest team in training chapters in the country. And they were just so great at bringing people in and teaching them everything from, you know, how do you ride a bike? How do you prepare for a race and, and creating a community around it? And I didn't know anything, like I showed up at my first ride with my mom's bike. That was Just a, like a towny bike and Umbro shorts and a t-shirt everybody was there, there, you know, try bikes and their kits and stuff, but people had just made me feel so welcome. And so part of it, even though I felt like I don't belong here at that moment. And then took me through every piece of it from. Falling over in the parking lot, three times is the first time I tried to clip in and, you know, a woman stayed with me and rode with me that whole day to teaching me, you know, everything about the bike. And then on the contrary, I'd be like, oh, I'm gonna go to this group ride, which would be primarily guys and primarily a race instead of a group ride, like the Tuesday night race, but they didn't communicate that. And so I remember one time I was up I. Dog sitting with my parents or something. And so I was at their house, which is in the north side of Atlanta. And it's really hilly. It's kind of, you're starting to get up into the Appalachians. I went on this ride and I didn't have like a Q sheet. They didn't give them out. They didn't communicate. They didn't say hello at the ride. I was like, okay, well I can hang. I'm a travel now. And I got so lost. Didn't know where I was. Didn't have anybody to call to get back. Finally, like somebody came by and pointed me the way back to town. And I thought if that were my experience, like the first time I showed up at a group ride, I would've never, I would've walked away from the bike. I. Forever. And and I've heard that experience from so many women of just having horrific experiences. The first time they walk into a group ride or a bike shop. And so I just want women to feel confident and be excited about, you know, that, and, and so, because I had such a great experience with team and training and saw the difference, it just it informed the way I wanted to contribute to the community. [00:12:23] Randall: That's great. And I have a confession. I was absolutely one of those men who treated every group ride like a race. I came into the sport, very hard charging and just wanted to compete and go hard and crush it and go into the pain cave and all the things that are associated with that very aggressive more ego driven aspects of the sport that make it so inaccessible. And, it's in recent years that I've come full circle and seen the opportunity to not just take what I've learned and to help bring someone in but also the huge benefit that I get personally from just slowing it down and taking the time to connect and facilitating. So I'm curious, how do you define your community? You have your podcast listeners, you have your Facebook group. What is the extent of the community? How do people interact with you now? How many people are in involved ? What's the structure of it? [00:13:12] Kathryn: Yeah. That's well, just real quick before we move on from like the group ride. Cause I do want like, it's okay. If you have a really hard, fast charging group ride, right. Like I think that is totally fine. And it's appropriate for some people. It's the communication and helping people understand and even saying, like being able to say. this isn't for you. If somebody shows up that's not ready or like I'm willing to sacrifice my night for you. So like, I don't wanna get rid of the group rides that people love to go out and smash themselves on. I just wanna make sure there's spaces. What that, when we say we're welcome to new people, that we're actually welcome to do people [00:13:47] Randall: Yeah. I, I think that that's a really valid point. And if you're going to have a ride that you're opening up to a broader audience, having something in place, whether it be, Points where somebody can break off, to cut the ride shorter or having different groups going at different paces and making sure you have a ride leader for each one of those groups I think goes a long way towards avoiding that sort of scenario that you were describing, where you have a bad experience. And then it's like, well, the bike is not for me. [00:14:13] Kathryn: Yeah. Yeah. So at our community, we, we have several different layers. So we have obviously the podcast we have a free Facebook community called women, gravel, cyclists, and that's women from all over the world. I think it's like between 14 and 15,000 women right now. And it's, it's still. I thought it would fall off after the pandemic, but it's still really active. We have a, when people join, we ask them they're how long they've been riding gravel. And I would say at least a third of them are brand new to gravel cycling. So they're coming to look for advice on bikes, saddles, Shammy, how to train, what events to do, how to find friends. And then we do, we have a small team of about a hundred women Or just a little bit more connected within us. And then this past year, we had our first gravel festival, our women's gravel festival, which is not a competitive event. It's literally just three days of hanging out, having parties riding and learning. And our first one we had about 220 women and we're getting ready next week to announce the 20, 22 dates. 2023 dates. What year are we in? So we'll be back in Bentonville next year for our next one. And we may be able to bump that number up a little bit. [00:15:33] Randall: It's a great location, by the way, the bike infrastructure there is, is quite incredible. And the community there too is it's one of the, one of the country's great cycling communities at this point. [00:15:43] Kathryn: yeah, we were lucky we snapped up Amy Ross. Do you know, have you ever met connected with Amy Ross? [00:15:48] Randall: I don't believe so. Tell me more about her. [00:15:50] Kathryn: She has been in the bike world for a long time, worked for different brands like Santa Cruz that she worked for. Wow. One of the big mountain bike things I can't remember, but her husband's NA Ross. He was a professional mountain biker and they moved to Beville. She was the had a bike Beville. and so she had left bike Bentonville. I was going through, and that's the group that like, if you wanna do an event in Beville you go and you talk to them. So she was, we'd had her on as a podcast guest I'd driven through Bentonville was checking it out. She was like, well, I'm leaving bike Bentonville. And I was like, do you want a job? and so we hired her as our event coordinator on the ground. Basically two weeks later. So she contracts for us as our event coordinator for that event, which makes a huge difference when somebody is in the community day in and day out to, to put together a really great community event. [00:16:40] Randall: And in terms of where people gather online and find you online? Is it primarily the Facebook page, what's your software stack look like? [00:16:47] Kathryn: Yeah. We have a website, girls go gravel. We put, I actually write a lot of the articles and then a woman Celine Jager. Everybody probably knows in the gravel space. Also she works with us at feisty media, so she writes some for us. And then I have another woman from CNN that I pull in a little bit here and there to write articles for me. Her name is Claire and we write a lot of stuff based on what people ask for in the Facebook group. So we're taking. Somebody's asking a question and we're like, oh, we see tons of answers. And I'm like, well, that's an article. So we create a lot of content. So we get a lot of visitors to that site just because we're creating content that people are searching for. From our Facebook page we have our Instagram page and then we have just private Facebook communities. We, we tried like things like slack or other communities and it's, it's just hard. It's hard to get people to go off of Facebook. I know everybody wants them to, but it's so hard. [00:17:42] Randall: We had the same kind of discussion when we started the ridership, we built it in slack initially, or I should say we got it started in slack, the community built itself from there. And there were certain challenges that we saw with Facebook that we wanted to avoid. But slack is great because it's a great communication tool and it is something that people are already using for work in a lot of cases. But then you can't do a lot of the things you'd wanna do like event coordination or dealing with club membership. Then again, Facebook has its own issues. I'd actually love to unpack this a little bit because I've had this conversation with Russ over at path, less pedals and Monica Garrison over at black girls do bike. I'm curious, what are the things that you. Like about the platform and that we're enabling. And what are the things that frustrate you that you would ideally avoid in migrating to something different? [00:18:32] Kathryn: What I like about Facebook is people. Whether they say it, they people say they wanna get off Facebook, but they're still staying there. And a lot of people are lurkers, but they participate in groups. And Facebook has gone really in, on groups in the last few years, because they've seen that trend. Right. So. they're promoting that. And I, I also worked for a tech company for a little while in Atlanta, and I learned it's really hard to get people to use something they're not already using from that that experience, you know, that's the biggest challenge. Yeah. And slack, it just felt like the conversation was really, could be really stagnant a lot of times. Because if people. If they didn't use it for work, it was hard to get them to like, get excited about it. And if they used it for work, sometimes people were like, I'm already on slack all day long. I have PTSD from the dings so, We also one of our communities within Feist, the feisty ecosystem, tried to use my new networks and that also wasn't a good fit for the same reasons. So, so that's why I've stayed on Facebook. I think I have somebody that helps manage the posts if it were just, and, and then I have another person on our team that actually helps manage like all the people coming into the community now and like, The community is really good actually at, at self-regulating so if somebody, if a spammer gets in or if somebody we have a no assholes rule, I don't know if I can cus on your podcast, but we have a no assholes [00:19:53] Randall: Oh, go, go, go right ahead. [00:19:55] Kathryn: And so, they're really good at reporting that and. You know, like we watch it and catch those things and delete them, or just kind of, don't let people get away with being jerks. And I've seen that on a lot of other, especially gravel, Facebook groups that I've been on. There's some real jerks in those groups and the way they can give feedback to people is just it's mean what I don't like is I when not everybody's on the platform and then you. Facebook sometimes is like, I don't think you need to see that anymore. So you have to go to the group if you want something. So, and then the, the other thing I've seen, and I think this is a characteristic of women, we really like to give advice. And so I'll see somebody post something I'm like, oh, they're about to get overwhelmed with like, so much advice about, you know, like, like, so and so just ask like, I'm just, I'm new to riding and I wanna do this 25 mile event. What should I do? And somebody's gonna like give them like a step by step nutrition plan. And I'm like, just go ride your bike. right. Make sure you have water and food when you go out. So people and they mean well, but I, I just see I'm like that they're gonna overwhelm this poor person with like so much. About things. So, so that's why I try to take things and then put, put that into good content. That's a little bit more succinct on our website. [00:21:18] Randall: What are the things that you either are doing off platform, so off of Facebook or that you wish you could do, but you just don't have a tool that works well with your current [00:21:27] Kathryn: Sounds like you all are creating a tech product. [00:21:29] Randall: Well, we've been working on the side with a, like constructing a mighty network and we have a concept for that. So whenever I talk to community organizers, I wanna understand those issues cuz , our vision is to create something that's like a community of allied clubs that share a common infrastructure, and then that organization, it would be a nonprofit. And so, we're starting to do little things like coordinate group rides in the mighty network. Chapter for the ridership and then post that within the slack group to, to get people to join. And it's not seamless , but it's a way of slowly experimenting with it. We have a couple of clubs that have brought their members into their club space in the ridership mighty network. So we're not so much building a tech product as much as we see that there's an opportunity to build a better place for people to come and find out, what to ride, how to ride it and take care of it where to ride, who to ride with and what events are happen. And right now, there's not a one stop shop for that. So maybe you find the girls gone gravel podcast or the podcast that we do or some other resource. So you find some forum, but there's not like a clearing house or one place where you can go and just say, I live here, what's happening near me. Who's near me that I can ride with. What are the recommended tires for my terrain? Things like this. It's very fragmented. [00:22:48] Kathryn: Yeah. Yeah. I would agree on that. Like, one of the things that I know the community wants is they would like they would like to find more people to ride with and more local local things. You know, like regional, because we, especially cuz we're a worldwide group. So people are like you know, every day somebody will be like, I'm in Africa, I'm in here, anybody here that I can ride with. So, those connections and that, you know, that would just become a full-time job in our Facebook community. If you started managing all of those little mini groups and, and like you all, like, we don't, the Facebook community's free. Like it's like, everybody's a volunteer. That's doing it. My job is with feisty media and girls go, gravel came under feisty media. So I get quote unquote paid as a part of that. But I mean, I spent, you know, thousands of my own dollars and hours building everything for before that ever happened, or we ever made a dollar off of anything. So I wish we had that. And then also kind of the step back from that, one of the reasons I haven't been willing. Try to create things around group rides, as I would really like some kind of course or training that you need to go through to be a certified like girls can gravel group ride or something like that, just because of the experiences that I've had. And it's not, I don't want like this massive training, but I want things like you should introduce yourself to people when they show up, it seems like duh, but I think people just get nervous a lot of times if they've not led things in the past or. you know, make sure everybody knows the route, like little things like that. And I just haven't had the capacity to create that, [00:24:27] Randall: Yeah. Well, and these aren't unique to women or to any particular demographic, one of the folks that we've had on the group is Monica Garrison over at black girls do bike. She also started that as a Facebook group with people reaching out . And it's now, a hundred plus chapters and a hundred thousand women around the world and they're organizing events and doing all this stuff. And the challenges that they have are no different than the challenges that we have. And what you're describing too, so there should be some basic toolkit for someone to be able to organize a ride and people need to be able to sign up to post a route, to have a legal waiver. Right. That covers everybody. You know, you're not getting sued for trying to get people together. But then also having some protocols that are in place, like you're describing, introduce yourself, you're expected to arrive on this at this time. Here's the equipment that you should have. It's self-supported. And I think that these things can be largely standardized in a shared infrastructure. And if that were created, then you could leverage the expertise that this much bigger community of people who just wanna ride. You'll have some lawyers in there, you'll have some people who have a lot of technical expertise in there. And then this toolkits available to everyone, you don't have to be an expert in any domain to leverage it. [00:25:35] Kathryn: Yeah, that sounds really smart. And, and, you know, back in my triathlon days, I definitely, there were definitely men that I saw that if they didn't come in looking like a triathlon body, they were treated differently often. So it, it is not just a women issue. Like you said, like it's, it's, it's human issue. And every, I, I just go back to, everybody wants to have a place that they belong and they wanna feel. They're wanted places. And so if we can create those spaces for people, like at the end of the day, when I look at group rides, I'm like one ride a week. Me like riding at the very back of the pack at a super slow pace is not the end of the world for somebody to feel like they belonged. [00:26:16] Randall: Yeah. Everyone has something to gain from having a, common space for diverse people to come together. [00:26:22] Kathryn: Yeah, I was actually talking to Abby Robbins. The first non-binary athlete to finish Unbound. And so Abby just received a good bit of attention. And then there was I can't, I don't know which company was doing a, a video about them, but Abby was at Unbound camp and they were tell at the gravel festival. Abby was telling me about an experience that they were on a ride at a gravel camp. Ended up just like talking to this dude for a long time. Like it was a great conversation. And then the guy was like, oh, well, we should ride some Unbound together. And Abby was like, well, you should know, like, there's gonna be a camera crew following me because of this thing. And the guy was like, oh, what's the thing. Abby said, you know, I'm a non-binary athlete and the guy as well, you should know, like I'm a conservative Christian. And Abby was like, I would've never, and they had a great conversation and Abby was like, I would've never had this conversation. I'm like, I'm sure this, this, somebody that's like in this very conservative Christian camp would also have never like sought out a non-binary athlete to have a conversation with coming from a very conservative Christian background in my past. So I'm like, that's the beauty of it. Right? You experienced these people that you would've never experienced in these points of view and these conversations that shape your life. And I, I just love that about our sport, you know, [00:27:37] Randall: I find that gravel amongst all the different cycling disciplines does seem to be especially amenable to those sorts of really healthy and welcoming dynamics because there's no one thing that is gravel and there's no one type of bike that is a gravel bike. You can, much more so than in other disciplines , ride what you got or get started with what you got. If you ride it on mixed terrain, it's a gravel bike. And yes, you can have fancy equipment, but then also, there's lots of different ways to be a part of it. And we see that in our listenership and within the ridership and even amongst customers that ride the bikes that my company makes. But it's also, you have people of all different abilities who are going for it. It's very different than say roadie culture especially competitive roadie culture, or even mountain bike culture had a little bit more of that festivaly type atmosphere, but then also has its aggressive, hard edge to it too. [00:28:29] Kathryn: Yeah. I never feel like I'm cool enough for mountain biking. I'm like I gotta up my game or something. [00:28:36] Randall: So tell me a bit more about feisty media and how that collaboration started who's involved and the scope of its mission and what it's doing currently. [00:28:47] Kathryn: Sure. So feisty media is a, a women focused media company. So it's, we actually all women on our team. Although we, we would hire men and we focus primarily in the endurance sports space and the whole conversation is about creating an empowering culture for women. And, and we go, we really hone in on the culture piece because there's so much within culture that has. Has given women messages, whether it's about motherhood, whether it's about diet culture, whether it's about equality in sport, that, that if you can address the cultural piece, like a lot of the dominoes will fall. So as an example, one of the reasons that women often under fuel on the bike is because the message of diet culture that you need to look a certain way. And so if you go back to like, actually. We should be fueled and we should be fed when we're riding. And like this message of diet culture is causing us to not do that. So, so we really kind of, we kind of addressed that, but we're, we're kind of fun and cheeky and yeah, so feisty was started by this woman. Her name is Sarah Gross and she was a professional triathlete for 14 years. So back in the day when I was doing triathlon, I actually had a. Triathlon podcast with this friend of mine, Bethany who passed away. And Sarah was a guest on our podcast. And then when Bethany passed away, Sarah reached out to me and she said, I'm so sorry. They wanted to do at one of their events, an award in Bethany's honor. And so, we just kind of got connected through that. She came to Atlanta for the marathon trials. Right before COVID shut the world down, but it was the largest women women's field in the marathon trials ever. So, I helped her do some live coverage for that. And I was like, Hey, they came out you know, starting a podcast, everybody keeps asking for it, but I don't wanna edit a podcast on my, like, by myself again, so much work. Would you be interested in expanding beyond triathlon? And she said, yes. And so. And then she was also like, Hey, we're starting to really grow. We could do some contract work. Would you be interested in some contract work? I was like, sure. And so it, it just, we started with the podcast. I was doing a little contract work within. I think six months, six or eight months, I was working full time with them managing some of our brands. We, we have feisty triathlon. We have our women's performance brand. We have feisty menopause, which is what Celine Jager leads. So that was the brand that I was brought on to manage at first. And then the girls gone gravel brand. And is that all that we have? So within that we have about eight podcasts that fall under. Kind of those different topics. And yeah, so then when we decided to launch a gravel festival, we just brought girls gun gravel fully under the feisty brand, which for me is so great because that was, we were talking about systems. That was a lot of what was stopping me is like, these are all things I can do. I can figure out the financials. I can figure out. The contractors, but it's not stuff I wanted to do. [00:31:48] Randall: Mm-hmm mm-hmm [00:31:49] Kathryn: being able to say, we have a team that's gonna put this festival on. We have money that we can invest in the front end. So I'm not risking my own money for things. It just really opened up the door for us to be able to, to try and experiment with some more things. So it's been a, it's been a great partnership and, you know, part of what we do is we highlight what's happening in the women's fields, but then we also create educational materials. For women for training or racing or those cultural pieces. And then we create communities. So that's the third piece of it. [00:32:20] Randall: Well, I wanna take a moment to highlight. I'm just looking through some of the articles and it's like training and breastfeeding for active moms, or how to handle your period when you're on a gravel ride. These are things that are women's issues, but then also you can look at them as part of accessibility. As well, and these are not resources that I see in any of the media that I'm granted, it's not targeted at me of course, but [00:32:42] Kathryn: Yeah. Now you're gonna get the ads. Now that you've come on our site. [00:32:45] Randall: Yeah. But in just looking at some of the content here, it's obvious why this needs to exist. It is obvious why this is such a core part of making this sport accessible. And in fact, I would even add that it would be beneficial for some of, at least these headlines to exist in media sources, that men or people who don't necessarily need them are at least seeing so that they're aware that this is an issue for this particular group of people that you may be riding with [00:33:11] Kathryn: well, because Celine yer, who does our hip play out pause, which is our menopause podcast. You know, she does a ton of gravel writing. Her husband puts on unpaved and she's like I'm out at gravel rides all the time or gravel events and all these guys come up to me that their wives are like hitting perimenopause or menopause. And they're like, thank you so much for your podcast. I understand so much more about what my wife's going through. She's like, it's so weird having these conversations with guys while I'm racing a gravel of it. [00:33:36] Randall: That actually brings up a great question, what would be the bits of wisdom or knowledge that you would wanna share? To our audience, either for women listening or for men listening to help them be more aware of issues that women face when they're entering the sport or participating in the sport. [00:33:53] Kathryn: Yeah. I mean, I think like the more we can normalize conversations around periods and pregnancy and, you know, menopause, all those things even. especially with the guys we ride with. Right. Cuz that's sometimes what makes it awkward is we're like, Hey, I don't wanna say that. I need to stop on this ride because I have my period, but I really kind of need to stop along this ride. You know, so, or pregnancy it's I feel like a lot of times it's expected that the, the mom is gonna just take this long break while the dad, you know, if they're both into cycling. You see with Laura and Ted king, I just put a post up on Instagram the other day, celebrating Laura, because this is her choice. Like she, she wants to do this, but she wanted to come right back to writing. She wanted to come right back to directing the event. That's not what the choice that every person wants to make, but for so long, the choice was you're a bad bomb. If you wanna do these other things well, for the, the message for the dad was. Yeah, good for you. You're making it all work, you know, celebrating them because they were able to, to hold all those things together. And so, so, so I think like that's a, a big thing is just kind of being okay with normalizing those conversations and like, they feel awkward at first, but like, I don't like go around asking women at the group. Right. If they're on their period and they need to stop, like, don't get weird. [00:35:14] Randall: But maybe if you're organizing a really big group ride, be mindful of the fact that you need a place for people to be able to access a bathroom, or an isolated patch of woods where they can get well off the road. [00:35:25] Kathryn: Yeah. Or, or event directors, you know, we've had talk somebody, when we posted that period, article an event director reached out to me and he said I feel really dumb asking this question, but we wanna offer feminine supplies at the aid stops and I don't know what to buy. Can you just tell me what to buy? And I was like, I love that you asked me this question, [00:35:42] Randall: Hmm. [00:35:42] Kathryn: right? Like we're, we're talking to Laura about coming back on the podcast because she's doing Leadville and is it next weekend is Leadville. And she's like, I have to stop and pump along the way. Like this is the first time I've ever done a race. I'm gonna have to stop and pump. Does Leadville have any place to stop and pump? I don't know. but it'll be interesting to hear. you know, how that plays out for her. So, so yeah, I think like the more we can just say this is, this is normal. Just, just like a guy can just stop and pee on the side of the road, because it's easy. I've been on group rides with guys where it's like, everybody just stopped and is going all of a sudden I'm like, I, I don't know what just happened, but I think I'm gonna go too, since everybody else is [00:36:21] Randall: I'm fortunate. I have an older and two younger sisters and my older and immediately younger sister both have three kids each. And so children and breastfeeding things like this. I've been kind of normalized in my world. But I see how culturally, it's still something that's very uncomfortable for a lot of people. And certainly I also had my adaptation too, even being surrounded by it in my family or with female friends who had kids and had to stop and pump, and just understanding that and not having it be a big deal. I think it's part of a broader cultural shift that's needed to support mothers, but also fathers in playing a more involved, more mindful role that acknowledges the biological realities, and doesn't push it into the shadows. But actually celebrates it. [00:37:06] Kathryn: Yeah, I agree. It's I love seeing, like, I, I love watching Ted and Laura because Ted's like, you know, he obviously was a high level pro he's. They both race in the pro category, but Ted's obviously has more visibility in that because of his background. But, you know, he is also saying, well, I'm not gonna do this event, so Laura can do this event or like, we'll switch. [00:37:29] Randall: Yeah. [00:37:30] Kathryn: ride times and just, and just saying, this is a part of our family, this is something that's important to her. You know, and, and just making that the norm. And so I think they're a really great family. That's kind of leading the way for what that can look like. Yeah. [00:37:44] Randall: Yeah, there's there's a very central role that a mother plays early in a child's life in terms of attachment and so on. But at the same time the gender roles that our society generally has people play, has so much of the burden falling on the woman. And I think it's a missed opportunity, frankly, for a lot of men to connect with their kids really early on. [00:38:05] Kathryn: Yeah, and full transparency. I do not have kids. But you know, just having had many conversations with women, seeing, you know, in the sport of triathlon women, once they had kids, they were done. And now we're seeing like all these moms come back and race at the top levels after they've had. Had children and you're seeing that in the sport of running and gravel's such a new sport and especially the pointy under the spear is a really new sport as far as the pro racing. But I think we're gonna start to see that more and more as well with women saying, I wanna have a kid and I also want to continue to race at this level. And, and we know women can for a long time race those long distances at a high level. [00:38:47] Randall: One of the formative relationships I had in high school was with a then student teacher. She was somebody who was very supportive of me during the difficult periods of high school. And I reconnected with her a few years ago, and she was doing elite triathlons . She's in her mid, late forties, I believe has had two or three kids and just crushes it just as competing at a very high level. And it's really impressive to see what is possible. And it also Dispels a lot of the assumptions about what life can be like for women after having kids. [00:39:21] Kathryn: Yeah, well, Scotty Laga she won the outright Arkansas high country. She's twin boys that are, I can't remember how old they're eight or. And she was racing pro when she got pregnant and decided she wanted to continue racing. And you know, Ernie was racing as well and they just made that choice for their family. Like she actually has the more potential in her career. So, you know, which isn't the choice for everybody. Right. But it's, it's just like saying it doesn't have to be the way that society's always said it should be that you're a, you're a bad person or you're a bad mom. If you want to do these. [00:39:53] Randall: There's inevitably trade offs, but I think that there should be a lot more support from the father and the broader community so that a woman can continue to pursue being a complete version of herself even after kids [00:40:06] Kathryn: Yeah, exactly. [00:40:08] Randall: So what is the longer term vision for feisty media? [00:40:11] Kathryn: We really wanna create something. That's a little bit like the south by Southwest for women in endurance sports or women in sports where there's a place where women can come and gather and learn and have experiences together and, and, you know, connect and, and just feel like, feel like all those pieces, the community, the education of what we're learning about women's physiology and how that impacts. You know, our training and the way we approach life. And and yeah, just like the unique ex opportunity for brands all come together. It was really funny Randall. Like we, when we had our gravel festival, one of the brands there, so 220 women, one of the brands made more money at our festival than they did all three Belgium waffle rides last year because women were coming in an environment. They just felt comfortable and they wanted to spend money and we heard people were like we wish you would've had more brands there because we went, we came to spend money at the festival. And so, so I, I just think there's so many opportunities for creating those, those educational and gathering spaces. So, so that's where we're going. We're four years old, so. right now, we're really focused on bringing together the community and, and we really listen to what does the community want? And we try to create, create that from, for the community, instead of saying, this is what we, you know, it's the, the classic tech, right? Know your audience and then build, solve the problem the audience needs solved. [00:41:42] Randall: As I think. The initiatives that we're involved in, that reminder to validate the vision, getting out of one's own head and one's own biases and going out and actually listening. And what is it that, that the people who are already with you, what is it that they need with the problems that they have? So we've covered a fair amount of ground in terms of how you got your start. Both as a, as a cyclist and with girls gone gravel collaborations and so on. Is there any areas that we didn't cover that you wanna dive into before we split up today? [00:42:10] Kathryn: I think those are the big ones, you know, I think just the more we're celebrating, we're creating space for all people and gravel and, and just saying when the whole community is there. We're all better. I think that's really powerful. The, the other big thing that we try to do is to, is to support the pointy end of the field. And it's not because that's who our everyday person is. Right. But I think the more we can elevate the women's field in cycling and, and kind of create fans and create support around that. The more, it gives people opportunities to see somebody. I'll just give an example. My little niece, I was taking care of her. She had COVID a few weeks ago. So aunt cat got called in to take care of her. And she was feeling much better. She wanted to go on a bike ride. So we were out riding bikes. And then I showed her a video of Kate Courtney when we got back. And she's like, Ugh, she's amazing. Do you think I could ever do that? And that was she's six and I was. You can, but like, if I, if there weren't women like Kate Courtney, that I could show her videos of that are doing those amazing things at six years old, she wouldn't like, see that and dream, like I could do that. Right. And so, just, just being able to see those, those amazing women out there, I think is really important for the future cycling. [00:43:24] Randall: Well, I think you definitely set an example as one of those women, who's doing the work to make it a lot more accessible in allowing little girls like your needs to dream. So thank you for coming on the podcast to share your story. And I look forward to continuing the conversation. [00:43:38] Kathryn: Yeah, we'll have to connect at one of the events soon. [00:43:41] Randall: Absolutely. [00:43:42] Craig Dalton: That's gonna do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Big, thanks to Randall and Catherine for that interesting interview. I love what they're doing over there at girls gone gravel, and I hope you go check out their podcast. We'll have links in the show notes for everything they mentioned during the show. And another big, thanks to our friends over at bike index, a nonprofit that's out there helping people get their stolen bikes back. Simply head over to bike index.org and register your bike today. If you're interested in connecting with me or Randall, please visit us in the ridership. That's www.theridership.com. That's a free global cycling community, connecting riders from around the world and sharing information about the sport we love. And if you have a. Please drop a rating or review. That's usually helpful in our discovery until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels.

    Locked On Razorbacks
    The first four games will determine how good of a season the Razorbacks have

    Locked On Razorbacks

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 31:10


    John Nabors dives into the 2022 Razorback Football schedule from beginning to end, how the 1st four games of the year will determine if the Hogs have an amazing or average year, new CB coach Dominique Bowman has a lot of energy to bring to Arkansas, and people need to stop unfairly criticizing Hudson Clark at the cornerback position. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The Late Kick with Josh Pate
    Latest intel from fall camps | Late Kick Live Ep. 287

    The Late Kick with Josh Pate

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 66:03 Very Popular


    Late Kick Live Ep. 287 includes Josh Pate taking a look at some of the most important names in College Football this fall. Will Spencer Rattler lead South Carolina to another season of exceeding expectations? Can Kyle Whittingham and Utah break through into the CFP? Will Tyler Van Dyke lead Miami to the ACC Title Game? How will Bama's OL look under Eric Wolford? Can Sherrone Moore and Matt Weiss keep Michigan's offense in ascension mode? The bold prediction segment returns tonight with some of the most risky bets Pate State members claim they are willing to make including Arkansas once again leading the country in rushing, the Big 12 Championship Game featuring Kansas State versus someone NOT names Oklahoma or Texas, Ohio State having a top 10 defense, Iowa winning 10 games and making the conference title game, and Alabama losing to both Texas teams. Josh also takes a look at the current structure of College Football recruiting and speculates what kind of changes could be made to better the sport. Follow Josh on Twitter: @LateKickJosh Follow Josh on Instagram: @LateKickJosh Follow Josh on TikTok: @LateKickJosh Have a question for Josh? Email the show! Follow or Subscribe to The Late Kick with Josh Pate on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe to the Late Kick YouTube Channel! To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Brandon Baxter In The Morning
    AMS w/ Brandon & Kelly - 08/08/22 | Kelly Feared For Her Life + BB's Son Is Back In The Saddle

    Brandon Baxter In The Morning

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 50:10


    *** Brandon accuses Kelly of lying about a weekend scare *** Another Razorback drafted to the MLB *** Go karts, boom boxes and terrorizing the neighborhood *** Dating mistakes men and women make *** Every dark cloud has a silver lining *** Little Rock woman sells watermelon to donate 500 back packs *** When the cheapest lunch combo is $13 *** Arkansas' Morning Show High Five - Russellville School Board raises teacher salaries *** Where the Crawdads Sing *** Sports Card & Memorabilia Show ***

    The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
    Walmart Transportation with Doug Estrada

    The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 61:02


    Doug Estrada and Joe Lynch discuss Walmart transportation. Doug is a Senior Director of Supply Chain at Walmart Stores Inc. About Doug Estrada Douglas Estrada is a Senior Director of Supply Chain at Walmart Stores Inc. A graduate of Doane University in Crete, NE. Doug Estrada has 30 plus years of experience in Supply Chain with the last 20 years of supporting Walmart Stores, Inc. Doug has held various supply chain roles with the Walmart Private Fleet as well as working Internationally for Walmart in Central America in setting up the Retail Transportation Supply Chain Network for Walmart in several Central American Countries. Doug currently leads the Great Lakes / Upper Midwest Transportation Region for Walmart overseeing 15 Transportation Distribution Centers with over 2000 Walmart Drivers that support Stores and Clubs in that part of the country. Doug has been a board member of the  Washington DC Metro Police Foundation since 2016 and sits on the Advisory Board for Truckers Against Trafficking. Doug and his wife Lisa of 31 years reside in Bentonville, AR and have three adult children. About Walmart Sixty years ago, Sam Walton started a single mom-and-pop shop and transformed it into the world's biggest retailer. Since those founding days, one thing has remained consistent: our commitment to helping our customers save money so they can live better. Today, we're reinventing the shopping experience and our associates are at the heart of it. When you join our Walmart family of brands (Sam's Club, Bonobos, Moosejaw and many more!), you'll play a crucial role in shaping the future of retail, improving millions of lives around the world. This is that place where your passions meet purpose. Join our family and build a career you're proud of. Key Takeaways: Walmart Transportation Douglas Estrada is a Senior Director of Supply Chain at Walmart, the largest retailer in the world. In the podcast interview, Doug and Joe discuss Walmart transportation along with Walmart's vast network of carriers and brokers. The Average Walmart Supercenter receives the following in 20-40 Walmart truckloads (private fleet) 200 shipment from UPS or other carrier Walmart private fleet consists of: 12K plus tractors 65-80K trailers 13K plus drivers Walmart is hiring for drivers, distribution, and fulfillment: www.drive4walmart.com Walmart is not only the largest retailer, they are also one of the largest shippers and their best practices often become industry best practices. Walmart pioneered the use of the OTIF metric, which stands for on-time and in-full – meaning the shipment arrived on-time and everything that was supposed to deliver was included with the shipment (in-full). Walmart Inc. engages in the operation of retail, wholesale, and other units worldwide. The company operates through three segments: Walmart U.S., Walmart International, and Sam's Club. Walmart operates supercenters, supermarkets, hypermarkets, warehouse clubs, cash and carry stores, and discount stores; membership-only warehouse clubs; ecommerce websites, such as walmart.com, walmart.com.mx, walmart.ca, flipkart.com, and samsclub.com; and mobile commerce applications. Walmart operates approximately 10,500 stores and various ecommerce websites under 46 banners in 24 countries. The company was formerly known as Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and changed its name to Walmart Inc. in February 2018. The company was founded in 1945 and is based in Bentonville, Arkansas. Learn More About Walmart Transportation Doug's LinkedIn Walmart LinkedIn Walmart: Drivers & Transportation Truckers Against Trafficking  Walmart: Sustainability Supply Chain Lessons From NW Arkansas with Donnie Williams The True Cost of OTIF Failure with Andrew Lynch Children's Miracle Network, Walmart Raise Awareness For Children's Hospitals with "Champions Across America" The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

    HitThatLine.com Audio
    Bud Light Next Morning Rush Podcast: Will Arkansas sellout a game this year?

    HitThatLine.com Audio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 75:40


    Tye, Tommy and Chuck on games you could sell out, Pittman on fall camp and more!

    Bell Work Talks
    Episode 35: Normal is still Normal in Child Sexual Abuse (even if Daubert and Frye disagree)

    Bell Work Talks

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 14:33


    In this Bell Work Talks, Dr. Farst will discuss common challenges faced in courtroom settings by medical providers when presenting the facts that the majority of children who have been sexually abused will not have residual visible physical injuries on examination. This could include being summoned to pre-trial hearings, formulating strategies to explain the issue to judges/jurors and use of published articles to mis-represent the established standard of care that the absence of physical findings does not discount the possibility of prior sexual abuse. Dr. Farst has worked as a child abuse pediatrician with the Team for Children at Risk at Arkansas Children's Hospital since 2004. She completed undergraduate and medical school training at Texas Tech University. Following residency training in internal medicine and pediatrics, she was in primary care private practice for 3 years. During this time, she served as a volunteer medical provider for a community-based CAC and decided to pursue child abuse pediatrics as a career. After completing a fellowship in child abuse pediatrics at Cincinnati Children's Hospital she returned to practice at AR Children's Hospital and now serves as the medical director for the Team for Children at Risk and is a professor of pediatrics with the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Dr. Farst has provided numerous local and national presentations regarding the medical evaluation and management of child abuse and neglect and directs the Support for Health Involved Professionals at Safety Centers for the CAC's of Arkansas. Resources: * Adams J, et al. Interpretation of Medical Findings in Suspected Child Sexual Abuse: An Update for 2018. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2018. Jun;31(3):225-231 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29294380/ (open access) * Hornor G. A normal ano-genital exam: Sexual abuse or not? J Pediatr Health Care 2010;24(3). * Smith T. Anogenital Findings in 3569 Pediatric Examinations for Sexual Abuse/Assault. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2018;31:79e83 * Kotze. Child sexual abuse: The significance of the history and testifying on non-confirmatory findings. PHCFM, 2019 https://phcfm.org/index.php/phcfm/article/view/1954/3152 (open access) * Frasier and Makoroff. Medical evidence and expert testimony in child sexual abuse. Juv and Family Court Journal 2006;57(1)

    HawgSports Live: An Arkansas Razorbacks Podcast

    Join HawgSports.com publisher Trey Biddy as he breaks down everything going on with Arkansas fall camp through the first three practices. HawgSports.com is 50% off until tonight at 10:59 pm (CDT) 8/8/22!! Act now and get unmatched insider coverage for half of the regular rate!! It breaks down to just $1.03 cents a week, $4.48 a month and is billed at only $53.70 for the annual VIP membership. SHOW LESS To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    HitThatLine.com Audio
    Ruscin & Zach Podcast August 8

    HitThatLine.com Audio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 43:46


    A spirited discussion about NIL deals and the college football preseason coaches poll is out and we talk about if Arkansas is ranked too low or too high.

    Locked On Razorbacks
    How to recruit 5 star players to play Razorback Football

    Locked On Razorbacks

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:47


    John Nabors discusses the latest from Razorback Fall Camp as they hold their first few practices of August, some of the biggest updates to come from the weekend, how TE coach Dowell Loggains understands the way to recruit the biggest name players to a place like Arkansas, and Bud Walton Arena is still the best atmosphere in all of college basketball. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Aaron Torres Sports Podcast
    The Most Intriguing Teams in College Football Part I and II + previewing Kentucky and Arkansas summer basketball tours

    Aaron Torres Sports Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 72:20


    With three weeks until college football, Aaron discusses the eight most intriguing teams in the sport in two parts, hitting on USC, Texas, Michigan, A&M and two playoff contenders (not named Alabama or Ohio State). Then he previews two big summer hoops tours starting this week - Kentucky and Arkansas. Here's a full rundown: Most intriguing teams in college football Part I (2:00): With three weeks until the start of college football, Aaron opens the show by discussing Part I of the eight most intriguing teams in college football. What are realistic expectations in Year 1 for Lincoln Riley at USC, how safe is Steve Sarkisian at Texas and is this finally the year Scott Frost figures things out at Nebraska? Plus, Vegas sees LSU as a six-win team - how patient will Tigers fans stay if that happens? Most intriguing teams in college football Part II (24:00): From there Aaron continues with part II of most intriguing teams - and opens the segment with an audible. After meeting an angry Oklahoma fan he decides to discuss the Sooners, as well as if Jim Harbaugh has already lost all his goodwill after last year's playoff run. Plus, thoughts on A&M, Clemson and more! Previewing Kentucky and Arkansas's hoops summer tours (50:00): Finally, Aaron wraps by discussing summer tours for Kentucky and Arkansas that kick off this week. He explains why the reigning National Player of the Year Oscar Tshiebwe is the least interesting thing about Kentucky basketball this year, and also wonders: How will Eric Musselman juggle a loaded 13-man roster. Plus early thoughts on Auburn and Oklahoma, who have already played games overseas. This episode is sponsored by Pristine Auction! Register at https://www.pristineauction.com/register and get $10 off your first item won when you use code: Torres Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Arkansas Democrat Gazette
    8/8/22: New stages for the 30 Crossing project...and more news

    Arkansas Democrat Gazette

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 3:45


    New stages for the 30 Crossing project; Arkansas has fallen in the rankings of overall child well-being; Body of an Arkansas County district judge recovered in Mud Lake; Active covid cases in Arkansas down to a one-month low

    Morbidology
    164: Westside Middle School Shooting

    Morbidology

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 61:15


    It was shortly after lunch time at Westboro Middle School in Jonesboro, Arkansas, on the 24th of March, 1998, when the fire alarm began blaring in the classrooms. Children shuffled out into the schoolyard. It was a welcome relief from the morning's mundane classes. As children stood around chatting, a pop echoed in the schoolyard, followed by another and then another…SPONSORS -BetterHelp: Thank you to BetterHelp for sponsoring this episode! Is there is something that interferes with your happiness or is preventing you from achieving your goals? BetterHelp online counseling is there for you. Get matched with a counsellor today: https://betterhelp.com/morbidologyPodcorn: Thank you to Podcorn for sponsoring this episode! Podcorn is revolutionizing podcast sponsorship. Start browsing sponsorship opportunities today: https://podcorn.com/SHOW NOTES - https://morbidology.com/morbidology-the-podcast-164-westside-school-shooting PATREON - https://www.patreon.com/morbidologyAudio Credit:Evening of Chaos - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Empty Reflections - ErikMMusic - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgq4SPKHlyIA Mothers Sacrifice - OurMusicBox - https://ourmusicbox.com/Dark Tranquility - Anno Domini Beats - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6mBav72Ak

    Ozarks at Large
    Children, Gambling, and a Music Legend Statue

    Ozarks at Large

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:07


    On today's show, taking stock of how Arkansas is taking care of children. Plus, gambling in Hot Springs in the 1960s, getting Johnny Cash ready for the U.S. Capitol, and much more.

    The Razorback Daily
    Dowell Loggains Talks Building Off a Successful Season

    The Razorback Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 29:30


    Arkansas tight ends coach Dowell Loggains joins Q & Z to talk about the first weekend of practice and how the Hogs are hoping to build off a successful 2021 season.

    Ozarks at Large Stories
    Gov. Asa Hutchinson sees Johnny Cash statue for U.S. Capitol

    Ozarks at Large Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:16


    Work continues on the Johnny Cash statue that will be one of two new statues representing the state of Arkansas in the U.S. Capitol. Michael Hibblen from our partner station KUAR speaks with the sculptor and a Johnny Cash admirer.

    Ozarks at Large Stories
    Arkansas Ranks 43rd in the Nation for Child Wellbeing

    Ozarks at Large Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 5:19


    The latest data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation's KIDS COUNT data book has been released, and Arkansas is worse than the national average in 11 of their 16 indicators.

    Ozarks at Large Stories
    Jewish Studies Course Offers Jewish Language Lessons

    Ozarks at Large Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 6:21


    Emeritus Rabbi Jacob Adler, an associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Arkansas, is offering a course on Jewish languages this fall semester. He's a founding member of the Jewish Studies Program, the only program like it in Arkansas, taught by an interdisciplinary team of instructors to an array of students with various aims.

    Smartinvesting2000
    Jobs Report, Job Openings, Credit Card Increases, Asset Under Management, Secondary Market, Recession, Inflation & Earning Season

    Smartinvesting2000

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 59:23


    Jobs Report Friday's job report was a good surprise showing non-farm payroll increased by 528,000 jobs, this caused the unemployment rate to fall to 3.5%. We have now recovered all the jobs lost during the pandemic returning to levels not seen since February 2020. Average hourly earnings were up 5.2% over last year but it appears that wage growth could be slowing. In a separate survey from Greenhouse a recruitment software company said that 70% of workers are optimistic about the job market. 66% of people surveyed said if their wages were cut, they would look for a new job. There are still about 5.9 million people in the labor force who want a job, based on the latest JOLT's report there is still nearly two jobs for each person looking for a job. The biggest gains in jobs were found in the Leisure and Hospitality, 96,000. These are not low paying jobs any longer, the nationwide average is $20.22/hr which is 26% higher than four years ago. Remember this is a national average, wages will be higher in California then in Arkansas. Job growth was also seen in Professional and Business services up 89,000, Healthcare up 70, 000, Government climbed 57,000, lastly construction jobs increased 32,000. The good news scared the markets and pushed the ten-year treasury to 2.84% with concerns of sharply higher and longer rate increases. Job Openings The JOLTS report came out this week and while the headline numbers may look concerning it is important to point out the levels, we have been seeing were extremely elevated and not sustainable. Total job openings of 10.7 million at the end of June missed the estimate of 11.14 million. This was a decline of 605,000 or 5.4% compared to the month of May and was well off the recent all-time high in March of 11.86 million. The level of job openings is well above the level of available workers as the difference is still 4.8 million. This means there were still 1.8 open jobs per available worker! Also, to give you an idea of where we were at pre pandemic, in December 2019 total job openings stood at 6.7 million. This was an elevated level historically and also, during a very healthy job market. Overall, this job's market still remains very strong. US Dollar We have been talking about the strong dollar that we are currently enjoying along with some of the benefits and unfortunately some of the negatives. Another example is recently the US dollar could by 80 Indian rupees, a high that has never been seen in history. Using the most recent trade report from 2019 (2020 was during Covid and not useable data) shows the US exported to India $59 billion but our imports were $87 billion. Our strong dollar means we will be paying less for the imports from India, hopefully we will not see a decline in what we export to them. Credit Card Increases Credit card balances increased $46 billion in the second quarter bringing total credit card debt to $890 billion. Inflation became the immediate concern, but maybe that is not the entire reason. Remember how much traveling has exploded in the second quarter with airlines and hotels seeing their businesses boom. When's the last time you were at the airport and saw someone pay cash? Most of these reservations and transactions are done online via credit card. The JOLTs report came out yesterday and was strong at 10.6 million job openings. When people have a job, they feel confident that they won't be losing it anytime soon and feel more comfortable running up some debt on credit cards. Two other facts should be pointed out. In the final quarter of 2019 credit card debt hit $930 billion, roughly $40 billion above where we are now. Also, consumers do have $2 trillion more in savings today than back in 2019. Assets Under Management A recent survey conducted by Bank of America of 300 fund managers with assets under management of $800 billion backed my optimism for our portfolio come the end of the year. It was revealed that cash holdings now stand at 6.1% which is the highest since October 2001, a month after the terrible event of 9/11. This may not mean that the decline is now over in equities, but it could signal that perhaps the worst is behind us. It was also notable that responses to the survey listed the three most popular sectors which included consumer staples, utilities, and healthcare. Unpopular in the survey was technology and consumer discretionary. Anyone want to guess what popular sectors Wilsey Asset Management agrees with? Please be aware we will not confirm nor deny. Secondary Market Around 6 to 12 months ago we did a post about the crazy secondary sneaker market with sales of sneakers going at outrageous prices. We posted this was happening because of all the free money that was being given out and when the free money stopped the market on secondary sneakers would drop like a deflated basketball. Well that time has come with a glut of sneakers on the secondary market and prices are falling by nearly a third. Just like the meme stocks and cryptocurrencies, when the demand drops so do the prices, and if you did invest in some limited edition sneakers you may want to be one of the many who are unloading now to get better prices. If not, you may be using them for playing basketball on the weekends. As I write this post, I also remember writing another post about the high-end luxury purses and how they were going for outrageous prices. I have not read anything yet on their decline, but it would not surprise me to see that within the next six months as well. If people would just be satisfied earning around 10% on good quality equities many more people would have a much better retirement. Recession 42% of Americans say they are not impacted financially from the recession but have become cautious with spending. However, consumer sentiment is at the lowest level on record going back to the late 70s which means consumers are more pessimistic than the 911 attack, the tech bust and the great recession from 2007 to 2009. On the positive side unemployment stands near record lows, savings for consumers are $2 trillion higher than before the pandemic and overall consumers seem resilient. So, what is a difference this time? The only thing I can think of is people have less faith in this current administration in Washington than they have in a long time. Inflation I've been predicting we will see inflation by the end of the year somewhere between 4% and 6%. While that is good news from these levels, the problem is that the Fed's inflation target is 2%. This may result in a repeat of the 1980 and 81-82 double dip recession. If inflation gets stuck in the 4% to 6% range in 2023 the Fed may once again start increasing interest rates in late spring or early summer causing two consecutive quarters of negative GDP. In summary this means 2022 and 2023 will be low growth years which do not favor growth stocks and investors will have to find good values in value stocks along with being patient and happy with returns in the 6% to 10% range and high volatility. Earning Season We're in the middle of earning season and you may be hearing or will be hearing some companies talk about the effects of the strong dollar on their earnings. Nearly a third of S&P 500 earnings come from overseas which can negatively affect their earnings. Be aware this negative affect could be gone in a year or so.   Harrison Johnson, CFP®: Medicare Irmad  (Income related monthly adjusted amount)

    The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
    Travelers in the Night Eps. 623 & 624: Arecibo & Incoming

    The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 5:30 Very Popular


    Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - We all will miss this scientific treasure. - Greg Leonard discovered 623' diameter 2020 XU6.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

    Sermons with Pastor Kendall Ross | Ozark Free Will Baptist Church

    Ozark, Free Will, Free Will Baptist, Church, Arkansas, Bible, Family, Sermon, Christian, Christ, Jesu

    SFBC
    Sunday Morning August 7, 2022

    SFBC

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 29:57


    Sunday Morning August 7, 2022 Salem First Baptist Church Hunter Delargy Salem, Arkansas

    Fishing Arkansas
    Fishing Arkansas Recording

    Fishing Arkansas

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 90:02


    The Fishing Arkansas Show with Big Sarge

    The Razorback Daily
    Arkansas Begins Fall Camp: What's It Look Like?

    The Razorback Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 19:51


    What's the start of fall camp look like for the Razorback football team? Q's been through it, and he explains. Plus the guys tackle Fan Question Friday, and take you into the weekend with our Song of the Week.

    Movement By Lara: Redefining Yoga
    The Importance of Essential Amino Acids with Dr. Robert Wolfe from The Amino Co

    Movement By Lara: Redefining Yoga

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 44:28


    Join Lara for a discussion with Dr. Robert Wolfe, director of the Center for Translational Research on Aging and Longevity at the University of Arkansas. Dr. Wolfe is both a scientist and a long-distance runner. His research is focused on the regulation of muscle metabolism and he shares how amino acids might be able to help your performance and recovery, as well as, how they can help with aging. He has developed products for Amino Company which are built on amino acid technology first funded by NASA and further refined through rigorous research and independent clinical trials.In this episode, you'll learn:what are amino acids and why are they important?about the products that Dr. Wolfe has developed and patented so you can take advantage of his research. important amino acid considerations if you're vegan and/or getting older.To learn more, and for the complete show notes, visit: lytyoga.com/blog/category/podcasts/ Resources:Shop my favorite 100% Science-Backed Amino Acid Supplements. Enter code "LYT" to save 30%. aminoco.com/LYT Dr. Robert Wolfe's publicationsDr. Robert Wolfe's info at Arkansas State UniversityVisit almondcow.co/shop and use code LARA for a discount off your purchase!Instagram: @lara.heimann See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Riding The Pine
    Ep. 238 Bowling Green Hot Rods Minor Leaguer Patrick Wicklander

    Riding The Pine

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 27:38


    Join me today for a brand new episode of Riding The Pine! On today's episode, I'm joined by a guest who has overcome quite a bit during his journey to the minor leagues, current Bowling Green Hot Rods minor leaguer in the Tampa Bay Rays organization Patrick Wicklander (1:51-26:37)! Patrick and I discuss his career in baseball starting out in the SEC pitching for the Arkansas Razorbacks and how he was able to overcome a diabetes diagnosis while playing for Arkansas, the day he was drafted by the Rays and what the transition was like to the pros, how he's handled the adjustment from Low-A to High-A in the minors and so much more! Intro: 0:00-1:50Interview w/ Patrick Wicklander: 1:51-26:37Outro: 26:38-27:38

    Midnight Train Podcast
    ”Hell's Belle” Gunness, aka Lady Bluebeard, aka ”The La Porte Ghoul”

    Midnight Train Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 97:45


    www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com  www.patreon.com/accidentaldads Belle Sorenson Gunness was initially born as Brynhild Paulsdatter Størseth; November 11, 1859, Selbu, Norway – April 28, 1908?, Lwas a Norwegian-Americ Standing six feet tall (183 cm) and weighing over 200 pounds (91 kg), she was a massive, physically strong woman.   Early years   Gunness' origins are a matter of some debate. Most of her biographers state that she was born on November 11, 1859, near the lake of Selbu, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway, and christened Brynhild Paulsdatter Størset. Her parents were Paul Pedersen Størset (a stonemason) and Berit Olsdatter. She was the youngest of their eight children. They lived at Størsetgjerdet, a very small cotter's farm in Innbygda, 60 km southeast of Trondheim, the largest city in central Norway (Trøndelag).   An Irish TV documentary by Anne Berit Vestby aired on September 4, 2006, tells a common, but the unverified story about Gunness' early life. The story holds that, in 1877, Gunness attended a country dance while pregnant. There she was attacked by a man who kicked her in the abdomen, causing her to miscarry the child. The man, who came from a wealthy family, was never prosecuted by the Norwegian authorities. According to people who knew her, her personality changed substantially. The man who attacked her died shortly afterward. His cause of death was said to be stomach cancer. Growing up in poverty, Gunness took to milking and herding cattle the following year on a large, wealthy farm and served there for three years to pay for a trip across the Atlantic.   Following the example of a sister, Nellie Larson, who had emigrated to America earlier, Gunness moved to the United States in 1881 and assumed a more American-style name. Initially, In Chicago, while living with her sister and brother-in-law, she worked as a domestic servant, then got a job at a butcher's shop cutting up animal carcasses until her first marriage in 1884.   First Victim   In 1884, Gunness married Mads Ditlev Anton Sorenson in Chicago, Illinois, where, two years later, they opened a candy store. The business was unsuccessful, and the shop mysteriously burned down within a year. They collected the insurance, which paid for another home.   Some researchers tend to believe that the marriage to Sorenson produced no offspring. However, Neighbors gossiped about the babies since Belle never appeared to be pregnant. Other investigators report that the couple had four children: Caroline, Axel, Myrtle, and Lucy. Caroline and Axel died in infancy, allegedly of acute colitis. The symptoms of acute colitis — nausea, fever, diarrhea, and lower abdominal pain and cramping — are also symptoms of many forms of poisoning. Caroline's and Axel's lives were reportedly insured, and the insurance company paid.   A May 7, 1908 article in The New York Times states that two children belonging to Gunness and her husband Mads Sorensen were interred in her plot in Forest Home cemetery.   On June 13, 1900, Gunness and her family were counted on the United States Census in Chicago. The census recorded her as the mother of four children; only two were living: Myrtle A., 3, and Lucy B., 1. An adopted 10-year-old girl, possibly identified as Morgan Couch but later known as Jennie Olsen, was also counted in the household.   Sorenson died on July 30, 1900, reportedly the only day on which two life insurance policies on him overlapped. Both policies were active simultaneously, as one would expire that day, and the other would begin. The first doctor to see him thought he was suffering from strychnine poisoning. However, the Sorensons' family doctor had been treating him for an enlarged heart, and he concluded that heart failure caused death. An autopsy was considered unnecessary because the death was not thought suspicious. Sorenson died of cerebral hemorrhage that day. Gunness explained he had come home with a headache, and she provided him with quinine powder for the pain; she later checked on him, and he was dead.   She applied for the insurance money the day after her husband's funeral. Sorenson's relatives claimed Gunness had poisoned her husband to collect on the insurance. Surviving records suggest that an inquest was ordered. It is unclear, however, whether that investigation actually occurred or Sorenson's body was ever exhumed to check for arsenic, as his relatives demanded. The insurance companies awarded her $8,500 (about $299,838.51 in today's dollars), with which she bought a pig farm on the outskirts of La Porte, Indiana.   Suspicion of murder   In 1901, Gunness purchased a house on McClung Road. It's been reported that both the boat and carriage houses burned to the ground shortly after she acquired the property.   As she was preparing to move from Chicago to LaPorte, she became re-acquainted with a recent widower, Peter Gunness, also Norwegian-born. They were married in LaPorte on April 1, 1902; just one week after the ceremony, Peter's infant daughter died (of uncertain causes) while alone in the house with Belle. In December 1902, Peter himself met with a "tragic accident.” According to Belle, he reached for his slippers next to the kitchen stove when he was scalded with brine. She later declared that part of a sausage-grinding machine fell from a high shelf, causing a fatal head injury. A year later, Peter's brother, Gust, took Peter's older daughter, Swanhilde, to Wisconsin. She is the only child to have survived living with Belle.   Her husband's death netted Gunness another $3,000 (some sources say $4,000). Local people refused to believe that her husband could be so clumsy; he had run a hog farm on the property and was known to be an experienced butcher; the district coroner reviewed the case and unequivocally announced that he had been murdered. He convened a coroner's jury to look into the matter. Meanwhile, Jennie Olsen, then 14, was overheard confessing to a classmate: "My mama killed my papa. She hit him with a meat cleaver and he died. Don't tell a soul."   Jennie was brought before the coroner's jury but denied having said anything. Gunness, meanwhile, convinced the coroner that she was innocent of any wrongdoing. She did not mention that she was pregnant, which would have inspired sympathy, but in May 1903, a baby boy, Phillip, joined the family. In late 1906 Belle told neighbors that her foster daughter, Jennie Olsen, had gone away to a Lutheran College in Los Angeles (some neighbors were informed that it was a finishing school for young ladies). Jennie's body would later be recovered, buried on her adoptive mother's property.   Between 1903 and 1906, Belle continued to run her farm. In 1907 Gunness employed a single farm hand, Ray Lamphere, to help with chores.   The Suitors   Around the same time, Gunness inserted the following advertisement in the matrimonial columns of all the Chicago daily newspapers and those of other large midwestern cities:   “Personal — comely widow who owns a large farm in one of the finest districts in La Porte County, Indiana, desires to make the acquaintance of a gentleman equally well provided, with view of joining fortunes. No replies by letter considered unless sender is willing to follow answer with personal visit. Triflers need not apply.”   Several middle-aged men of means responded to Gunness' ads. One of her ads was answered by a Wisconsin farmhand, Henry Gurholt. After traveling to La Porte, Gurholt wrote his family, saying that he liked the farm, was in good health, and requested that they send him seed potatoes. When they failed to hear from him, the family contacted Gunness. She told them Gurholt had gone off with horse traders to Chicago. She kept his trunk and fur overcoat.   Another one was John Moe, who arrived from Elbow Lake, Minnesota. He had brought more than $1,000 with him to pay off her mortgage, or so he told neighbors, whom Gunness introduced him to as her cousin. He disappeared from her farm within a week of his arrival.  Although no one ever saw Moe again, a carpenter who did occasional work for Gunness observed that Moe's trunk remained in her house, along with more than a dozen others.   Next came George Anderson from Tarkio, Missouri, who, like Peter Gunness and John Moe, was an immigrant from Norway.   During dinner with Anderson, she raised the issue of her mortgage. Anderson agreed that he would pay the debt off if they decided to get hitched. Late that night, Anderson awoke to see her standing over him, holding a burning, almost spent candle in her hand and with a strange, sinister expression on her face. Without uttering a word, she ran from the room. Anderson fled from the house, soon taking a train to Missouri.   The suitors kept coming, but none of them, except for Anderson, ever left the Gunness farm. By this time, she had begun ordering massive trunks to be delivered to her home. Hack driver Clyde Sturgis delivered many of these trunks to her from La Porte. He later remarked how the heavyset woman would lift these enormous trunks "like boxes of marshmallows,” tossing them onto her broad shoulders and carrying them into the house. She kept the shutters of her house closed day and night; farmers traveling past the dwelling at night saw her digging in the hog pen.   Ole B. Budsberg, an elderly widower from Iola, Wisconsin, showed up next. He was last seen alive at the La Porte Savings Bank on April 6, 1907, when he mortgaged his Wisconsin land, signing a deed and obtaining several thousand dollars in cash. Ole B. Budsberg's sons, Oscar and Mathew Budsberg, had no idea that their father had gone off to visit Gunness. When they finally discovered his destination, they wrote to her; she promptly responded, saying she had never seen their father.   Several other middle-aged men appeared and disappeared in brief visits to the Gunness farm throughout 1907. Then, in December 1907, Andrew Helgelien, a bachelor farmer from Aberdeen, South Dakota, wrote to her and Belle was all about it. The pair exchanged many letters until a letter came that overwhelmed Helgelien, written in Gunness' careful handwriting and dated January 13, 1908. This letter was later found at the Helgelien farm. It read:   “To the Dearest Friend in the World: No woman in the world is happier than I am. I know that you are now to come to me and be my own. I can tell from your letters that you are the man I want. It does not take one long to tell when to like a person, and you I like better than anyone in the world, I know. Think how we will enjoy each other's company. You, the sweetest man in the whole world. We will be all alone with each other. Can you conceive of anything nicer? I think of you constantly. When I hear your name mentioned, and this is when one of the dear children speaks of you, or I hear myself humming it with the words of an old love song, it is beautiful music to my ears. My heart beats in wild rapture for you, My Andrew, I love you. Come prepared to stay forever.”   Yikes….   In response to her letter, Helgelien flew to her side in January 1908. He arrived with a check for $2,900, the entire savings he had drawn from his local bank. A few days after Helgelien arrived, he and Gunness appeared at the Savings Bank in La Porte and deposited the check. Helgelien vanished a few days later, but Gunness appeared at the Savings Bank to make a $500 deposit and another deposit of $700 in the State Bank. At this time, she started to have problems with her farmhand, Ray Lamphere.   In March 1908, Gunness sent several letters to a farmer and horse dealer in Topeka, Kansas named Lon Townsend, inviting him to visit her; he decided to put off the visit until spring and thus did not see her before a fire at her farm. Gunness was also in correspondence with a man from Arkansas and sent him a letter dated May 4, 1908. He would have visited her, but didn't because of the fire at her farm. Gunness allegedly promised marriage to a suitor Bert Albert, which did not go through because of his lack of wealth.   Turning Point   The hired hand Ray Lamphere was deeply in love with Gunness; he performed any chore for her, no matter how gruesome. He became jealous of the many men who arrived to court his employer and began making scenes. She fired him on February 3, 1908. Shortly after dispensing with Lamphere, she presented herself at the La Porte courthouse. She declared that her former employee was not in his right mind and was a menace to the public. She somehow convinced local authorities to hold a sanity hearing. Lamphere was pronounced sane and released. Gunness was back a few days later to complain to the sheriff that Lamphere had visited her farm and argued with her. She contended that he threatened her family and had Lamphere arrested for trespassing.   Lamphere returned again and again to see her, but she told him to kick rocks each time. Lamphere made thinly disguised threats. Like on one occasion, he confided to farmer William Slater, "Helgelien won't bother me no more. We fixed him for keeps." Helgelien had long since disappeared from the area, or so it was believed. However, his brother, Asle Helgelien, was disturbed when Andrew failed to return home and he wrote to Belle in Indiana, asking her about his sibling's whereabouts. Gunness wrote back, telling Asle Helgelien that his brother was not at her farm and probably went to Norway to visit relatives. Asle Helgelien said he did not believe his brother would do that. He believed his brother was still in the La Porte area, the last place he was seen or heard from. Gunness, being the ballsy bitch she was, told him that if he wanted to come and look for his brother, she would help conduct a search, but she cautioned him that searching for missing persons was an expensive proposition. If she were to be involved in such a manhunt, she stated, Asle Helgelien should be prepared to pay her for her efforts. Asle Helgelien did come to La Porte, but not until May.   Ray Lamphere represented an unresolved danger to Belle, and now Asle Helgelien was making inquiries that could very well send her to the gallows. She told a lawyer in La Porte, M.E. Leliter, that she feared for her life and her children's. Ray Lamphere, she said, had threatened to kill her and burn her house down. She wanted to make out a will just in case Lamphere followed through with his threats. Leliter, the attorney, complied and drew up her will. She left her entire estate to her children and left Leliter's office. She went to one of the La Porte banks holding the mortgage for her property and, not suspiciously at all, paid it off. However, she did not go to the police to tell them about Lamphere's allegedly life-threatening conduct. The reason for this, most historical, true crime nerds agree, was that there hadn't been any threats; she was merely setting the stage for her own arson. Joe Maxson, who had been hired to replace Ray Lamphere in February 1908, awoke in the early hours of April 28, 1908, smelling smoke in his room on the second floor of the Gunness house. He opened the hall door to a shit load of flames. Maxson screamed Gunness' name and those of her children but got no response. He slammed the door and then, in his tighty whiteys, leaped from the second-story window of his room, barely surviving the fire that was closing in around him. He raced to town to get help, but by the time the old-fashioned hook and ladder firetruck arrived at the farm at early dawn, the farmhouse was a big ol' pile of smoking ruins. Four bodies were found inside the house. One of the bodies was that of a woman who could not immediately be identified as Gunness, since she had been decapitated. The head was never found. The bodies of her children were found still in their beds. County Sheriff Smutzer had somehow heard about Lamphere's alleged threats, so he took one look at the carnage and quickly went after the former handyman. Attorney Leliter came forward to recount his tale about Gunness' will and how she feared Lamphere would kill her and her family and, coincidentally, burn her house down.   Lamphere reeeeeally didn't help his own cause. The moment Sheriff Smutzer confronted him and before the lawman uttered a word, Lamphere exclaimed, "Did Widow Gunness and the kids get out all right?" He was then told about the fire, but he denied having anything to do with it, claiming that he was not near the farm when the blaze occurred. A young lil dude, John Solyem, was brought forward. He said he was watching the Gunness place and saw Lamphere running down the road from the Gunness house just before the structure erupted in flames. Lamphere snorted to the boy: "You wouldn't look me in the eye and say that!"   "Yes, I will,” replied Solyem. "You found me hiding behind the bushes and you told me you'd kill me if I didn't get out of there." Lamphere was arrested and charged with murder and arson. Then scores of investigators, sheriff's deputies, coroner's men, and many volunteers began to search the ruins for evidence.   The headless woman's body was a massive concern to La Porte residents. C. Christofferson, a neighboring farmer, looked at the charred remains of this body and said that it was not the remains of Belle Gunness. As did another farmer, L. Nicholson, and so did Mrs. Austin Cutler, an old friend of Gunness. More of Gunness' old friends, Mrs. May Olander and Mr. Sigward Olsen, arrived from Chicago. They examined the remains of the headless woman and said it was't Belle Gunness.   Doctors then measured the remains and, making allowances for the body's missing neck and head, stated the corpse was that of a woman who stood five feet three inches tall and weighed no more than 150 pounds. Friends and neighbors, as well as the La Porte dressmakers who made her dresses and other garments, swore that Gunness was taller than 5'8" and weighed between 180 and 200 pounds. Remember, she was a large woman who could toss around clothing trunks like they were frisbees. Detailed measurements of the body were compared with those on file with several La Porte stores where she purchased her apparel.   When the two sets of measurements were compared, the authorities concluded that the headless woman could not possibly have been Belle Gunness, even when the ravages of the fire on the body were considered. (The flesh was severely burned but intact). Moreover, Dr. J. Meyers examined the internal organs of the dead woman. He sent the stomach contents of the victims to a pathologist in Chicago, who reported months later that the organs contained lethal doses of (dun dun dunnnn)...strychnine. Gunness' dentist, Dr. Ira P. Norton, said that if the teeth/dental work of the headless corpse had been located, he could definitely ascertain if it was, for sure, Belle Gunness. Enter Louis "Klondike" Schultz, a former miner, who was hired to build a sluice and begin sifting the debris (as more bodies were unearthed, the sluice was used to isolate human remains on a larger scale). What the flying FUCK is a sluice you may be asking your obviously intelligent self. Well, it's a sliding gate or other devices for controlling the flow of water, especially one in a locked gate. On May 19, 1908, a piece of bridgework was found consisting of two human, canine teeth, their roots still attached, porcelain teeth and gold crown work in between. Norton, her dentists, identified them as work done for Gunness. As a result, Coroner Charles Mack officially concluded that the adult female body discovered in the burned debris was Belle Gunness. Even though NOTHING ELSE LINES UP.   Asle Helgelien arrived in La Porte and told Sheriff Smutzer that he believed his brother had met with foul play at Gunness' hands. Then, the new farmhand, Joe Maxson came forward with information that could not be ignored: He told the Sheriff that Gunness had ordered him to bring loads of dirt by wheelbarrow to a large area surrounded by a high wire fence where the hogs were fed. Maxson said that there were many deep depressions in the ground that had been covered by dirt. These filled-in holes, Gunness had told Maxson, were nothing but garbage. She wanted the ground made level, so he filled in the depressions.   Sheriff Smutzer took a dozen men back to the farm and began to dig. On May 3, 1908, the diggers unearthed the body of Belle's stepdaughter, Jennie Olson (who vanished in December 1906). Then they found the small bodies of two unidentified children. Subsequently, the body of Andrew Helgelien was unearthed (his overcoat was found to be worn by Ray Lamphere). As days progressed and the gruesome work continued, one body after another was discovered in Gunness' hog pen:    So, let's run through these poor, unfortunate souls.   Ole B. Budsberg of Iola, Wisconsin, (vanished May 1907);   Thomas Lindboe, who had left Chicago and had gone to work as a hired man for Gunness three years earlier;   Henry Gurholdt of Scandinavia, Wisconsin, who had gone to wed her a year earlier, taking $1,500 to her; a watch corresponding to one belonging to Gurholdt was found with a body;   Olaf Svenherud, from Chicago;   John Moe of Elbow Lake, Minnesota; his watch was found in Lamphere's possession;   Olaf Lindbloom, age 35 from Wisconsin.   Reports of other possible victims began to come in:   William Mingay, a coachman of New York City, who had left that city on April 1, 1904;   Herman Konitzer of Chicago who disappeared in January 1906;   Charles Edman of New Carlisle, Indiana;   George Berry of Tuscola, Illinois;   Christie Hilkven of Dovre, Barron County, Wisconsin, who sold his farm and came to La Porte in 1906;   Chares Neiburg, a 28-year-old Scandinavian immigrant who lived in Philadelphia, told friends that he was going to visit Gunness in June 1906 and never came back — he had been working for a saloon keeper and took $500 with him;   John H. McJunkin of Coraopolis (near Pittsburgh) left his wife in December 1906 after corresponding with a La Porte woman;   Olaf Jensen, a Norwegian immigrant of Carroll, Indiana, wrote his relatives in 1906 he was going to marry a wealthy widow at La Porte;   Henry Bizge of La Porte who disappeared June 1906 and his hired man named Edward Canary of Pink Lake Ill who also vanished 1906;   Bert Chase of Mishawaka, Indiana sold his butcher shop and told friends of a wealthy widow and that he was going to look her up; his brother received a telegram supposedly from Aberdeen, South Dakota claiming Bert had been killed in a train wreck; his brother investigated and found the telegram was fictitious;   Tonnes Peterson Lien of Rushford, Minnesota, is alleged to have disappeared April 2, 1907;   A gold ring marked "S.B. May 28, 1907" was found in the ruins;   A hired man named George Bradley of Tuscola, Illinois is alleged to have gone to La Porte to meet a widow and three children in October 1907;   T.J. Tiefland of Minneapolis is alleged to have come to see Gunness in 1907;   Frank Riedinger a farmer of Waukesha, Wisconsin, came to Indiana in 1907 to marry and never returned;   Emil Tell, a Swede from Kansas City, Missouri, is alleged to have gone in 1907 to La Porte;   Lee Porter of Bartonville, Oklahoma separated from his wife and told his brother he was going to marry a wealthy widow at La Porte;   John E. Hunter left Duquesne, Pennsylvania, on November 25, 1907 after telling his daughters he was going to marry a wealthy widow in Northern Indiana.   Two other Pennsylvanians — George Williams of Wapawallopen and Ludwig Stoll of Mount Yeager — also left their homes to marry in the West.   Abraham Phillips, a railway man of Burlington, West Virginia, left in the winter of 1907 to go to Northern Indiana and marry a rich widow — a railway watch was found in the debris of the house.   Benjamin Carling of Chicago, Illinois, was last seen by his wife in 1907 after telling her that he was going to La Porte to secure an investment with a wealthy widow; he brought $1,000 from an insurance company and borrowed money from several investors as well; in June 1908 his widow was able to identify his remains from La Porte's Pauper's cemetery by the contour of his skull and three missing teeth; $1000 at that time is approximately $31,522.45 today.   Aug. Gunderson of Green Lake, Wisconsin;   Ole Oleson of Battle Creek, Michigan;   Lindner Nikkelsen of Huron, South Dakota;   Andrew Anderson of Lawrence, Kansas;   Johann Sorensen of St. Joseph, Missouri;   A possible victim was a man named Hinkley;   Reported unnamed victims were:   a daughter of Mrs. H. Whitzer of Toledo, Ohio, who had attended Indiana University near La Porte in 1902;   an unknown man and woman are alleged to have disappeared in September 1906, the same night Jennie Olson went missing. Gunness claimed they were a Los Angeles "professor" and his wife who had taken Jennie to California;   a brother of Miss Jennie Graham of Waukesha, Wisconsin, who had left her to marry a rich widow in La Porte but vanished;   a hired man from Ohio age 50 name unknown is alleged to have disappeared and Gunness became the "heir" to his horse and buggy;   an unnamed man from Montana told people at a resort he was going to sell Gunness his horse and buggy, which were found with several other horses and buggies at the farm.   Most of the remains found on the property could not be identified. Because of the crude recovery methods, the number of individuals unearthed on the Gunness farm is unknown but is believed to be approximately twelve. On May 19, 1908, the remains of approximately seven unknown victims were buried in two coffins in unmarked graves in the pauper's section of LaPorte's Pine Lake Cemetery. Andrew Helgelien and Jennie Olson are buried in La Porte's Patton Cemetery, near Peter Gunness.   So, here's the even MORE fucked up part… if it's possible.   Ray Lamphere was arrested on May 22, 1908, and tried for murder and arson. He denied the charges of arson and murder that were filed against him. His defense hinged on the assertion that the body was not that of that big ol' girl, Belle Gunness.   Lamphere's lawyer, Wirt Worden, developed evidence that contradicted Norton's identification of the teeth and bridgework. A local jeweler testified that though the gold in the bridgework had emerged from the fire almost undamaged, the fierce heat of the fire had melted the gold plating on several watches and items of gold jewelry. Local doctors replicated the fire conditions by attaching a similar dental bridgework to a human jawbone and placing it in a blacksmith's forge. The natural teeth crumbled and disintegrated; the porcelain teeth came out pocked and pitted, and the gold parts melted (both the artificial elements were damaged to a greater degree than those in the bridgework offered as evidence of Gunness' identity). The hired hand Joe Maxson and another man also testified that they'd seen "Klondike" Schultz take the bridgework out of his pocket and plant it just before it was "discovered.” Lamphere was found guilty of arson but acquitted of murder. On November 26, 1908, he was sentenced to 20 years in State Prison (in Michigan City). He died of tuberculosis the next year on December 30, 1909.   On January 14, 1910, the Rev. E. A. Schell came forward with a confession that Lamphere was said to have made to him while the clergyman was comforting the dying man. In it, Lamphere revealed Gunness' crimes and swore that she was still alive. Lamphere had stated to the Reverend Schell and a fellow convict, Harry Meyers, shortly before his death that he had not murdered anyone but had helped Gunness bury many of her victims. When a victim arrived, she made him comfortable, charming him and cooking a large meal. She then drugged his coffee, and when the man was all fucked up, she split his head with a meat chopper. Sometimes she would simply wait for the suitor to go to bed and then enter the bedroom by candlelight and chloroform the hapless sap. A powerful woman, Gunness would then carry the body to the basement, place it on a table, and dissect it. She then bundled the remains and buried these in the hog pen and on the grounds around the house. Thanks to her second husband's instruction, Peter Gunness, the butcher, Belle had become an expert at dissection. To save time, she sometimes poisoned her victims' coffee with strychnine. (Um… the first husband) She also varied her disposal methods, sometimes dumping the corpse into the hog-scalding vat and covering the remains with quicklime. Lamphere even stated that if Belle was overly tired after murdering one of her victims, she merely chopped up the remains and, in the middle of the night, stepped into her hog pen and fed the remains to the hogs.   Lamphere also cleared up the mysterious question of the headless female corpse found in Gunness's home's smoking remains. Gunness had lured this woman from Chicago on the pretense of hiring her as a housekeeper only days before she decided to make her permanent escape from La Porte. Gunness, according to Lamphere, had drugged the woman, then bashed in her head and decapitated the body, taking the head, which had weights tied to it, to a swamp where she threw it into deep water. Then, she chloroformed her children, smothered them to death, and dragged their small bodies, along with the headless corpse, to the basement.   She dressed the female corpse in her old clothing, and removed her false teeth, placing these beside the headless corpse to assure it being identified as Belle Gunness. She then torched the house and fled. Lamphere had helped her, he admitted, but she didn't take off by the road where he waited for her after the fire had been set. She had betrayed her one-time partner in crime in the end by cutting across open fields and then disappearing into the woods. Some accounts suggest that Lamphere admitted that he took her to Stillwell (a town about nine miles from La Porte) and saw her off on a train to Chicago.   Lamphere said that Gunness was a rich woman, that she had murdered 42 men by his count, and maybe more, and had taken amounts from them ranging from $1,000 to $32,000. She had allegedly accumulated more than $250,000 through her murder schemes over the years—a considerable fortune for those days (about 10 million dollars, today). She had a small amount remaining in one of her savings accounts, but local banks later admitted that she had withdrawn most of her money shortly before the fire. Gunness withdrawing most of her money suggested that she was planning to evade the law. Gunness was, for several decades, allegedly seen or sighted in cities and towns throughout the United States. Friends, acquaintances, and amateur detectives apparently spotted her on the streets of Chicago, San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. As late as 1931, Gunness was reported alive and living in a Mississippi town, where she supposedly owned a great deal of property and lived the life of a respected woman. Sheriff Smutzer, for more than 20 years, received an average of two reports a month. She became part of American criminal folklore, a female Sasquatch, if you will.   Gunness's three children's bodies were found in the home's wreckage, but the headless adult female corpse found with them was never positively identified. Gunness' true fate is unknown; La Porte residents were divided between believing that Lamphere killed her and that she had faked her own death. In 1931, a woman known as "Esther Carlson" was arrested in Los Angeles for poisoning August Lindstrom for money. Two people who had known Gunness claimed to recognize her from photographs, but the identification was never proved. Carlson died while awaiting trial.   So, what the fuck happened to “Hell's Belle”??   The body believed to be that of Belle Gunness was buried next to her first husband at Forest Home Cemetery in Forest Park, Illinois.   On November 5, 2007, with the permission of descendants of Belle's sister, the headless body was exhumed from Gunness' grave in Forest Home Cemetery by a team of forensic anthropologists and graduate students from the University of Indianapolis to learn her true identity. It was initially hoped that a sealed envelope flap on a letter found at the victim's farm would contain enough DNA to be compared to that of the body. Unfortunately, there was not enough DNA, so efforts continue to find a reliable source for comparison purposes, including the disinterment of other bodies and contact with known living relatives.   As far as we know… Belle Gunness, the wicked Norwegian bitch… got away with So. Many. Murders… including her own.   Movies   https://deluxevideoonline.org/our-tens-list-faked-deaths-in-movies/