Midday

Follow Midday
Share on
Copy link to clipboard

Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall and his guests are talking about what's on your mind, and what matters most to Marylanders: the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medic…

WYPR Baltimore


    • May 17, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 33m AVG DURATION
    • 1,826 EPISODES


    Search for episodes from Midday with a specific topic:

    Latest episodes from Midday

    John Waters on his first novel, 'Liarmouth: A Feel-Bad Romance'

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 48:45

    Tom's guest today is John Waters. He's the director of 16 films, a visual artist with museum shows to his credit, a spoken word artist who performs in venues around the world, an actor, and a pitchman for haute couture.  He is also a Son of Baltimore and one of America's most original and enduring voices in the arts, with a deep artistic palette. His early films in the 1970s —Multiple Maniacs, Pink Flamingosand Female Trouble — earned him monikers like “The King of Sleaze,” “The Pope of Trash,” “The Duke of Dirt,” and the classic, “Prince of Puke.” It should also be noted, BTW, that when it comes to names, the French Government calls him "an Officer of the Order of Arts and Letters." His visual art has been featured in museum shows, he's been nominated for a Grammy and his 1988 film, Hairspray, was adapted as a musical that won 8 Tony Awards. As an actor, he has a role in this season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,and he will be touring his stand-up show in the fall. Waters is the author of several books of non-fiction, including his memoir, Mr. Know It All, a road trip diary called Carsick,and his compendium of profiles of people who have influenced his work, Role Models.His non-fiction commentary is fascinating, funny, insightful and often a bit outrageous. Waters's latest book is his first novel, a book that dials up the outrageousness in a big, wild way. His protagonist is as despicable as they come, and the entourage of people in her orbit are as odd as anyone we encountered in the cult classic movies John Waters made more than 50 years ago. The novel is called Liarmouth, which Waters describes as a “feel-bad romance.” John Waters joins Tom on our digital line from his home in Baltimore. You are welcome to join us as well. Call: 410.662.8780. Email: midday@wypr.org. Tweet: @MiddayWYPR A word about our conversation today: the book has more than a few explicit sexual references, and we will likely refer to a few of them… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Jon Baron, Democratic primary candidate for Maryland Governor

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 48:44

    Today on Midday, it's another installment in our series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest is Jon Baron, who is running in the Democratic primary for Maryland Governor. Mr. Baron has experience in both government and the nonprofit sector. Before running for Governor, he was the Vice President of Evidence Based Policy for Arnold Ventures, which describes itself as a non-partisan philanthropic organization that works in criminal justice, education, health and public finance. Before that, Mr. Baron served as the President of the Coalition for Evidence Based Policy, an organization he founded in 2001. He also served on a Presidential Commission, in various roles at the Department of Defense, and as the lead staffer for the House Committee on Small Business. Mr. Baron is a graduate of Rice University. He holds a Master's Degree from Princeton and a Law degree from the Yale Law School. He is 58 years old. He and his wife Jessica have lived in Montgomery County for 24 years. They are the parents of two grown children. This is Mr. Baron's first campaign for elective office. He has chosen Natalie Williams, the Senior Director of Public Affairs at the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education, as his Lt. Governor running mate. Jon Baron joins us on our digital line from Bethesda.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Historian Kathleen Belew on 'A Field Guide to White Supremacy'

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 48:31

    (This conversation first aired on December 8, 2021) The House Select Committee investigating the insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6, 2021 has interviewed hundreds of witnesses and made several criminal referrals to the US Justice Department for witnesses who have refused to appear before the Committee. Meanwhile, hundreds of rioters have been indicted and many imprisoned for their role in the attempt to subvert democracy. A federal jury in Charlottesville, Virginia, found 12 individuals and five organizations liable for $26 million in damages stemming from the Unite the Right Rally in 2017. Did the mob that stormed the US Capitol simply coalesce around the fantasy that the election was stolen from Donald Trump? What effect do monetary verdicts and criminal penalties have on the neo Nazi and White supremacist organizations that are behind this tragic deadly violence? Can the roots of the violence be traced back to rage about government that began in the 1970s? Today, we'll listen back to a conversation Tom had back in December, 2021, with Dr. Kathleen Belew. She's an assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago, where she is also the faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture. She is the author of Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America. And along with Ramón Gutiérrez, she is the editor of, and contributor to, a new collection of essays called A Field Guide to White Supremacy, in which she and other leading scholars explore how different forms of White supremacy and hatred manifest in events like those that took place on January 6th, and extend to domestic partner violence, homophobia, transphobia, Islamophobia, anti-immigration, and anti-Semitism. The authors chronicle how hate groups have moved from the fringe to the mainstream in America, and they send a clear warning that the violence we've seen in recent years may well be repeated. Kathleen Belew joined us on our digital line from Chicago. (Because this conversation is recorded, we can't take any call or comments today.) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Martha Jones' 'Vanguard': Black women's historic fight for the vote

    Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 48:33

    (This program first aired on January 12, 2022) Back in January of this year, President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris traveled to Atlanta to speak about the importance of voting rights, and the need for federal legislation to overcome the dozens of state laws that have been enacted and the hundreds of laws that are being considered to restrict voting. Before the President spoke, Vice President Kamala Harris advocated for an end to the filibuster that might clear the path for the passage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act and the Freedom to Vote Act. And then, President Biden also called for changes to the filibuster that would make passage of the voting rights legislation possible. That was the first time he had taken that position publicly. It's a position that is not shared by at least two members of the Democratic caucus: Senator Joe Manchin, and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema. The war in Ukraine, soaring inflation and other issues have for the moment overwhelmed the policy agenda of the Admininistration. Voting rights appear to have taken a back seat. Today on Midday, we revisit a conversation about an important and often overlooked dimension in the history of voting rights: the long fight for Black women's suffrage. Tom's guest is the acclaimed legal and cultural historian, Martha S. Jones. She has written a broad, insightful survey of the unsung heroes of the movement for equality, a movement that started two centuries ago, and which included scores of remarkable women whose importance and impact are made clear by Dr. Jones' compelling narrative. The book is called Vanguard:  How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All.   Dr. Martha S. Jones joined us for the hour on Zoom from her home in Baltimore. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rousuck's Review: 'Dream Hou$e,' live at Baltimore Center Stage

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 10:02

    It's time for another visit with Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins Tom each week with her reviews of the regional stage. In keeping with today's housing theme, she spotlights Dream Hou$e, playwright Eliana Pipes' energetic satire about how two LatinX sisters deal with cultural assimilation, capitalism, and the American home-ownership dream, now running at Baltimore Center Stage. The world-premiere production, staged in partnership with Atlanta's Alliance Theatre and New Haven's Long Wharf Theatre, is directed at Center Stage by Laurie Woolery. Dream Hou$e continues at Baltimore Center Stage through this Sunday, May 15. Follow the theater link for showtimes and ticketing information. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Renewing Baltimore: a talk with two housing restoration pioneers

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 38:44

    This week brought news of some positive signs in the area of real estate development in Baltimore. As five buildings near completion in the Port Covington Project on the city's Southern tip, it was announced that two development firms have been chosen to lease and provide marketing for the next phase of the project. MAG Partners is based in New York. It is a woman-owned firm. MacFarlane Partners is a Black-owned firm based in San Francisco. And on Monday, the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore released its annual report that shows a slight uptick in the number of businesses and residents in the area around the Inner Harbor. But when it comes to the other 276 neighborhoods in Baltimore, the story is often not about growth, but decay. Tom's guests today lead two organizations that are turning that trajectory around. Sean Closkey is the founding president of ReBUILD Metro, which is working to transform neighborhoods on Baltimore's East side. Bree Jones is the founder and CEO of Parity, a development company that restores abandoned properties on the West side of town. Sean Closkey joins us on our digital line; Bree Jones joins us on Zoom. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Lawrence Jackson's 'Shelter: A Black Tale of Homeland, Baltimore'

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 48:49

    For decades, political discourse in Baltimore has included condemnation of the fact that there are “two Baltimores,” one in which opportunity abounds and the other in which systemic racism and inequity create insurmountable barriers. Tom's guest today has lived in both Baltimores, and he has written a fascinating memoir that paints a vivid portrait of these two disparate worlds, and of himself. It is a portrait that is richly detailed, expertly researched, and beautifully enlarged by insight, candor and a fair dollop of iconoclasm. Dr. Lawrence Jackson is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of English and History at Johns Hopkins University, and the founding director of the Billie Holiday Center for the Liberation Arts. He's the author of several books on the history of African American writers and critics, the Black crime novelist Chester B. Himes, and the author Ralph Ellison. He also wrote a book about his family's history in Virginia after the Civil War. His latest book is, in part, another work of family history. It's called Shelter: A Black Tale of Homeland, Baltimore. Dr. Lawrence Jackson joins us on Zoom from Baltimore. Dr. Jackson will discuss the book (again) with Tom Hall Wednesday night (May 11) with an audience at The Church of the Redeemer in Baltimore, a place that figures prominently in the book. The event is co-sponsored by The Ivy Bookshop, and starts at 7:00. For more information, click here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Baltimore Community Mediation Center & The Ceasefire Weekend

    Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 14:17

    This past weekend, Baltimore Ceasefire 365 coordinated a number of events to call attention to the pain and trauma caused by the excessive levels of violence in our city. Ceasefire Weekends are held four times a year, and after each one, we pause here on Midday to reflect on how all of us can act to reduce violence and heal those who are broken by it. Joining Tom today are Erricka Bridgeford.  She's a co-organizer of Baltimore Ceasefire 365 and the Executive Director of the Baltimore Community Mediation Center, which she co-founded in 1995 with Tom's other two guests: Letrice Gant is another co-organizer of Baltimore Ceasefire and the Mediation Center's Deputy Director… Michelle Herringis also a co-organizer of Baltimore Ceasefire and the Mediation Center's Neighborhood Peace Coordinator… They all join us on Zoom from Baltimore. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Elon Musk's Twitter takeover: what it could mean for the rest of us

    Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 34:26

    It's been two weeks since the stunning announcement that one of the richest men in the world, Elon Musk, has entered into a deal to purchase Twitter for roughly $44 billion dollars. The deal will take three to six months to close. If either side backs out, the other side gets a billion dollars as a breakup fee. Financial analysts have pointed to some potential problems with the way Musk is financing the deal, but there are no clear indications at this point that he won't be able to pull this off. As to what will happen after that, it's hard to say. But that won't stop us from trying today... Tom's guest is Angelo Carusone, the President and CEOof Media Matters for America, a media watchdog. Mr. Carusone has joined a large chorus of observers who fear that Musk, who describes himself as a “free speech absolutist,” will open the platform to all manner of hate speech and disinformation. What do you think? Is this good news or bad news for the world's nearly 300 million Twitter users? Angelo Carusone joins us on our digital line from Los Angeles. You can join us as well: Call 410.662.8780 email: midday@wypr.org. Or Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    John B. King, Democratic primary candidate for Maryland Governor

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 48:45

    Today, it's another installment in our election-year series, Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest is John B. King, Jr.. He is an educator who served as the U.S. Secretary of Education from 2015-2017, during the last couple of years of the Obama Administration. Following that, he was appointed President and CEO of the Education Trust, a national non-profit that advocates on behalf of students of color and students from low-income families. From 2011-2015, Dr. King was the Commissioner of Education of the State of New York. Dr. King holds an undergraduate degree from Harvard, a master's degree and doctorate in education from Columbia, and a law degree from the Yale Law School. He is 47 years old. He is married to a fellow educator, Melissa Steel King. They have two school aged children, and they live in Silver Spring. This is John King's first campaign for public office. He is one of ten contenders in the Gubernatorial primary. Dr. King has chosen Michelle Siri, the Executive Director of The Women's Law Center of Maryland, as his running mate for Lt. Governor. John King joins us on Zoom from Silver Spring, Maryland. You are welcome to join us as well…call 410.662.8780; email: midday@wypr.org; Tweet: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rousuck's Review: 'Ain't Too Proud' at the Hippodrome Theatre

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 10:28

    Now it's time for a visit with Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins us each week with her reviews of the Maryland stage. Today, she spotlights the new touring company production of Ain't Too Proud – The Life and Times of The Temptations, lighting up the stage this week only, at Baltimore's historic Hippodrome Theatre. The smash-hit 2019 Broadway musical — nominated for 12 Tony® Awards and the winner of the 2019 Tony Award for Best Choreography — follows The Temptations' extraordinary musical careers from their Detroit roots to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. During a decade of civil unrest and political turmoil, their smart-stepping, smoothly harmonized performances won the group 42 Top Ten Hits — with 14 reaching number one. Ain't Too Proud was written by three-time Obie Award winner Dominique Morisseau, is directed by two-time Tony Award winner Des McAnuff (Jersey Boys), and features the Tony-winning choreography of Sergio Trujillo (Jersey Boys, On Your Feet!). The musical also features many of the group's greatest hits, including Ain't Too Proud to Beg, My Girl, Just My Imagination, Get Ready, Papa Was a Rolling Stone, and others. Ain't Too Proud - The Life and Times of the Temptations continues at the Hippodrome Theatre through Sunday, May 8. For showtimes and ticket info, click here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wordsmith, on his musical craft and upcoming local performances

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 20:24

    Joining Tom now is the songwriter and spoken word artist Wordsmith. His music is heard on Netflix hits like Russian Doll and The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and in performances with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, where he is an artistic partner. He is performing a concert tomorrow night here in Baltimore that's part of a multi-city tour that takes him coast to coast. He'll be collaborating with Kory Caudill, a recording artist, composer and pianist from Nashville, in a show called A Concert for the Human Family, at 6pm Friday night at the Church on the Square in Baltimore. Follow the links for more information. Here's a sample of the work Kory and Wordsmith do together: "I Pray,"  (from Wordsmith's new album, "Progressions," Music by Kory Caudill and Words by our guest, Wordsmith and by Marc Costanzo. And on June 1, Wordsmith performs with the Baltimore Symphony in a special Symphony in the City concert in Baltimore's Patterson Park. Again, check the links for more info and tickets.Wordsmith joins us today on Zoom from Baltimore. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Analysis: Political fallout from High Court draft on abortion rights

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 17:54

    A report on the political news website Punchbowl yesterday examined how prominent the issue of abortion has been in the midterm primaries. The answer is, “Not so much.” In December 2021 and January and February of this year, when Gallup asked respondents what they thought the most important problem was facing the United States today, fewer than half of one percent answered “abortion.” In March, that number went to zero. If reaction to the leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court about its upcoming decision in an abortion case is any indication, that number has probably gone up this week. From an issue barely mentioned in primary races to what some are hoping will be the defining issue of the midterm elections, the future of abortion rights is on everybody's minds again. Joining Tom to discuss the political ramifications of this week's stunning developments at the Supreme Court is Domenico Montanaro, senior political editor and correspondent for National Public Radio. Domenico joins us on our digital line from Washington, DC… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Michelle Singletary's advice for managing your money in troubled times

    Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 31:23

    Time now for Midday on Personal Finance. Tom welcomes back the award-winning syndicated personal finance columnist for the Washington Post, Michelle Singletary. Her column is called The Color of Money. She is also the author of several books. Last year, we spoke about her latest, a hands-on, step by step guide to navigating out of financial problems when our money plans are upended by unexpected things like a pandemic, for example. It's called What to Do With Your Money When Crisis Hits: A Survival Guide. And, as recent events have demonstrated, global medical crises aren't the only reason people find themselves behind the eight ball. Inflation, supply chain issues and war create trouble that is reflected in many aspects of our economy and our lives. If you have questions about how to save, how to invest and how to handle the challenges of debt, or anything related to personal finance, this is your chance to ask an expert! Join us…Call 410.662.8780. email: midday@wypr.org Tweet: @MiddayWYPR Michelle Singletary joins us on our digital line from Bowie, Maryland. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    US Senate Dems respond to High Court draft striking abortion rights

    Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 17:23

    Politico's publication Monday night of a leaked draft of a Supreme Court opinion in a Mississippi abortion rights case set off a firestorm of criticism from abortion-rights supporters, and paroxysms of joy from abortion rights opponents. In a 98-page draft of an opinion that was not supposed to made public until the Court majority signed off on a final version, Justice Samuel Alito stated bluntly, “We hold that Roe and Casey must be overruled. The Constitution makes no reference to abortion, and no such right is implicitly protected by any constitutional provision....” He's referring, of course to the two landmark Supreme Court cases that have defined laws about abortion access: Roe v. Wade and Casey v. Planned Parenthood. Reaction from Democrats on Capitol Hill was swift. Majority Leader Chuck Schumer vowed to call a vote on legislation that would codify in law a woman's right to end her pregnancy. Joining Tom now is Sen. Chris Van Hollen. He is a co-sponsor of the Women's Health Protection Act, a version of which passed in the House last September. Sen. Van Hollen was first elected to the Senate in 2016. He is standing for re-election this year. His opponent in the Democratic primary is Michelle Smith, a policy analyst at USAID and an audio engineer. Ten Republicans will appear on the ballot in July in the race to be the nominee to oppose Sen. Van Hollen in November. Sen Chris Van Hollen joins us on Zoom from his office on Capitol Hill. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Del. Brooke Lierman, Democratic candidate for MD Comptroller

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 37:35

    And now, another in our series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest is Del. Brooke Lierman. She's running in the Democratic primary for Maryland Comptroller. Her opponent in that race is Bowie Mayor Tim Adams. Barry Glassman, the Harford County Executive, is running unopposed in the Republican Comptroller primary. The Maryland Comptroller is an office that doesn't change hands very frequently. Louis Goldstein had the job for nearly 40 years. The current Comptroller, Peter Franchot, was first elected to that office in 2007. He is running in the Democratic primary for Governor. Brooke Lierman was elected to the House of Delegates in 2014. She serves in a leadership role on the Environment and Transportation Committee, and on joint committees on Chesapeake and Atlantic Coastal Bays, the Committee to end homelessness, and the committee on Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review. She has also served on the Appropriations Committee and the Joint Committee on Pensions. After graduating from Dartmouth College, Del. Lierman worked as a grassroots organizer and on the political campaigns of several progressive candidates. She received a law degree from the University of Texas at Austin, and after a Federal District Court clerkship, she joined the law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, where she is “of counsel,” with a focus on civil rights and disability rights.Brooke Lierman is 43 years old. She and her husband live in Baltimore. They are the parents of two young children. Brooke Lierman joins us on our digital line from Baltimore. You are welcome to join us as well! Call us: 4109.662.8780 Email us: midday@wypr.org Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The end of Roe v. Wade? Analysis of the SCOTUS leaked draft ruling

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 11:16

    On Monday night (May 2, 2022), Politicopublished what appears to be a draft of a Supreme Court ruling overturning the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which has allowed legal abortion for the past 50 years. Joining Tom now to put this story in context for us is Kimberly Wehle. She is on the faculty of the University of Baltimore School of Law, and the author of several books, including her latest:How to Think Like a Lawyer and Why:  A Commonsense Guide to Everyday Dilemmas… Kim Wehle join us on Zoom from Chevy Chase, MD. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Jerome Segal, Democratic primary candidate for Maryland Governor

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 40:30

    Welcome to this special Web-only installment of our series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest is Jerome Segal, a socialist who founded the Bread and Roses Party in 2020, who is running as a Democrat in the primary for Governor. Dr. Segal ran for the US Senate in 2018, and for President in 2020. He holds a PhD in Philosophy, he is the author of several books, and in addition to experience as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, he has worked on Capitol Hill, and in the Executive Branch of the Federal government. Dr. Segal holds a PhD. in Philosophy from the U of Michigan, a Master's in Public Policy from the U of Minnesota and a BA from the City College of New York. He is 78 years old. He's married and the father of a son. He has chosen Justin Dispenza, a city councilman in Galena, Maryland, as his Lt. Governor running mate. Jerome Segal spoke with Tom on Friday, April 29th, 2022. Maryland's Primary Election Day is July 19th. Early voting begins on July 7th. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Healthwatch: Dr. Leana Wen on kid vax, mask laws, MD's COVID rates

    Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 49:46

    Today, it's another edition of the Midday Healthwatch, our monthly focus on the latest COVID news and other public health issues, with Dr. Leana Wen. On the 11th of April, the testing positivity rate for COVID 19 in MD stood at 2.42%, nearly twice what it was three weeks earlier. It's nearly doubled again in the last three weeks. The BA.2 variant is highly transmissible. The CDC estimates that nearly 60% of Americans have already been infected. For children, the infection rate is even higher: closer to 75%. And now, two more variants, BA 4 and BA5 are causing big spikes in South Africa. What's on the horizon for the US? Of course, with the rise in infections, many fewer people are becoming seriously ill than in the past. But serious illness and death for immunocompromised patients is still a major concern. Dr. Wen is with us for the hour to talk about all the latest COVID news. The former Baltimore City health commissioner is an emergency physician now serving as visiting professor at GW University's Milken Institute of Public Health. She's a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution, a health columnist for The Washington Post, and a medical analyst for CNN. And she is the author of a compelling memoir, Lifelines: A Doctor's Journey in the Fight for Public Health(Metropolitan Books, 2021). Dr. Leana Wen joins us on Zoom from Baltimore. And we take your questions and comments as well: Call us: 410.662.8780. Email us: midday@wypr.org. Or Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rousuck's Review: 'Henry V' by the Chesapeake Shakespeare Co.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 12:05

    Midday on the Arts concludes with a visit from our theater critic, J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins Tom each week with her reviews of the regional stage. Today, she shares her take on William Shakespeare's Henry V, now getting a rousing new production at Baltimore's Chesapeake Shakespeare Company. With its themes of strident nationalism, war and "band of brothers" bravado, Henry V is one of the Bard's most muscular and popular history plays. This CSC production is directed with timely resonance by Alec Wild. Henry Vcontinues at Chesapeake Shakespeare Company through May 15. For showtimes and ticketing information, click here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Sheku and Isata Kanneh-Mason: The sibling duo to play at Shriver Hall

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 16:27

    As Midday on the Artscontinues, Tom's next guests are a brother and sister classical music duo who are part of a large family of talented musicians. Sheku Kanneh-Mason is a cellist who shot to fame when he was invited to play at the wedding of Prince Harry and Megan Markle, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. His sister, Isata Kanneh-Mason is an award winning pianist, who, like her brother, plays concerts all over the world. They are currently touring together, and they'll be playing in Baltimore Sunday night. Here's a sample of their beautiful artistry from their first CD as a duo, Muse,performing Samuel Barber's Sure on This Shining Night. Cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason and pianist Isata Kanneh-Mason join Tom on Zoom from their tour venue in Kansas City, Missouri. Sheku and Isata Kanneh-Mason are performing Sunday night at Shriver Hall, on the campus of Johns Hopkins University. The concert starts at 5:30. For program and ticketing information, click here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Producer David Simon on HBO's GTTF drama, 'We Own This City'

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 20:10

    It's Midday on the Arts.  Coming up later in the hour, we'll hear from the young cellist who burst on the classical music scene when he performed at the wedding of Prince Harry and Megan Markle. Sheku Kanneh-Mason and his sister Isata, a wonderful pianist, will be performing in Baltimore this weekend, and they both join us. We'll also check in with theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck who will give us her take on Henry V, the latest production at the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company. But we begin with David Simon, the journalist, author and filmmaker. He is the creative force behind The Wire, The Deuce, Show Me a Hero, Treme  and many other acclaimed TV series and movies. We'll talk about his latest project: the HBO limited series We Own This City,based on the book by Justin Fenton, about the notorious criminal enterprise that was embedded in the Baltimore City Police Department called the Gun Trace Task Force. The first episode is available on HBO Max. New episodes will stream over the next five weeks. David Simon joins us on Zoom. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Peter Franchot, Democratic candidate for Maryland Governor

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 48:47

    Today, it's another installment in Midday's series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest for the hour is Peter Franchot. He was first elected to the General Assembly in 1986. He represented part of Montgomery County in the House of Delegates for 20 years. In 2006, he was elected Comptroller of MD. In 2018, he won the race for his fourth term in that office by the largest margin of any statewide candidate in MD history. He has decided not to stand for election to a fifth term as Comptroller. Instead, he's running in the Democratic primary for Governor. Mr. Franchot has often been at odds with Democratic leaders during his 35 years in Annapolis. He opposed slot machines when legislation to legalize them was introduced in 2008. He joined Gov. Larry Hogan and then Treasurer Nancy Copp to end the contract to develop the State center complex in Baltimore. And in 2019, in a dispute with Democratic leaders, the legislature stripped the Comptroller's office of some of its regulatory role over alcohol and tobacco. Mr. Franchot is one of 10 contenders in Maryland's gubernatorial primary, and internal polls from his campaign and the campaign of Rushern Baker show him in the lead, with 71 days left until early voting begins. Before entering elective politics, Mr. Franchot served in the Army during the Vietnam War, and later worked for Ralph Nader, the Union of Concerned Scientists, and as a staff director for then-Congressman Ed Markey of Massachusetts. Peter Franchot is 74 years old. He holds a bachelor's degree from Amherst College and a law degree from Northeastern University. He and his wife, Anne Maher, are the parents of two grown children, and three grandchildren. They are longtime residents of Takoma Park. Mr. Franchot has chosen former Prince George's County Councilwoman Monique Anderson-Walker as his running mate for Lt. Governor. Peter Franchot joins us today on Zoom from Takoma Park. You are welcome to join us, as well. Call us: 410.662.8780. email us: midday@wypr.org. Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    'Lynching and Leisure': How racial terrorism became public spectacle

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 48:44

    Tom's guest today is Dr. Terry Anne Scott, an associate professor of history, the chair of the History Department at Hood College, and a good friend of the Midday show. Dr. Scott has written a book that is as difficult as it is important. It chronicles the evolution of mob violence in Texas at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. The NAACP has documented more than 4,700 lynchings across America from the 1880s through the 1960s. Professor Scott has found evidence — in just the state of Texas — that 469 Black people, as well as 140 white people, 111 Mexicans and at least one Native American were victims of mob violence in roughly that same time period. Dr. Scott's book traces how these killings — once furtive, clandestine acts — eventually became popular public spectacles, and she examines what that means for our understanding of the legacy of racial violence and discrimination in America. Her book is called Lynching and Leisure:  Race and the Transformation of Mob Violence in Texas. It's published by University of Arkansas Press. CONTENT ADVISORY: We talk today about a book that includes graphic descriptions of torture and murder. Understanding the depravity of these acts is fundamental to understanding what Black people faced and feared on a daily basis. It is difficult to comprehend the cruelty of the White mobs that inflicted these painful deaths on so many people. But Dr. Scott's book is the result of important research that we think is very important to share. Terry Anne Scott joins us on our digital line from Frederick, Maryland. You're welcome to join us as well. Call us: 410.662.8780. email us: midday@wypr.org Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    'Torn Apart': Dorothy Roberts on racial disparities in foster care

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 48:47

    Tom's guest today is Dorothy Roberts, a professor of law and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of four books, including Killing the Black Body,about systemic abuse of African American women, and Fatal Invention, which explores the relationship between race, science and politics. Her new book argues that the nation's foster care system, putatively designed to protect children, instead deprives Black parents of fundamental rights and leads to traumatic consequences for Black children. The child welfare system, she argues, is “more accurately described as the family policing system,” and she calls for it to be dismantled. The book is called Torn Apart:  How the Child Welfare System Destroys Black Families—And How Abolition Can Build a Safer World. Dorothy Roberts joins us on Zoom from Philadelphia. You're welcome to join the conversation. Call: 410.662.8780. email: midday@wypr.org. Tweet: @MiddayWYPR A week from Thursday, on May 5th, Dorothy Roberts will be the keynote speaker at a conference sponsored by the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and its Department of the History of Medicine, called Reckoning with Race and Racism in Academic Medicine— another subject on which Professor Roberts has written extensively. For more information on the in-person and virtual symposium and for a link to register, click here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Barry Glassman, Republican candidate for MD Comptroller

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 48:47

    On Midday today, another in our series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest is Harford County Executive Barry Glassman. He is a Republican who is running unopposed in the Republican primary for Maryland Comptroller, the agency executive elected to serve as steward of the state's tax and financial affairs. There are two Comptroller candidates in the Democratic primary: Del. Brooke Lierman and Bowie Mayor Tim Adams. Tom will be speaking with them in the coming weeks. Maryland Comptroller is an office that doesn't change hands very frequently. Louis Goldstein had the job for nearly 40 years. The current Comptroller, Peter Franchot, was first elected to that office in 2007. He is running in the Democratic primary for Governor. Barry Glassman is a sheep farmer who began his political career in 1990 when he was first elected to the Harford County Council. He served in the MD House of Delegates from 1999-2008, and in the MD Senate from 2008-2014. He has served as the President of the MD Association of Counties. He will soon complete his second term as County Executive. Mr. Glassman holds a Bachelor's Degree in political science from Washington College. Before entering politics, he was a claims adjuster for BGE. He has been active in the Harford County 4-H Club, the Harford County Farm Bureau and the Level Volunteer Fire Company.Barry Glassman is 60 years old. He and his wife are the parents of an adult son, and the grandparents of a young grandson. Barry Glassman joins us on our digital line from Bel Air, MD. You are welcome to join us as well…call us: 410.662.8780 email us: midday@wypr.org or Tweet: @MiddayWYPR. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Movies: A '22 MDFilmFest preview; HBO's 'We Own This City' launch

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 48:46

    It's Midday at the Movies, our monthly look at films and filmmaking. Tom is joined again today by two of our favorite movie mavens: Ann Hornaday is film critic for the Washington Post and author of Talking Pictures: How to Watch Movies, now available in paperback; she joins us on our digital line. And joining us on Zoom is Jed Dietz, the founder and retired director of the Maryland Film Festival, which is about to begin its first IN-PERSON festival since 2019. On today's program, we're also joined by the MD Film Festival's Artistic Director Christy LeMaster,who helps usspotlight some of the many short films, docs and features being showcased this year. The Festival opens on April 27 and runs through May 1 at the Parkway. Check out the Festival schedule here. Among the films highlighted today is HBO Max's new limited series, We Own This City, a 6-part dramatization of reporter Justin Fenton's best-selling book about the Baltimore Police Department's infamous Gun Trace Task Force scandal. A special Festival screening of the first episode of the series, on Thursday at 7pm, will be followed by a community panel discussion, including executive producers and writers George PelecanosandDavid Simon (The Wire), writer D Watkins, and reporter Justin Fenton, author of the book We Own This City. We get a sneak preview of Episode One of host and series co-writer D Watkins' official We Own This City Podcast, (which drops Monday), in which he interviews actor Jon Bernthal, the actor who portrays GTTF's Sgt Wayne Jenkins in the HBO Max series. We also discuss Navalny, the new documentary by director Daniel Roher about jailed Russian dissident and Vladimir Putin rival Alexei Navalny. The doc is being screened at MFF at 9:30 Thursday night. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Thiru Vignarajah, Democrat for Baltimore City State's Attorney

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 48:38

    Today on Midday, we continue our series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest is Thiru Vignarajah, who is running in the Democratic primary for Baltimore City State's Attorney. This is his third try for public office. He ran for State's Attorney in 2018, and he ran for Baltimore Mayor in 2020. His opponents in the 2018 race are the same people he is facing this time around: the incumbent, Marilyn Mosby, and former prosecutor and defense attorney, Ivan Bates. A fourth candidate, Roya Hannah has announced her intention to run in the general election as an independent. Mr. Vignarajahserved as a federal prosecutor at the U.S. Attorney's Office in Baltimore. He also headed the Major Investigations Unit in the Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office, and he was the Deputy Attorney General for Maryland for about two years. He was a partner at the law firm, DLA Piper, and since August of last year, he has been the CEO of Capital Plus Financial, a community development financial institution (CDFI) that works to close the wealth gap for people of color. Mr. Vignarajah is 45 years old. He attended Yale University and Harvard Law School, where he served as president of the Harvard Law Review. He was also a clerk for Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer. Thiru Vignarajah joins us on Zoom. You are welcome to join us as well…give us a call at 410.662.8780. email us: midday@wypr.org, or Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Power of Home: Three views on the importance of safe shelter

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 48:41

    Today on Midday:  strategies to help people who are homeless. Tom's first guest is Dr. Sam Tsemberis, a clinical psychologist and the founder of Pathways Housing First Institute. He is the creator of what's come to be known as the “Housing First” model, which Tsemberis calls the “vaccine for homelessness.” Sam Tsemberis joins us on Zoom from Los Angeles, California. Then, Tom speaks with Katie Allston, the president and CEO of Marian House, a Baltimore organization that has been helping formerly incarcerated women with housing and support services since 1982. On Friday night, they will celebrate their 40th anniversary with an event at the R House Garage in Remington, hosted by the actor Rachel Hilson and Denise Koch of WJZ Television. We also hear from recent Marian House graduate Juanita “Nita” Bowie. Juanita Bowie and Katie Allston join us on Zoom from Baltimore... The United Nations estimates that more than 11 million people have been displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Roughly half of them have fled their homes to other places in Ukraine, but nearly 5 million people have fled to other countries, including the United States. Airbnb is coordinating with federal officials to provide free, temporary housing for refugees from Ukraine here and throughout Europe. Tom's next guest is Liz DeBold Fusco, the Communications Lead for North America for Airbnb. She joins us on Zoom from Colts Neck, New Jersey. BTW, local musicians are collaborating to help Ukraine. Tomorrow night, members of the Baltimore Symphony will partner with The Creative Alliance for a concert at the Meyerhoff. For more info, click here. And on Saturday night, An Die Musik in Baltimore will present pianist Lisa Weiss, hammer dulcimer virtuoso Ken Kolodner, klezmer clarinetist Seth Kibel, and mandolin master Joel-Michael-Schwartz in a concert to benefit Ukraine. For information on that concert, click here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rousuck's Review: 'Treasure Island' at Classic Theatre of Maryland

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 11:19

    It's time again for a visit with Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins Tom each week with her reviews of the regional stage. Today, she spotlights a mostly faithful and lively new adaptation of Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson's 1883 adventure novel, Treasure Island, in a world-premiere production on stage at the Classic Theatre of Maryland (formerly Annapolis Shakespeare Company). CTM's founder and artistic director Sally Boyett and resident director Donald Hicken wrote the streamlined new adaptation. Their family-friendly play runs about two hours, including an intermission. Treasure Island continues at Classic Theatre of Maryland in Annapolis through April 24. Follow the theater link above for showtimes and ticketing information. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Curbing Baltimore's gun violence epidemic: two new strategies

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 37:19

    Today on Midday, a conversation about public safety and strategies for ending the gun violence that plagues so many Baltimore neighborhoods. Tom's first guest is Maryland Delegate Chanel Branch. She is a Democrat. In 2020, she was appointed as one of three delegates to represent Baltimore City in District 45, replacing Cheryl Glenn, who went to jail when she was convicted on corruption charges. Del. Branch served alongside her father, House Majority Whip Talmadge Branch, who was first elected in 1995. On Friday, Talmadge Branch announced he will not seek re-election. Chanel Branch is running to retain her seat, as is the other incumbent, Del. Stephanie Smith. Other challengers in the 45th district include Jackie Addison, George Johnson and Caylin Young. We've invited Del. Branch to the show today to talk about a bill she introduced (HB 1430)during the 2022 session establishing Gun Courts. The Delegate has personal experience with the tragedy of gun violence. Her son, Tyrone Ray, was murdered in 2017. Del. Chanel Branch join us on Zoom… Then, Tom speaks with Shantay Jackson, the head of the Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Safety and Engagement (MONSE), about the city's new efforts to create a Community Violence InterventionEcosystem in Baltimore. Shantay Jackson joins us on Zoom from her office in City Hall. Join us… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Judge Katie O'Malley, Democratic candidate for MD Attorney General

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 49:45

    Today, it's another installment in our series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest for the hour is Judge Katie Curran O'Malley. In October, 2021, she retired after 20 years as a Baltimore District Court judge to run in the Democratic primary for Maryland Attorney General. The incumbent AG, DemocratBrian Frosh, will retire at the end of this term. Judge O'Malley was admitted to the Maryland Bar in 1991, and she began her legal career that year as an Assistant State's Attorney in Baltimore County. She was appointed as a Judge on the Baltimore District Court in 2001 by Gov. Paris Glendening. Her opponent in this year's primary election is Congressman Anthony Brown, who served for eight years as Lt. Governor in the administration of Judge O'Malley's husband, Gov. Martin O'Malley. Judge O'Malley's father, J. Joseph Curran, Jr. also served as Lt. Governor (with MD Governor Harry Hughes) and won election five times to serve as Maryland Attorney General, from 1987 to 2007 — the longest tenure of any Attorney General in the state's history. Katie Curran O'Malley holds an undergraduate degree in international studies from Towson University and a law degree from the University of Baltimore School of Law. She is 59 years old. She and her husband live in Baltimore. They are the parents of four grown children. Judge O'Malley joins us on our digital line from Baltimore. And you are welcome to join us as well…Call: 410.662.8780. email: midday@wypr.orgTweet us:@MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Dr. Freeman Hrabowski: Reflecting on 30 years at the helm of UMBC

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 49:49

    Tom's Newsmaker guest today is Dr. Freeman Hrabowski III, who has served as the president of University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) for 30 years. He will retire from that position at the end of June. He will be succeeded by a scholar and Dean from Duke University, Dr. Valerie Sheares Ashby. Dr. Hrabowski is UMBC's fifth president, and by far, the most impactful. For years, he has been regularly included on the lists of the world's most influential people and top leaders. He has been an unparalleled visionary as an educator, and a joyful and tireless champion of diversity and equity in academia and in society at large. He transformed UMBC's modest, somewhat sleepy Catonsville campus into an academic powerhouse, which is now recognized as one of only 146 R1 institutions, the highest ranking afforded to the country's most prestigious research institutions. And he has created opportunities for students from diverse and non-traditional academic backgrounds. For years, UMBC has produced more Black M.D. and Ph. D. degree-earners than any other college in the country. Freeman Hrabowski's commitment to civil rights and social justice has been life-long. He grew up in Birmingham, Alabama. Before he was a teenager he was marching with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, and he counted among his friends the girls who were murdered in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in 1963. Dr. Freeman Hrabowski joins us on our digital line from the UMBC campus in Catonsville. You're welcome to join us as well, by phone: 410.662.8780 email: midday@wypr.org or Tweet: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    As Title IX turns 50, many US schools ignoring the sex bias ban

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 48:43

    Today, we're going to talk about Title IX. What's Title IX? It's a statute within the Education Act passed by the US Congress in 1972 which states that: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." That has been the law of the land for 50 years. And in recognition of that milestone, a group of journalists from the University of MD have spent four months looking closely into whether Title IX is doing what it set out to do when it comes to high school sports. They have published a series of reports called “Unlevel Playing Fields.” Three guests join me today to talk about this investigation and what it has revealed. Sandy Banisky is a former editor at the Baltimore Sun, and the Abell Professor in Baltimore Journalism for the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland. And, full disclosure, Sandy also serves as a member of the board of directors of WYPR… Mark Hyman has been a good friend of Midday for many years. He is a former reporter for the Baltimore Sun and other publications, and he's written three books on youth sports. He is the director of The Shirley Povich Center for Sports Journalism at the University of MD… Lauren Rosh is a senior at the University of MD, and the managing editor of Testudo Times, which covers sports at the school. She is one of more than 20 student reporters who contributed reporting to this project. The report was a collaborative effort by the Shirley Povich Center for Sports Journalism and the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill College of Journalism. All our guests join us on Zoom from College Park, Maryland. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Keeping Maryland on Daylight Saving Time: the pros and cons

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 49:46

    Last month, to the surprise of many, the United States Senate passed, by voice vote, a measure that would keep Daylight Saving Time year round. No more falling back in November and springing forward in March. The bill still has to clear the House. Neither Speaker Nancy Pelosi nor President Biden has said whether or not they support it. We tried this once before. In 1974, Congress tried permanent Daylight Saving Time in an effort to save energy, by increasing daylight hours at the end of the day. Americans hated it, and we've been changing our clocks twice a year ever since. Recent polling, however, indicates much broader support for the idea. Today on Midday, a conversation about the merits and pitfalls of permanent daylight saving time, or the counter proposals: making standard time permanent, or staying with the system we've got. We begin our discussion with a Delegate from the Maryland General Assembly who has introduced a bill that would keep the clocks set to Daylight Saving Time all year in Maryland.Del. Brian Crosby represents District 29B, in St. Mary's County. He's a Democrat who serves as the vice chair of the Economic Matters Committee in the House of Delegates. Delegate Crosby joins Tom on Zoom from St. Mary's County. Later in the hour, Tom talks with Dr. Beth Ann Malow, a professor of neurology and pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center who has studied what happens when we switch back and forth between standard and daylight time. She's also the director of Vanderbilt's sleep division. Dr. Malow joins us on Zoom from Nashville, Tennessee. Then, for another perspective on the issue of making Daylight Saving Time permanent, Tom speaks with Lisa VanBuskirk. She's the Maryland and Anne Arundel County chapter leader of Start School Later,a nonprofit advocacy group that is concerned with kids starting their school day in the dark. Lisa VanBuskirk joins us on Zoom… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rousuck's Review: 'Sense and Sensibility' at Everyman Theatre

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 11:18

    It's time again for a visit with Middaytheater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins Tom each week with her reviews of the regional stage. Today Judy spotlights a new production of playwright Kate Hamill's 2016 adaptation of Jane Austen's classic novel, Sense and Sensibility, live on stage at Baltimore's Everyman Theatre. Hamill's spirited but faithful adaptation of the 1811 best-seller follows the adventures (and misadventures) of the Dashwood sisters - sensible Elinor, hypersensitive Marianne and good-natured Margaret, the youngest - after the death of their father and sudden loss of fortune. The play is directed at Everyman by Susanna Gellertand features a ten-member ensemble cast playing more than two dozen characters. Sense and Sensibility continues live on stage at Everyman Theatre through May 1. For showtimes and ticketing information, click the theater links. A digital streaming version will be available for ticketed patrons starting April 22 and continuing through May 15. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Sizing up the 2022 Maryland General Assembly Session

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 37:36

    The 2022 Session of the Maryland General Assembly came to a close last night in Annapolis, at midnight, with most of the business of the legislature wrapped-up before Sine Die and the bang of the final gavel. Governor Larry Hogan called this year's session the best he's had in his eight years in office. Senate President Bill Ferguson agreed that it was successful. He described it as “historic.” At this hour, Governor Hogan is holding a bill signing ceremony at the State House in Annapolis in which he will sign 79 bills into law. Several others will become law without his signature, and many will become law as a result of overrides of the Governor's vetoes. Joining Tom first to discuss some of the key legislative achievements of the session is Delegate Luke Clippinger, a Democrat who represents Baltimore City and the 46th District, and who chairs the House Judiciary Committee. Del. Clippingerjoins us on Zoom. Then, Tom turns to Josh Kurtz, the founding editor of Maryland Matters, the online news journal covering Maryland politics and government, for more wide-ranging analysis of the 2022 session. Mr. Kurtz, a veteran journalist and State House-watcher, also joins us on Zoom. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Healthwatch with Dr. Leana Wen: a BA.2 variant surge; 2nd boosters?

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 48:38

    It's the Midday Healthwatch, our monthly focus on public health issues with Dr. Leana Wen. For weeks, the state testing positivity rate for COVID 19 has been below 2%. But it's starting to creep up again. As of this morning, it stands at 2.42%, nearly twice what it was three weeks ago. At last week's Gridiron Club dinner in Washington, about a dozen political A-listers, including Attorney General Merrick Garland, Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo and Congressmen Adam Schiff and Joaquin Castro tested positive for the coronavirus. Do the rising numbers and high profile cases indicate that we should once again avoid large gatherings? Dr. Wen says, “No.” She writes in the Washington Post, “At this point in the pandemic, we have to accept that infections will keep occurring.” Is another Coronavirus surge in the cards? The BA.2 sub-variant strain is even more transmissible than the original omicron variant, which itself spread much more quickly than the delta variant. During the last surge, nearly half of Americans contracted the virus, but many fewer people became seriously ill than in previous surges. If there is another surge, are we better prepared, this time around? Dr. Leana Wen is with us for the hour to talk about all the latest COVID news.The former Baltimore City Health Commissioner is an emergency physician who's now a visiting professor at George Washington University's Milken Institute School of Public Health, a medical analyst for CNN, a health columnist for the Washington Post and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. She is also the author of a compelling memoir, Lifelines: A Doctor's Journey in the Fight for Public Health. As always, we welcome your questions or comments for Dr. Wen! Call us: 410.662.8780. Email us at midday@wypr.org, or Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Slap: Why are we still talking about Will Smith's Oscars assault?

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 23:38

    I'm not going to talk about it. I'm going to be clear up top, I've talked about it enough. I kept talking about it. I kept thinking about it. I don't want to talk about it, and you can't make me talk about it...But I have a question…Do you want to talk about?..." --The comedian and actor Jerrod Carmichael, in his SNL monologue last week. “The Slap” as it's come to be known, happened nearly two weeks ago, and we have not yet discussed it here on Midday. There is plenty of other news to ponder, and there have been plenty of people jumping-in to talk about what should happen to Will Smith, how Chris Rock handled the situation, and what the Academy coulda and shoulda done in the moment, and since. Members of the Academy board are meeting in Los Angeles at this hour to discuss disciplinary measures against Mr. Smith. We're going to jump in now. Joining Tom to talk it over is Dr. Theopia Jackson. She is the immediate past president of the Association of Black Psychologists. She connects with us on Zoom. And Ann Hornaday is a film critic for The Washington Post. She joins us on our digital line. And if you want to talk about it, give us a call, send us an email, or Tweet us.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    City wastewater woes: what's gone wrong at Back River and Patapsco

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 24:35

    Today, a conversation about problems with Baltimore's water system. Aging infrastructure, ineffective accounting and billing, and high costs to rate-payers are just some of the challenges facing the City's Department of Public Works (DPW). Two weeks ago, problems got worse. The Maryland Secretary of the Environment, Ben Grumbles, ordered that the authority over the operations of the Back River wastewater treatment plantbe taken away from the city, and transferred to the state. Late last month, state inspectors found that the Back River plant was discharging polluted water in violation of the Clean Water Act. Their scathing report on the plant cited "the precipitous decline of the functioning of several critical processes at the Plant in comparison with prior inspections.” Yesterday, when Tom asked Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott about why problems at the city-owned Back River and Patapsco wastewater treatment plants hadn't been addressed, the mayor noted that the problems pre-date his administration: "We know the Back River and Patapsco wastewater issues in Baltimore, the issues have been there you know they don't just predate my administration but the administration that came before me and the one that came before that, and the one that came before that.  We are committed to working with MDE and MES to get this facility into compliance.  I actually personally met with the secretary right before this decision was made, and said that we want to continue to work with them. But we know this is not an overnight fix. We're going to work collaboratively with them to combine resources to ensure that we're being good stewards of this service, right? And making sure that we are supporting our Chesapeake Bay. We know that there are supply-chain issues and staffing shortages that have made getting Back River...into compliance difficult."  — Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott, speaking with Tom Hall here on Midday, yesterday. We think it's important to know what's going on at these wastewater facilities, why these alleged violations of the Clean Water Act are serious, and what the city is going to have to do to solve these longstanding problems. To help us understand, Tom invited two environmental advocates to join us for part of the hour today. Alice Volpitta of Blue Water Baltimore is the Baltimore Water Keeper. Blue Water Baltimore is part of the lawsuits that are currently in the courts…Angela Haren is a Senior Attorney at the Chesapeake Legal Alliance. She also happens to be a former Baltimore Water Keeper… Alice Volpitta and Angela Haren join us on Zoom. We apologize for the technical difficulties on Friday that delayed the publication of this post. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rousuck's Review: 'Pretty Woman: The Musical' at the Hippodrome

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 10:40

    It's time again for a visit with Midday's theater critic, J. Wynn Roususk, who joins us every week with her reviews of the regional stage. Today's she tells us about Pretty Woman: The Musical, the touring company production of the hit Broadway show that's currently lighting up the stage at Baltimore's Hippodrome Theatre. Based on the popular 1990 movie of the same name (which starred Richard Gere, and featured Julia Roberts in the title role), Pretty Woman: The Musical opened on Broadway in 2018 and closed a year later after 485 performances. The touring company production's creative team is led by two-time Tony Award®-winning director and choreographer Jerry Mitchell (Hairspray, Kinky Boots, Legally Blonde), and features the original score by Grammy® winner Bryan Adams and Jim Vallance (“Summer of '69”, “Heaven”), and a book by the movie's late director, Garry Marshall and screenwriter J. F. Lawton. Pretty Woman: The Musical continues at the Hippodrome Theatre through Sunday, April 10. Follow the theater links for showtimes and ticketing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Young Vo's 'Gibberish': a picture book about immigrants' struggles

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 15:38

    Tom's next guest is Young Vo, a Baltimore-based artist, animator, and illustrator whose new children's picture book, Gibberish, has just been published by Levine Querido. Vo's debut story of a young Asian immigrant who struggles to understand the language of his newly adopted home country mirrors Vo's own experience after coming to the United States as a young refugee from Vietnam. Young Vo joins us on Zoom from Baltimore. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Mayor Scott on anti-crime funds, wastewater, re-opening City Hall

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 23:26

    It's Midday with the Mayor, and Baltimore City Mayor Brandon Scottjoins Tom Hall for another of their monthly live conversations about key issues on the mayor's and the city's agenda. In today's installment, they discuss the major points in Mayor Scott's State of the City address, the $45 million in state anti-crime funds, the problems at two of the city's wastewater treatment plants, a new city initiative to support the families of incarcerated citizens, and this week's post-COVID re-opening of City Hall, among other topics. Mayor Brandon Scott joins us on Zoom from City Hall. And you're welcome to join us as well. Call 410.662.8780. email us at midday@wypr.org or Tweet us @MiddayWYPR. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Back to the Garden: Our Spring guide to your plant & garden care

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 49:42

    One of these days, it's gonna get warm and sunny, and when it does, a lot of us will head Back to the Garden.    That's what we're doing today on Midday, in another of our seasonal conversations about what we're all growing around our homes, in our yards and our community gardens.  And joining us once again with answers to all of your plant and gardening questions is Carrie Engel, the veteran plant specialist and Greenhouse Manager at Valley View Farms Nursery and Garden Center in Cockeysville, Maryland. And a little later in this hour we'll also be joined by Richard Francis, better known as "Farmer Chippy,"the director of The Plantation Park Heights Urban Farm, and the Agrihood in Northwest Baltimore.Carrie EngelandFarmer Chippyjoin us on Zoom. Let us know what's on your mind, and what's going to be in your garden this year… Join us! Call 410.662.8780 email: midday@wypr.org Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wes Moore, Democratic primary candidate for Maryland Governor

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 49:42

    Yesterday, Governor Larry Hogan signed into law a revised mapwith new boundaries for Congressional districts, after a judge in Anne Arundel County threw out the original map drawn by Democrats last December. When MD Attorney General Brian Frosh changed his decision to appeal that ruling, the Governor agreed to the new maps, saying in a statement, that the maps, quote, “weren't, in my opinion, as good as the ones drawn by the citizen commission, and we shouldn't have wasted so much time—but they are a huge improvement.” The commission he referred to was a bipartisan group the Governor appointed. A number of redistricting maps created by Republicans have been thrown out in court around the country because they were found to be unconstitutional due to gerrymandering. The decision in MD is the first time a map drawn by Democrats met the same fate. The maps for state legislative districts remain in limbo. In a separate case, Republicans challenged those maps in court as well. The Court of Appeals is expected to rule in that case soon. Primary elections are scheduled for July 19th. Early voting will begin on July 7th. Today on Midday, we continue with our election-year interview series, Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest is Wes Moore, who is one of 10 candidates in the Democratic primary for Governor. This is Wes Moore's first run for elective office. His career has included military service, with a tour in Afghanistan, a stint as a White House Fellow, and work in the financial industry. He is the author of several books, including the best-selling The Other Wes Mooreand Five Days: The Fiery Reckoning of an American City, his account, co-written with journalist Erica L. Green, of what led up to, and what happened after the 2015 Freddie Gray uprising.  He founded an organization called BridgeEdU, which helps students navigate the college experience, and before he entered the primary race, he was the CEO of the Robin Hood Foundation, a national anti-poverty organization. Wes Moore holds an Associate's degree from Valley Forge Military College, and an undergraduate degree in International Relations from Johns Hopkins University. In 2001, he was elected a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University.Mr. Moore is 43 years old. He and his wife Dawn have two young children. They live in Baltimore. Mr. Moore has tapped Aruna Miller, a former Maryland Delegate who represented Montgomery County in the General Assembly from 2010-2018, as his Lt. Governor. Wes Moore joins us on Zoom from Prince George's County, Maryland. You are welcome to join us, too.Call us: 410.662.8780. Email us: midday@wypr.org Tweet us @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rebecca Hoffberger reflects on her three decades at AVAM's helm

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 16:55

    The American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore has garnered international attention as a unique, national museum and education center dedicated to "intuitive, self-taught" artistry. It is the brainchild of Rebecca Hoffberger, its founder and director for the past 27 years. Last summer, Rebecca announced that she would be retiring as the museum's director and primary curator. Earlier this month, the Museum announced that Jenenne Whitfield, the president and CEO of the Heidelberg Project in Detroit, will become the museum's director in September. Rebecca Hoffberger joins us on Zoom from her home in Baltimore County… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Jason Steinhauer on 'History, Disrupted' & the Web's reality warp

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 32:51

    The images from Ukraine are shocking and horrifying. Civilians bound and murdered, left on the streets of Bucha. A ghostly parade of bombing survivors in Mariupol, ash covered, reminiscent of people fleeing lower Manhattan after the 9/11 attacks. A family gunned down on the street as they fled across a burned-out bridge over the Irpin River. Children, numb with fear after days on end hiding in dank and freezing basements. A recent headline in the Economist stated, “The Invasion of Ukraine Is Not the First Social Media War, But It Is the Most Viral.” “Ukraine is the most wired country ever to be invaded,” the article observes. As images and accounts from Ukraine generate millions of views, they comprise an instant e-history of this heart-breaking conflict. Tom's guest today studies how Internet-based social media have changed our understanding of the distant and recent past, and how technology has upended how we learn and communicate our understanding of history. Jason Steinhauer is a public historian, the founder of the History Communication Institute, a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center and a Senior Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. He's also the founder and host of The History Club podcast on Clubhouse, which has more than 100,000 members, and he's the author of History Disrupted: How Social Media and the World Wide Web Have Changed the Past. Jason Steinhauer joins us on Zoom from Washington, DC. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rousuck's Review: 'The Folks at Home,' at Baltimore Center Stage

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 10:59

    Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who brings us her reviews of the regional stage each week, joins Tom today to spotlight The Folks at Home, a new comedy now getting its world premiere at Baltimore Center Stage. Written by Baltimore's own R. Eric Thomas(whoseother new play, Crying on Television, is premiering at Everyman Theatre next month), The Folks at Homeis a TV sitcom-inspired romp about race, marriage and family ties that's directed by Obie Award-winner Stevie Walker-Webb. The cast includes Alexis Bronkovic, Brandon E. Burton, E. Faye Butler, Jane Kaczmarek, Eugene Lee, Christopher Sears and Roz White. The Folks at Home continues on stage at Baltimore Center Stage through April 10. For showtimes and ticket info, click here. The play will also be livestreamedApril 6-10. For livestream tickets, click here.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    New Israel Fund's Daniel Sokatch on understanding the Jewish state

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 38:45

    As Ukraine continues its war with Russian invaders, tensions in the Middle East are once again on the rise. Eleven people have been killed in terror attacks in Israel and the West Bank during the past week-and-a-half. Several others were severely injured. Today on Midday,a conversation with a Jewish progressive advocate for peace in the Middle East.Tom's guest is Daniel Sokatch. He's the CEO of the New Israel Fund, an organization which advocates for equality in Israel for all citizens, recognizing and reinforcing pluralism and a tolerance for diversity and protecting the access of minorities to democratic channels and human rights. That is, to say the least, a tall order. Mr. Sokatch has written a book that attempts to rise to that challenge, examining in an even-handed way the situation in Israel and the occupied territories, the complicated history of the region, and possible solutions to what has been an unsolvable problem for generations. It's called Can We Talk About Israel?  A Guide for the Curious, Confused and Conflicted.  Daniel Sokatch joins Tom on Zoom today from San Francisco… Daniel Sokatch and Tom Hallwill continue their conversation about the book and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in an event at Beth Am Synagogue in Baltimore a week from Sunday, on April 10th at 4:00pm. For more information and to register for the free event, click here. And Ramadan Mubarak to all of our Muslim listeners. We wish you a peaceful and healthy Ramadan, as this evening marks the beginning of Islam's holiest month. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rep. Anthony Brown, Democratic candidate for MD Attorney General

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 49:41

    Today, it's another installment in our series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022. Tom's guest is Maryland Congressman Anthony Brown (D., Dist. 4) who has announced that he will not stand for re-election to the House of Representatives, but rather, run in the Democratic primary for Maryland Attorney General. The incumbent, Democrat Brian Frosh, will retire at the end of this term. Anthony Brown served as the Lt. Governor in the administration of Gov. Martin O'Malley for two terms, from 2007-2015. Prior to that, he was in the General Assembly for eight years where he served as Vice Chairman of the Judiciary Committee and the Majority Whip in the House of Delegates. He was elected to Congress in 2016, representing Prince George's and Anne Arundel counties. In 2014, he ran for Governor, losing to Republican Larry Hogan. Rep. Brown holds an undergraduate degree and a law degree from Harvard. A decorated military veteran, he is a retired Colonel in the United States Army Reserve, where he served for more than 25 years, including a tour in Iraq where he earned a Bronze Star. He was admitted to the Maryland bar in 1994. He was a clerk in the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. Anthony Brown is 60 years old. He and his wife Karmen live in Largo. They are the parents of three adult children. Congressman Anthony Brown joins us on Zoom. You are welcome to join us as well with your comments or questions.Call us: 410.662.8780. email: midday@wypr.org or Tweet us: @MiddayWYPR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Dr. Chris Emdin: how #HipHopEd is helping to spark science learning

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 10:45

    Tom's next guest is a scholar of Urban Education who is the creator of the Hip Hop Ed social media movement, which explores the intersection of hip hop and education. Dr. Christopher Emdin is the author of several books, including the New York Times best-seller, For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y'All Too, and STEM, STEAM, Make Dream. Dr. Emdin is a Professor of Education at the University of Southern California, where he holds an endowed chair in Curriculum Theory, and he directs youth engagement and community partnerships at the USC Race and Equity Center. Dr. Christopher Emdin joins us on Zoom from Los Angeles, California. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Claim Midday

    In order to claim this podcast we'll send an email to with a verification link. Simply click the link and you will be able to edit tags, request a refresh, and other features to take control of your podcast page!

    Claim Cancel