Podcasts about foreign affairs

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Government's strategy in relating with other nations

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  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
foreign affairs

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Best podcasts about foreign affairs

Show all podcasts related to foreign affairs

Latest podcast episodes about foreign affairs

The John Batchelor Show
1774: Target Taiwan. Gerrit van der Wees @GerritWees, and @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 12:50


Photo:  Tsai Ing-wen, President of the Republic of China Target Taiwan.  Gerrit van der Wees @GerritWees, and @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek https://thediplomat.com/2021/10/what-do-taiwanese-think-of-chinas-record-setting-incursions-into-taiwans-adiz/ Gerrit van der Wees, adjunct professor at George Washington University's Elliott School of Foreign Affairs and George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government 

Spectator Radio
Chinese Whispers: Will Xi invade Taiwan?

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 31:28


Last week, the US and Canada each sent a warship through the Taiwan Strait and Taiwan has appealed to the US for faster delivery of fighter aircraft. It's been a tense month in the Strait, kicked off by China's celebration of its national day on October 1 through flying a record number of aircraft through Taiwan's air defense identification zone. Could war really happen? Could China really successfully take Taiwan? Cindy Yu speaks to Oriana Skylar Mastro, fellow at Stanford and the American Enterprise Institute, whose detailed piece for Foreign Affairs took a close look at China's military options: https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/china/2021-06-03/china-taiwan-war-temptation. To find out just why China cares about Taiwan so much, tune into a previous episode of Chinese Whispers where Cindy Yu speaks to Professor Rana Mitter and analyst Jessica Drun: https://www.spectator.co.uk/podcast/why-does-china-care-about-taiwan-.

Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs
Strengthening U.S. Policy in Southeast Asia with Congressman Ami Bera

Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Over the past twenty years, Southeast Asia a diverse region of 10 nations, has become increasingly important to global economic development, U.S. interests, and great power geopolitics. In this special episode of the Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs, we discuss with Congressman Ami Bera the growing importance of Southeast Asia in the world and in … Continue reading Strengthening U.S. Policy in Southeast Asia with Congressman Ami Bera

Net Assessment
Richard Haass Is Unhappy

Net Assessment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:12


Chris, Melanie, and Zack return to discuss Richard Haass's critique of “Washington's new flawed foreign policy consensus.” The Council on Foreign Relations president laments the bipartisan turn away from the mostly internationalist spirit that has informed U.S. foreign policy since the end of the World War II. Is he right? Does such a consensus exist? And does that explain why successive U.S. presidents seem so skeptical of internationalism? The three also try to discern what Haass favors as an alternative, but conclude that dissatisfaction with the current direction of U.S. foreign policy doesn't easily translate into specific and implantable policies. Grievances for Katherine Tai for an underwhelming speech on U.S. trade policy, for Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley for holding up ambassadorial appointments, and to those who harassed Sen. Kyrsten Sinema — in the restroom! — for being … jerks. Attagirl to Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa who braved abuse and intimidation for uncovering corruption and misrule in the Philippines and elsewhere. Chris gives a shout out to Reps. Jim McGovern and Peter Meijer for introducing legislation to rein in executive power, and Melanie praises the developers at GlaxoSmithKline for their life-saving new malaria vaccine. She also gives a special shout out to her nephew Zack and his Utah state champion golf team at Long Peak High School. Links: Richard Haass, “The Age of America First: Washington's Flawed New Foreign Policy Consensus,” Foreign Affairs, November/December 2021, https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2021-09-29/biden-trump-age-america-first. Richard Haass, “What Mike Pompeo doesn't understand about China, Richard Nixon and U.S. foreign policy,” Washington Post, July 25, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/07/25/what-mike-pompeo-doesnt-understand-about-china-richard-nixon-us-foreign-policy/.   New American Engagement Initiative Annual Student Competition, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/programs/scowcroft-center-for-strategy-and-security/new-american-engagement-initiative/naei-annual-student-competition/. New American Engagement Initiative Future Foreign Policy series with Rep. Joaquin Castro, Monday, Oct. 18 at 3:30 pm, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/future-foreign-policy-series-featuring-rep-joaquin-castro/. “America is shorthanded in foreign affairs. Thanks, Ted Cruz,” Washington Post, Oct. 10, 2021, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/10/10/america-is-shorthanded-foreign-affairs-thanks-ted-cruz/. Ankit Panda Twitter, https://twitter.com/nktpnd/status/1447366126447570946?s=12. Apoorva Mandavilli, "A 'Historic Event': First Malaria Vaccine Approved by WHO," New York Times, Oct. 6, 2021, https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/06/health/malaria-vaccine-who.html.  Connor O'Brien, “Lawmakers aim for blockbuster overhaul of war powers, arms sales,” POLITICO, Sept. 30, 2021, https://www.politico.com/news/2021/09/30/war-powers-act-bipartisan-overhaul-514794. Dina Smeltz, Ivo Daalder, Karl Friedhoff, Craig Kafura, and Emily Sullivan, "A Foreign Policy for the Middle Class--What Americans Think," Chicago Council on Global Affairs, Oct. 2021, https://www.thechicagocouncil.org/sites/default/files/2021-10/ccs2021_fpmc_0.pdf. Peggy Noonan, "Progressives Hold the Capital Captive," Wall Street Journal, Oct. 7, 2021, https://www.wsj.com/articles/biden-progressives-aoc-squad-sinema-reconciliation-infrastructure-lbj-approval-polling-11633643510.  Tyler Haslam, "High School Golf: Kihei Akina Leads Lone Peak Knights to 8th State Title in 9 Years," Deseret News, Oct. 5, 2021, https://www.deseret.com/2021/10/5/22708095/high-school-golf-kihei-akina-leads-lone-peak-knighs-to-8th-state-title-in-9-years-6a-uhsaa.   

The China in Africa Podcast
Lightning Round: Africa-France Summit, FOCAC & UK Port Deal

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:49


An often contentious leaderless summit took place last in Montepellier where African youth activists did not hold back in telling French President Emmanuel Macron what they thought needed to be done to improve ties between the two regions. Eric & Cobus look at what lessons China, the U.S., and others can take away from the heated exchanges that took place.Plus, a preview of what might be on the agenda at the upcoming Forum on China-Africa Cooperation summit that is expected to take place next month in the Senegalese capital Dakar and the guys dive into a billion port development deal led by the UK and the United Arab Emirates.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesqueJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Borderline
Will Buckingham | Leave the door open to strangers

Borderline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:10


Will Buckingham gave me my new favourite word. He's a philosopher so it's only right the word should be Greek. Philoxenia is the word. Love of the foreign. It's that sense of curiosity, desire to connect and good will that make us seek out those we don't know and invite them to share our hearth. It's the cat that runs up to a house guest to smell his hand and rub against new legs. But we fear the stranger too as much as we wish for him. The cat hisses, scratches and hides under the sofa. You know that word – xenophobia. Will Buckingham explores what the stranger means to us and why philoxenia is worth cultivating. In this episode: 

The World of Intelligence
Cryptocurrency and Terrorist Financing in the Middle East and North Africa

The World of Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:09


In this episode we discuss the use of various cryptocurrencies in terrorist financing in the Middle East and Africa. Ahmed Buckley is an independent expert serving on the Analytical Support and Monitoring Team supporting the UN Security Council Committee concerning sanctions. An ACAMS Certified Global Sanctions Specialist, Ahmed co-designed and delivered trainings on sanctions implementation and compliance to national authorities, financial institutions, as well as to trainees at NATO's Defense Against Terrorism Centre of Excellence. He co-drafted the Joint Report on Actions Taken by Member States to Disrupt Terrorism Finance pursuant to UNSC resolution 2462 (2019). He was previously Deputy Director of the Global Counterterrorism Unit at Egypt's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and served diplomatic postings in Pakistan and Canada.

The Global Politico
Europe's top 'tech cop' is ready to take on Big Tech with America

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 22:01


It looks like the European Union's competition czar Margrethe Vestager has finally found her right hand partner in Lina Khan. She tells host Ryan Heath the Biden administration, with its commitment to regulating Big Tech, is a “dream come true.” But what will that EU-U.S. cooperation really look like? Also: Vestager's game plan to protect whistleblowers, plus her own rules for tech at home.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

The China in Africa Podcast
China's Role in Zambia's Unfolding Debt Crisis

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:27


Zambia owes at least 18 Chinese creditors $6.6 billion, nearly twice as much as previously stated, according to a new report published by the China-Africa Research Initiative (CARI) at Johns Hopkins University. And that figure may be even higher as it doesn't account for penalties accrued by various Zambian borrowers who've fallen behind in their payments.While these latest findings confirm Zambia indeed has a very serious Chinese debt problem, the CARI report, however, details why the situation there is actually very different from that of other African countries that are also struggling to repay Chinese loans.The report's two authors, CARI Director Deborah Brautigam and Senior Research Assistant Yinxuan Wang join Eric & Cobus from Washington to discuss their findings and explain why Zambia is an outlier when it comes to Chinese debt in Africa.SHOW NOTES:China-Africa Research Initiative: How Zambia and China Co-Created a Debt "Tragedy of the Commons" by Deborah BrautigamChina-Africa Research Initiative: Zambia's Chinese Debt in the Pandemic Era by Deborah Brautigam and Yinxuan WangJOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque JOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectYour support of this podcast helps to keep the show on the air. Thank you!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The John Batchelor Show
1758: The Ethiopian civil war reignites Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:10


Photo:  Ethiopian Warriors on their way to the Northern Front. Abyssinian warriors going to the northern front during the Second Italo-Ethiopian War . CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Ethiopian civil war reignites.  Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/ethiopian-government-launches-staggering-new-offensive-against-rebel-tigray-forces-group-says/ar-AAPnITA

The John Batchelor Show
1758: Morocco and the risk of hot war with Algeria. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:10


Photo:. Natural hazards;  Dust Storm over Morocco and Algeria CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Morocco and the risk of hot war with Algeria.  Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN https://www.reuters.com/world/africa/algeria-closes-airspace-moroccan-aviation-2021-09-22/

Lead With Your Brand!™
S2E39 : Accessible Healthcare on Brand, Dr. Ilan Shapiro, Medical Director, Health Education and Wellness, AltaMed

Lead With Your Brand!™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:11


In the final week of Hispanic Heritage Month, Jayzen is pleased to welcome Dr. Ilan Shapiro to the show. Throughout his career, Dr. Shapiro has been an outspoken health advocate for the Hisapnic community and has worked tirelessly to create health policy that is both accurate and accessible. During and before the COVID-19 pandemic, he's been a featured commentator on CNN, NBC, Univision, Telemundo and EstrellaTV and other international channels to share critical evidence based information for the community. Currently, Dr. Shapiro serves as AltaMed's Medical Director of Health Education and Wellness, helping to create and implement programs and services that expand access to care and improve outcomes for the community. Early in his career, after graduating as Honorary Valedictorian with his medical degree, he worked for the Mexican Secretary of Health as the liaison between Mexico and the World Health Organization (WHO). Dr. Shapiro was recently recognized by the City of Los Angeles, the California State Assembly and the Los Angeles Times en Español as a one of the Héroes de la Pandemia. Guest Bio Ilan Shapiro, MD Medical Director, Health Education and Wellness, AltaMed Dr. Shapiro is a tireless advocate for health care equality, with a deep affinity for innovation and public health policy, especially relating to the Latino population. Currently, Dr. Shapiro serves as AltaMed's Medical Director of Health Education and Wellness, helping to create and implement programs and services that expand access to care and improve outcomes for the community. One of his biggest accomplishments at AltaMed has been the development of a dedicated AltaMed health and wellness facility. The center uses the latest technology, as well as traditional evidence-based principles and a hands-on approach, to teach members healthy habits relating to nutrition, fitness, and chronic condition management, a reflection of the combination of technology and innovation efforts to bridge new offerings for underserved communities. As part of his educational efforts, he has been featured on CNN, NBC, Univision, Telemundo and EstrellaTV and other international channels to share critical evidence based information for the community. After graduating as Honorary Valedictorian with his medical degree, he worked for the Mexican Secretary of Health as the liaison between Mexico and the World Health Organization (WHO). He has created binational public health programs to improve the health of Hispanic communities on both sides of the border. In 2011, he was invited to join the White House Hispanic Policy Group and help educate and raise awareness for the Affordable Care Act and continue serving as an Advisor for the Foreign Affairs and Health Mexican Ministries. Dr. Shapiro is also a recent recipient of the Othli Award, an honor presented by the Consul of Mexico to recognize individuals working to improve the lives of Mexican nationals living in the United States and abroad. In addition to his work at AltaMed, Dr. Shapiro serves on the Board of Governors at L.A. Care Health Plan. He currently acts as the regional director for the National Hispanic Medical Association. Links To learn more about Lead With Your Brand and the Career Breakthrough Mentoring program, please visit: LeadWithyYourBrand.com To book Jayzen for a speaking engagement or workshop at your company, visit: JayzenPatria.com

Modern Minorities
Remi Adekoya's (unpacking) Biracial Britain

Modern Minorities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 70:59


“Mixed-race identity presents opportunities and challenges. There's some bad, but there's also some good. So I have to take both.” Remi Adekoya is a Polish-Nigerian living in the UK, and the author of “Biracial Britain: A Different Way of Looking at Race” - and we had a great conversation on biracial identity — growing up, fitting in, standing out...and kids. Born the son of a Nigerian father and a Polish mother, Remi's a lecturer of politics a the University of York, the former political editor of the Warsaw Business Journal, and he's written for Foreign Affairs, Politico, and several well known Polish newspapers. Remi's currently conducting PhD research on identity politics, having provided socio-political commentary and analysis for the BBC, Foreign Policy, Stratfor, and Radio France International, among others. But as a bi-racial man, researcher, author, journalist, and father - Remi engages in conversation with a unique lens to uncover common - and uncommon - truths. Basically, Remi's the perfect podcast guest for us, and for anyone who wants to understand the inevitable makeup of the biracial world we are living in =) LEARN ABOUT REMI TW: @RemiAdekoya1 WORK: york.ac.uk/politics/people/academicstaff/adekoyaremi BOOK: Biracial Britain: goodreads.com/book/show/50412190-biracial-britain MENTIONS TV: Game of Thrones (as a study on power dynamics): imdb.com/title/tt0944947/ PERSON: Barack Obama: wikipedia.org/wiki/Barack_Obama --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/modern-minorities/support

The Impossible State
Dovish Hawk? South Korea's Military Buildup

The Impossible State

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:39


In this episode, Victor Cha is joined by Dr. Lami Kim, Assistant Professor at the U.S. Army War College, and a CSIS-USC U.S.-Korea NextGen Scholar for a conversation on their recent op-eds in Foreign Affairs and War on the Rocks, military buildup under South Korean president Moon Jae-in, and options for dealing with the North Korean crisis.  Dr. Victor Cha, Foreign Affairs: https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/north-korea/2021-09-22/last-chance-stop-north-korea   Dr. Lami Kim, War on the Rocks: https://warontherocks.com/2021/09/a-hawkish-dove-president-moon-jae-in-and-south-koreas-military-buildup/

The China in Africa Podcast
China's Love-Hate Relationship With Coal

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 52:06


If you're confused about China's stance on the use of coal, well, you're definitely not alone. This week, China went on a global coal buying binge in a frantic effort to put a stop to rolling blackouts that have afflicted millions of residents, factories, and businesses in at least nine provinces over the past several weeks.But just two weeks earlier, President Xi Jinping told everyone at the United Nations General Assembly that Beijing planned to phase out the use of dirty fuels as part of an ambitious effort to reach peak carbon dioxide emissions before 2030. And the President also said his government would halt the building of new coal-fired power plants abroad.So, China is doubling down on coal at home while abandoning the dirty fuel abroad?Rishikesh Ram Bhandary, assistant director of Boston University's Global Economic Governance Initiative and a leading expert on renewable energy in BRI countries joins Eric & Cobus to discuss the complex, confusing role that coal plays in Chinese energy policy.SHOW NOTES:The Journal of Energy Research and Social Science: Banking on coal? Drivers of demand for Chinese overseas investments in coal in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, and VietnamJOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @rishirbhandaryJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectYour support of this podcast helps to keep the show on the air. Thank you!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Dept. of Foreign Affairs reiterates commitment towards Irish in Afghanistan

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 4:47


Simon Coveney, Minister for Foreign Affairs, tells Paschal Sheehy, Southern Editor, that a total of 88 Irish citizens or dependents have now been safely evacuated from Afghanistan and what they are doing to get more out.

Borderline
Qian Julie Wang | Growing up undocumented

Borderline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 39:54


When she was 7, Qian Julie Wang – just Qian Wang then – landed at JFK airport in New York City. Her airsick mother leaned on her for support. Her father, whom she hadn't seen in two years, had skimped on food to afford the cab driving them from the airport. Thus started her life as an undocumented child in America. Show notes00:00 Intro02:32 "A privilege, power and responsibility to share my secret"06:13 "What it means to be a writer"07:56 "At bottom we're all not really that different"09:49 "The before and after of my childhood and my life"13:10 "We had to be everything for each other"15:22 "It was my job to keep us from being noticed"17:44 "Salvation and refuge in books"18:39 "Split between the two worlds"20:48 Membership ad22:19 "Public school in Chinatown"27:49 "I went to school hungry every day"31:18 "Everything I thought was wrong with me was simply a part of being human"34:10 "There's nothing we are afraid of now"39:01 Outro

The John Batchelor Show
1745: Australia Coal 1, PRC 0. vvvGregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 14:35


Photo:    Eighteenth-century coke blast furnaces in Shropshire, England Australia Coal 1, PRC 0. vvvGregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs.   https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-06/china-releases-australian-coal-trapped-in-storage-reuters-says?sref=5g4GmFHo

The John Batchelor Show
1745: What about the SPD, Olaf Scholz, the Bundestag and Moscow? Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 10:05


Photo:   Russia-Germany border before World War I What about the SPD, Olaf Scholz, the Bundestag and Moscow?  Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs.   https://www.straitstimes.com/world/europe/kremlin-says-wants-continuity-in-ties-with-berlin-following-german-polls

Simon Marks Reporting
October 6, 2021 - Top Biden aide meets top Chinese foreign affairs envoy in Zurich

Simon Marks Reporting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 4:45


Simon's update on Jake Sullivan's meeting with Yang Jiechi for CNA with Dawn Tan anchoring.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Interim measures supporting Dignity in the Workplace for Defence Forces

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 12:38


Simon Coveney, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Defence, discusses issues facing the Defence Forces ahead of addressing the PDFORRA annual conference later today.

World Business Report
Businesses hit by Facebook outage

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 26:44


Following an extended outage of Facebook services we hear about the impact on businesses. And we examine the wider implications of the problems faced by WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook, with Dan Cooper, senior editor at Engadget. Also in the programme, for four days in a row, Chinese warplanes have flown close to Taiwan. The island's president Tsai Ing-wen has warned in an article for Foreign Affairs magazine that there would be "catastrophic" consequences for peace and democracy in Asia if it were to fall to China. We get the background to the dispute from the BBC's Taiwan correspondent, Cindy Sui. Sales of electric cars rose significantly in the UK in September, though still make up just 15% of the overall figure. We hear about the global market for such vehicles from Professor Jillian Anable at the Institute for Transport Studies at the University of Leeds. Plus, the BBC's Dougal Shaw reports on a new dating app that uses people's music tastes to try and make a match. Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Benjie Guy and Russell Newlove.

Leadership Is Changing
206: Simon O'Connor - Leaders; Understand Who You Are

Leadership Is Changing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 30:04


Do you understand what it is you're trying to achieve as a leader? Have you reflected deeply on why you want it? In this episode, we're going to explore this so you can walk out with confidence, able to articulate your goals as a leader. Simon O'Connor, a politician with the soul of a poet, is the Member of Parliament for the Tamaki electorate in New Zealand. In this role he combines his two passions - people and ideas. He was most recently the Chair of Parliament's Foreign Affairs, Defence, and Trade select committee and before that, the Chair of the Health committee. Currently he holds the largest number of responsibilities in the caucus.  Prior to politics he was in the corporate world. He also has his own podcast called “On Point” where he interviews various guests on contemporary topics both in New Zealand and abroad.  Leaders, it's time to understand who you are! Tune in and learn the best strategies to make your leadership successful. On this episode: Learn more about Simon's background and how it informed his leadership today  How well do you understand what it is you're trying to achieve?  Why it's important to understand what your goal is and why you want it How Sony Walkman, as an example, was able to change and pivot to adapt to the market  Simon shares how leadership has changed in the space of politics Leaders are loaded with feelings and emotions - we need to lead with a focus on reason and discussion Too many leaders don't know who they are - when a leader knows who they are, that's what builds success - learn to understand yourself better through reflection  Key Takeaways: Leaders need to put their hand up and lead from the front by example Understand deeply what it is you want and why  Leadership take constant education  You need to be able to change and adapt quickly  Stop, sit down, and make decisions from reason  “The un-reflected life is not worth having” Tweetable Quotes: “You've got to understand what you stand for and why… If you can't explain an idea to someone quickly and simply, you yourself don't understand it.” - Simon O'Connor “Leadership is about making the decisions that you won't… You've got to be the one who makes the call.” - Simon O'Connor “The un-reflected life is not worth having… What makes a leader successful? It's someone who is able to reflect on what they're doing and why.” - Simon O'Connor  Connect with Simon on https://www.facebook.com/SimonOConnorMP (Facebook), https://www.instagram.com/SimonOConnorMP/ (Instagram), and https://www.linkedin.com/in/simonoconnormp/ (LinkedIn). Be sure to tune into https://podcasts.apple.com/nz/podcast/on-point/id1573255372 (One Point) to hear amazing content on the most burning issues in our modern times.                 Resources: Email: denis@leadingchangepartners.com Website: http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/ (http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/)  Leadership Is Changing Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/ (https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/) Leadership is Changing LinkedIn Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/)

The Next Page
The Crossroads of Multiculturalism & Multilateralism with Ambassador Federico Villegas of Argentina

The Next Page

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 51:16


How did Argentina's multicultural society shape how they approach multilateralism? And how did Argentina contribute to the human rights law we know today?   In this episode, Ambassador Federico Villegas, the Permanent Representative of Argentina to the United Nations Office at Geneva joined the #NextPagePod for a discussion around the history of Argentina and how diversity has shaped the country today.   Before being appointed to Geneva, Mr. Villegas has had an expansive career in foreign services as a career diplomat and lawyer. Appointed as the Argentinian Ambassador to Mozambique in 2016, he was then appointed as the Director-General of Human Rights at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Argentina from 2012 to 2016 and as a Representative to the Southern Common Market in Uruguay from 2008 to 2011.   In discussion with Director of the UN Library & Archives Geneva, Francesco Pisano, Mr. Villegas talks about his experience as a UN Disarmament fellow, Argentina's relations with neighbouring America and how immigration in Argentina created a turning point for society. He also talked about military coups, and how periods in the country's history led to a new human rights wave dedicated to the enforced disappearances of persons.   Resources: More about Ambassador Villegas:  https://unctad.org/node/33987 Transcript: click here  Listen to us also on: Apple podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-next-page/id1469021154 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/10fp8ROoVdve0el88KyFLy Podbean: https://unitednationslibrarygeneva.podbean.com/ Follow us: https://www.facebook.com/UNOGLibrary https://twitter.com/UNOGLibrary Content:  Speakers: Ambassador Federico Villegas & Francesco Pisano Host: Tiffany Verga Editor & Producer: Tiffany Verga Social media designs: Tiffany Verga Recorded & produced at the United Nations Library & Archives Geneva 

The China in Africa Podcast
Key Takeaways From AidData's New Report on How China's Finances the BRI

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 67:59


AidData, the development research lab at William & Mary College in Virginia, published a landmark report this week that provides the most comprehensive overview to date of Chinese financing of projects along the Belt and Road. Researchers pored through 13,247 projects in 165 countries worth $843 billion from 2000 through 2017.The report sparked a torrent of media coverage this week, mostly on the news about $385 billion of so-called "hidden debts."But the data in this report tells a much more nuanced story about Chinese overseas development finance than what was portrayed in the news. AidData's Executive Director Brad Parks joins Eric & Cobus to walk through the report's key findings and explain why Chinese debt financing is incredibly complicated.SHOW NOTES:Download the full report: Banking on the Belt and RoadAidData Blog: AidData's new dataset of 13,427 Chinese development projects worth $843 billion reveals major increase in ‘hidden debt' and Belt and Road Initiative implementation problemsJOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @aiddataJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectYour support of this podcast helps to keep the show on the air. Thank you!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Net Assessment
Much Ado About AUKUS

Net Assessment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 53:29


Zack and Melanie are joined by Adam Mount, senior fellow at the Federation of American Scientists, to discuss the AUKUS security agreement between Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. What does the pact say about these countries' assessment of the influence and ambition of China in the Indo-Pacific? France, which had an agreement to provide Australia with conventionally-powered submarines, was dropped in favor of the United States and United Kingdom helping Australia to develop nuclear-propelled submarines. Can AUKUS members repair their relationships with France? The deal provides a framework for cooperation between the countries on sharing information related to cyber, AI, quantum computing, and other technology. How might this arrangement affect national security as well as societies in the coming decades? Finally, should we be concerned about proliferation?  Zack wishes the administration would be more forthright about how it worked to secure the return of hostages from China, Adam is unhappy with the departure of an important voice on nuclear issues from the Pentagon, and Melanie is happy it's finally autumn! Links: Andrew S. Erickson, “Australia Badly Needs Nuclear Submarines,” Foreign Policy, Sept. 20, 2021, https://foreignpolicy.com/2021/09/20/australia-aukus-nuclear-submarines-china/. Ashley Townshend, “Far From Breaking with the Past, AUKUS Advances Australia's Commitment to Collective Defence,” The Strategist, Australian Strategic Policy Institute, Sept. 24, 2021, https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/far-from-breaking-with-the-past-aukus-advances-australias-commitment-to-collective-defence/.   Caitlin Talmadge, "Don't Sink the Nuclear Submarine Deal," Foreign Affairs, Sept. 27, 2021, https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2021-09-27/dont-sink-nuclear-submarine-deal. Daniel Baer, “Sub Snub Has Paris in a Tizzy over AUKUS,” Foreign Policy, Sept. 17, 2021, https://foreignpolicy.com/2021/09/17/aukus-france-submarines-australia/. Gender Champions in Nuclear Policy, https://www.gcnuclearpolicy.org/. James M. Acton, “Why the AUKUS Submarine Deal Is Bad for Nonproliferation—And What to Do About It,” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Sept. 21, 2021, https://carnegieendowment.org/2021/09/21/why-aukus-submarine-deal-is-bad-for-nonproliferation-and-what-to-do-about-it-pub-85399. IPA Talent Exchange Program, Partnership for Public Service, https://ourpublicservice.org/ipa-talent-exchange/. Jen Psaki, "Press Briefing by Press Secretary," The White House, Sept. 27, 2021, https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/press-briefings/2021/09/27/press-briefing-by-press-secretary-jen-psaki-september-27-2021/. Josh Zumbrun, “World Bank Cancels Flagship ‘Doing Business' Report After Investigation,” Wall Street Journal, Sept. 16, 2021, https://www.wsj.com/articles/world-bank-cancels-flagship-doing-business-report-after-investigation-11631811663. Lindsay Hughes, “Does Australia Need Nuclear-Powered Submarines and a Nuclear-Power Sector?”, Future Directions International, Feb. 25, 2021, https://www.futuredirections.org.au/publication/does-australia-need-nuclear-powered-submarines-and-a-nuclear-power-sector/.

Borderline
Ariane Bernard | Tfw you lead a team you've never seen

Borderline

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 45:38


Ariane Bernard founded Helio in 2020. Her startup has never known a world where you could network in person, meet clients and investors easily or work from a common space with your employees. How do you lead a team you've never seen? And in a multinational startup, how do you work past cultural barriers and incomprehensions when you can't look your coworkers in the eye? She had to find out the hard way. Highlights- "A lot of good team culture is safety, ultimately. You want a culture whose first achievement is the ability to say the words "I don't understand. I don't agree. I propose that we do X. Has anyone thought about Y?" If all team members, whether they are the most junior all the way to your executive team, equally feel like they have access to these words without risking something, then you have the making of solving for many other problems."- "Everything that helps you understand whether people are connecting with a particular goal, everything that helps you understand whether people understand, everything counts because the distance does not help us."- "The uncertainty is, what am I not getting and what is this company not getting if we are not as fully present and as fully engaged as we could be?"- "The complexity of the distributed team is compounded by our cultural differences." - "I don't have a problem going to an American and being like, "turn on your camera, what the hell!" Because the worst thing that happens is that they'll be like, "no, and here's why." But when you're working with folks who come from cultures that you only know in a much more superficial way, those are exactly the things that become like, what am I actually asking them? It feels like I'm just asking them to turn on the camera. It can't be that much. But I don't actually know this. I don't know what this stands for." Show notes[00:00:00] Intro[00:03:14] Making the jump from intrapreneur to entrepreneur[00:06:57] Anchoring a new company culture without an office[00:10:12] Zoom cameras on, please[00:14:07] Take every opportunity to reduce uncertainty[00:15:52] When physical and culture distance combine[00:19:43] Do we still need culture?[00:25:54] "Do as I say" vs just one man's opinion[00:27:51] The Culture Map by Erin Meyer[00:29:31] Good culture is psychological safety[00:36:03] Resting bitch face and the curse of the screen [00:37:39] The benefits of hiring worldwide[00:41:29] If you had a choice... centralised or distributed? [00:44:32] Outro

The John Batchelor Show
1725: China without adequate power, food, water? Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 11:20


Photo: Drought and famine in China:  The public dining hall (canteen) of a people's commune. The slogan on the wall reads "Eat Free, Work Hard". China without adequate power, food, water? Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs GLXXG https://www.reuters.com/world/china/china-seeks-calm-power-supply-fears-crunch-bites-2021-09-29/

The John Batchelor Show
1725: Australian attack submarines Collins Class, British attack submarines Astute Class; & What is to be done? Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 16:20


Photo:  The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Collins Class Submarine Her Majestys Australian Ship (HMAS) RANKIN (SSK 78) sits pier side at Naval Base Pearl Harbor. The ship is participating in this year's Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2004 exercise. RIMPAC is the largest international maritime exercise in the waters around the Hawaiian Islands. This years exercise includes seven participating nations: Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. RIMPAC enhances the tactical proficiency of participating units in a wide array of combined operations at sea, while enhancing stability in the Pacific Rim region Australian attack submarines Collins Class, British attack submarines Astute Class; & What is to be done? Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs GLXXG https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collins-class_submarine

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Constraining Putin's Russia

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Thomas Graham, distinguished fellow at CFR, leads a conversation on constraining Putin's Russia. FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Thomas Graham with us to talk about Putin's Russia. Mr. Graham is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior advisor at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He is cofounder of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program at Yale University, and is also a research fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale. He previously served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and director for Russian affairs from 2002 to 2004. His résumé is very distinguished. I will just also say that he is a U.S. diplomat who served two tours of duty in Moscow, where he worked on political affairs. So, Mr. Graham, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought you could get us started by talking about the primary interests at stake in U.S.-Russia relations. GRAHAM: Great. Thank you very much, Irina, for that introduction, and it's a real pleasure to be with all of you here today. I want to start with three broad points that will frame the rest of our discussion. The first is that the problem that the United States faces is not simply with Putin; it is with Russia more generally speaking. The last seven years of very difficult, challenging adversarial relationship is really not an aberration in the history of the relationship between our two countries. In fact, from the moment the United States emerged as a major power on the global stage at the very end of the nineteenth century, we have had a rivalry with Russia. And the issues that divide us today are the ones that divided us 125, 150 years ago: We have opposing worldviews. We have different geopolitical interests. And clearly, we have different systems of values that inform our domestic political systems. This rivalry has intensified, ebbed and flowed during the twentieth century. But the effort we made at partnership after the breakup of the Soviet Union up until 2014, marked by the eruption of the crisis in Ukraine, is really the aberration in the history of relations between our two countries and one that was founded very much on the fact that Russia endured a period of strategic weakness. So the issue we have to deal with Russia and how we're going to deal with Russia well into the future, even after Putin departs—which he will, obviously, at some point, if only for biological reasons. The second point that I would make is that Russia is not going to go away. We hear a lot in the public debate in the United States about Russian decline, about the population/demographic problems it has, about its stagnating economy, and so forth. None of this is necessarily untrue, but I think it tends to exaggerate the problems that Russia faces. It ignores the problems that all other major countries face—including China, the United States, and many major European countries—but it also overlooks the very great strengths that Russia has had for decades that are going to make it a player and an important player on the global stage, nuclear weapons to begin with. We should never forget that Russia remains the only country that can destroy the United States as a functioning society in thirty minutes. Russia has the largest natural endowment of any country in the world, a country that can pretend to self-sufficiency and, in fact, is better placed than most other countries to deal with a breakdown in globalization in the decades to come if that, indeed, happens. It has a veto on the U.N. Security Council, which makes it an important player on issues of importance to the United States, and it has a talented population that has fostered a scientific community that, for example, is capable of taking advances in technology and developing the military applications from them. Just look at the strength that Russia exhibits in cyberspace, for example—again, a major challenge for the United States. So Russia is going to continue to be a challenge. One other thing that I should have mentioned here is that the Russian state throughout history and Putin's Russia today has demonstrated a keen ability to mobilize the resources of their own society for state purposes. So even if in relative terms they may be weaker and weakening vis-à-vis China and the United States, in some ways that political will, that ability to mobilize, allows Russia to play a much larger role than mere indicators of its economic size and population size would suggest. Now, Russia clashes with the United States across a whole range of issues, and as I said that is going to continue for some time. And this brings me to my third point: How we should think about American foreign policy, what our guidelines should be in dealing with Russia. And here there are three, I think, key elements to this. First, the United States needs to preserve strategic stability. We need to have that nuclear balance between us (sic) and the United States. This is an existential question. And as I already mentioned, Russia does have a tremendous nuclear capability. Second, the United States should seek to manage its competition with Russia responsibly. We want to avoid or reduce the risk of a direct military conflict that could escalate to the nuclear level. This is—also, I think, recognizes that the United States is not going to be able to compel Russia to capitulate on issues that are of interest to us, nor are we going to be able to radically change the way they think about their own national interests. So it's a competitive relationship and we need to manage that responsibly. And finally, given the complex world that we live in today—the very real transnational challenges we face: climate change, pandemic diseases, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction—the United States should seek, to the extent possible, ways to cooperate with Russia in dealing with these issues. We should recognize that Russia is not necessarily the only player nor necessarily the most important player in dealing with these challenges, but it does have a role to play along with other major powers in handling these transnational issues. So those, I think, are three sort of broad points that help set the stage for our discussion. Now let me turn sort of very briefly to the questions about U.S. policy. How do we deal with this Russia? What are sort of—the way we should think about American foreign policy? And here the point I would make is that we should think of the policy in terms of what I would call the three Ds: defense, deterrence, and dialogue. Now, defense and deterrence in many ways go together. If you have a very good defense, if you demonstrate an ability and willingness to defend your interests effectively and deliberately, then you tend to deter another power. They have less reason to want to attack you. But if deterrence fails, you very much need to be able to defend yourself—to disrupt Russian operations in cyberspace, for example, or disrupt military operations by the Russians that you find problematic in some way. So defense and deterrence go together, and we need to think about that. Now, you build these elements on a number of other things that we're all familiar with. A strong military—strong, capable military—is, obviously, an element of both defense and deterrence, and something that we have managed quite well in the past and I imagine will manage quite well going into the future. Cyber defenses are also an important element of constraining Russia on the global stage. Now, here the United States really has much room for improvement. We built our internet, our cyberspace largely for the accessibility, the ability to pass information from one entity to another, and we spent much less attention to the security of that system. As cyberspace has become more important to our socioeconomic and political lives, we really need to devote much more attention to cybersecurity, hardening our commuter—computer networks, for example, making sure we have strong passwords and so forth, something that I think we now recognize but we need to put a much greater effort into doing that. Third area of defense and deterrence is strong alliances. When we're thinking about Russia, this is clearly the transatlantic community, NATO, our relations with our other European partners. And here, we need to develop the types of military/defense cooperation that we need to demonstrate quite clearly that the United States, along with the rest of the NATO allies, is ready and prepared to meet its Article 5 guarantees to collective security should the Russians do something that is untoward in our neighborhood. And then, finally, and I think of increasing importance, is the question of national unity. National unity, national resilience, has really become a key element in defense and deterrence at this point. We need to demonstrate to the Russians that we have sufficient national unity to clearly identify what our interests are and pursue them on the international stage. One of Putin's close colleagues several years ago said that what Putin is doing is messing with the Americans' minds, and certainly we've seen that over the past several years. Putin hasn't sowed the discord in the United States, but he certainly has tried to exploit it for Russian purposes. And this is something that he's going to concentrate on in the future, in part because he recognizes the dangers of military confrontation with the United States. So great-power competition, from the Kremlin's standpoint, is going to move very, very quickly from the kinetic realm to the cyber realm, and we need to be able to deal with that. So building national unity at home, overcoming our polarization, is really perhaps one of the key steps in constraining Russia on the global stage. And then, finally, some very brief words about dialogue. We tend to downplay this in our national discussion. Many believe that diplomatic relations are—should not be branded as a reward for bad behavior. But I think if you look at this objectively, you'll see that diplomatic relations are very important as a way of defending and advancing our national concerns. It's a way that we can convey clearly to the Russians what our expectations are, what our goals are, what our redlines are, and the responses that we're capable of taking if Russia crosses them. At the same time, we can learn from the Russians what their goals are, what their motivations are, what their redlines are, and we can factor that into our own policy. This is a major element of managing the competition between our two countries responsibly. You'll see that we have begun to engage in negotiations and diplomacy with the Russians much more under President Biden than we did under President Trump. We've already launched strategic stability talks with the aim of coming up with a new concept of strategic stability that's adequate to the strategic environment of the present day and the near future. We've engaged in cybersecurity talks, which my understanding is have, in fact, had some success over the past several weeks. Where we, I think, have lagged is in the discussion of regional issues—Europe, Ukraine, the Middle East, for example. These are areas where there is still potential for conflict, and the United States and Russia ought to be sitting down and talking about these issues on a regular basis. So three Ds—defense, deterrence, and diplomacy or dialogue—are the ways that we should be thinking about our relationship with Russia. And obviously, we'll need to adjust each of these three elements to the specific issue at hand, whether it be in Europe, whether it be in the nuclear realm, cyberspace, and so forth. Now, with that as a way—by way of introduction, I am very pleased to entertain your questions. FASKIANOS: Tom, thanks very much for that terrific overview and analysis. We're going to go to all of you now for your questions. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the icon, and I will call on you, and you can tell us what institution you are with; or you can type your question in the Q&A box, although if you want to ask it you can raise your hand. We encourage that. And if you're typing your question, please let us know what college or university you're with. So I'm going to take the first raised-hand question from Babak Salimitari. And unmute yourself. Q: Can you guys hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hello. I'm a third-year UCI student, economics. I have a question. I'm going to sound a bit like Sean Hannity here, so please forgive me, but I have a question about that Nord Stream 2 pipeline that you constantly hear on the news, and it just doesn't make that much sense for me of why this pipeline was allowed to be completed into the heart of Europe considering Russia's strength with natural gases and the leverage that they have over Europe with that pipeline. Why was that allowed to be completed? GRAHAM: Well, I think from the standpoint of the Biden administration this was a matter of what we call alliance management. Germany is clearly a key ally for the United States in Europe, and the Germans were very committed to the completion of that pipeline, starting with Chancellor Angela Merkel down through I think both the leading political parties and the German business community. So I think they made the decision for that. But let me step back because I'd like to challenge a lot of the assumptions about the Nord Stream 2 project here in the United States, which I think misconceive it, misframe the question, and tend to exaggerate the dangers that is poses. The first point that I would make is that Europe now and in the future will have and need Russian gas. It's taken a substantial amount in the past—in the past decades, and even as it moves forward towards a green revolution it will continue to take considerable amounts of Russian gas. It can't do without that gas. So the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, contrary to what you hear in the United States or at the U.S. Congress, I don't think poses an additional threat to Europe's energy security, no larger than the threat that was posed before that pipeline was completed. The Europeans, I think are aware of the problems that that poses, and they've taken steps over the past several years to integrate the gas—the gas distribution network in Europe, to build facilities to import liquified natural gas, all as a way of eroding the leverage that Gazprom might have had over energy markets in Europe. And that has been quite successful over the past—over the past several years. Now, I think, you know, the other issue that comes up in the discussion in the United States is Ukraine, because Nord Stream 2 clearly provides Russia with a way to import the gas into Europe and bypass Ukraine at the—at the same time. And Ukraine is going to suffer a significant loss in budgetary revenue because of the decline in transit fees that it gets from the transportation of Russian gas across its territory. You know, that is a problem, but there are ways of dealing with that: by helping Ukraine fill the budgetary gap, by helping Ukraine transition away from a reliance on gas to other forms of energy, of helping Ukraine develop the green-energy resources that will make it a much more important partner in the European energy equation than it is now. And then finally, you know, it strikes me as somewhat wrongheaded for Ukraine to put itself in a position where it is reliant on a country that is clearly a belligerent for a significant part of its federal revenue. So we need to think hard with the Ukrainians about how they deal with this issue, how they wean themselves off Russian transit fees, and then I think we have a situation where we can help Ukraine, we can manage the energy-security situation in Europe, we can reduce any leverage that Russia might have, and that Nord Stream 2 really doesn't pose a significant risk to the United States or our European allies over the long run. FASKIANOS: Thank you. We're going to take the next question from the written queue from Kenneth Mayers, who's at St Francis—sorry, that just popped away; oh, sorry—St. Francis College. Thinking beyond this triangular framework, what pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually, even globally, beneficial ways? GRAHAM: What triangular relationship are we talking about? FASKIANOS: His—thinking beyond this triangular framework and— GRAHAM: Oh, OK. So I think it's defense, deterrence, and diplomacy is the— FASKIANOS: Correct. GRAHAM: OK. Can you repeat the final part of the question, then? FASKIANOS: What pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually beneficial ways? GRAHAM: Well, there are a number of areas in which we can work together beneficially. If you think about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, for example, the United States and Russia over the past two decades have played a major role in both securing weapons that were located in Russia, but also in securing highly-enriched uranium that was in Soviet-designed reactors throughout the former Soviet space. We have taken a lead together in setting down rules and procedures that reduce the risk of nuclear material—fissile material getting into the hands of terrorist organizations. And we have played a role together in trying to constrain the Iranian nuclear program. Russia played an instrumental role in the conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that we signed in 2015 that the Trump administration walked away with, but they will continue to play a role in constraining Iranians' nuclear ambitions going forward. And we've also worked in a cooperative fashion in dealing with the North Korean nuclear program. So there are areas in nonproliferation where the two countries can work together. On climate change, I mean, I think the big challenge for the United States is actually persuading Russia that climate change is a significant threat to their own security. They're slowly beginning to change that view, but as they come around to recognizing that they have to deal with climate change there are a number of areas where the two countries can cooperate. One of the things that climate is doing is melting the permafrost. That is destabilizing the foundation of much of Russia's energy infrastructure in areas where gas and oil are extracted for export abroad. The United States has dome technologies that the Russians might find of interest in stabilizing that infrastructure. They suffer from problems of Siberian fires—peat-bog fires, forest fires—an area that, obviously, is of concern to the United States as well. And there may be room for cooperation there, two. And then, finally, you know, the United States and Russia have two of the leading scientific communities in the entire world. We ought to be working together on ways that we can help mitigate the consequences of climate change going forward. So I see an array of areas where the two countries could cooperate, but that will depend on good diplomacy in Washington and a receptivity on the part of the Russians which we haven't seen quite yet. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Jeffrey Ko. You can unmute yourself. Thank you. Q: Hi. So I'm Jeffrey Ko. I'm an international relations master's student at Carnegie Mellon. And my question has to deal with these private military forces, and especially the Wagner Group. And so I would like to know, you know, how does this play into our security strategy regarding Russia in countries that have seen proxy warfare? And how does this—how difficult will it be to engage with Russia either diplomatically or militarily on the use of these gray-zone tactics, and specifically utilizing the Wagner Group as an informal branch of Russia's military? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, I do think that we need, one, to sit down and have a discussion with Russia about the use of these private military forces, particularly the Wagner firm, which has played a significant role in a number of conflicts across the globe in the Middle East, Africa, and in Latin America. But we also ought to help the countries that are of interest to us deal with the problems that the Wagner Group causes. You know, the United States had to deal with the Wagner Group in Syria during the Syrian civil war. You know, despite the fact that we had a deconfliction exercise with the Russians at that point, tried to prevent military conflicts between our two militaries operating in close proximity, when the Wagner forces violated those strictures and actually began to attack a U.S. facility, we had no hesitation about using the force that we had to basically obliterate that enemy. And the Wagner Group suffered casualties numbering in the hundreds, one to two hundred. I think the Russians got the message about that, that you don't—you don't mess with the United States military, certainly not while using a private military company like Wagner. You know, in places like Libya, where Wagner is quite active, I think the United States needs a major diplomatic effort to try to defuse the Libyan crisis. And part of the solution to that would be negotiating an agreement that calls for the withdrawal of all foreign military forces and certainly private military groups from Libyan territory, and lean on the Russians to carry that through. In any event, you know, this is not going to be an easy issue to resolve. I think we deal with this by—country by country, and we focus our attention on those countries where our national interests are greatest. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Jill Dougherty, who's at Georgetown University. The Putin administration appears to be hardening its control of Russia's society with the purpose of keeping Putin in power at least until 2036. Most recent example is the Duma elections that just took place. Will this crackdown domestically affect or damage U.S.-Russia relations? GRAHAM: Thank you, Jill. Always a good question and always a difficult question to answer. You know, I think the issue here is the extent to which the Biden administration wants to make the domestic political situation in Russia a key item on its agenda with Russia over the next—over the next few years. You know, my impression from the conversations I've had with people in the administration—in and around the administration is that President Biden is not going to focus on this. You know, his focus really is going to be China, and what he wants to do is maintain something of a status quo in the relationship with Russia. You will notice that the second round of sanctions that the United States levied with regard to the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, something that was mandated by U.S. law, were actually quite mild—much less extreme, much less punitive than the legislation allowed—I think a signal that the Biden administration was not going to let domestic political issues in Russia overwhelm the agenda that the United States has, which is going to be focused on strategic stability, cyber issues, and so forth. So my immediate reaction is that the Duma election is really not going to have a dramatic impact on the state of the relationship between our two countries. We accept the fact that Russia is an authoritarian system. It is becoming more authoritarian. We will continue to try to find ways to support those elements of civil society we can, but always being careful not to do it in ways that causes the Russian government to crack down even harder on those individuals. This is a very sort of difficult needle to thread for the United States, but I think that's the way we'll go and you won't see this as a major impediment to the improvement of relations—which, as we all know, are at a very low level at this point in any event. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. Let's go next to Sujay Utkarsh. Q: Hi, yeah. Can you hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. So, regarding the issue about cyber warfare, I was wondering if you can go into more detail about what advantages the Russians have in cyberspace and what the United States can do to compete with those advantages. GRAHAM: A good question and a difficult question for people outside the government to answer, since we're not privy to all the information about Russian cyber capabilities nor are we privy to the information about American cyber capabilities. Both countries cloak those programs in a great deal of secrecy. You know, it seemed to me that one of the advantages that perhaps Russia has is that it's a much more closed society than the United States. Now, I'm thinking simply in terms of the way societies can be disrupted through cyberspace. We're a much more open society. It's easier to access our internet. We are—just as I mentioned before, we are a polarized society right now. That allows Russia many avenues into our domestic political system in order to exacerbate the tensions between various elements in our society. The United States can't reply in the same way in dealing with Russia. You know, second, Russia, in building its own internet, its own cyberspace, has paid much more attention to security than the United States has. So, you know, I would presume that its computer systems are somewhat harder to penetrate than American systems are at this point, although another factor to take into account here is that much of the initial effort in building up cyberspace—the Web, the computer networks—in Russia was built with American technology. You know, the Googles, the Intels, and others played an instrumental role in providing those types of—that type of equipment to the Russians. So I wouldn't exaggerate how much stronger they are there. And then, finally, I think what is probably one of the strengths, if you want to call it that, is that Russia is probably a little more risk-prone in using its cyber tools than the United States is at this point, in part because we think as a society we're more vulnerable. And that does give Russia a slight advantage. That said, this shouldn't be a problem that's beyond the capability of the United States to manage if we put our minds to it. We have done a lot more over the past several years. We are getting better at this. And I think we'll continue to improve in time and with the appropriate programs, the appropriate education of American society. FASKIANOS: Thank you. The next question is a written one from Kim-Leigh Tursi, a third-year undergraduate at Temple University. Where do you see Russia in relation to the rise of China, and how does that affect how the U.S. might approach foreign policy toward Russia? GRAHAM: Well, you know, that's an important question, obviously one that a lot of people have focused on recently. You know, Russia and China have developed a very close working strategic relationship over the—over the past several years, but I think we should note that the Russian effort to rebuild its relations with China go back to the late Soviet period to overcome the disadvantages that then the Soviet Union felt they had because of the poor relationship with China and the ability of the United States to exploit that relationship to Moscow's detriment. So relations have been improving for the past twenty-five, thirty years; obviously, a dramatic acceleration in that improvement after 2014 and the breakdown in relations between Russia and the West. Now, there are a number of reasons for this alignment at this point. One, the two countries do share at a very general level a basic view of for—a basic dislike of what they see as American ambitions to dominate the global—the global security and economic environment. They don't like what they consider to be American hegemonic goals. Second, the economies seem to be complementary at this point. Russia does have a wealth of natural resources that the Chinese need to fuel their robust economic growth. You have similar domestic political systems. And all of this, I think, is reinforced by what appears to be a very good personal relationship between President Putin and President Xi Jinping. These two leaders have met dozens of times over the past five to seven years and have maintained, I think, very robust contact even during the—during the pandemic. So there are very good strategic reasons why these two countries enjoy good relations. They are going to step those up in the near term. The Russians are continuing to provide the Chinese with significant sophisticated military equipment. They've also undertaken to help the Chinese build an early warning system for ballistic missiles, and when that's completed it will make China only the third country in the world to have such a system along with Russia and the United States. Now, I would argue that this strategic alignment does pose something of a challenge to the United States. If you look at American foreign policy or American foreign policy tradition, one of the principles that has guided the United States since the end of the nineteenth century, certainly throughout the twentieth century, was that we needed to prevent the—any hostile country or coalition of hostile countries from dominating areas of great strategic importance, principally Europe, East Asia, and more recently the Middle East. A Russian-Chinese strategic alignment certainly increases the chances of China dominating East Asia. Depending on how close that relationship grows, it also could have significant impact on Europe and the way Europe relates to this Russian-Chinese bloc, and therefore to the United States as a whole. So we should have an interest in trying to sort of attenuate the relationship between the two countries. At a minimum, we shouldn't be pursuing a set of policies that would push Russia closer to China. Second, I think we ought to try to normalize our diplomatic relationship with the Russians. Not that we're necessarily going to agree on a—on a range of issues at this point, but we need to give the Russians a sense that they have other strategic options than China going forward—something that would, I think, enhance their bargaining position with the Chinese going forward and would complicate China's own strategic calculus, which would be to our advantage. I think we also should play on Russia's concerns about strategic autonomy, this idea that Russia needs to be an independent great power on the global stage, that it doesn't want to be the junior partner or overly dependent on any one country as a way, again, of attenuating the tie with China. The one thing that I don't think we can do is drive a wedge between those two countries, in part because of the strategic reasons that I've mentioned already that bring these two countries together. And any very crude, I think, effort to do that will actually be counterproductive. Both Beijing and Moscow will see through that, quite clearly, and that will only lead to a closing of the ranks between those two countries, which as I said is a strategic challenge for the United States going forward. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Holli Semetko, who's at Emory University. Polarization is something we must overcome, as you said, but those of us working on social media have some evidence to suggest that social media has fostered political polarization in the U.S. Yuri Milner, a Russian Israeli entrepreneur, invested in an early round of Facebook funding with help from VTB, a Russian state-controlled bank, as well as his investment in Jared Kushner's real estate firm. What is the level of FDI from Russia in the U.S. and do you see it as a threat to national security? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, the actual level of Russian FDI in the United States is quite small. You know, you have some few, I think, good examples of it—the one that you've mentioned with Yuri Milner, for example. There was some investment in a steel factory some years ago. But by and large, there hasn't been a significant amount of Russian foreign direct investment in the United States. I think our growing concerns about Russia have made us even more leery of allowing Russian investment, particularly in sectors that we consider critical to American national security. So I'm not deeply concerned about that going forward. I think we probably face a much greater challenge from the Chinese in that regard. Of course, you've seen efforts by the United States to deal more harshly or look more closely at Chinese investment in the United States over the past several years. Let me just make one sort of final point on social media since it's come up. You know, Russia is a problem. We need to pay attention to Russia in that space. But again, I don't think that we should exaggerate Russia's influence, nor should we focus simply on Russia as the problem in this area. There is a major problem with disinformation in social media in the United States, much of that propagated by sources within the United States, but there are a host of other countries that also will try to affect U.S. public opinion through their intrusions into American social media. You know, given our concerns about First Amendment rights, freedom of speech and so forth, you know, I think we have problems in sort of really clamping down on this. But what we need to do, certainly, is better educate the American public about how to deal with the information that crosses their electronic devices day in and day out. Americans need to be aware of how they can be manipulated, and they need to understand and know where they can go to find reliable information. Again, given the political polarization in our country today, this is a very real challenge and difficult one. But I think if we think long term about this problem, the key really is educating the American public. An educated American public is going to be the best defense against foreign countries, other hostile forces trying to use social media to undermine our national unity and exacerbate the politics of our country. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Eoin Wilson-Manion, who's raised his hand. Q: Hello. Can you hear me now? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. Well, thank you. I just wanted to ask if you could touch a little bit more on Russia's presence in Syria and what that means for U.S. interests in Syria and I guess the larger Middle East. I'm Eoin from Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks very much. GRAHAM: Well, you know, the Russians entered Syria in 2015 militarily largely to save Assad from what they thought was imminent overthrow by what they considered a radical Islamic force, a group of terrorists that they thought would challenge Russian interests not only in Syria but would fuel extremist forces inside Russia itself, particularly in the North Caucasus but farther afield than that—even into Moscow, into areas that were Muslim-dominated inside Russia itself. So they had very good national security reasons for going in. Those ran—I mean, the Russian presence in Syria clearly has run counter to what the United States was trying to do at that point since we clearly aligned against Assad in favor of what we considered moderate reformist forces that were seeking a more sort of democratic future for Syria as part of this broader Arab Spring at that time. So there was a clear conflict at that point. You know, subsequently and in parallel with its continued presence in Syria, the Russians have extended their diplomatic—their diplomatic effort to other countries in the region. Russia enjoys a fairly robust diplomatic relationship with Israel, for example, that has been grounded in counterterrorism cooperation, for example. They have a sort of strange relationship, largely positive, with Turkey that they have pursued over the past several years. We know of the ties that they've had in Tehran, in Iran for some time. They have reached out to the Saudis and the Saudis have bought some military equipment from them. We see them in Egypt and Libya, for example. So they're a growing presence, a growing diplomatic presence in the Middle East, and this does pose some problems for the United States. From the middle of the 1970s onward, one of the basic thrusts of American foreign policy was to limit the role the Russians played in the Middle East. We sidelined them in the negotiations between the Arabs and the Israelis in the 1970s and in the 1980s. We limited their diplomatic contacts to countries that we considered critical partners and allies in that part of the world. Now I think the geopolitical situation has changed. Our own interest in the Middle East has diminished over time, in part because of the fracking revolution here in the United States. Gas and oil, we've got close to being independent in that area. We're not as dependent on the Middle East as we once were for energy sources. And also, as, you know, the Biden administration has been clear, we do want to pivot away from the Middle East and Europe to focus more of our energies on what we see as the rising and continuing strategic challenge posed by China. So I think that means that going forward the United States is going to have to deal with Russia in a different fashion in the Middle East than in the past. We're going to have to recognize them as a continuing presence. We're not going to be able to push them out, in part because we're not prepared to devote the resources to it. We have countries that are still important to us—Saudi Arabia, Israel for example—that do want a Russian presence in the Middle East. And so what we ought to do, it seems to me, is to begin that discussion about how we're going to manage the rivalry in the Middle East. Now, it's not all simply competition. There are areas for cooperation. We can cooperate in dealing with Iran, for example, the Iran nuclear dossier, as we have had in the past. Neither country has an interest in Iran developing nuclear weapons. Second, I think the two countries also would like to see a Middle East that's not dominated by a single regional power. So despite the fact that the Russians have worked together quite closely with the Iranians in Syria, they don't share Iranian ambitions elsewhere in the Middle East. And if you look at the diplomatic ties that the Russians have nurtured over the past with Turkey, with Israel, Saudi Arabia for example, none of these are friends of Iran, to put it mildly. So we can talk, I think, to the Russians of how our—you know, we can conduct ourselves so as to foster the development of a regional equilibrium in the Middle East that tends to stabilize that region, makes it less of a threat to either country, less of a threat to America's European allies, and use this as a basis for, again, sort of not escalating the tension in the region but moderating it in some ways that works to the long-term advantage of the United States. FASKIANOS: Next question from Michael Strmiska, who's a professor at Orange County Community College in New York state. Do you see any hope of persuading Russia to abandon its occupation of Crimea in the near term? Or do you think this is like the occupation of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia after World War II, where a very long timespan was needed before any liberation was realistically possible? GRAHAM: Well, I guess my answer to those two questions would be yes and no, or no and yes. On Crimea, you know, I see no sort of near-term scenario that would lead to the Russians agreeing to the return of Crimea to Ukraine. Quite the contrary, Russia has taken steps since 2014 they continue at this point to further integrate Crimea into the Russian Federation politically, economically, socially, and so forth. The Russians have also built up their military presence in Crimea as a way of enhancing their domination or their influence in the greater Black Sea region. So I see no set of circumstances that would change that, certainly not in the—in the near term. And I think, you know, the Ukrainian effort to focus attention on Crimea is not going to, in fact, gain a great deal of traction with Europe nor with the United States going forward, though we will maintain the principled position of not recognizing Russia's incorporation or annexation of Crimea. You know, I don't think that the Crimean and Baltic situations are necessarily analogous. You know, in the Baltic states there was a significant indigenous element, governments in exile, that supported the independence of those countries. There was a fulcrum that the United States or a lever that the United States could use over time to continue pressure on the Soviets that eventually led to the independence of those countries as the Soviet Union broke down and ultimately collapsed at the end of the 1980s into 1991. I don't see any significant indigenous element in Crimea nor a movement of inhabitants of Crimea outside Crimea that wants Crimea to be returned to Ukraine. I think we need to remember that a significant part of the population in Ukraine is Russian military, retired Russian military, that feels quite comfortable in—within the Russian Federation at this point. So if I were being quite frank about this, although I think the United States should maintain its principled position and not recognize annexation of Crimea, I don't see anything over the long term, barring the collapse of Russia itself, that will change that situation and see Ukraine (sic; Crimea) reincorporated into the Ukrainian state. FASKIANOS: So there are a couple questions in the chat about Russia's economy: What is their economy like today? And what are the effects of the sanctions? And from Steve Shinkel at the Naval War College: How do you assess the tie between Russia's economy and being able to continue to modernize its military and ensure a stable economy? And will economic factors and Russia's demographic challenges be a future constraining factor? So if you could— GRAHAM: Yeah. No, no, just take the economy. Obviously, a big issue, and it will be a constraining factor. I mean, the Russian economy is stagnating and it has for some—for some time. They enjoyed—the Russian economy enjoyed a very rapid period of growth during President Putin's first presidential—two presidential terms in the 2000s, but since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 Russia has run into very difficult economic times. In fact, it's never really recovered from that crisis. If you look at the past ten years, barely any growth in the Russian economy at all. If you look at the impact that that has had on Russians themselves, there's basically been no growth in real disposable income; rather, a decline over the past six or seven years. I think the Russians recognize that. The question is whether they can come up with a set of policies that actually will reverse that and that lead to a more robustly growing economy. Now, what the Kremlin has tried to do is not so much reform the economy—which I think is necessary if they're going to enjoy robust economic growth—as much as professionalize the economy; that is—that is, bring in a younger sort of cadre who are well educated, many of them educated in the West, who understand how modern economies function and can keep the economy stable at least at the macro level. And this is one of the reasons that Western sanctions have not had nearly the impact on Russian behavior that many had hoped for or anticipated back in 2014 when we began to turn repeatedly to this tool in response to Russian activities and operations against Ukraine. You know, it has had some impact. I think the IMF would say that it's probably taken a percentage point off—or, not a percentage point, but a tenth of a percentage point off of Russia's GDP growth over the past several years. That certainly hasn't been enough to change Russian behavior. But it hasn't been more, in fact, because the governors of the—of the central bank have dealt quite adeptly with that, and maintain said Russian macroeconomic stability and some sort of foundation for the economy to grow going forward. I imagine that's going to continue into the—into the future as well. So it is a constraining factor. Then I would end with what I—with a point that I made in my introduction. Russia does have a tremendous ability to mobilize its resources for state purposes, to extract what it needs from society at large to modernize the military, to maintain certainly Russia's defenses and also some capability to project power abroad. So I wouldn't write them off because of that. I think it's going—still going to be a serious power, but not nearly as great a challenge to the United States as if it, in fact, solved its demographic problems, its economic problems, and had a robustly growing economy, greater resources that it could devote to a whole range of things that would improve its standing on the global stage vis-à-vis the United States and vis-à-vis China. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we are at the end of our time. And I apologize to everybody. We had over twenty written questions still pending and raised hands. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you, but we do try to end on time. So, Thomas Graham, thank you very much for sharing your insights and analysis with us today. We appreciate it. And to all of you for your terrific questions and comments, we appreciate it. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, October 6, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. And we will focus on the Indo-Pacific with Dhruva Jaishankar, who is the executive director of the Observer Research Foundation America and nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute. And in the meantime, I encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. So, Tom, thank you very much. GRAHAM: Thank you. Good luck to all of you. (END)

Fault Lines
Episode 99: Ford v. Harman: A NatSec Debate

Fault Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 36:52


Fault Lines welcomes Dr. Christopher Ford, author of the recent NSI paper "Principled Conservatism in America's Foreign Affairs and National Security Policy", and former U.S. Rep. Jane Harman, Distinguished Fellow and President Emerita at the Wilson Center, and author of the book, "Insanity Defense: Why Our Failure to Confront Hard National Security Problems Makes Us Less Safe," to discuss the intersection between different views of national security. How do we get Americans back to a point of embracing free trade? What is the best function of multilateral institutions? What could a bipartisan national security policy look like? These questions and more are covered in this week's episode of Fault Lines.If you like what we're doing, be sure to like, rate, and subscribe to Fault Lines. If you have ideas for future episodes, be sure to email us at nsi@gmu.edu or tweet us at @MasonNatSec.Next week is our 100th episode of Fault Lines! Keep an eye on social media and our website for some fun ways to engage with our podcast team before we record the extra special episode. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Art of Living Well Podcast
E94: A personalized solution to uncover root causes of skin issues & a path to better skin & health with Allie Egan, Founder and CEO of Veracity Selfcare

The Art of Living Well Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 58:19


We are thrilled to introduce today's guest, Allie Egan. Allie is the Founder and CEO of Veracity Selfcare, a next-generation beauty and wellness brand empowering women to understand the connection between their skin and their broader health through at-home testing and a holistic, data-driven approach to skincare. Their products are at the forefront of clean performance, excluding all endocrine disruptors and safe for all life moments, including pregnancy and breastfeeding. Prior to founding Veracity, Allie was the CEO of the women's fashion brand, Cynthia Rowley where she led the transformation to direct-to-consumer and more than doubled the business in two years. She has extensive experience in the beauty industry through her time at some of Estee Lauder's best brands, including Origins, Clinique, and La Mer. She also has broad consumer experience through her time as an investor at L Catterton. She holds a BS in Finance and Foreign Affairs from the University of Virginia and an MBA with high distinction from Harvard Business School.  Allie was inspired to create Veracity after years of seeking answers about her own skin. Frustrated from trying to heal persistent dry patches on her face, her "aha moment" came when she was tested for fertility issues. After suffering for three years she learned that she had an underactive thyroid– which was the direct cause of her skin issues. That is why she founded Veracity: to give people the tools she didn't have, and the knowledge she believes all women should have. A solution that uncovers root causes of issues big and small, offers proactive steps forward, and puts one on a path to better skin and better health. This conversation is insightful and empowering as Allie inspires you to take control of your own health.  We unpack so much in this episode including how her new innovative company, Veracity, will help you get to the root of your skin issue through a simple at home lab test.     Allie is an incredible wealth of knowledge when it comes to understanding how our hormones play a direct role in our skin and overall health. She talks about hormone disruptors that are in many prescription and over the counter beauty and personal care products and how they can impact our skin as well as our overall  health.  We are excited that Veracity's new Scientifically clean and endocrine disruptor-free skin care line is officially launched.  All of their products are designed to treat hormonal imbalances and are created to work with your unique biochemistry. Allie believes that healthy skin is balanced, nourished, and radiant from the inside out. Shop Veracity's new product line here. Special Offer You can take 15% off your purchase by using discount code ArtofLiving15 at checkout.  You can find Allie on: www.veracityselfcare.com IG: https://www.instagram.com/veracityselfcare/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/veracityselfcare Thanks to our amazing sponsor:This episode is brought to you by The Healthy Place, an online and brick and mortar supplement store based in Wisconsin.  One of things that sets The Healthy Place apart from the other places you can buy supplements from is their team of wellness consultants who are ready to help you find the highest quality products. They won't just find you a product for what you believe you may need, they ask questions to understand the underlying condition that you're trying to address and they really guide and educate you on your journey to find wellness.   Head on over to www.findyourhealthyplace.com and chat with an online wellness consultant and use code livingwell for 30% off the full price of your supplement purchase.   --------------------------------------------------------------- 10 Ways to Create a Healthy Relationship with Sugar - Online Workshop: Are you ready to change your relationship with sugar? Take our online sugar workshop and be on your way to having a healthy relationship with sugar in no time. Purchase this 1 hour workshop here. SPECIAL OFFER FOR OUR LISTENERS: Download our Summer BBQ Season Recipe Book --------------------------------------------------------- Rate and Review Us!  Please head over to Apple Podcasts and give the Art of Living Well Podcast a rating and review. We would so appreciate it and it helps our podcast get found in searches. Thank you! Don't forget to Subscribe to our podcast The Art of Living Well Podcast so that you can uncover strategies, tips and resources from a variety of experts and our own banks of knowledge as you progress on your journey to living well.  Please share this podcast with a friend or anyone who you think could benefit from this information.  Join our private Art of Living Well Podcast Facebook Community: This is a community where you can directly interact with us and ask us questions and suggest topics for future episodes. Shop our Favorite Products:   https://www.theartoflivingwell.us/products Shop Clean-crafted wines! Instagram: @theartofliving_well FB: theartoflivingwell Sign-up for our Art of Living Well Podcast email list. (We promise not to bombard you with email). Marnie Dachis Marmet's Website (Zenful Life Coaching) Stephanie May Potter's Website 

The Global Politico
Union leader Sharan Burrow: How to convince governments to actually change

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 21:09


Health workers who don't get paid if they contract Covid-19. Over 6,000 migrant workers dead after helping with World Cup construction in the Middle East. As the head of the world's largest union confederation, it's Sharan Burrow's priority to protect workers against abuses like these and hold offending governments accountable. But as she tells host Ryan Heath, she's walking a tightrope between convincing governments to change and keeping her seat at the table. Sharan Burrow is the General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

POLITICO Dispatch
A 'problematic' alliance with India

POLITICO Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 11:05


Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has a troubling track record when it comes to human rights. But Biden needs him to counter China. POLITICO's Nahal Toosi reports. Plus, polls have Democrat Terry McAuliffe ahead in the Virginia gubernatorial election. And California becomes a permanent vote-by-mail state. Nahal Toosi is a senior foreign affairs correspondent for POLITICO. Jeremy Siegel is a host for POLITICO Dispatch. Irene Noguchi is the executive producer of POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the senior producer of POLITICO audio. Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Read more: Biden needs India to counter China, but it comes with a cost Take part in our 2021 podcast survey.

The China in Africa Podcast
Lightning Round: US-Africa, DRC-China and China-Africa Trade

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 43:35


This week's scheduled guest didn't show, so Eric & Cobus went back to their roots by producing a Lightning Round Podcast where they hashed out three of the hottest topics in the news this week.Join the guys for a fast-paced discussion on U.S. President Joe Biden's decision to not meet with any African leader last week, the latest in the China-DRC mining saga and why the opening of the four day China-Africa Trade Expo in the central Chinese province of Hunan is kind of a big deal.SUBSCRIBE TO THE CHINA AFRICA PROJECTYour subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. The world's only curated China-Africa News Feed with thousands of articles archive2. Exclusive analysis of the day's top stories about China in Africa and the Global South3. A copy of the popular China-Africa Daily Brief newsletter delivered to your inbox by 6am Washington time M-FTry it free for 30-days and see if you like it. Subscriptions start at just $7 a month for students and teachers and $15 a month for everyone else. Subscribe here: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Bennett will differ from Bibi in maiden UN speech

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 19:55


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. ToI founding editor David Horovitz and Arab affairs correspondent Aaron Boxerman join Jessica Steinberg on today's podcast. Horovitz starts off with Prime Minister Naftali Bennett's first speech to the United Nations General Assembly, his second official visit to the US as PM and what's expected from this speech and visit. Boxerman fills in some information about Palestinian Authority Mahmoud Abbas' speech at the UN, in which he gave Israel a one-year ultimatum to go back to the 1967 borders. He also brought up the unexpected plea by over 300 prominent Iraqis who called for their country to normalize ties with Israel. Horovitz speaks about Germany's election day on Sunday, as Angela Merkel ends 16 years in power, finishing an unprecedented period in German leadership and politics. Finally, Boxerman speaks about an article he's working on, regarding violence in the Arab community and Israeli efforts to help stem that trajectory. Discussed articles include: Leaving for NY, Bennett dismisses ‘failed' anti-Israel minority in US House Bennett on Iraqis' call for normalization: ‘Israel extends its hand in peace' Gantz: Abbas's 1967 lines ultimatum ‘will be hard to climb down from' Hundreds of Iraqi notables call to join Abraham Accords, make peace with Israel Germany votes in pivotal election ushering in post-Merkel era Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. PHOTO: Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett leads a cabinet meeting at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jerusalem on September12, 2021. Photo by Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Global Politico
UNGA Dispatch 4: Namibia's First Lady on her refusal to stay silent

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 12:58


Monica Geingos, the First Lady of Namibia, and Ryan Heath take a break from the chaos of UNGA for a cup of tea. Geingos opens up about how to start honest discussions about AIDS and sex in her home country, and reveals why she broke her silence against her online trolls.  Stay tuned to the end for Ryan's lesson on how to identify who's the most powerful person in the motorcade.  Monica Geingos is the First Lady of Namibia.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

The China in Africa Podcast
Is China Exporting Authoritarianism Around the World?

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 66:50


The Chinese and U.S. Presidents spoke on the same day this week at the United Nations General Assembly with each offering a different vision for the future. Joe Biden challenged critics who contend that democracy is in retreat while Xi Jinping warned "the world is once again at a historical crossroads" and pushed back on a U.S.-led international order.And there's a lot at stake for developing countries in Africa and elsewhere in this debate as both major powers seek to align others to their worldview. In Washington, D.C., there's a widespread perception that Beijing is increasingly using technology, money, and ideological influence to spread authoritarianism around the world to better strengthen its geopolitical position.Charles Edel and David Shullman, two leading U.S. China analysts laid out the challenge in an article published in the current edition of Foreign Affairs where they detail "China's international efforts to subvert democracy." Charles and David join Eric & Cobus from Washington to discuss the threat they think China presents and how policymakers should respond.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @charlesedel | @davidshullmanSUBSCRIBE TO THE CHINA AFRICA PROJECTYour subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. The world's only curated China-Africa News Feed with thousands of articles archive2. Exclusive analysis of the day's top stories about China in Africa and the Global South3. A copy of the popular China-Africa Daily Brief newsletter delivered to your inbox by 6am Washington time M-FTry it free for 30-days and see if you like it. Subscriptions start at just $7 a month for students and teachers and $15 a month for everyone else. Subscribe here: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Global Politico
UNGA Dispatch 3: Colombian President Iván Duque on protests, vaccines & Bezos

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 14:53


 Ryan Heath sits down with Colombia's leader Iván Duque. What's on their minds? Deadly protests, lack of vaccines, climate change, refugees and… oh yeah, space travel with Jeff Bezos.  Also: if you have the time, we're trying to learn more about our listeners. We'd appreciate it if you're able to take our short survey.  Iván Duque is the president of Colombia.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

The John Batchelor Show
1711: Olaf Scholz all green lights for the Sunday polling for Germany. Tom Nuttal @TheEconomist Berlin Bureau Chief GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 15:05


Photo:  Willy Brandt (1913–1992): Vice Chancellor & Federal Minister of Foreign Affairs (1966–1969).  Vice-Chancellor of 1900s mid-century. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Olaf Scholz all green lights for the Sunday polling for Germany.. Tom Nuttal @TheEconomist Berlin Bureau Chief GLXXG https://www.economist.com/europe/2021/09/18/the-warring-parties-plans-for-germanys-economy-are-full-of-holes?frsc=dg%7Ce

The Global Politico
UNGA Dispatch 2: Hungary and Estonia speak up

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 15:51


“You don't have to be big to make a difference.” While sprinting between leaders on Day 2 at the UN General Assembly, Ryan Heath sits down 1-on-1 with Hungary's foreign minister, Péter Szijjártó, and Estonia's president, Kersti Kaljulaid. Also: if you have the time, we're trying to learn more about our listeners. We'd appreciate it if you're able to take our short survey.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Péter Szijjártó is the foreign minister of Hungary.  Kersti Kaljulaid is the president of Estonia.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.  You can subscribe to Ryan's “Global Insider” newsletter here. And check out POLITICO's other newsletters:  China Watcher West Wing Playbook Playbook Nightly Corridors EU's Brussels Playbook Morning Tech Morning Energy Weekly Shift

The John Batchelor Show
1708: 2/2: Australia on the frontlines vs the PRC. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 9:20


Photo: A Kuomintang political luncheon in Australia in 1942. . CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 2/2: Australia  on the frontlines vs the PRC. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN https://www.perthnow.com.au/politics/diplomacy/pm-defends-aukus-french-subs-not-enough-c-4033129

The John Batchelor Show
1708: 1/2: Australia on the frontlines vs the PRC. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 15:20


Photo: Lin Sen was the first Chinese head of state (in office 1931–1943) to visit Australia (in 1931–2).. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 1/2: Australia  on the frontlines vs the PRC.  Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN https://www.perthnow.com.au/politics/diplomacy/pm-defends-aukus-french-subs-not-enough-c-4033129

Grand Tamasha
The Biden-Modi Summit and the Future of U.S.-India Relations

Grand Tamasha

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 29:19


This week, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi arrives in Washington for his first in-person meeting in the American capital with U.S. President Joe Biden. Modi, Biden, and the leaders of Australia and Japan will also be gathering for an in-person edition of the Quad Leader's summit. To understand what's on the agenda and what it means for the United States and for India, Milan is joined this week by Ashley J. Tellis. Ashley holds the Tata Chair for Strategic Affairs and is a senior fellow at Carnegie.Milan and Ashley discuss the agenda for the coming Biden-Modi summit, turbulence in U.S.-India relations, and whether the Quad is paying dividends. Plus, the two speak about the impact of regime change in Afghanistan on India, on U.S.-Pakistan ties, and the future of U.S.-India cooperation in the region. Evan S. Medeiros and Ashley J. Tellis, “Regime Change Is Not an Option in China,” Foreign Affairs, July 8, 2021.Ashley J. Tellis, “Well Begun Is Half Done? Managing U.S.-India Relations,” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, April 27, 2021.Ashley J. Tellis interview with Karan Thapar, “Taliban Win Big Setback for India but India's Importance for US Has Sharply Increased,”The Wire, September 7, 2021.

The Global Politico
UNGA Dispatch 1: Covid precautions and fears dominate Day One

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 9:53


Host Ryan Heath runs all over New York, capturing the madness of UNGA's kickoff, accompanied by his sidekick, producer Olivia Reingold. Hear from Ryan's go-to “U.N. whisperer,” Richard Gowan of the Crisis Group, and Penny Abeywardena, New York City's Commissioner for International Affairs. Plus: protestors accusing the U.S. of “vaccine apartheid” stop New York City traffic, setting the tone for critics of the Biden administration to come throughout the week. Also: if you have the time, we're trying to learn more about our listeners. We'd appreciate it if you're able to take our short survey.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.  Richard Gowan is the Crisis Group's UN director.  Penny Abeywardena is New York City's Commissioner for International Affairs.  Linda Thomas-Greenfield is the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.   You can subscribe to Ryan's “Global Insider” newsletter here. And check out POLITICO's other newsletters:  China Watcher West Wing Playbook Playbook Nightly Corridors EU's Brussels Playbook Morning Tech Morning Energy Weekly Shift

The China in Africa Podcast
Update on the China-DR Congo Mining Contracts Dispute

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 61:16


After months of negative media coverage, Chinese mining companies in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are pushing back against the perception they aren't fulfilling their contractual obligations to provide social services and build infrastructure for the local communities where they operate.There's been a recent flurry of news coverage, social media posts, and even ministerial visits to mining sites to bolster their position.DRC mining and policy analyst Christian-Geraud Neema Byamungu has been closely following the Chinese response to the government's moves to review foreign mining contracts and how this increasingly contentious issue is unfolding.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @christiangeraudSUBSCRIBE TO THE CHINA AFRICA PROJECTYour subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. The world's only curated China-Africa News Feed with thousands of articles archive2. Exclusive analysis of the day's top stories about China in Africa and the Global South3. A copy of the popular China-Africa Daily Brief newsletter delivered to your inbox by 6am Washington time M-FTry it free for 30-days and see if you like it. Subscriptions start at just $7 a month for students and teachers and $15 a month for everyone else. Subscribe here: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Global Politico
This week: Dispatches from UNGA

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 1:02


We're doing something different this week: host Ryan Heath will be bringing you snapshots from the field at the United Nations General Assembly, where prime ministers rub elbows with the world's biggest business and nonprofit leaders. Starting Tuesday morning, Ryan and producer Olivia Reingold will share quick dispatches with global insiders during the most important week of their year. Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.  Linda Thomas-Greenfield is the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.   You can subscribe to Ryan's “Global Insider” newsletter here. And check out POLITICO's other newsletters:  China Watcher West Wing Playbook Playbook Nightly Corridors EU's Brussels Playbook Morning Tech Morning Energy Weekly Shift

The John Batchelor Show
1687: "Russia moving very very rapidly to consolidate its position." Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 9:10


Photo: A map showing the ballistic missile defense system surrounding Moscow. From Soviet Military Power 1985 . CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow "Russia moving very very rapidly to consolidate its position." Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2021/09/13/mccaul_to_blinken_is_it_true_that_putin_threatened_biden_to_keep_us_spies_out_of_central_asia.html

The John Batchelor Show
1687: "US foreign policy is merely US domestic politics carried out abroad." Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 13:40


Photo:  Dwight D. Eisenhower delivers a major foreign policy address from the Rostrum in The Heart of Texas Coliseum in Waco, Texas.  The speech was part of the graduation ceremony at Baylor University. . CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow "US foreign policy is merely US domestic politics carried out abroad." Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs HFN https://www.reuters.com/world/biden-failed-secure-summit-with-chinas-xi-call-last-week-ft-2021-09-14/ 

The John Batchelor Show
1686: 2/2 The Kennan Sweepstakes for a Grand Mission. James Astill @TheEconomist

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 11:10


Photo: NATO's purpose is to guarantee the freedom and security of its members through political and military means.*   Here:  Moldovan stamp in honor of NATO. 2/2  The Kennan Sweepstakes for a Grand Mission. James Astill @TheEconomist American policy. How America wasted its unipolar moment. ..  ..  ..  * George F. Kennan, a career Foreign Service Officer, formulated the policy of “containment,” the basic United States strategy for fighting the cold war (1947–1989) with the Soviet Union.  Kennan's ideas, which became the basis of the Truman administration's foreign policy, first came to public attention in 1947 in the form of an anonymous contribution to the journal Foreign Affairs, the so-called “X-Article.”               To that end, he called for countering “Soviet pressure against the free institutions of the Western world” through the “adroit and vigilant application of counter-force at a series of constantly shifting geographical and political points, corresponding to the shifts and maneuvers of Soviet policy.”             . . . In fact, Kennan advocated defending above all else the world's major centers of industrial power against Soviet expansion: Western Europe, Japan, and the United States. Others criticized Kennan's policy for being too defensive.              Remarkably applical to today.