Podcasts about Scotland

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Country in Northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

  • 11,801PODCASTS
  • 33,249EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 17, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Scotland

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Latest podcast episodes about Scotland

And That's Why We Drink
E245 Napkin Hating Ghosts and an Immortal Pregnancy Portal

And That's Why We Drink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 94:39


Our napkins are on the floor and our wigs are being ripped off by ghosts this week... episode 245 is a doozy! Em takes us to Scotland for the Ringcroft Poltergeist that not only includes some haunted napkins and wigs but also flying chairs. Then Christine covers the wildly sad and brutal case of Moses Sithole aka the South African Strangler. And we hope this week you heed this warning, "thou shalt be troubled til Tuesday" -- our local demon... and that's why we drink! 

Being Freelance
No Competition - Social Media Strategist Suz Bird

Being Freelance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 43:58


From South Africa, to Scotland and now to your ears. This is the story of Suz Bird.Being made redundant, going through a separation, moving house, parenting… it might not have seemed like perfect timing. But volunteering her vast marketing experience to a charity suddenly led to the possibility of freelance work. Something flexible for her new life.A year later after referrals kept bringing her work she looked around and realised - “oh, so this is the business you always wanted to start, but you never knew you were going to..'Now we get to find out how she got serious about her business, her prices and her marketing whilst remaining fun and happy . Realising that when no one can offer exactly what you offer, you have no direct competition, so embrace it. This episode is sponsored by With Jack - insurance for creative freelancers.Not sure why you need insurance? Check out this awesome With Jack guide and take that first step to becoming a confident freelancer.New to freelancing? The Being Freelance course is literally made for you!Steve's rolled up everything he's learnt from over 6 years of conversations with more than 250 freelancers.There's no ‘one way' to be a successful freelancer, but this course will help you avoid the many mistakes that most of us make. Find out more about the course. Looking to learn from and connect with other freelancers? Check out the website beingfreelance.com, and be part of the Being Freelance Community!You'll also find useful links, show notes and transcript for this episode. That's beingfreelance.comLike VIDEO? - Check out the Being Freelance vlog - YouTube.com/SteveFolland

Off the Ball
16 Oct 21: John Blain

Off the Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 79:15


Locked in, your biggest away win, cricket and football mashups + the Billy Connolly XI with former Scotland cricketer John Blain

The Documentary Podcast
Climate: Activists

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 24:13


World leaders, scientists and activists are preparing for next month's UN climate change summit in Scotland. These talks have been taking place for decades - but you sense the world is watching like never before, as awareness increases around how the planet is changing. In 1992, a 12-year-old called Severn Cullis-Suzuki from Canada gave a rousing speech and appeal for action at the Earth Summit in Rio. Severn and her father remain long-term environmental activists and host Nuala McGovern brings them together in conversation to hear their thoughts on whether Severn's speech would be any different today.

The Verb
George Mackay Brown and Orkney

The Verb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:12


The Verb celebrates Orkney and the work of George Mackay Brown in his centenary year. One of Scotland's greatest 20th century writers, George Mackay Brown was a poet, novelist, columnist and chronicler of Orcadian life. Ian McMillan is joined this week by the novelist James Robertson who is fascinated by 'time' in George Mackay Brown's work and has said his writing is 'full of beautiful sentences, big ideas, mischievous comedy, powerful tragedy and, again and again, simple observations that make you pause and say, yes, that's it, that's how it is'. James' most recent novel 'News of the Dead' also explores time. Alison Miller is National Library of Scotland and Orkney Library & Archive's Scots Scriever - she shares her love of George Mackay Brown's poem 'Them at Isbister' which appears in 'The Storm and other Poems', his first collection. Alison invites listeners to contact BBC Radio Orkney if they have a copy; only 250 were printed and she is part of a project to track as many down as possible ( radio.orkney@gmail.com). Josie Giles has just published a verse novel called 'Deep Wheel Orcadia' which has Orcadian dialect at its heart. 'Deep Wheel Orcadia' itself is described as 'a distant space station struggling for survival as the pace of change threatens to leave the community behind'. Josie reads poetry in Orcadian dialect and in English translation and explains how the English has been made less transparent. Artist Anne Bevan grew up in Orkney and George Mackay Brown was a family friend. She reads letters from two 'fairies' ( Moonbeam and Rosebud) which George wrote for her when she was a child, and reads the poem he dedicated to her when she was at art school. Anne explains how he still inspires her art. http://www.annebevan.co.uk/

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge
Good Talk - Cabinet Decisions

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 53:12


Chantal is in Montreal, Bruce is in Scotland as we tackle three issues including should the next minister of defence, if there's to be a new one,  be a woman? Should whoever it is have military experience? All this in light of continuing allegations of sexual harassment in the military.  But we start with Quebec's decision to hold back on its plan to have started vaccine passports in the health care system --  could that have an impact across the country? 

Otherworldly Oracle Official
Banshees and Celtic Fairy Queens

Otherworldly Oracle Official

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:58


We are traveling to Ireland and Scotland, to the land of the Sidhe and respectfully exploring the nature of the Banshee a.k.a. the Washer at the Fords. What is the banshee's scream and who hears it? Why does she keen and appear before a death? And we'll learn of a few of the Celtic Fairy Queens including Rhiannon, Flidais, and Queen Medb and share our experiences with them. We will tell some of these elementals' stories and discuss connections between them and some of the ancient Celtic deities.

Ransom Note
Nina Stanger: The 'Shine A Light On' Mix

Ransom Note

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 59:26


Perhaps one of the most wondrous facets of music culture in the UK comes in the form of grassroots, diy promoters and dj's who strive to broaden the eclecticism and experiences of people in their town. Based in Aberdeeen, Nina Stanger is a dj from Scotland who recently sent us an email following what some might deem as a fortunate, unfortunate experience if that makes any sort of sense. You never know who might turn up, hit the club, or the opportunities which might unfold as such... Earlier this year footage emerged from a party in Aberdeen in which British politician Michael Gove was seen wildin' out to electro and jungle - he was alone yet found his way into the murky, smoke filled club in which Nina Stanger was playing a carefully crafted set of electronic and bass inspired sounds. Soon after this she dropped us an email, explaining that she was gutted by the oblivious, unremarkable press coverage of the incident and was keen to be known for something more than accompanying the late night escapades of a rich Tory. We liked her style. She sent us the mixtape from the night itself and we were blown away by her selections. A keen digger, a radio regular on Edinburgh station EH-FM and a talented dj we offered her the opportunity to record a mix and demonstrate what she's all about. The result is an hour of cleverly orchestrated music which would work wonders in the club.

The Sports Rabbi
Episode 234: Israel Nat'l soccer team wrap, Maccabi TLV Euroleague plus Jerusalem and league play on Episode #234

The Sports Rabbi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 77:31


The Sports Rabbi & Roye Shelem looked back at the Israel National team's games against Scotland and Moldova and also discussed the latest in Israeli league news as we looked ahead to Matchday 6 this coming weekend.We then switched gears to the Holy Land Hoops portion of the podcast as we talked about Maccabi Tel Aviv's win over ASVEL and defeat to Milano while also diving into Jerusalem's issues and listener questions.Subscribe to The Sports Rabbi Show on iTunes, Spotify or Google Podcasts.

Which Murderer?
S4 Episode 18: Couples Who Murder Part Two

Which Murderer?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 26:30


In Season 4 Episode 18 Part Two - that's right another two parter! - the girls talk about Couples Who Murder (together, not each other). Mel spoke about The Moors Murders - Ian Brady and Myra Hindley last week and this week Holly covers Cynthia Coffman and James Marlow.Mel struggles with up and across directions, the girls are confused by the affordability of multiple divorces, some amazing life choices take place in Holly's story, Mel is outed as one of the annoying month counters, Mel has a light correction and the girls are thankful they can't hear the listeners screaming the correct information at them. Production, recording and post production completed by Holly who spent her weekend staring into the windows of Consulting Producer Craig's living room. Holly edited this week. All complaints should be sent directly to Mel while Consulting Producer Craig installs frosted window panels in his home. www.whichmurderer.comWARNING - Explicit language, content and themes (plus whatever else will cover us legally). All opinions stated are our own and case information was gathered from legitimate sources within the public realm.Pre-recorded in Scotland

Earth Wise
Direct Air Capture | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 2:00


There is a lot of interest in carbon capture and sequestration (or CCS) in the context of trapping the carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and industrial facilities.  The fossil fuel industry is especially enthusiastic about the potential for continuing to burn fuels without harming the environment.  Apart from the technical challenges, there is the […]

Free Forum with Terrence McNally
Episode 529: BILL McKIBBEN-Time to Mobilize Boomers vs Climate Change

Free Forum with Terrence McNally

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 59:26


Wildfires, droughts, heat waves, floods. Climate demands our attention. The next global meeting on the crisis, Cop26, opens October 31st in Glasgow, Scotland. This week I speak with BILL McKIBBEN, author, co-founder of the global climate campaign 350.org, and a frequent contributor to the New Yorker, where he recently announced a shift of focus back to organizing – specifically of Boomers and the Silent Generation. Young people are engaged with climate but those over 60 are not yet delivering what the crisis demands of them, and he's co-founding an entity called Third Act dedicated to changing that.

The John Batchelor Show
1765: 2/2 The UK food, fuel and Christmas shortages coming our way. Simon Constable @RealConstable, Edinburgh

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:00


Photo: Hopeful children with still-empty Christmas stockings.   2/2   The UK food, fuel and Christmas shortages coming our way.  Simon Constable @RealConstable, Edinburgh https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/fuel-shortages-persist-in-london-and-south-east-england/ar-AAP5TRf Simon Constable, economist, journalist, currently based in Scotland; and author, The WSJ Guide to the 50 Economic Indicators That Really Matter: From Big Macs to "Zombie Banks," the Indicators Smart Investors Watch to Beat the Market.   @RealConstable

The John Batchelor Show
1765: 1/2 The UK food, fuel and Christmas shortages coming our way. Simon Constable @RealConstable, Edinburgh

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 14:50


Photo: 1/2  The UK food, fuel and Christmas shortages coming our way.  Simon Constable @RealConstable, Edinburgh https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/fuel-shortages-persist-in-london-and-south-east-england/ar-AAP5TRf Simon Constable, economist, journalist, currently based in Scotland; and author, The WSJ Guide to the 50 Economic Indicators That Really Matter: From Big Macs to "Zombie Banks," the Indicators Smart Investors Watch to Beat the Market.   @RealConstable

Murder She Spoke
Episode 70: Helen Fiona Torbet

Murder She Spoke

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:18


Episode 70: Helen Fiona Torbet. This week Joannagh brings us the story of Helen Torbet, a 62-year-old outdoors-woman who disappeared in July 1993. Helen was an avid hill walker, having climbed all the Munro's in Scotland and we hear about the important and lasting contributions she made to hill walking in Scotland.However we also hear how Helen disappeared whilst on one of her solo hill walking adventures, with no trace being found of her, despite thorough searches by police and rescue teams.Joannagh tells us how a chance discovery 10 months after Helen went missing was the breakthrough that changed the case from a missing persons enquiry to the search for a body. This break in the case identified a potential suspect and ultimately led police to uncovering the grisly truth behind Helen's disappearance.Case research by Joannagh ShanksProduced by Emma Taylor & Joannagh ShanksEditing by Shaun O'NeillMusic by Tribe of NoiseSources of research:https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12696771.police-dig-for-body-at-guest-house-10-month-hunt-for-doctors-wife-returns-to-quiet-highland-village/https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12687291.i-really-suspected-all-along-that-it-was-mcmillan/https://www.glasgowtimes.co.uk/news/12820805.notorious-killer-found-dead-in-his-prison-cell/https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/hunt-for-walker-1369410.htmlhttps://www.pressreader.com/uk/the-herald-1130/20070213/281719790116430https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12687276.murderer-bagged-by-hidden-holdall/http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/highlands_and_islands/6354761.stmhttps://www.heraldscotland.com/news/11890368.former-soldier-who-killed-female-hillwalker-ordered-to-serve-15-years/https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12687596.hill-walking-claim-by-murder-accused/https://www.thefreelibrary.com/KILLED+BY+PEEPINGTON+CREEP%3B+Innocent+doctor%27s+wife+fell+victim+to+B%26B...-a0179444326https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_mountains_and_hills_in_the_British_Isles#Grahamshttps://twofeetfourpaws.blog/category/hill-classifications/https://www.strangeoutdoors.com/true-crime-in-the-outdoors/tag/Grianan+House+B%26B+murderThere is also a book named ‘Blood In The Glens' by Jean McLennan' which covers the disappearance of Fiona Torbet.

UK Podcast – Big Red Barrel
BRB UK 460.5: Gone Fishin'

UK Podcast – Big Red Barrel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


So yeah, about that podcast we put out each and every week without fail… The post BRB UK 460.5: Gone Fishin’ appeared first on Big Red Barrel.

The Jeremiah Show
TJS Radio Promo Ad - Adam Phillips | Folk Orchestra Santa Barbara

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 0:30


BUY TICKETS FOR SCOTTISH! Full Orchestrations of our favorite Scottish tunes - Loch Lomond, Ca' the Yowes, Flower of Scotland, Cabar Feidh, music from Braveheart and MORE! SATURDAY, October 16 and SUNDAY, October 17 at 5 pm https://folkorchestrasb.com Safely Outside at Casa de la Guerra!

The Terrace Scottish Football Podcast
Please sir, can I have less?

The Terrace Scottish Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 61:51


Tony and Telfer join the nation in simultaneously exhaling after Scotland squeaked out a victory over the Faroe Islands. They go over that match and our current standing in World Cup qualification before going to the not-so-recent past to talk through the next memorable Scotland game: Kazakhstan 3... you know the rest. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Cricket Podcast
T20 World Cup - First Round Preview - Are Scotland The Surprise Package? Will Sri Lanka Escape The Group Of Death?

The Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 53:57


The T20 World Cup kicks off on Sunday, as 8 teams face off, in two groups to make it into the super 12. The Cricket Podcast preview all eight sides, and make predictions about who will qualify. Group A is set up as the group of death. Namibia play the role of dark horse, Sri Lanka the fallen great, Netherlands the seasoned campaigners and Ireland may actuall be the favourites to qualify! In group B, the group of life, Bangladesh are the obvious favourites. Papua New Guinea are the new boys and most sartorial creative team in the tournament. Oman, as a home side, will feel confident. Finally, home nation, Scotland have a real chance of making it throug to the super 12. Our Twitter and Instagram: @thecricketpod Our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thecricketpod Our sponsor: https://woodstockcricket.co.uk/ Our channel membership: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1njF-8tUuQVbTZVyUaoBcQ/join Our website: www.thecricketpod.com #IPL2021

Stories of Scotland
The Cèilidh Hoose

Stories of Scotland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:50


Join Annie and Jenny on a trip to the Cèilidh house, as they discuss the magic of this old tradition. We blether about some old cèilidh lore, exploring how cèilidhs keep communities connected. We look at how the cèilidh house sometimes develops its own lore of ghosts, magic and wonder.  Stories of Scotland is an award-winning Scottish history podcast, proudly recorded in the Highlands. We research our heritage and mythology podcast using archives, books, museum objects, and oral histories from across Scotland. References: Captain Dugald MacCormick (contributor), Calum Iain Maclean (Fieldworker), TAIBHSE A THÀINIG GU TAIGH ANNS AN ROBH CÈILIDH, SA1953.050, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/2981) Donald MacLean (contributor), Donald Archie MacDonald (Fieldworker), FEAR AIG NACH ROBH SGEULACHD AIG CÈILIDH, SA1975.31.A2, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh (​​https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/62058) Reisebilder, Marion; A Highland Cèilidh of 35 Years Ago, Northern Chronicle and General Advertiser for the North of Scotland, 02 Dec 1908.  Scots Language Centre Website: www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/5263Traditional Arts and Culture Scotland Website: https://tracscotland.org/

Podlitical
"What I enjoy about this Coronavirus report."

Podlitical

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:14


It was one of the country's worst public health failures say MPs. Thousands of lives were lost following the UK's failure to do more to stop Covid spreading, according to the report published earlier this week. The 150-page document, Coronavirus:Lessons learned to date looked at the response to the pandemic predominantly in England. The approach, they said, was for the government to try and manage infection rates and in effect, achieve herd immunity by infection. And there were accusations of apparent “group think” among scientists. But they did also highlight the success of the vaccination rollout. So what has the response to the report been in Scotland and what are the consequences, if any, of the report?

Radio Prague - English
Czechia in 30 Minutes (October, 14, 2021)

Radio Prague - English

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:38


News; Bohemia Energy goes bankrupt; Czechia opens Honorary Consulate in Scotland; The story of Bat´a's interwar expansion.

Hard Factor
10/14/21: N. Korean Soldiers Self Defense Demo: Greatest Content Ever 

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 73:12


Katie Couric is spilling the tea on RBG's 2016 takes on Colin Kaepernick and kneeling during the national anthem ahead of her new book she's selling. Some sad news where a very young child shot his mother because his father left his gun in his Paw Patrol Bag. Also sadly it has been confirmed that cartel leaders, police chiefs and allegedly the army in Mexico teamed up to capture and kill 43 students back in 2014. A new product that looks like it might not work is being marketed as an anti cocaine spray. In quite possibly the greatest video ever elite North Korean soldiers put on a live display for Kim Jung Un (00:51:34) (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:06:00) - Fun Fact - 197 out of the 330 million Americans have heard of podcasts (00:07:20) - Holidays: Be Bald Day, National FRUMP Day, Spider Man Day and World Sight Day (00:09:10) - This Day in History: 1066 the Battle of Hastings and the Norman Invasion; 1322 Robert the Bruce of Scotland defeated Edward II of England (00:14:06) - Trending Mentions: NHL season started; There was a horrible bow and arrow attack in Norway where five people were killed; Adam Schefter in trouble from NFL emails to WFT execs too (00:19:41) - #3 - William Shatner went to outer space in a Blue Origin spacecraft, becoming the oldest man in space ever (00:22:14) - #2 - Kevin James trended after a fake graphic of the most searched for pornhub topics by state listed him as Tennessee's top search (00:23:55) - Cream of the Crop: Katie Couric admits she withheld Ruth Bader Ginsberg's comments about Colin Kaepernick and kneeling during the national anthem in 2016 (00:32:50) - Child shoots and kills his Mother by accident after father leaves gun in Paw Patrol bag (00:35:25) - Brett Favre and the Million Dollar Men might owe the state of Mississippi millions of dollars TikTok International Moment (00:40:35) - Newly released text messages prove that the cartel the police and the army in Mexico teamed up to capture and murder 43 students in Mexico in 2014 (00:45:50) - An Australian man stormed an animal shelter at gunpoint to retrieve his cat (00:51:34) - North Korean special forces put on the demonstration of a lifetime, breaking block and brick over their heads as a starter (01:02:59) - A company comes up with anti coke spray and markets to pub owners These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Talkspace - Match with a licensed therapist when you go to https://www.talkspace.com/ and get $100 off your first month with the promo code HARDFACTOR. Lightstream - Take control of your credit card debt with a consolidation loan from Lightstream. Get a special interest rate discount by going to https://www.lightstream.com/Factor Raycon - Everyday earbuds that look, feel, and sound better than ever. Get 15% off you Raycon order at https://buyraycon.com/hardfactor Go to store.hardfactor.com and patreon.com/hardfactor to support the pod with incredible merch and bonus podcasts Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480, send us a voice memo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com, and/or leave a 5-Star review on Apple Podcasts to hear it on Friday's show Other Places to Listen: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Lots More... Watch Full Episodes on YouTube Follow @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, and Facebook

Whispering Huntys
A Very Camp Departure (W/ Mijon Zulu, Nick Probst, & Adam Johannesson)

Whispering Huntys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 79:03


How lucky are we to have the darling Adam Johannesson grace on the podcast this week. An illustrator and graphic designer, Adam's drawing of queens like Miss Fame and Violet Chachki garnered so much attention that queens themselves started following and reposting. We get to hear about how he collaborated with Miss Fame and has recently featured The Queer Bible: Essays by Jack Guinness a gorgeously illustrated collection of essays written by today's queer heroes.On the pod: Drag Race UK Season 3, Episode 3, “Great Outdoors” What type of Camp was it?  Is Rupaul only searching for glamour?  Why did they drag our Victoria Scone's departure?  Did you catch the Tammie Brown callback?  HIV/AIDS education on Drag Race!  What is Ella Vday missing?  The meteoric rise of Scarlett Harlett.  Tearing up your dress is not a mood.  About our guest:Adam Johannesson is an illustrator and graphic designer. Originally from Scotland, he now lives and works in London. In the day he works full time as a graphic designer and at night, illustrates drag queens. Adam has worked on various projects for world famous drag performers such as Violet Chachki, Miss Fame and  A'Whora and his latest project is an illustration of RuPaul in the 2021 book 'The Queer Bible'; a collection of essays written about queer heroes.FOLLOW ADAM JOHANNESSON Instagram: adamjohanneson Adam's Website FOLLOW NICK Instagram: neprobst and grow_withnickTwitter: neprobst  FOLLOW MIJON Instagram:majorzu FOLLOW THE HUNTYS Instagram: whisperinghuntysFacebook: whisperinghuntysTiktok: whisperinghuntysTwitter: huntywhisperingWhispering Huntys Website  Whispering Huntys is an Apocalypse Podcast Network Podcast. Sign up to our Listserv: http://eepurl.com/hfnySr

Sandman Stories Presents
EP 97: Halloween- The True Tale of the Phantom Coach (W. T. Linskill 1921)

Sandman Stories Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 11:12


The story of bad omens, a phantom coach, and how death arrives to tell us someone has gone. Will you take a ride in this demon car into the Scottish sea? From the collection of Ghost stories of St Andrews in Scotland, by W.T. Linskill. Come listen to the story if you dare. (Not too scary for young ones) Source: St Andrews Ghost Stories by W.T. Linskill Music: TipToes- Myuu Sound Effects: Zapsplat Narrator: Dustin Steichmann Happy Halloween! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sandman-stories/message

Your Brain on Facts
Twins Remix (ep. 169)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:04


Twins, synchronicity, science, anomalies, and dark mysteries. Support the show Merch, book Music by Kevin MacLeod  Read the full script. Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email.     In 1940, a pair of twin boys, only three weeks old, were put up for adoption in Ohio.  Separate families adopted each boy and coincidentally named both James, calling them Jim for short.  They grew up never knowing anything about one another, but their lives were bizarrely similar.  They each had a dog named Toy and in elementary school, each both was good at math, showed talent in woodshop, but struggled with spelling.  But it was as they moved into adulthood that coincidences really started to pile up.  My name... If one is good, two must be better, so today we were talking about twin on the first of a pair of twin episodes.  Let's start with a quick review.  Fraternal twins occur when two eggs are separately fertilized.  They are genetically distinct, basically regular siblings that happened to be conceived at the same time.  Or not.  There's a rare circumstance called superfetation, where a woman ovulates while already pregnant and the second egg also gets fertilized.  Multiple eggs being released during ovulation can sometimes result in heteropaternal superfecundation, meaning the eggs were fertilized by different men's sperm, creating fraternal twins with different fathers.  Identical twins occur when a fertilized egg splits, creating two zygotes with the same cells.  The splitting ovum usually produces identical twins, but if the split comes after about a week of development, it can result in mirror-image twins.  Conjoined twins, what we used to call Siamese twins, can result from eggs that split most of the way, but not complete.  Twins account for 1.5% of all pregnancies or 3% of the population.  The rate of twinning has risen 50% in the last 20 years.  Several factors can make having twins more likely, such as fertility therapy, advanced age, heredity, number of previous pregnancies, and race, with African women have the highest incidence of twins, while Asian women have the lowest.    Twins have always been of great interest to scientists.  There's simply no better way to test variable vs control than to have two people with identical DNA.  Identical twins share all of their genes, while fraternal twins only share 50%.  If a trait is more common among identical twins than fraternal twins, it suggests genetic factors are at work.  "Twins studies are the only real way of doing natural experiments in humans," says Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at Kings College, London. "By studying twins, you can learn a great deal about what makes us tick, what makes us different, and particularly the roles of nature versus nature that you just can't get any other way.”   NASA was presented with a unique opportunity in the Kelly brothers, identical twins Scott, a current astronaut, and Mark, a retired astronaut.  As part of the "Year in Space" project, which would see Scott spend 340 on the ISS, the brothers provided blood, saliva, and urine samples, as well as undergoing a battery of physical and psychological tests designed to study the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.  According to Dr Spector, twin studies are currently underway in over 100 countries.  Working with data and biological samples in the TwinsUK Registry, Spector's team has found more than 600 published papers showing a clear genetic basis for common diseases like osteoarthritis, cataracts and even back pain.  "When I started in this field, it was thought that only 'sexy' diseases [such as cancer] were genetic," Spector says. "Our findings changed that perception."   Back on our side of the pond, the Michigan State University Twin Registry was founded in 2001 to study genetic and environmental influences on a wide range of psychiatric and medical disorders.  One of their more surprising findings is that many eating disorders such as anorexia may not be wholly to blame on societal pressured by may actually have a genetic component to them.  "Because of twins studies,” says co-director Kelly Klump, “we now know that genes account for the same amount of variability in eating disorders as they do in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We would have never known that without twins studies."  On the topic of body-fat, a LSU study by Claude Bouchard in 1990 overfed a dozen young male twins by 1,000 calories a day for three months.  Although every participant gained weight, the amount of weight, and more importantly for the study, fat varied considerably, from 9-29lbs/4-13kg.  Twins tended to gain a similar amount of weight and in the same places as each other, but each pair differed from the other pairs in the test.   While some twin studies, like Year In Space, are famous, others are infamous.   If you're worried where this topic is going, don't be.  We're not talking about Joseph Mengele or the Russian conjoined twins, Masha and Dasha, though they may show up next week.  Twin studies helped create the thinking and even the word “eugenics.”  Francis Galton, a half-cousin of Charles Darwin, was one of the first people to recognize the value of twins to study inherited traits.  In his 1875 paper, "The History of Twins," Galton used twins to estimate the relative effects of nature versus nature, a term he is credited with coining.  Unfortunately, his firm belief that intelligence is a matter of nature led him to become a vocal proponent of the idea that "a highly gifted race of men" could be produced through selective breeding and that unsuitable people should be prevented from reproducing.  The word “eugenics” came up a lot during the Nuremberg trials, if it wasn't already clear with adherents to the idea had in mind.  More recently, in 2003, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia reviewed the research on the heritability of I.Q.  He noticed that most of the studies that declared that I.Q. is genetic involved twins from middle-class backgrounds.  When he looked at twins from poorer families, he found that the I.Q.s of identical twins varied just as much as the I.Q.s of fraternal twins.  In other words, the impact of growing up poor can overwhelm a child's natural intelligence.   Bonus fact: The trope of the evil twin can be traced back as far as 300 BCE, to the Zurvanite branch of Zoroastrianism, the world's oldest continuously-observed religion.    Of all the things inherent to and special about twins, one of the most fascinating is twin language.  You might have seen the adorable viral video of a pair of toddlers having an animated conversation in their twin language.  If you want to bust out your Latin, it's cryptophasia, a form of idioglossia, an idiosyncratic language invented and spoken by only one person or very few people.  It was a struggle not to throw myself head-first down the idioglossia rabbit hole; maybe for a later episode.  Twin speak, or even sibling speak has existed, for as long as human language, but has only been seriously studied for the last few decades, not only to determine how the languages develop but to see if speaking a twin language could hamper the children learning their parents' language.  The reason twins are more likely than other sibling pairs to create their own language is less interesting than psychic phenomena - twins spend a lot of time together, being built-in companions, and are at the same developmental stage.  They unconsciously work together to build their language by imitating and pretending to understand one another, reinforcing their use of the language.  This can weaken their incentive to learn to speak to everyone else--they already have someone to talk to.  Some researchers advocate treating cryptophasia as early as possible.  According to Oxford neuropsychologist Dorothy Bishop, twins often get less intervention from speech therapists than nontwins. “People often assume that it's normal for twins to have funny language, and so they don't get a proper assessment and diagnosis. And then, when they are identified, they are often treated together as a unit, and so each gets half the attention of the professionals working with them.”   When doctors first began examining cryptophasic children, they discovered that the language isn't created out of nothing, but is made up of mispronounced words they've heard or references that only work inside their family.  It's usually not a language at all.  According to Karen Thorpe, a psychologist with Queensland University of Technology, you can think of it like “conversations between married couples where words are invented and abbreviated or restricted codes are used because full explanations are redundant.”  That absolutely happens here.  My husband and I talk like kids in a tree fort clubhouse.  But sometimes, just sometimes, a full-blown language does develop, complete with syntax and totally independent of the language spoken at home.  The syntax of a true twin language doesn't arise from mistakes made while learning the family's language.  It's similar to the syntax seen in deaf children who create their own sign language when not taught to sign.  This syntax could “gives us a potential insight into the nature of language” and mankind's “first language,” says linguist Peter Bakker.  Twin languages play fast and loose with word order, putting subjects, verbs, and objects wherever, but always putting the most important item first, which makes sense.  Negation, making something negative, is used as the first or last word of the statement, regardless of how the parental language handles negation.  It's almost like a Spanish question mark, letting you know where the sentence is going.  Verbs aren't conjugated--go is go, regardless of it's attached to I, he/she, us, or them.  There are also no pronouns, like he, she, or they, only the proper nouns.  There is also no way to locate things in time and space; everything just is.  If you're a fan of Tom Scott's language series on YouTube, he's started making them again.  If not, start with “Fantastic Features We Don't Have In The English Language.”  I'll put a link to it in the show notes.  If I forget, or you want to tell me what you thought, Soc Med.  Breakroom  Most children stop using private languages on their own or with minimal intervention, which is good, according to psychologists, because the longer they practice cryptophasia, the worse they do in tests later.  If you remember nothing else I say ever, remember that correlation does not equal causation.  Cryptophasia could be a symptom of an underlying handicap and that's the cause of the low test scores.     This simple-structured language is fine for two or a few people, but once there are more people to talk to or more things to talk about, you're going to need some more features, “unambiguous ways to distinguish between subject and object,” Bakker says.  “In the twin situation these can be dispensed with, but not in languages in which it is necessary to refer to events outside the direct situation.”  So do twin languages really offer insight into mankind's first language?  Could a primitive society have functioned as a cohesive unit with a language that can only refer to what can be seen at that moment?  That's what linguists are studying, but UC-Santa Barbara's Bernard Comrie adds the asterisk that this research into the infancy of spoken language is still a baby itself.  “First we were told that creole languages [that is, a distinct language that develops from the meeting a two or more languages] would provide us with insight into ‘first language,' then when that didn't pan out interest shifted to deaf sign language (also with mixed results)—I guess twin language will be the next thing.”     It's not an easy scientific row to hoe.  Twin languages come and go quickly as the children develop hearing their parents' language much more than their twin language.  They might keep speaking their twin language if they were very isolated, like two people in a Nell situation or that Russian family who lived alone for 40 years, but we'll file that idea under “grossly unethically and probably illegal.”  Not that it hasn't been tried.  Herodotus tells us of what is considered the first every psychological experiment, when Pharaoh Psammetichus I in the sixth century BCE wanted to know if the capacity for speech was innate to humans and beyond that, what language would that be.  He ordered two infants to be raised by a shepherd hermit who was forbidden to speak in their presence.  After two years the children began to speak; the word that they used most often was the Phrygian word for bread.  Thus, Psammetichus concluded that the capacity for speech is innate, and that the natural language of human beings is Phrygian.  Similar experiments were conducted by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 12th century CE who ordered children to be raised by caretakers forbidden to speak to them and 15th century James I of Scotland who ordered children raised exclusively by a deaf-mute woman, which was repeated by 16th century Mughal Indian Emperor Akbar, among others.  I shouldn't have to tell you that they were all based on dubious methodology and soaking in confirmation bias.  A less-terrible test was done in the 20th century by British ethologist, or animal behavior scientist, William H. Thorpe, who raised birds in isolation to determine which songs are innate.   One of the best-known cases a negative impact from cryptophasia is the Kennedy sisters of San Diego, Grace and Virginia, of Poto and Cabengo, as they called each other.  They created a media whirlwind in 1970s when it was reported that they only spoke their twin language, to the complete exclusion of English, at the rather advanced age of 6.  “Twin Girls Invent Own Language,” “Gibberish-Talking Twins,” “Like a Martian” the headlines read.  Here is a clip of the girls speaking and sadly this is the best audio quality I could find.  Grace and Virginia had suffered apparent seizures as infants, leading their parents to conclude that the girls had been left mentally handicapped.  Their parents opted to keep them inside and away from other children, leaving them mostly in the care of a laconic grandmother who often left them to their own devices.  They seemed like the next big thing in language-creation studies, but on closer examination, it was discovered that, like most cryptophasics, the girls were just very badly, and very quickly, mispronouncing English and German, the languages spoken at home.  Adding to their disappointment, when scientists tried to use the girls' words to converse with them, the girls couldn't stop laughing.  Grace and Virginia were also cleared of their parents mis-labeling them as intellectually handicapped.  Both were found to have relatively normal IQs, for as much good as IQ tests are, which is very little, but that's another show.  The girls eventually underwent speech therapy and learned regular English, though their language skills were a bit stunted, even into adulthood.  identical twins come from a fertilized egg that splits.  If the zygote splits most of the way, but not all, it results in conjoined twins.  Or if the zygotes collide and fuse, science isn't really sure.  Thus conjoined twins are always identical, meaning the same gender.  Why am I pointing that out?  I met two moms of twins at the She PodcastsLive conference who regularly have people ask them if their identical twins are the same gender.  This is why we need sex ed in school.  You'll also notice I'm not using the term Siamese twins.  That term comes from Chang & Eng Bunker, who were born in Siam, modern day Thailand, in 1811, connected by a band of tissue at the chest.  It's not offensive per e, but just doesn't apply to anyone not born in Siam, so people have stopped using it.   Conjoined twins occur once every 2-500,000 live births, according to the University of Minnesota. About 70% of conjoined twins are female, though I couldn't find a reason or theory why.  40 to 60% of these births are delivered stillborn, with 35% surviving only one day.  The overall survival rate is less than 1 in 4.  Often, one twin will have birth defects that are not conducive to life and can endanger the stronger twin.   Conjoined twins are physically connected to one another at some point on their bodies, and are referred to by that place of joining.  Brace yourself while I wallow in my medical Latin.  The most common conjoinments are thoracopagus (heart, liver, intestine), omphalopagus (liver, biliary tree, intestine), pygopagus (spine, rectum, genitourinary tract), ischiopagus (pelvis, liver, intestine, genitourinary tract), and craniopagus (brain, meninges).  75% are joined at the chest or upper abdomen, 23% are joined at the hips, legs or genitalia, 2% are joined at the head.     If the twins have separate organs, chances for separation surgery are markedly better than if they share the organs.  As a rule, conjoined twins that share a heart cannot be separated. Worldwide, only about 250 separation surgeries have been successful, meaning at least one twin survived over the long term, according to the American Pediatric Surgical Association. The surgical separation success rate has improved over the years, and about 75 percent of surgical separations result in at least one twin surviving.  The process begins long before the procedure, with tests and scans, as well as tissue expanders, balloons inserted under the skin and slowly filled with saline or air to stretch the skin, so there will be enough skin to cover the area where the other twin's body used to be. It requires a whole hospital full of specialties to separate conjoined twins, from general surgeons, plastic and reconstructive surgeons, neurosurgeons, neonatologists, cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, and maternal-fetal medicine specialists, among others.  In fact, the longest surgery of all time was a conjoined twin separation.  Separation surgeries often last an entire day; this one required 103 hours.  If they started at 8am Monday, the team finished the surgery at 3pm Thursday.  In 2001, a team of 20 doctors at Singapore General Hospital worked in shifts to separate Ganga and Jamuna Shrestha, 11-month-old twins conjoined at the head.  Not only did the girls share a cranial cavity, their brains were partially fused.  Each tiny brain had hundreds of bitty blood vessels, each of which had to be traced and identified as belonging to one or the other of the girls.  Their brains were not only connected, they were wrapped around each other like a helix.  Plus, each twin's skull needed to be reshaped and added to, using a blend of bone material and Gore-Tex fibers.  Both babies survived the surgery.  Sadly, Ganga died of meningitis at age 7, but Jamuna has gone on to live a healthy life and attend school.   We interrupt this podcast script for an exciting article.  Meaning I was almost done writing it, then I found something I had to go back and include.  There was another pair of conjoined twins named Ganga and Jamuna, this pair born in 1970 in West Bengal.  The pairing of the names makes sense when you learn that the Ganga and Jamuna are sacred rivers.  The sisters are ischio-omphalopagus tripus, meaning joined at the abdomen and pelvis.  They have two hearts and four arms, but share a set of kidneys, a liver and a single reproductive tract.  Between then they have three legs, the third being a nine-toed fusion of two legs, which was non-functional and they kept that one under their clothing.  They can stand, but they cannot walk and crawl on their hands and feet, earning them the show name "The Spider Girls".  Managed by their uncle while on the road with the Dreamland Circus, they exhibit themselves by lying on a charpoy bed, talking to the spectators who come to look at them.  They earned a good living, making about $6/hr, compared to the average wage in India of $.40.   Ganga and Jamuna have two ration cards for subsidized grain, though they eat from the same plate.  They cast two votes, but were refused a joint bank account.  They also share a husband, Gadadhar, a carnival worker who is twenty years their senior.  When asked which he loves more, Gadadhar replies, "I love both equally."  In 1993, the twins had a daughter via Caesarean section, but the baby only lived a few hours.  Though the sister would like to have children, doctors fear that pregnancy would endanger their lives.  Doctors have offered them separation surgery, but they're not interested.  They feel it would be against God's will, be too great of a risk, and put them out of a job.  "We are happy as we are. The family will starve if we are separated."   Not all parasitic twins are as obvious as a torso with arms and legs.  The condition is called fetus in fetu, a parasitic twin developing or having been absorbed by the autosite twin.  It's extremely rare, occurring only once in every 500,000 births and twice as likely to happen in a male.  The question of how a parasitic twin might develop is one that currently has no answer.  To say the fetuses in question are only partially developed is still overstating thing.  They are usually little more than a ball of tissues with perhaps one or two recognizable body parts.  One school of thought holds that fetus in fetu is a complete misnomer.  Adherents contend that the alien tissue is not in fact a fetus at all, but a form of tumor, a teratoma, specifically.  A teratoma, also known as a dermoid cyst, is a sort of highly advanced tumor that can develop human skin, sweat glands, hair, and even teeth.  Some believe that, left long enough, a teratoma could become advanced enough to develop primitive organs.   There have only been about 90 verified cases in the medical record.  One reason fetus in fetu is rare is that the condition is antithetical to full-term development.  Usually, both twins die in utero from the strain of sharing a placenta.  Take 7 year old Alamjan Nematilaev of Kazakstan, who reported to his family abdominal pain and a feeling that something was moving inside him.  His doctors thought he had a large cyst that needed to be removed.  Once they got in there, though, doctors discovered one of the most developed cases of fetus in fetu ever seen.  Alamjan's fetus had a head, four limbs, hands, fingernails, hair and a human if badly misshapen face.    Fetus in fetu, when it is discovered, is usually found in children, but one man lived 36 years, carrying his fetal twin in his abdomen.  Sanju Bhagat lived his whole life with a bulging stomach, constantly ridiculed by people in his village for looking nine months pregnant.  Little did they know, eh?  Fetus in fetu is usually discovered after the parasitic twin grows so large that it causes discomfort to the host.  In Bhagat's case, he began having trouble breathing because the mass was pushing against his diaphragm.  In June of 1999, Bhagat was rushed to Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India for emergency surgery.  According to Dr. Ajay Mehta, "Basically, the tumor was so big that it was pressing on his diaphragm and that's why he was very breathless.  Because of the sheer size of the tumor, it makes it difficult [to operate]. We anticipated a lot of problems."   While operating on Bhagat, Mehta saw something he had never encountered.  The squeamish may wish to jump30 and think about kittens, though if you've made it this far, you're cut from strong cloth.  As the doctor cut deeper into Bhagat's stomach, gallons of fluid spilled out.  "To my surprise and horror, I could shake hands with somebody inside," he said. "It was a bit shocking for me."   One unnamed doctor interviewed in the ABC News story described what she saw that day in the operating room:  “[The surgeon] just put his hand inside and he said there are a lot of bones inside,” she said. “First, one limb came out, then another limb came out. Then some part of genitalia, then some part of hair, some limbs, jaws, limbs, hair.”  There was no placenta inside Bhagat -- the enveloped parasitic twin had connected directly to Bhagat's blood supply. Right after the surgery, Bhagat's pain and inability to breathe disappeared and he recovered immediately.  Upon recovery from the surgery, in which his twin was removed, Bhagat immediately felt better. But he says that villagers still tease him about it. The story I was referring to was made into a plot point on AHS:FS, the tale of Edward Mordrake, the man with two faces.  In 1895, The Boston Post published an article titled “The Wonders of Modern Science” that presented astonished readers with reports from the Royal Scientific Society documenting the existence of “marvels and monsters” hitherto believed imaginary.   Edward Mordrake was a handsome, intelligent English nobleman with a talent for music and a peerage to inherit.  But there was a catch.  With all his blessings came a terrible curse.  Opposite his handsome was, was a grotesque face on the back of his head.  Edward Mordrake was constantly plagued by his “devil twin,” which kept him up all night whispering “such things as they only speak of in hell.”  He begged his doctors to remove the face, but they didn't dare try.  He asked them to simply bash the evil face in, anything to silence it.  It was never heard by anyone else, but it whispered to Edward all night, a dark passenger that could never be satisfied.  At age 23, after living in seclusion for years, Edward Mordrake committed suicide, leaving behind a note ordering the evil face be destroyed after his death, “lest it continues its dreadful whispering in my grave.”   This macabre story ...is just that, a story, a regular old work of fiction.  “But, but, I've seen a photograph of him.”  Sadly, no.  You've seen a photo of a wax model of the legendary head, Madame Toussad style.  Don't feel bad that you were convinced.  The description of the cursed nobleman was so widely accepted that his condition appeared in an 1896 medical encyclopedia, co-authored by two respected physicians.  Since they recounted the original newspaper story in full without any additional details, gave an added air of authority to Mordrake's tale.   “No, there's a picture of his mummified head on a stand.”  I hate to puncture your dreams, but that's papier mache.  It looks great, but the artist who made it has gone on record stating it was created entirely for entertainment purposes.  If you were to look at that newspaper account of Mordrake, it would fall apart immediately.  “One of the weirdest as well as most melancholy stories of human deformity is that of Edward Mordake, said to have been heir to one of the noblest peerages in England. He never claimed the title, however, and committed suicide in his twenty-third year. He lived in complete seclusion, refusing the visits even of the members of his own family. He was a young man of fine attainments, a profound scholar, and a musician of rare ability. His figure was remarkable for its grace, and his face – that is to say, his natural face – was that of Antinous. But upon the back of his head was another face, that of a beautiful girl, ‘lovely as a dream, hideous as a devil.'”  What did we say at the top?  Conjoined twins are identical, meaning among other things, the same gender.   And that… though we'll finish up out story of the twin Jims.  Their lives were so unbelievably similar, if you saw it in a movie, you'd throw your popcorn at the screen.  Both Jims had married women named Linda, divorced them and married women named Betty.   They each had sons that they named James Alan, though one was Alan and the other Allan.  Both smoked, drove a Chevrolet, held security-based jobs, and even vacationed at the exact same Florida beach, though one assumes not at the same time.  After being reunited at age 37, they took part in a study at University of Minnesota, which showed that their medical histories, personality tests, and even brain-wave tests were almost identical.  Remember, you can always find… Thanks…  

The MS Gym Podcast
rebuild, rewire, reinvent: Build confidence through life‘s challenges

The MS Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:35


In today's podcast, we join Michael from Scotland. He talks about his: Diagnosis Career changes Relationship challenges  MS treatment options MS Gym victories MS Gym Links: The MS Gym

Indianz.Com
Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry at National Congress of American Indians #NCAIAnnual21

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 12:45


United States Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry addresses the National Congress of American Indians on October 13, 2021. Kerry, a former U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, delivered remarks via video to NCAI, which is holding its 78th annual convention virtually due to COVID-19. During his speech, Kerry said Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland, who is the first Native person in a presidential cabinet, will help lead the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as COP26, in Glasgow, Scotland. Thumbnail photo by U.S. Department of State: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usembassydhaka/51104879531/

Red Star Radio
*Preview* "Postmodern" Nationalisms

Red Star Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:37


Full episode available to Patrons: https://www.patreon.com/posts/postmodern-57364680 We use the sub-nationalisms of Quebec and Scotland to understand nationalism theory and nation-building in the postmodern era. We contend that nationalisms in our current postmodern period are predominantly led by the petite bourgeoisie, in contrast to the ones of the past led by the bourgeoisie. We ask: Can a nation-building projects led by the petite bourgeoisie be successful? What value do they have to an internationalist socialist project? Mentioned in the show: Imagined Communities, book by Benedict Anderson Show on Aufhebunga Bunga podcast on Scottish independence: https://aufhebungabunga.podbean.com/e/181-juche-in-north-britain-ft-cat-boyd-david-jamieson/

3:59
How the centuries-old art of Scotch-making is embracing the future (The Daily Charge, 10/13/2021)

3:59

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:32


Whisky distilleries in Scotland are experimenting with new techniques to improve sustainability and widening their taste profiles.  Story: https://cnet.co/3DBacGq Text us: https://cnet.co/dailycharge Leave a voicemail: 862-250-8573 Follow us: twitter.com/thedailycharge Homepage: cnet.com/daily-charge Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wrestling Club with Darren and Brett | WFMU
Ep. 57: "Demons, Genies, Batman" with Scotland Green from Oct 12, 2021

Wrestling Club with Darren and Brett | WFMU

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 69:02


We have another Big Show & Tell with an incredible Bret Hart performance, debate Arsenio vs Regis, and look at the time Adam West's Batman met Jerry "the King" Lawler with out guest, Mister Green Mist himself, Scotland Green! Plus, Darren is back from Finn Balorland and we catch him up on the incoming freshmen of NXT 2.0, Lulu Pencil's shady friends and the many Misticos of Mexico. Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wrestlingclubwfmu/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/wrestling_club_ Subscribe: iTunes: https://apple.co/3mBPaii Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3jESGH2 Stitcher: https://bit.ly/37VuygQ Produced by Isaiah McBethTheme song by Steve DeSiena https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/108715

Ear Snacks
Tissues: How to Sneeze and Cellular Lego Kits

Ear Snacks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:39


Andrew & Polly investigate the science of sneezing, how tissues are made, how the amazing human body protects itself, and how we can all protect each other when we...ah...ah...achoo! Thanks to Wow in the World's Mindy Thomas for playing “Should I Pick It?” and communicating so much gooey science from her New York Times best-selling book The How and The Wow of the Human Body. And thanks to pediatric surgeon Dr. Willie Moses from UCSF for using his imaginary laparoscope to reveal the secrets of the cellular LEGO kit inside all of us. Thanks to the families who support our work at patreon.com/earsnacks! And thanks to the four fantastic kids -- Emily from Scotland, Mila from Wyoming, Valentino from Italy, and Izzy from California -- who helped us think about tissues inside and outside our bodies!  Thanks to this episode's sponsors! Thanks to MIT Kids Press. Get Ada and the Galaxies wherever books are sold Thanks iD Tech Pro. To save $150 on weekly, small-group semesters, go to idtech.com/EARSNACKS and use promo code EARSNACKS. You can also get started with a 1-on-1 tutoring lesson for just $49.

This Week with David Rovics
”Behind These Prison Walls” -- DontExtraditeAssange.com

This Week with David Rovics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:00


I fly off to London on Friday.  Very much looking forward to all the gigs around England, Scotland, events around COP26, etc. -- but I'm especially looking forward to singing at the rally against extraditing Julian Assange to the US on Saturday, October 23rd.  While still here in my little home studio in Portland, I thought I'd render a version of the song I'll be singing that afternoon outside the Royal Courts of Justice.

The My Love of Golf Podcast
Rossco Rocket & Mike say farewell to a great Scotsman Renton Laidlaw & catch up on the week that was | THE MLOG PODCAST EP149

The My Love of Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 66:53


VALE RENTON LAIDLAW As one of the great media figures on our time in golf we open this week with a brief tribute to a great Scottish Golf Media personality and say vale Renton Laidlaw who sadly passed away due to the effects of COVID 19 in Scotland. We have a Caddy chat, a PGA tour chat and a general chat. Applications Open for a Voluntary Role as Rockets Social Media Monitor. After a ten-week hiatus, he needs to put a person on. Listen in for details. We approach the big 150 Podcast mark. Appreciate all the support for the show.   Thanks Rossco My Love of Golf Insta Rosss' Personal Golf Insta   Supported By Drummond Golf Thank you to Drummond Golf for the support with MLOG. Remember they always have their LOWEST PRICE GUARANTEE With their support, we will continue to bring interesting PODCAST Material from the GOLF INDUSTRY VISIT DRUMMOND GOLF

Late Boomers
Writing a Page-Turner: A Conversation with Mystery/Romance Author Marie Jones

Late Boomers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 35:18


Writing and telling stories since she was a child, British Mystery/Romance Author Marie Jones talks about her latest book Those We Trust and how it came about. She gives pointers to aspiring writers on the writing process, publishing, working around family and on how she stays fit via her work as an ambassador for the global charity My Peak Challenge which has helped inspire people to live healthier, happier and more balanced lives.

The Thomistic Institute
Preaching as Praising the Trinity | Fr. Andrew Hofer, O.P.

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:07


This lecture was delivered on June 25, 2021 as part of "The Trinity & Priestly Life: Praying, Preaching, & Ministering in Light of the Mystery of God," a Thomistic Institute intellectual retreat for priests. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Fr. Andrew Hofer, O.P., grew up as the youngest of ten children on a farm in Kansas, and studied history, philosophy, and classics at Benedictine College. He then went to St Andrews, Scotland for a Master of Letters in medieval history. He entered the Order of Preachers as a son of the Province of St. Joseph, and was ordained a priest in 2002. After finishing his S.T.L. and serving as an associate pastor for a brief time, he was sent to Kenya as a missionary for two years. He taught at the Tangaza College of The Catholic University of Eastern Africa and other institutions in Nairobi. He returned to the U.S. and completed a Ph.D. in theology at the University of Notre Dame, with the primary area of history of Christianity, specializing in patristic theology with additional studies in medieval theology, and the secondary area of systematic theology. His research appears in such journals as Vigiliae Christianae, Augustinianum, International Journal of Systematic Theology, New Blackfriars, Nova et Vetera, Pro Ecclesia, The Thomist, Communio, and Angelicum and in books published by Catholic University of America Press and Ignatius Press. He is the author of Christ in the Life and Teaching of Gregory of Nazianzus (Oxford Early Christian Studies), Oxford University Press, 2013, and the editor of Divinization: Becoming Icons of Christ through the Liturgy, Hillenbrand Books, 2015.

Football Weekly
England fail to ignite at Wembley and Scotland leave it late – Football Weekly

Football Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 50:11


Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Jonathan Wilson and Jordan Jarrett-Bryan after England's 1-1 draw with Hungary at Wembley. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/footballweeklypod

Manchester Football Social
England frustrated in Hungary draw, Manchester United injury headache and what next for Steve Bruce at Newcastle?

Manchester Football Social

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 50:44


Feargal Brennan, Jim Salveson and Ian Brannan on duty to look back at the latest round of 2022 World Cup qualifiers and Premier League news.Gareth Southgate's much changed England side were held to a 1-1 draw on a controversial night at Wembley with Scotland clinching a key win away in the Faroe Islands.Back in the Premier League, Manchester United have been dealt a double injury blow by Raphael Varane and Harry Maguire, and the gang look at what is next for Steve Bruce at St. James' Park and Premier League opposition to the PIF takeover at Newcastle.

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere
Des Empires français et britanniques à Black Lives Matter: une décolonisation inachevée (3/5)

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:12


Qu'ils aient opté pour les réformes, comme les Français en Algérie, ou pour une décolonisation rapide, comme les Britanniques en Inde, le retrait de ces deux puissances coloniales s'est fait dans la violence. Il s'est soldé par ces centaines de milliers de morts. Troisième épisode de cette série avec Jacques Frémeaux, professeur honoraire (Paris-IV Sorbonne) en histoire contemporaine, spécialiste de l'histoire coloniale. Il est notamment l'auteur de "La France et l'Algérie en guerre" (Economica, 2002), et de "De quoi fut fait l'Empire - Les guerres coloniales au XIXe siècle" (CNRS Editions, 2010). John MacKenzie, professeur émérite d'histoire impériale à l'Université de Lancaster, qui a été l'un des premiers à s'intéresser aux aspects populaires et culturels de l'impérialisme. Il est l'auteur de "The encyclopedia of empire" (Wiley-Blackwell, 2016) et "Scotland, Empire and Decolonisation in the Twentieth Centur" (2015). Nicolas Bancel, professeur d'histoire contemporaine à l'Université de Lausanne, spécialiste de l'histoire coloniale et post-coloniale mais également de l'histoire du sport. Il a notamment publié "Le postcolonialisme", (PUF) et "Enseignement, formation et biopolitique, du colonial au postcolonial" (dans Enjeux postcoloniaux de l'enfance et de la jeunesse. Espace francophone (1945-1980) (Peter Lang, 2019). Ils sont tous trois interviewés par Etienne Duval, journaliste franco-écossais basé à Édimbourg et ancien correspondant de la RTS à Londres. Photo: double page du journal français l'Express, datée du 29 décembre 1955 et titrée: "Des faits terribles qu'il faut reconnaître". L'article condamne le massacre ayant eu lieu en août de la même année à Constantine (Algérie) et la censure dont celui-ci fit l'objet.

The Two Cities
Episode #90 - The Ministry of Women in the New Testament with Revd Canon Professor Dorothy Lee

The Two Cities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:32


On this episode we discuss the ministry of women in the New Testament with Revd Canon Professor Dorothy Lee, who is Stewart Research Professor of New Testament at Trinity College, Melbourne, an ordained priest in the Anglican church, and the author of The Ministry of Women in the New Testament: Reclaiming the Biblical Vision for Church Leadership (published by Baker). In our conversation, Prof. Lee tells us about the shape and scope of the book, which is to provide a somewhat canonical overview of all of the relevant material in the NT about the ministry of women. Specifically, we talk about the various ministry activities of women, as well as some of the crucial passages that are often used to deny that women can participate fully in ministry. Along the way we talk about contemporary ordination of women, how Prof. Lee distinguishes her work from a kind of Sachkritik or a social justice endeavor, and we also note fondly our respective connections to the Free Church of Scotland. Team members on the episode from The Two Cities: Dr. Josh Carroll, Dr. John Anthony Dunne, and Dr. Chris Porter.

The Football Ramble
You still turn me on

The Football Ramble

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:26


England's swashbucklers cut through precisely sod all last night in an underwhelming draw with Hungary. Maybe we need... *more* attackers?Kate, Andy and Jim pick through that throwback performance and celebrate a vital derby win for Scotland in the Faroe Islands. We also wonder how Arsène Wenger can tarnish his legacy even further with more biennial World Cup nonsense and get to some of your dilemmas!Search ‘Football Ramble' on social media to find us, and email us here: show@footballramble.com.***Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your pods. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for other potential listeners to find us. Thanks!*** See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ghostly
080 Edinburgh Castle

Ghostly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 66:21


Is Edinburgh Castle haunted? It's Haunted Castles month on Ghostly! Next up is Edinburgh Castle in Scotland, widely considered one of the most haunted places in the world. From ghostly bag pipers to an executed witch, this place is full of ghostly activity. Or is it? Listen and vote! The post 080 Edinburgh Castle appeared first on Ghostly Podcast.

La Vie Creative
EP 154: Valerio Lysander, a chamber pop singer/songwriter

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:59


Valerio Lysander is a chamber pop singer/songwriter. Based in London but originally from Italy, Valerio has built his career in the UK and abroad, performing in England, Scotland, Italy, France, Germany, Norway, the Netherlands and Hungary.In 2016 he was among the 10 nominees for Best Male in the Best of British Unsigned Awards and Ryan, new single released in the same year, was broadcasted by BBC Introducing. In 2017 he was among the finalists of the Coffee Music Project and Pride's Got Talent, and performed in Trafalgar Square for Pride in London and on the main stage of Manchester Pride.In 2018 he successfully founded a new album with a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter. Many songs from the album, titled “We Are Like Coloured Moths Towards The Sunlight” and released on 21st July 2018, were broadcasted on BBC Radio, including If You Were Me You Would Be, a song about the hardship of being a musician in modern society.In 2019 he released the new EP “When the Clouds Will Gather I Will Drink the Rain” and was broadcasted on BBC6 with his single Fools.Valerio is also a vocal coach teaching in London (UK) and Rome (Italy).Instagram: @valeriolys (https://www.instagram.com/valeriolys/)Spotify: https://bit.ly/ValerioLysanderFacebook: http://www.facebook.com/ValerioLysanderYouTube: http://www.youtube.com/valeriolysanderbuy my music here on Bandcamphttps://valeriolysander.bandcamp.com/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/Laviecreative)

Grand Tamasha
How India Can Get to Net Zero Emissions

Grand Tamasha

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:59


In a few weeks, climate negotiators from around the world will descend on Glasgow, Scotland, for the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as COP 26. Amid dire warnings from climate scientists about our warming planet and desperate calls for stepped-up action, India finds itself at the center of the conversation. At home, Indians are debating how to tackle climate change without hampering an economy that has started to slowly recover from the COVID pandemic.   To discuss India's options and the path forward, Milan is joined on  this week's show by Jayant Sinha, a key figure in India's ongoing climate change debate. Jayant is a member of Parliament from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and the chairperson for the Standing Committee on Finance. He's also authored or co-authored several publications advocating for India to adopt a net-zero approach.Milan and Jayant discuss possible pathways for India's future carbon emissions, the arguments for and against a net-zero approach, and what lessons India can draw from international experience. Plus, the two discuss what responsibilities countries like the United State have when it comes to helping India and other developing countries address the climate challenge. Chloe Farand, “Indian lawmaker submits private bill to achieve net zero emissions by 2050,” Climate Home News, March 18, 2021. Jayant Sinha, “India's search for greener pastures should end in a climate change law,” Economic Times, March 10, 2021Jayant Sinha et al., Getting to the Green Frontier, Observer Research Foundation, 2020.Jayant Sinha and Anshu Bhardwaj, “The many paths to a greener future,” Business Standard, July 22, 2021

ESPN FC
Can Southgate Get the Best Out of England?

ESPN FC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 58:55


The FC crew discuss England's subpar performance against Hungary and question whether Gareth Southgate can actually get the best out of a talented England squad. Plus, Scotland squeeze by Faroe Islands to keep their World Cup hopes alive, and Erling Haaland is rumored with a potential move to Barcelona.

Football Daily
England held by Hungary after crowd trouble

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 35:04


Kelly Cates is joined by former England goalkeeper Rob Green, former England defender Matt Upson and our senior football reporter Ian Dennis to analyse England's 1-1 draw with Hungary in their World Cup qualifier. Ian reflects on the crowd trouble that broke out in the away supporters' end at Wembley, which overshadowed the early stages of the match. The panel discuss if England's starting eleven lacked balance and if it was the right decision to substitute Jack Grealish in the second half. You'll hear interviews from England manager Gareth Southgate and players Kyle Walker, John Stones and Declan Rice. And our Scotland reporter Roddy Forsyth and the former Scotland player Lee McCulloch give their thoughts on Lyndon Dykes' performance after he scored a late winner to help Scotland beat the Faroe Islands. Topics: 1'12” – Round-up of England 1-1 Hungary 2'30” – Analysis of England's “lacklustre” performance 6'00” – Crowd trouble in the away end at Wembley 9'12” – Was Hungary's penalty harsh on England? 11'30” – Interview with Kyle Walker 13'00” – Did Hungary approach the game differently because they were playing England? 14'00” – Interview with John Stones 16'17” – Analysis of Stones' performance 17'10” – Interview with Gareth Southgate 21'00” – Was it the right decision to sub Jack Grealish? 25'00” – Interview with Declan Rice 28'12” – Reaction to Scotland's 1-0 win over the Faroe Islands

The Inner Circle with Carrie Doll

James Shapiro obtained his medical degree from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, and trained in surgery at the University of Bristol. After coming to Canada in 1993, he received training in liver transplantation and hepatobiliary surgery at the University of Alberta, and earned a PhD in Experimental Surgery. Shapiro developed a brand new approach to optimize islet cell transplant engraftment that involved a radical departure from previous practice. Of almost 300 islet transplants attempted before 1999, fewer than 10% of these worked in patients. His protocol was designed to address many of the previous shortcomings by transplanting sufficient numbers of islets into the liver by using multiple donors, and by testing a novel anti-rejection strategy that avoided steroids and allowed the transplanted islets to work at their best. The result became known internationally as the ‘Edmonton Protocol.' Shapiro led the clinical team that tested his approach in seven initial patients, all of whom (100%) were able to discontinue the need for insulin injections for periods beyond a year. He was the lead author in the landmark paper published in July, 2000 that described these results. Since then, he and his team have transplanted almost 300 Canadians and have continued to refine and optimize the protocol. This treatment has been replicated many times internationally, and over 2000 patients worldwide have now received islet transplants using the backbone of his protocol. A large ‘registration' trial conducted in Canada and the USA reported its positive findings in 2016 in the Journal Diabetes Care. Countries including England, Scotland, France, Switzerland, Australia, and Canada have approved and funded islet transplantation as part of ‘standard of care' for patients with brittle, difficult-to-control, forms of Type 1 diabetes. Since the development of the Edmonton Protocol, he has led or co-led three major ongoing international multicentre clinical trials to further improve islet transplantation outcomes. He leads the Edmonton team, which is the largest islet transplantation team worldwide. Shapiro also led the first-in-human stem cell transplant trials in Edmonton, Canada in 2014, and continues to refine stem cell transplantation approaches in patients. So far these studies are proving both promising and safe when tested in Canadians. In his basic science laboratory, Professor Shapiro developed a new means to transplant cells beneath the skin by using a temporary tube to induce new blood vessels to grow. Before then, islet transplants beneath the skin failed universally, but this treatment is now known as the ‘Deviceless Technique'. In liver transplantation research, Shapiro and his team recently conducted two trials in Edmonton of a new machine designed to incubate and keep donated human livers alive outside the body before transplantation. This technology is radically altering our ability to rescue damaged livers and provide safer livers for transplant. It is also allowing these transplants to happen during regular daylight hours. Professor Shapiro further led a cross-Canadian research team to test similar technologies in heart, lung, kidney and pancreas transplantations as part of the Canadian National Transplant Research Project.  His busy research lab is currently working on more than 30 projects and 15 human clinical trials. One is an exciting immune reset trial. In this study, people newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are given a combination of targeted medications designed to reset their immune system and repair the pancreas. Besides maintaining an active immunology/transplant research laboratory, Dr. Shapiro has a busy clinical practice specializing in hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery, surgical oncology, as well as transplant surgery, and was featured in an internationally acclaimed movie about organ transplantation called ‘Memento Mori.' A shorter length version of this called ‘Vital Bonds' was aired last year across Canada by the CBC's David Suzuki's 'The Nature of Things'. An edited version called ‘Transplanting Hope' has been aired across the USA as part of PBS. This movie is helping to raise awareness about organ donation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talking Tastebuds
Tessa Khan on the fight for a fossil fuel free future

Talking Tastebuds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 36:52


Tessa Khan is an international climate change and human rights lawyer, campaigner and strategist.She is the founder and director of Uplift, a new organisation helping to move the UK towards a fossil fuel-free future. They strategically resource, connect, and elevate ideas and voices to set in motion a just transition away from fossil fuel production that is in proportion with the scale of the climate crisis. Before this role, she co-founded and is co-director of the Climate Litigation Network, a project of the Urgenda Foundation, which supports groundbreaking strategic climate litigation around the world. She has spent more than fifteen years supporting grassroots, regional and international movements for justice and has served as an expert advisor to UN human rights bodies and national governments, while working in Thailand, Egypt, India, the US, the Netherlands and Australia. Tessa is a trustee of Global Greengrants Fund UK and a member of the Steering Committee of the Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty Initiative. Her writing has been published in international media outlets and academic publications, and she has been invited to speak at the United Nations and events convened by The Economist, Wall Street Journal and TEDx. In 2019, Tessa was named by TIME magazine as one of fifteen women leading the fight against climate change. She is also an awardee of the Climate Breakthrough Project.If you're UK based, you should know that the government has spent 4 BILLION propping up the oil and gas industry since we signed the Pairs Agreement in 2016. At the end of October 2021, The 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as COP2 6will be taking place in Glasgow, Scotland. Boris Johnson has referred to this as the turning point for humanity, yet our government is spending billions propping up the oil and gas industry, which is directly causing the overheating and destruction of our planet.Actions and links for this episodeLearn more about the work of Uplift.The Government are set to approve the climate-wrecking Cambo oil field later this year. If we want a liveable climate, we can't allow any new oil and gas extraction. To learn more and take action please head to: stopcambo.org.uk/take-actionCheck out the PaidToPollute campaignCheck out podcast guest Daze Aghaji's campaign to sue the government for failing to tackle climate change: crowdjustice.com/case/carbon-budgets/Find me: @venetialamannaFind the show: @atstpodcastThis episode was co-produced by Venetia La Manna and Holly Falconer and edited by Nada Smiljanic. The music was composed by William Haxworth and the artwork was designed by Alex Sedano. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gone Medieval
Galloway Hoard

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:02


In September 2014, a metal detectorist discovered the rarest collection of Viking-age objects ever found to date in Britain. The Galloway hoard displays a remarkable variety of material and treasures, not only from the United Kingdom but as far as central Asia. In this episode, Dr. Martin Goldberg, the Senior Curator of Early Medieval and Viking Collections at the National Museums Scotland joins Cat. Discussing the extraordinary hoard, we delve into the range of objects. What can it tell us about medieval Scotland? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Football Weekly
Nations League final, Scotland euphoria and Newcastle – Football Weekly

Football Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 54:55


Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Natasha Henry, Philippe Auclair, Sid Lowe and Ewan Murray to discuss the latest internationals, a new offside debate, Newcastle and more. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/footballweeklypod