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Living on Earth is a weekly news and information program from PRI about the world's changing environment, ecology, and human health. If there's something new about global warming, climate change, environmental politics or environmental quality and human health, you can count on Host Steve Curwood an…

PRI/World Media Foundation


    • Nov 26, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 51m AVG DURATION
    • 5,069 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from Living on Earth

    The Reign of Wolf 21, Plant and Planet-Centered Eating, Celebrating the "Seven Sisters," and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 53:29

    “The Reign of Wolf 21” is the true love story of an alpha pair who lead their Yellowstone pack with grace, courage, and an unbreakable bond. What these wolves can teach us about love, loyalty, and leadership. Also, our global food system feeds environmental crises like global warming and water pollution even as it fails to adequately feed billions of people worldwide. So in the 50th anniversary edition of “Diet for a Small Planet,” author Frances Moore Lappé renews her calls for a plant- and planet-centered food revolution for the sake of climate, health, and democracy. And in some Native cultures four more crops join the “Three Sisters” of corn, beans, and squash. The “Seven Sisters” and the importance of saving Native seeds.  Join the next Living on Earth Book Club event on December 9th at 6:30 p.m.! We'll be speaking with diver-filmmaker Craig Foster about his book Underwater Wild, which captures the underwater world of wonder seen in the Academy Award-winning documentary “My Octopus Teacher.” Register at loe.org/events Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    A Generational Investment, Little Progress at COP26, The Seed Keeper and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:37

    The bipartisan infrastructure bill sets aside $1.2 trillion dollars in funding for clean water, bridges, and roads, as well as higher-tech infrastructure like EV charging stations and electric school buses. Why the implementation of these projects needs to focus on creating equitable and sustainable systems that will last for generations. Also, the COP26 climate talks in Glasgow, Scotland brought mixed results with an agreement to phase down coal, side agreements to cut methane emissions and a rulebook for international carbon trading markets. But there was little progress in efforts to help developing countries cope with the effects of climate change and the talks were widely criticized for their lack of inclusivity. Most importantly, COP26 failed to establish a fully credible path to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. And for many Native American communities, seeds are living and life-giving organisms which should be carefully kept and cherished. The 2021 novel “The Seed Keeper” relays the importance of seed keeping across 4 generations of Dakota women. Join the next Living on Earth Book Club event on December 9th at 6:30 p.m.! We'll be speaking with diver-filmmaker Craig Foster about his book Underwater Wild, which captures the underwater world of wonder seen in the Academy Award-winning documentary “My Octopus Teacher.” Register at loe.org/events Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Cashing Out Coal, Saving the Tropical Carbon Bank, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 52:37

    At the COP26 climate talks in Glasgow, the US and European nations agreed to provide $8.5 billion in financing to help South Africa phase out its use of coal power. South Africa, which is experiencing yet another wave of power outages, gets most of its electricity from burning coal and is the largest carbon emitter in Africa. What international aid means for South Africa's energy transition.  Also, tropical forests are a treasure trove of biodiversity and contain vast stores of carbon that threaten the stability of Earth's climate system if released through deforestation. And at the recent COP26 in Glasgow more than 130 countries representing 90 percent of the world's forest cover pledged to end net forest loss by 2030.  Join the next Living on Earth Book Club event on November 18th at 6:30 p.m.! We'll be speaking with Devi Lockwood about her book 1,001 Voices on Climate Change and her quest to bike around the world collecting real, personal stories about how flood, fire, drought, and rising seas are changing communities. Register at loe.org/events Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    COP26 Challenges, Reining In Methane, Guardians of the Trees and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 52:23

    As the UN climate talks called COP26 continue in Glasgow, Scotland, all eyes are on world leaders and negotiators as they face challenges to ramp up ambition and commit to substantial climate finance. Also, new EPA rules would strengthen requirements for the oil and gas industry to prevent, identify, and repair methane leaks. Why tackling methane emissions now is key to limiting global warming. And people who live near tropical forests sometimes resort to illegally logging the trees they treasure to pay for healthcare. A conversation with the founder of a nonprofit working to keep the forest healthy by keeping people healthy. Join the next Living on Earth Book Club event on November 18th at 6:30 p.m.! We'll be speaking with Devi Lockwood about her book 1,001 Voices on Climate Change and her quest to bike around the world collecting real, personal stories about how flood, fire, drought, and rising seas are changing communities. Register at loe.org/events    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    China's Energy Crunch and Climate, Fast Food with a Side of Phthalates, Plastic Planet and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 51:34

    Roughly 20 Chinese provinces are enduring rolling electricity blackouts amid a coal and natural gas shortage. How the current energy crunch intersects with China's long-term climate commitments and the prospects for China's influence at the UN climate talks. Also, fast food could be even more unhealthy than we knew – laden with phthalates, chemicals that are linked to serious health problems and even early death.  And greenhouse gas emissions from plastic production in the United States are on track to outpace domestic coal emissions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Carbon Offset Illusion, A New African Voice on Climate, Right Whales Struggle to Grow and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 51:38

    More than 170 major companies have pledged to become carbon neutral by 2050, with many counting on carbon offsets to help them reach that goal. But critics say these offsets are often hard to verify and can give these companies a license to continue to pollute.  Also, a conversation with Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate about how the climate crisis is impacting Africa and the discrimination she's faced in speaking up.  And critically endangered North Atlantic right whales are struggling to grow to their full length because of entanglements in fishing gear and other threats.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Biden Infrastructure and the Environment, Phthalates Linked to Premature Death, Author Richard Powers, and More

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 51:19


    The multi trillion dollar budget reconciliation bill working through Congress includes billions of dollars to mitigate climate change, improve drinking water safety, and improve resiliency for coastal communities.   Also, a new study finds an association between high levels of phthalate in blood and premature death. These “everywhere chemicals” are linked to elevated risk for cardiovascular deaths for middle-aged Americans.   And Pulitzer Prize winning author Richard Powers on his new book, Bewilderment, about a father and son struggling to survive as the damaged planet does the same. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


    "Land Back" For Indigenous Peoples, Warming Arctic's “Pizzly Bear” Hybrids, Rising Seas Threaten Landfills, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 51:38

    For Indigenous People's Day we take a look at the “Land Back” movement that seeks to return land like the Black Hills in South Dakota to its original inhabitants and restore a meaningful connection to the land. Also, with the changing climate, polar bears are moving south in search of food, and grizzly bears are moving north in search of cooler climes. In some cases, the two have mated and created a hybrid animal known as a "pizzly" bear. And until recently landfills in America were often sited in coastal wetlands. Now rising seas are threatening to unleash their trash, toxics, and even nuclear waste into coastal areas.       Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Saving Seven Million Lives from Bad Air, Fall Gardening Tips, Putting Food By for a Sustainable Harvest and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 51:30

    If nations adopt new air quality guidelines from the World Health Organization millions of lives could be saved every year from deadly air pollution. Also, for gardeners in the northern hemisphere, now is the time to take stock of this year's successes and failures. Find out what you can do now to build fertile soil for next spring.  And as the harvest season picks up, we share preservation tips and tricks for keeping the bounty and preventing fresh produce from ending up in landfills. Join us on October 5 for our next Living on Earth Book Club event! “Guardians of the Trees” author Dr. Kinari Webb will join Steve Curwood and Bobby Bascomb to talk about healing the world's rainforests and the communities who depend on them. Register at https://loe.org/events/   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Big Oil Under Fire for Climate Disinformation; “They Knew”: The Feds' 50-Year Climate Failure; Widespread Youth Anxiety About Climate and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 51:15

    Industry and the US federal government have long worked in tandem to sideline climate concerns and continue to promote Earth-warming fossil fuels. Now the US House Oversight and Reform Committee has summoned top executives from Exxon, Shell, BP and Chevron and two affiliated lobbying groups to testify in front of a committee hearing in October, as part of an ongoing investigation into the fossil fuel industry's promotion of climate disinformation.   Also, for the past 50 years, the US government has known about the problem of climate change but has continued to promote fossil fuel development and done little to avert a crisis. Longtime environmental leader Gus Speth joins us to discuss his new book “They Knew.”   And a recent study found that three-quarters of young people surveyed believe the future is frightening because of climate change. What young people are expressing about their eco-anxiety and how parents can safely talk to their kids about climate.   Join us on October 5 for our next Living on Earth Book Club event! “Guardians of the Trees” author Dr. Kinari Webb will join Steve Curwood and Bobby Bascomb to talk about healing the world's rainforests and the communities who depend on them. Register at https://loe.org/events/   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    “Vaccine Apartheid”: A Call to Delay UN Climate Talks, Getting the US Grid to 40 Percent Solar, Harvard Divests Fossil Fuels and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 51:05


    As COVID-19 spread continues and vaccine access remains limited in some of the countries most vulnerable to climate impacts, civil society is warning of a “vaccine apartheid” and calling for a delay of the upcoming UN climate talks. Also, how solar power can produce up to 40% of the nation's electricity by 2035 to meet President Biden's goal of decarbonizing the grid by then.  And Harvard University announced that it will no longer invest in fossil fuel companies, following years of refusal amid a prominent and vocal divestment campaign. Join us on September 23 for our first Living on Earth Book Club event of the season! Richard Powers, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Overstory, will join Host Steve Curwood to talk about his new book Bewilderment. Register at https://loe.org/events/   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


    Hurricane Ida Adds Misery to Cancer Alley, ‘The Hummingbirds' Gift,' and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 51:22


    Hurricane Ida left people in the Louisiana region known as ‘Cancer Alley' with destroyed homes, no electricity, and polluted water. That's on top of the toxic air they breathe every day because of some 150 petrochemical plants in the area. We hear from grassroots activist Sharon Lavigne, a 2021 Goldman Prize recipient, about what it's like living through these disasters and what drives her to keep fighting yet another plastics plant.  Also, hummingbirds are truly superlative creatures -- relative to their size, they are both the world's fastest avians and have some of the longest migratory journeys of any animal. Sy Montgomery focuses on these incredible birds in her latest book, The Hummingbirds' Gift, where she looks back on her harrowing but rewarding time raising two orphaned baby hummingbirds alongside an artist and hummingbird rehabilitator. And join us on September 23 for our first Living on Earth Book Club event of the season! Richard Powers, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Overstory, will join Host Steve Curwood to talk about his new book Bewilderment. Register at loe.org/events


    The Way Forward For People And Our Planet

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 51:43

    As Living on Earth celebrates 30 years on the air, we examine this decisive moment for the human species and our challenging relationship with our planet.  We meet people who envision a future reshaped by an emerging energy system and new power structures, as we wean off of fossil fuels. Next we take a big-picture view of Earth as a complex and sustaining organism known as Gaia. Over billions of years life has interacted with the elements of this planet in cycles of constant change and adaptation. With the help of deep ecologists, children, an astronaut and more, we survey our place on this ever-evolving living planet. And while science and policy are vital in building a more sustainable world, they can't convey the values we need as we strive for ecological harmony. Indigenous stories, holy scriptures, East Asian cosmologies, papal encyclicals and divine revelation all shed light on our duties and relationship to each other and to our common home.

    Alaska Drilling Project Blocked, Chemicals and Breast Cancer Risk, Finding the Mother Tree and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 51:35

    A major Alaska drilling project to tap 600 million barrels of oil has been blocked. A federal judge ruled in favor of Indigenous and environmental groups, finding that the permitting process has yet to fully consider impacts on the climate and polar bears.   Also, higher levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone lead to a greater risk of breast cancer. Researchers at the Silent Spring Institute have shed new light on how chemical exposure can raise those hormone levels in women, and found that nearly 300 chemicals increased one or both hormones.   And an intricate web of roots and fungi connects life in an old growth forest, allowing ancient “mother trees” to nourish and protect their kin. A forest ecologist shares her research findings and reflects on how mother trees helped her through the challenges of motherhood and a cancer diagnosis.

    U.N. Report Charts Possible Climate Futures, Investing in Green Infrastructure, Sheltering with Thoreau in the Age of Crisis and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 51:37


    Scientists are once again sounding the alarm about the climate emergency, with a new UN climate report. Hundreds of experts collaborated to bring together the best science on past, present, and future climate change.  Also, the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill includes some green measures to address and invest in crumbling American infrastructure. But climate and environmental justice advocates say much more is needed now from a much larger budget reconciliation package that's in the works.  And the COVID-19 pandemic slowed the pace of life for many of us, and for writer David Gessner, this era of retreating to our homes brought to mind one famous expert in social distancing. Looking to Henry David Thoreau for guidance on living through a pandemic, a time of racial reckoning, and a climate crisis.


    Tree Deaths and Climate, ‘Forest Bathing', Journeys North: The Pacific Crest Trail and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 51:21

    Earth's complex, interconnected climate system means that changes in one part of the world can impact atmospheric moisture and the climate thousands of miles away. Research shows that when trees die in California from drought, wildfires, and bark beetles, that can hinder plant growth all the way across the continent in Eastern North America. Also, every year, several hundred intrepid hikers walk all the way from Mexico to Canada, along the Pacific Crest Trail. At more than twenty-six hundred miles long, it covers some of the most challenging and spectacular terrain in North America. But with a tight-knit community of thru-hikers, the PCT isn't just about the pretty scenery.  And a walk in the woods might be just what your health care provider ordered. Numerous studies suggest that taking in the peaceful atmosphere of a forest can have significant health benefits. Now the practice of “forest bathing,” which originated in Japan in the 1980s as a form of nature therapy, is becoming more popular around the world.

    Anxiety and Bad Air, Colorado River in Crisis, Planetary Health and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 51:32

    Small particulates from fossil fuels are linked to as many as 300,000 excess deaths in the United States each year. And these small, PM 2.5 particulates may also be harming the mental health of children and teens by worsening depression, anxiety, suicidality and more. Also, the Colorado River that carved the Grand Canyon and now quenches the thirst of much of the American West is parched in a “megadrought.” Two key reservoirs are expected to drop to record low levels this year and trigger a formal water shortage declaration. Why supply continues to shrink as demand holds steady.  And a healthier planet also means a healthier society. We'll look at the intersection of environmental change and human health, and how saving the planet can also save human lives.

    The Climate Emergency Warning from Extreme Weather, Eco-Justice40, Imagining Wolves Returning to Scotland and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 51:29

    As a slew of extreme weather events hits the headlines, the evidence mounts we are headed for dangerous thresholds of climate disruption beyond the reach of adaptation to cope. Why sea level rise could be counted in the dozens of feet by 2100, and how an unchecked climate emergency imperils human civilization. Also, the Biden Administration has now rolled out details of its environmental justice plan called Justice40, which aims to share at least 40% of benefits from federal climate and infrastructure spending with disadvantaged communities. And Charlotte McConaghy, the author of last year's best-selling novel Migrations, talks about her newest book Once There Were Wolves. It's a mysterious tale of a woman-led team working to re-introduce wolves to the Scottish Highlands, the people who confront them and the deadly toll of domestic abuse.    

    Amazon Near Climate Tipping Point, Indigenous People and Forest Care, Deep Time Reckoning: How Future Thinking Can Help Earth Now, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 51:37

    New research confirms that the damaged Amazon rainforest is now a net contributor to climate change overall, and parts of the Amazon are showing signs of nearing a crucial “tipping point”. But there is hope for protecting the forest: Indigenous people have taken care of these forests for millennia, and now with the help of a nonprofit they're using GPS data to take a stand against illegal deforestation. Also, many of us are fixated on the now, and in fact much of the environmental damage we are causing is an outcome of seeking short-term rewards at the cost of long-term sustainability. But the author of the book “Deep Time Reckoning” is on a mission to get us to think far beyond. He profiles safety experts in Finland working on how to prudently store nuclear power waste, which can be radioactive for millions of years.    

    The Troubling Decline in Fertility, Chemicals and Hormone Havoc, Winning a Fight Against Plastic Bags and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 51:47

    Over the past four decades, sperm counts have dropped by more than 50% in the US, and female fertility is also declining. Some chemicals that disrupt hormones are key culprits, including those found in plastics, cosmetics and fracking solutions. Why this looming fertility crisis hits vulnerable communities especially hard. Also, a recent study finds the toxic class of chemicals called PFAS, also known as “forever chemicals”, is widespread in lipstick, mascara, and other cosmetics. The ugly truth about your beauty products. And worried about the environmental degradation caused by increasing plastic pollution in her home country of Malawi, Gloria Majiga-Kamoto organized a grassroots movement to fight the plastic industry and to support a national ban on thin single-use plastic. She's been recognized with a 2021 Goldman Environmental Prize.

    Ocean Warming Speeding Up, Oyster Shell Recycling, Secrets of the Whales and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 51:49

    Recent data show the Earth's oceans are warming much more rapidly than previously reported. That means rising sea levels, stronger storms, and more intense droughts. Also, fertilizer runoff can create massive algae blooms in water that suck up oxygen and create dead zones for most other forms of life. The Chesapeake Bay is particularly vulnerable but restaurants in Pittsburgh are pitching in to help. And a documentary miniseries seeks to unravel the secrets of whale behavior and understand whale cultures of orcas, humpbacks, narwhals, belugas, and sperm whales. “Secrets of the Whales” and more, this week on Living on Earth.    

    DNA Barcoding for Quick Species ID, Ubuntu and Unity for Healing, The Butterfly Effect and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 51:50

    Roughly 1.3 million species have been identified and recorded, but that's just a fraction of life on our planet. A recent advancement known as DNA barcoding samples small but key parts of genomes to ID species. Also, the U.S. is extremely divided in many ways, from politics to race to wealth. But for a model of unity, we might look to the African concept of Ubuntu as a way to heal the many broken relationships in America. And insects far outnumber us on this planet, and they've shaped the course of human history. Stories about the ancient relationship between human society and insects, and the critical need to preserve insect biodiversity for future generations.    

    Line 3 Pipeline Threatens Native Way of Life, Oil Leasing in Court, Plastic Waste Suppliers and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 51:55

    Activists are ramping up actions against the Line 3 pipeline, which would carry tar sands oil through delicate wetlands and the treaty territory of the Anishinaabe peoples in northern Minnesota. And while that oil would be coming from Canada, President Biden is hoping he can use his executive power to pause oil and gas leasing on U.S. public lands and waters like the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. But this is being challenged in the courts. Also, increasingly the oil and gas we extract from the ground is being turned into plastic that litters the oceans to the tune of 8 million metric tons every year. Much of that waste is take-away packaging, and a recent study found that only 20 companies are responsible for most of this waste.

    Celebrating Juneteenth, Farming While Black and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 51:50

    Juneteenth and African Foodways / One in Five Deaths from Fossil Fuels / Redlined Real Estate and Extreme Urban Heat / Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors / Farming While Black: A Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land June 19th marks the holiday known as Juneteenth, when African Americans gather to celebrate emancipation of ancestors from slavery with picnics and cook outs. The voyage from Africa isn't often on people's minds, but it is in their stomachs, by way of the foodways from across the Atlantic. Fast-forward to today, to the farmers who are working to cultivate justice, root out racism, and find liberation on the land, by reconnecting people of color to the earth. And systemic racism has set Black Americans up for far greater exposure to deadly air pollution, and extreme heat brought by climate change. Both environmental concerns have been primarily caused and exacerbated by white Americans, yet it's Black communities that bear the brunt of the harm. Dismantling racism, celebrating Juneteenth, and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRX.

    Celebrating Juneteenth, Farming While Black and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 51:50

    Juneteenth and African Foodways / One in Five Deaths from Fossil Fuels / Redlined Real Estate and Extreme Urban Heat / Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors / Farming While Black: A Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land June 19th marks the holiday known as Juneteenth, when African Americans gather to celebrate emancipation of ancestors from slavery with picnics and cook outs. The voyage from Africa isn't often on people's minds, but it is in their stomachs, by way of the foodways from across the Atlantic. Fast-forward to today, to the farmers who are working to cultivate justice, root out racism, and find liberation on the land, by reconnecting people of color to the earth. And systemic racism has set Black Americans up for far greater exposure to deadly air pollution, and extreme heat brought by climate change. Both environmental concerns have been primarily caused and exacerbated by white Americans, yet it's Black communities that bear the brunt of the harm. Dismantling racism, celebrating Juneteenth, and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRX.

    Celebrating Juneteenth, Farming While Black and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 51:50

    Juneteenth and African Foodways / One in Five Deaths from Fossil Fuels / Redlined Real Estate and Extreme Urban Heat / Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors / Farming While Black: A Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land June 19th marks the holiday known as Juneteenth, when African Americans gather to celebrate emancipation of ancestors from slavery with picnics and cook outs. The voyage from Africa isn't often on people's minds, but it is in their stomachs, by way of the foodways from across the Atlantic. Fast-forward to today, to the farmers who are working to cultivate justice, root out racism, and find liberation on the land, by reconnecting people of color to the earth. And systemic racism has set Black Americans up for far greater exposure to deadly air pollution, and extreme heat brought by climate change. Both environmental concerns have been primarily caused and exacerbated by white Americans, yet it's Black communities that bear the brunt of the harm. Dismantling racism, celebrating Juneteenth, and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRX.

    The Golden State Going Greener, The Ev Rx, Roadside Pollinator Havens and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 51:50

    The Golden State Going Greener / Beyond the Headlines / The First All-Electric Ford Pickup / The EV RX / Backup: African Elephant and Chacma Baboon / Running Buffalo Clover / Roadsides as Vital Habitat California has often led the nation in environmental ambition, and now that his state finds itself with a big budget surplus Governor Gavin Newsom wants to invest 14 billion of it in climate initiatives, with a focus on vulnerable communities. We catch up with Jared Blumenfeld, California Secretary for Environmental Protection and the host of the podcast, Podship Earth, about California's climate ambitions. Also, electric vehicles like Ford's new F-150 Lightning are not only good for the environment, new research suggests that EVs are also better for our health. And some 17 million acres of green space line US highways and byways. It's vital habitat for pollinators, as well as small animals and birds.

    The Golden State Going Greener, The Ev Rx, Roadside Pollinator Havens and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 51:50

    The Golden State Going Greener / Beyond the Headlines / The First All-Electric Ford Pickup / The EV RX / Backup: African Elephant and Chacma Baboon / Running Buffalo Clover / Roadsides as Vital Habitat California has often led the nation in environmental ambition, and now that his state finds itself with a big budget surplus Governor Gavin Newsom wants to invest 14 billion of it in climate initiatives, with a focus on vulnerable communities. We catch up with Jared Blumenfeld, California Secretary for Environmental Protection and the host of the podcast, Podship Earth, about California's climate ambitions. Also, electric vehicles like Ford's new F-150 Lightning are not only good for the environment, new research suggests that EVs are also better for our health. And some 17 million acres of green space line US highways and byways. It's vital habitat for pollinators, as well as small animals and birds.

    Exxon's New Board and Climate, Brazilian Enviro Officials Accused of Profiting From Illegal Deforestation, Katherine Johnson and One Step Further and More!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 51:50


    Corruption In Brazilian Government / The G7 Gears Up to Talk Climate / Climate Activists Take Board Seats at Exxon / Beyond the Headlines / One Step Further:The Story of Katherine Johnson Brazil's environment minister and nine other government officials face allegations of corruption, including profiting from illegal deforestation in the Amazon. But despite public criticism, the Brazilian government continues to endanger the environment. Also, climate activists take three seats on ExxonMobil's board of directors, in the hopes of convincing the company that continuing to deny climate change hurts the "triple bottom line": people, planet, and profit. And from the Living on Earth Book Club: the story of NASA "hidden figure" mathematician, Katherine Johnson, and how she became one of the most critical contributors in the Space Race despite the racism she faced, as told by her daughter Katherine Moore. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Nord VPN


    Exxon's New Board and Climate, Brazilian Enviro Officials Accused of Profiting From Illegal Deforestation, Katherine Johnson and One Step Further and More!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 51:50


    Corruption In Brazilian Government / The G7 Gears Up to Talk Climate / Climate Activists Take Board Seats at Exxon / Beyond the Headlines / One Step Further: The Story of Katherine Johnson Brazil's environment minister and nine other government officials face allegations of corruption, including profiting from illegal deforestation in the Amazon. But despite public criticism, the Brazilian government continues to endanger the environment. Also, climate activists take three seats on ExxonMobil's board of directors, in the hopes of convincing the company that continuing to deny climate change hurts the "triple bottom line": people, planet, and profit. And from the Living on Earth Book Club: the story of NASA "hidden figure" mathematician, Katherine Johnson, and how she became one of the most critical contributors in the Space Race despite the racism she faced, as told by her daughter Katherine Moore. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Nord VPN


    Climate and Infrastructure, Youth Climate Plaintiffs Try Again, Mark Bittman’s “Animal, Vegetable, Junk”, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 51:50


    Climate and Infrastructure / Beyond the Headlines / Youth Climate Plaintiffs Try Again / Audio Postcard: Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica / "Animal, Vegetable Junk" President Joe Biden's proposed $2 trillion infrastructure bill presents a rare opportunity to pass climate legislation through Congress. But it won't be easy and will require lots of political maneuvering. Also, back in 2015 a group of young people sued the United States for failing to protect the climate and therefore their rights to a livable future, but the case was eventually dismissed. Now the youth plaintiffs have gone back to a lower court and this time the judge has ordered mediation with the Biden Justice Dept. Meanwhile young people recently won a similar case in Germany. And from the Living on Earth Book Club: columnist and cookbook author Mark Bittman's new book traces the origins of our industrial agricultural system and how we can strive for a better and healthier future with food. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism


    Climate and Infrastructure, Youth Climate Plaintiffs Try Again, Mark Bittman's “Animal, Vegetable, Junk”, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 51:50


    Climate and Infrastructure / Beyond the Headlines / Youth Climate Plaintiffs Try Again / Audio Postcard: Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica / "Animal, Vegetable Junk" President Joe Biden's proposed $2 trillion infrastructure bill presents a rare opportunity to pass climate legislation through Congress. But it won't be easy and will require lots of political maneuvering. Also, back in 2015 a group of young people sued the United States for failing to protect the climate and therefore their rights to a livable future, but the case was eventually dismissed. Now the youth plaintiffs have gone back to a lower court and this time the judge has ordered mediation with the Biden Justice Dept. Meanwhile young people recently won a similar case in Germany. And from the Living on Earth Book Club: columnist and cookbook author Mark Bittman's new book traces the origins of our industrial agricultural system and how we can strive for a better and healthier future with food. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism


    Brood X Emerges!, Cicada Cuisine, Rescuing the Planet, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 51:50

    EPA Updates Signs of Climate Change / Beyond the Headlines / Rescuing the Planet / "Fight Card": Elk at Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada / Brood X Emerges! / Cicada Cuisine Brood X is here at last: trillions of cicadas, underground for the last 17 years, are emerging in numerous Eastern and Midwestern states to transform, sing, and mate. Many will become a meal for birds, raccoons, squirrels and more. Also, eating cicadas isn't just for the birds. Insects are rich in proteins and nutrients while having a much smaller carbon footprint than meat. A Brooklyn chef who specializes in insect cuisine cooks up a dish with seasonal spring produce and, of course, cicadas. And climate change is placing stress on plants and animals to rapidly adapt but without intact habitat, that could become impossible for many. Tony Hiss is the author of the book Rescuing the Planet: Protecting Half the Land to Heal the Earth, which looks at several places across North America where communities are already working to protect habitat and biodiversity. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia And Nord VPN

    Brood X Emerges!, Cicada Cuisine, Rescuing the Planet, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 51:50

    EPA Updates Signs of Climate Change / Beyond the Headlines / Rescuing the Planet / "Fight Card": Elk at Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada / Brood X Emerges! / Cicada Cuisine Brood X is here at last: trillions of cicadas, underground for the last 17 years, are emerging in numerous Eastern and Midwestern states to transform, sing, and mate. Many will become a meal for birds, raccoons, squirrels and more. Also, eating cicadas isn't just for the birds. Insects are rich in proteins and nutrients while having a much smaller carbon footprint than meat. A Brooklyn chef who specializes in insect cuisine cooks up a dish with seasonal spring produce and, of course, cicadas. And climate change is placing stress on plants and animals to rapidly adapt but without intact habitat, that could become impossible for many. Tony Hiss is the author of the book Rescuing the Planet: Protecting Half the Land to Heal the Earth, which looks at several places across North America where communities are already working to protect habitat and biodiversity. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia And Nord VPN

    Youth Activists Win Stronger Climate Action in Germany, Elizabeth Kolbert’s "Under a White Sky", The Colorado River's Shrinking Water Supply and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2021 51:50


    Youth Activists Win Stronger Climate Action in Germany / French Climate Bill Disappoints Activists / Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future / Beyond the Headlines / Note on Emerging Science: Biochar and Irrigation / The Colorado River's Dwindling Water Supply After a trial brought forth by youth climate activists, Germany's highest court recently ruled that present government commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are insufficient to protect future needs. Also, humans have undoubtedly altered the environment. We've reversed rivers, introduced invasive species, and even disrupted the climate. In the new book Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Elizabeth Kolbert explores cutting edge and controversial technologies aimed at solving the problems these changes have created. And the Colorado River is parched in a "megadrought," with two key reservoirs expected to drop to record low levels this year and trigger a formal water shortage declaration. Why supply continues to shrink as demand holds steady. Thanks to our sponsor this week: Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia


    Youth Activists Win Stronger Climate Action in Germany, Elizabeth Kolbert's "Under a White Sky", The Colorado River's Shrinking Water Supply and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2021 51:50


    Youth Activists Win Stronger Climate Action in Germany / French Climate Bill Disappoints Activists / Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future / Beyond the Headlines / Note on Emerging Science: Biochar and Irrigation / The Colorado River's Dwindling Water Supply After a trial brought forth by youth climate activists, Germany's highest court recently ruled that present government commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are insufficient to protect future needs. Also, humans have undoubtedly altered the environment. We've reversed rivers, introduced invasive species, and even disrupted the climate. In the new book Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Elizabeth Kolbert explores cutting edge and controversial technologies aimed at solving the problems these changes have created. And the Colorado River is parched in a "megadrought," with two key reservoirs expected to drop to record low levels this year and trigger a formal water shortage declaration. Why supply continues to shrink as demand holds steady. Thanks to our sponsor this week: Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia


    Fixing America’s Water Crises, Gardening for Abundance and Generosity, Secrets of the Whales and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 51:50

    Fixing America's Water Crises / Beyond the Headlines / Young Climate Activists / Gardening for Abundance and Generosity / Secrets of the Whales In a bipartisan vote the U.S. Senate approves $35 billion to address the public health hazards of lead pipes and overflowing wastewater. Why water infrastructure improvements to protect public health are long overdue and where the money would be spent. Also, as northern springtime advances, gardeners look forward to carefully tending to what's growing in their window boxes, raised beds, and greenhouses. How gardening fosters a spirit of generosity. And a documentary miniseries seeks to unravel the secrets of whale behavior and understand whale cultures of orcas, humpbacks, narwhals, belugas, and sperm whales. "Secrets of the Whales" and more, this week on Living on Earth. Thanks to our sponsors this week: The Crazy Town podcast from the Post Carbon Institute And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia

    Fixing America's Water Crises, Gardening for Abundance and Generosity, Secrets of the Whales and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 51:50

    Fixing America's Water Crises / Beyond the Headlines / Young Climate Activists / Gardening for Abundance and Generosity / Secrets of the Whales In a bipartisan vote the U.S. Senate approves $35 billion to address the public health hazards of lead pipes and overflowing wastewater. Why water infrastructure improvements to protect public health are long overdue and where the money would be spent. Also, as northern springtime advances, gardeners look forward to carefully tending to what's growing in their window boxes, raised beds, and greenhouses. How gardening fosters a spirit of generosity. And a documentary miniseries seeks to unravel the secrets of whale behavior and understand whale cultures of orcas, humpbacks, narwhals, belugas, and sperm whales. "Secrets of the Whales" and more, this week on Living on Earth. Thanks to our sponsors this week: The Crazy Town podcast from the Post Carbon Institute And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia

    Methane and Swift Climate Action, Getting Bushmeat Off the Table, Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 51:50

    Methane and Swift Climate Action / Senate Votes for Strong Methane Rules / Biden, LOE and Dykstra / Getting Bushmeat Off the Table / "Planet" by Poet Catherine Pierce / Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in An Age of Extinction Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas that doesn't last long in the atmosphere, so reducing it can have almost immediate benefits for the climate. But weak Trump administration standards allowed the oil and gas industry to leak massive amounts of methane. Now the U.S. Senate has voted to return to stronger Obama-era regulation of these leaks, and Democratic Senator Martin Heinrich of New Mexico joins us to discuss. Also, the forests of the Congo Basin are among the most biodiverse in the world, but its wildlife is being threatened by huge demand for bushmeat. A new campaign encourages people to cook traditional recipes with protein alternatives to wild meat. And animals like the American Bison, bald eagle, and giant panda have come dangerously close to extinction thanks to our own species. But thanks to some visionary humans, these animals and others have been saved from that fate and are now recovering. Science writer Michelle Nijhuis shares the stories of some conservation heroes. Thanks to our sponsors this week: The Crazy Town podcast from the Post Carbon Institute And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia

    Methane and Swift Climate Action, Getting Bushmeat Off the Table, Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 51:50

    Methane and Swift Climate Action / Senate Votes for Strong Methane Rules / Biden, LOE and Dykstra / Getting Bushmeat Off the Table / "Planet" by Poet Catherine Pierce / Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in An Age of Extinction Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas that doesn't last long in the atmosphere, so reducing it can have almost immediate benefits for the climate. But weak Trump administration standards allowed the oil and gas industry to leak massive amounts of methane. Now the U.S. Senate has voted to return to stronger Obama-era regulation of these leaks, and Democratic Senator Martin Heinrich of New Mexico joins us to discuss. Also, the forests of the Congo Basin are among the most biodiverse in the world, but its wildlife is being threatened by huge demand for bushmeat. A new campaign encourages people to cook traditional recipes with protein alternatives to wild meat. And animals like the American Bison, bald eagle, and giant panda have come dangerously close to extinction thanks to our own species. But thanks to some visionary humans, these animals and others have been saved from that fate and are now recovering. Science writer Michelle Nijhuis shares the stories of some conservation heroes. Thanks to our sponsors this week: The Crazy Town podcast from the Post Carbon Institute And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia

    The Way Forward For People And Our Planet: An Earth Day Special

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 51:50

    Greening the Economy / A Living Earth Called "Gaia" / Ecological Conversion and Solidarity As Living on Earth celebrates 30 years on the air, we share an Earth Day special that examines this decisive moment for the human species and our challenging relationship with our planet. We meet people who envision a future reshaped by an emerging energy system and new power structures, as we wean off of fossil fuels. Next we take a big-picture view of Earth as a complex and sustaining organism known as Gaia. Over billions of years life has interacted with the elements of this planet in cycles of constant change and adaptation. With the help of deep ecologists, children, an astronaut and more, we survey our place on this ever-evolving living planet. And while science and policy are vital in building a more sustainable world, they can't convey the values we need as we strive for ecological harmony. Indigenous stories, holy scriptures, East Asian cosmologies, papal encyclicals and divine revelation all shed light on our duties and relationship to each other and to our common home. Thanks to our sponsors this week: The Crazy Town podcast from the Post Carbon Institute And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia

    The Way Forward For People And Our Planet: An Earth Day Special

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 51:50

    Greening the Economy / A Living Earth Called "Gaia" / Ecological Conversion and Solidarity As Living on Earth celebrates 30 years on the air, we share an Earth Day special that examines this decisive moment for the human species and our challenging relationship with our planet. We meet people who envision a future reshaped by an emerging energy system and new power structures, as we wean off of fossil fuels. Next we take a big-picture view of Earth as a complex and sustaining organism known as Gaia. Over billions of years life has interacted with the elements of this planet in cycles of constant change and adaptation. With the help of deep ecologists, children, an astronaut and more, we survey our place on this ever-evolving living planet. And while science and policy are vital in building a more sustainable world, they can't convey the values we need as we strive for ecological harmony. Indigenous stories, holy scriptures, East Asian cosmologies, papal encyclicals and divine revelation all shed light on our duties and relationship to each other and to our common home. Thanks to our sponsors this week: The Crazy Town podcast from the Post Carbon Institute And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia

    Biden's Climate Summit, "Stooping" Turns Trash to Treasure, Poetry In the Time of Climate Trouble, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 51:50

    Biden's Climate Summit / Beyond the Headlines / "Stooping" Turns Trash to Treasure / When a Gas Plant Moves in Next Door / BirdNote®: The Power Of Albatross Partnerships / Poetry in the Time of Climate Troubles President Biden has invited 40 world leaders to a virtual Leaders Summit on Climate this Earth Day, a key moment in the international effort to address climate change. Also, when people move out or clean up their apartments, many leave discarded items on the stoop or curb for others to claim before it goes to the landfill. The Instagram page Stooping In Queens helps connect this free stuff with new owners. And poet Catherine Pierce grapples with unfolding climate disaster and other 21st century perils, and the ways they reframe parenting. She shares poems from her books Danger Days and The Tornado Is the World, and reflects on finding beauty and calls to action during the Anthropocene. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Giving Multiplier And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia

    Biden's Climate Summit, "Stooping" Turns Trash to Treasure, Poetry In the Time of Climate Trouble, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 51:50

    Biden's Climate Summit / Beyond the Headlines / "Stooping" Turns Trash to Treasure / When a Gas Plant Moves in Next Door / BirdNote®: The Power Of Albatross Partnerships / Poetry in the Time of Climate Troubles President Biden has invited 40 world leaders to a virtual Leaders Summit on Climate this Earth Day, a key moment in the international effort to address climate change. Also, when people move out or clean up their apartments, many leave discarded items on the stoop or curb for others to claim before it goes to the landfill. The Instagram page Stooping In Queens helps connect this free stuff with new owners. And poet Catherine Pierce grapples with unfolding climate disaster and other 21st century perils, and the ways they reframe parenting. She shares poems from her books Danger Days and The Tornado Is the World, and reflects on finding beauty and calls to action during the Anthropocene. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Giving Multiplier And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism And Democracy in Danger, a podcast from the University of Virginia

    Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors, Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands, The Wonders of Spring Migration, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 51:50

    Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve / Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors / Exploring the Parks: Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands / Spring Awakening / A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration Some stereotypes about who can be "outdoorsy" can leave people of color out, but a pair of beloved Air Jordan "Bred" 11 sneakers is helping one environmental educator encourage young American people of color to feel that they belong in the outdoors. Also, Arizona's Sky Islands are home to heat and cactus, but also many species that you're more likely to find far north of the desert Southwest - and even considerable snow. And a veteran field guide author discusses the incredible phenomenon that happens every spring and fall, as a journey of thousands of miles begins with a single wing flap. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Giving Multiplier And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism

    Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors, Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands, The Wonders of Spring Migration, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 51:50

    Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve / Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors / Exploring the Parks: Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands / Spring Awakening / A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration Some stereotypes about who can be "outdoorsy" can leave people of color out, but a pair of beloved Air Jordan "Bred" 11 sneakers is helping one environmental educator encourage young American people of color to feel that they belong in the outdoors. Also, Arizona's Sky Islands are home to heat and cactus, but also many species that you're more likely to find far north of the desert Southwest - and even considerable snow. And a veteran field guide author discusses the incredible phenomenon that happens every spring and fall, as a journey of thousands of miles begins with a single wing flap. Thanks to our sponsors this week: Giving Multiplier And Christiana Figueres' podcast Outrage + Optimism

    Restoring Life in the Oceans, Boosting US Wind Power, Tips for the Casual Gardener and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 51:50

    Biden Boosts Offshore Wind / The Ocean as Solution, Not Victim / Restoring Life in the Oceans / Beyond the Headlines / Tips for the Casual Gardener Enric Sala's love for the ocean drew him into a career in marine biology. But as he studied damaged marine environments, he began to feel he was writing the "obituary of the ocean." Now he advocates for marine protected areas that support ocean biodiversity and bring big economic benefits. Also, President Biden recently announced a plan to dramatically expand offshore wind power along the East Coast, with 30 gigawatts along the U.S. coasts by 2030, backed up by billions in federal loan guarantees. How this key part of Biden's infrastructure plan may especially help New York City meet its clean energy demands. Also, spring is the perfect time to start gardening -- and growing your favorite fresh produce doesn't have to feel like a chore! Tips for the casual gardener and more. Thanks to our sponsor: Giving Multiplier

    Restoring Life in the Oceans, Boosting US Wind Power, Tips for the Casual Gardener and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 51:50

    Biden Boosts Offshore Wind / The Ocean as Solution, Not Victim / Restoring Life in the Oceans / Beyond the Headlines / Tips for the Casual Gardener Enric Sala's love for the ocean drew him into a career in marine biology. But as he studied damaged marine environments, he began to feel he was writing the "obituary of the ocean." Now he advocates for marine protected areas that support ocean biodiversity and bring big economic benefits. Also, President Biden recently announced a plan to dramatically expand offshore wind power along the East Coast, with 30 gigawatts along the U.S. coasts by 2030, backed up by billions in federal loan guarantees. How this key part of Biden's infrastructure plan may especially help New York City meet its clean energy demands. Also, spring is the perfect time to start gardening -- and growing your favorite fresh produce doesn't have to feel like a chore! Tips for the casual gardener and more. Thanks to our sponsor: Giving Multiplier

    [Broadcast] Amazon Adds To Global Warming; Prehistoric Magnetic Flip Shook Up Life On Earth; Birch, Beech And Other Unusual Syrups; and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 51:50

    Amazon Adds to Global Warming / Belo Monte Dam Disrupts Amazon Floodplain Balance / Horse of a Different Color / Beyond the Headlines / Prehistoric Magnetic Flip Shook Up Life on Earth / Not Just Maple Syrup: Birch, Beech and Other Sappy Trees The first broad study of all greenhouse gases in the Amazon rainforest reveals that the damaged ecosystem is now a net contributor to climate change, due mostly to warming and other human activities like logging, dam-building, and cattle ranching. Also, Earth's magnetic poles wander around and flip every now and then, and now scientists have evidence for how these flips impact life on Earth. Linking a magnetic pole reversal about 41,000 years ago to megafauna extinctions, climatic changes, and even a rise in ancient cave art. And it's maple syrup season, but these aren't the only sappy trees that can be tapped to make syrup. A trip to a syrup producer in New Hampshire to taste syrups made from birch, beech, walnut, and other trees.

    [Broadcast] Amazon Adds To Global Warming; Prehistoric Magnetic Flip Shook Up Life On Earth; Birch, Beech And Other Unusual Syrups; and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 51:50

    Amazon Adds to Global Warming / Belo Monte Dam Disrupts Amazon Floodplain Balance / Horse of a Different Color / Beyond the Headlines / Prehistoric Magnetic Flip Shook Up Life on Earth / Not Just Maple Syrup: Birch, Beech and Other Sappy Trees The first broad study of all greenhouse gases in the Amazon rainforest reveals that the damaged ecosystem is now a net contributor to climate change, due mostly to warming and other human activities like logging, dam-building, and cattle ranching. Also, Earth's magnetic poles wander around and flip every now and then, and now scientists have evidence for how these flips impact life on Earth. Linking a magnetic pole reversal about 41,000 years ago to megafauna extinctions, climatic changes, and even a rise in ancient cave art. And it's maple syrup season, but these aren't the only sappy trees that can be tapped to make syrup. A trip to a syrup producer in New Hampshire to taste syrups made from birch, beech, walnut, and other trees.

    [Broadcast] Damaged Amazon Adds To Global Warming; Prehistoric Magnetic Flip Shook Up Life On Earth; Birch, Beech And Other Unusual Syrups; and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 51:50

    Damaged Amazon Adds to Global Warming / Belo Monte Dam Disrupts Amazon Floodplain Balance / Horse of a Different Color / Beyond the Headlines / Prehistoric Magnetic Flip Shook Up Life on Earth / Not Just Maple Syrup: Birch, Beech and Other Sappy Trees The first broad study of all greenhouse gases in the Amazon rainforest reveals that the damaged ecosystem is now a net contributor to climate change, due mostly to warming and other human activities like logging, dam-building, and cattle ranching. Also, Earth's magnetic poles wander around and flip every now and then, and now scientists have evidence for how these flips impact life on Earth. Linking a magnetic pole reversal about 41,000 years ago to megafauna extinctions, climatic changes, and even a rise in ancient cave art. And it's maple syrup season, but these aren't the only sappy trees that can be tapped to make syrup. A trip to a syrup producer in New Hampshire to taste syrups made from birch, beech, walnut, and other trees.

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