Podcasts about Parity

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Best podcasts about Parity

Latest podcast episodes about Parity

15-30 A Tennis Podcast (ATP)
Parity at Indian Wells (2021)

15-30 A Tennis Podcast (ATP)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 30:38


Indian Wells has been dominated by Djokovic and Federer. But the last three years someone unexpected from the field has claimed the prestigious title in the desert at what many refer to as the “5th Slam”. With Djokovic, Federer, and Nadal absent at this year’s edition of Indian Wells there were ample opportunities for the … Continue reading Parity at Indian Wells (2021)

Brian Windhorst & The Hoop Collective
What Will The 76ers Do? Parity Across The NBA

Brian Windhorst & The Hoop Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 56:15


Brian Windhorst, Tim MacMahon and Tim Bontemps talk how long it will take for Ben Simmons to get traded, how the 76ers can succeed with the current situation, some interesting quotes about the Mavs' past, the parity in the NBA this season and what teams are flying under the radar.

Rebel Human Resources Podcast
Episode 67: Leading with Love - Odessa Jenkins

Rebel Human Resources Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:11


Featured on Fox, CBS, ESPN, Yahoo Sports and more, Odessa "OJ" Jenkins is a sports disrupter and known leadership expert who was also named one of the most influential and powerful women in sports by Sports Illustrated. She co-founded women's national tackle football league, is the first female owner (and coach) of a national sports team and the winningest female football coach in football history. In addition to her sports background, she recently took a position as one of Silicon Valley's only openly gay, black female presidents of a technology company, Emtrain, that is helping to improve diversity, equity & inclusion programs among Fortune 500 companies.Prior to Emtrain, she served as head of business development for Parity, and VP of operations at YourCause, a start-up that helped to revolutionize the CSR industry. An in-demand national speaker, Jenkins is a recognized market leader in CSR, DE&I, Team Dynamics, and SAAS technology with multiple years of leadership experience in private funded start-ups, joint ventures and Fortune 100 public companies. Football was OJ's shield growing up and her ticket out of central L.A., where her brother was murdered by gangs when OJ was just 11. From that point on, she lived by the motto, "create opportunities where none exist before your life is over". That motto has served her throughout her professional and personal life, and its one to be shared with your audience. We discuss How to lead from love while holding people accountableHow to breakdown workplace inequitiesWhy leading with your "why" is critical to future successCreating champions of your people OJ is a female football Hall of Famer, a 5X National Champion, 2X USA National Team captain, 2X Gold Medalist and was named the world's leading running back by FIFA in 2013. Odessa's Profilelinkedin.com/in/odessajenkinsTwitterOJENKINS3Rebel HR is a podcast for HR professionals and leaders of people who are ready to make some disruption in the world of work.We'll be discussing topics that are disruptive to the world of work and talk about new and different ways to approach solving those problems.Follow Rebel HR Podcast at:www.rebelhumanresources.comhttps://twitter.com/rebelhrguyhttps://www.facebook.com/rebelhrpodcastwww.kyleroed.comhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/kyle-roed/Rebel ON, HR Rebels!  Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/rebelhrpodcast)

LazyBoy QBs
Parity in the NFC South and 'Confidence Meter' | Ep. 70

LazyBoy QBs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 80:15


On this episode, the guys start off as they do with every episode, with the Homer section of the podcast by discussing the eventful Week 5 matchups that took place for the Dallas Cowboys and the Miami Dolphins (2:30). Then, they discuss a variety of teams, coaches, and quarterbacks and determine how much confidence (or lack there of) they have in each (22:15). If you would like to leave any suggestions please feel free to email us at lazyboyqbs1@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @LazyBoyQ. We would also appreciate if you subscribe, rate, and leave a review for the podcast.

Forever FAB Podcast
Interview with Brooke Harley: “Rebel with A Cause: Financial Equity, Parity, and Power for All” Part 2

Forever FAB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:05


Dr. Shirley Madhere is a NYC-based plastic surgeon and Founder of Holistic Plastic Surgery.  This philosophy is based on a whole-body, mind, and spirit approach to beauty and incorporates wellness, integrative nutrition, functional aesthetics, and complementary medicine.   Dr. Madhere's approach to optimal outcomes in plastic surgery is through a lens of wellness, and is grounded in science and backed by ivy league medical study, research, and extensive surgical training.  View her menu of services at ElementsandGraces.com.  Consultations are available in-office, virtually, and online via Click-lift.com.   Coming soon: Dr. Madhere offers beauty on call services through Jet Set Beauty Rx, a mobile medical aesthetics unit delivering beauty in the privacy of your own home.  Reserve at JetSetBeautyRx.com.   As a creative outlet and means to broaden the perspective on the “spectrum of beauty,”  Dr. Madhere created Forever F.A.B., a podcast dedicated to Fashion, the Art of living well (i.e., wellness), and all things Beauty.  Visit ForeverFABpodcast.com for past and new episodes.     If you enjoy listening to the Forever F.A.B. podcast, get more audio and visuals with a membership through Patreon.  Choose the Gold, Platinum, or Diamond tier for premium added content, special co-hosts, lifestyle videos, branded merchandise, and private access to Dr. Shirley's Clubhouse by visiting patreon.com/ForeverFAB.   This week's podcast episode features an interview with Brooke Harley.   Brooke Harley is the CEO and Founder of Class Rebel.  Class Rebel is “a modern education company that believes that education is a form of peaceful protest against class inequality.  Modern skillsets should be available and affordable to all.”  The company believes in longevity of learning; lifelong learning and development as a means to happiness; keeping pace with change; experiencing education live IRL; accessibility of skillsets; learning from being street-smart.   In her early career trajectory, Brooke worked as the Head of Business Development for Lululemon Athletica's international operations.   Prior to Lululemon, she was an M&A attorney.  She then transitioned to raising capital as a venture capitalist.   Brooke founded Campfire Capital in 2014. She raised $32 million USD from 50 consumer industry founders, CEOs, and executives and she has evaluated hundreds of early-stage consumers in the consumer space. When distributing funds, Brooke noticed the disparity between entrepreneurs from elite colleges and universities and everyone else.  To help close that gap, she created two courses—Fundraising 101 and Angels 101. Investing and fundraising, like many high-powered and lucrative fields, is a male-dominated space.  Brooke challenges the status quo by educating more female entrepreneurs in the venture-capital and angel investing.    Catch the latest episode of the Forever F.A.B. podcast on Apple podcasts, Spotify, YouTube, iheartradio, Podbean, and wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.  For past episodes featuring guest star interviews, beauty product reviews and innovations in plastic surgery, visit ForeverFABpodcast.com.   The F.A.B. Five according to Brooke Harley: Sometimes good things fall apart so better things can come together. Strong body; strong mind: exercise and keep your body fit. The quality of your life comes down to the quality of your relationships.  Invest in them. Helping people makes us happy. It's important to take care of something/someone other than yourself.   Get your financial life in highest order and sign up at classrebel.com. Follow on IG @ClassRebel.   ***** As always, if you liked this episode of the Forever FAB podcast, please share it and subscribe to the feed. Listen to past episodes or check out who's coming up next on foreverfabpodcast.com.   If you enjoy listening to the Forever F.A.B. podcast, get more audio and visuals with a membership through Patreon.  Choose the Gold, Platinum, or Diamond tier for premium added content, special co-hosts, lifestyle videos, branded merchandise, and private access to my Clubhouse by visiting patreon.com/ForeverFAB.   If you are the Founder of or represent a beauty brand and want to be featured on an episode of the Forever FAB podcast segment of Fifteen Minutes of FAB, send me some stuff.  Visit ForeverFABpodcast.com and fill out the Contact form.   For general holistic beauty tips or to set up an appointment with me to discuss your personalized options for leveling up your beauty, go to ElementsandGraces.com and sign up for my newsletter.   And for an online e-consultation on time, anytime and on your time, visit Click-Lift.com for your wellness, plastic surgery, and beauty questions on the go.   And… if you don't want to go anywhere or leave your home, look out for Jet Set Beauty Rx offering mobile aesthetic medical services, such as injectable fillers and multi-vitamin facial treatments.  Jet Set Beauty Rx is coming to your neighborhood soon.      If you'd like to be a guest or know a potential FABulous guest for the Forever FAB podcast, let us know at foreverfabpodcast.com.   Produced by www.oneofoneproductions.com Recorded, mixed, edited and original music by www.23dbproductions.com   Podcast Medical Disclaimer The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. It is no substitute for professional care by your doctor or your own qualified healthcare professional. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this podcast or in any linked materials. Guests who speak on this podcast express their own opinions, experience and conclusions, and Dr. Shirley Madhere neither endorses nor opposes any particular opinion discussed in this podcast. The views expressed on this podcast have no relation to those of any academic, hospital, practice, institution or other entity with which Dr. Shirley Madhere may be affiliated.

Screaming in the Cloud
Changing the Way We Interview with Emma Bostian

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:30


About EmmaEmma Bostian is a Software Engineer at Spotify in Stockholm. She is also a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast, author of Decoding The Technical Interview Process, and an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters.Links: Ladybug Podcast: https://www.ladybug.dev LinkedIn Learning: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/emma-bostian Frontend Masters: https://frontendmasters.com/teachers/emma-bostian/ Decoding the Technical Interview Process: https://technicalinterviews.dev Twitter: https://twitter.com/emmabostian TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the weird things that I've found in the course of, well, the last five years or so is that I went from absolute obscurity to everyone thinking that I know everyone else because I have thoughts and opinions on Twitter. Today, my guest also has thoughts and opinions on Twitter. The difference is that what she has to say is actually helpful to people. My guest is Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify, which is probably, if we can be honest about it, one of the least interesting things about you. Thanks for joining me.Emma: Thanks for having me. That was quite the intro. I loved it.Corey: I do my best and I never prepare them, which is a blessing and a curse. When ADHD is how you go through life and you suck at preparation, you've got to be good at improv. So, you're a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast. Let's start there. What is that podcast? And what's it about?Emma: So, that podcast is just my three friends and I chatting about career and technology. We all come from different backgrounds, have different journeys into tech. I went the quote-unquote, “Traditional” computer science degree route, but Ali is self-taught and works for AWS, and Kelly she has, like, a master's in psychology and human public health and runs her own company. And then Sydney is an awesome developer looking for her next role. So, we all come from different places and we just chat about career in tech.Corey: You're also an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters. I'm going to guess just based upon the name that you are something of a frontend person, which is a skill set that has constantly eluded me for 20 years, as given evidence by every time I've tried to build something that even remotely touches frontend or JavaScript in any sense.Emma: Yeah, to my dad's disdain, I have stuck with the frontend; he really wanted me to stay backend. I did an internship at IBM in Python, and you know, I learned all about assembly language and database, but frontend is what really captures my heart.Corey: There's an entire school of thought out there from a constituency of Twitter that I will generously refer to as shitheads that believe, “Oh, frontend is easy and it's somehow less than.” And I would challenge anyone who holds that perspective to wind up building an interface that doesn't look like crap first, then come and talk to me. Spoiler, you will not say that after attempting to go down that rabbit hole. If you disagree with this, you can go ahead and yell at me on Twitter so I know where you're hiding, so I can block you. Now, that's all well and good, but one of the most interesting things that you've done that aligns with topics near and dear to my heart is you wrote a book.Now, that's not what's near and dear to my heart; I have the attention span to write a tweet most days. But the book was called Decoding the Technical Interview Process. Technical interviewing is one of those weird things that comes up from time to time, here and everywhere else because it's sort of this stylized ritual where we evaluate people on a number of skills that generally don't reflect in their day-to-day; it's really only a series of skills that you get better by practicing, and you only really get to practice them when you're interviewing for other jobs. That's been my philosophy, but again, I've written a tweet on this; you've written a book. What's the book about and what drove you to write it?Emma: So, the book covers everything from an overview of the interview process, to how do you negotiate a job offer, to systems design, and talks about load balancing and cache partitioning, it talks about what skills you need from the frontend side of things to do well on your JavaScript interviews. I will say this, I don't teach HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in-depth in the book because there are plenty of other resources for that. And some guy got mad at me about that the other day and wanted a refund because I didn't teach the skills, but I don't need to. [laugh]. And then it covers data structures and algorithms.They're all written in JavaScript, they have easy to comprehend diagrams. What drove me to write this is that I had just accepted a job offer in Stockholm for a web developer position at Spotify. I had also just passed my Google technical interviews, and I finally realized, holy crap, maybe I do know what I'm doing in an interview now. And this was at the peak of when people were getting laid off due to COVID and I said, “You know what? I have a lot of knowledge. And if I have a computer science degree and I was able to get through some of the hardest technical interviews, I think I should share that with the community.”Because some people didn't go through a CS degree and don't understand what a linked list is. And that's not their fault. It's just unfortunately, there weren't a lot of great resources—especially for web developers out there—to learn these concepts. Cracking the Coding Interview is a great book, but it's written in backend language and it's a little bit hard to digest as a frontend developer. So, I decided to write my own.Corey: How much of the book is around the technical interview process as far as ask, “Here's how you wind up reversing linked lists,” or, “Inverting a binary tree,” or whatever it is where you're tracing things around without using a pointer, how do you wind up detecting a loop in a recursive whatever it is—yeah, as you can tell, I'm not a computer science person at all—versus how much of it is, effectively, interview 101 style skills for folks who are even in non-technical roles could absorb?Emma: My goal was, I wanted this to be approachable by anyone without extensive technical knowledge. So, it's very beginner-friendly. That being said, I cover the basic data structures, talking about what traditional methods you would see on them, how do you code that, what does that look like from a visual perspective with fake data? I don't necessarily talk about how do you reverse a binary tree, but I do talk about how do you balance it if you remove a node? What if it's not a leaf node? What if it has children? Things like that.It's about [sigh] I would say 60/40, where 40% is coding and technical stuff, but maybe—eh, it's a little bit closer to 50/50; it kind of depends. I do talk about the take-home assessment and tips for that. When I do a take-home assessment, I like to include a readme with things I would have done if I had more time, or these are performance trade-offs that I made; here's why. So, there's a lot of explanation as to how you can improve your chances at moving on to the next round. So yeah, I guess it's 50/50.I also include a section on tips for hiring managers, how to create an inclusive and comfortable environment for your candidates. But it's definitely geared towards candidates, and I would say it's about 50/50 coding tech and process stuff.Corey: One of the problems I've always had with this entire industry is it feels like we're one of the only industries that does this, where we bring people in, and oh, you've been an engineer for 15 years at a whole bunch of companies I've recognized, showing career progression, getting promoted at some of them transitioning from high-level role to high-level role. “Great, we are so glad that you came in to interview. Now, up to the whiteboard, please, and implement FizzBuzz because I have this working theory that you don't actually know how to code, and despite the fact that you've been able to fake your way through it at big companies for 15 years, I'm the one that's going to catch you out with some sort of weird trivia question.” It's this adversarial, almost condescending approach and I don't see it in any other discipline than tech. Is that just because I'm not well-traveled enough? Is that because I'm misunderstanding the purpose of all of these things? Or, what is this?Emma: I think partially it was a gatekeeping solution for a while, for people who are comfortable in their roles and may be threatened by people who have come through different paths to get to tech. Because software engineer used to be an accredited title that you needed a degree or certification to get. And in some countries it still is, so you'll see this debate sometimes about calling yourself a software engineer if you don't have that accreditation. But in this day and age, people go through boot camps, they can come from other industries, they can be self-taught. You don't need a computer science degree, and I think the interview process has not caught up with that.I will say [laugh] the worst interview I had was at IBM when I was already working there. I was already a web developer there, full-time. I was interviewing for a role, and I walked into the room and there were five guys sitting at a table and they were like, “Get up to the whiteboard.” It was for a web development job and they quizzed me about Java. And I was like, “Um, sir, I have not done Java since college.” And they were like, “We don't care.”Corey: Oh, yeah, coding on a whiteboard in front of five people who already know the answer—Emma: Horrifying.Corey: —during a—for them, it's any given Tuesday, and for you, it is a, this will potentially determine the course that your career takes from this point forward. There's a level of stress that goes into that never exists in our day-to-day of building things out.Emma: Well, I also think it's an artificial environment. And why, though? Like, why is this necessary? One of the best interviews I had was actually with Gatsby. It was for an open-source maintainer role, and they essentially let me try the product before I bought it.Like, they let me try out doing the job. It was a paid process, they didn't expect me to do it for free. I got to choose alternatives if I wanted to do one thing or another, answer one question or another, and this was such an exemplary process that I always bring it up because that is a modern interview process, when you are letting people try the position. Now granted, not everyone can do this, right? We've got parents, we've got people working two jobs, and not everyone can afford to take the time to try out a job.But who can also afford a five-stage interview process that still warrants taking vacation days? So, I think at least—at the very least—pay your candidates if you can.Corey: Oh, yeah. One of the best interviews I've ever had was at a company called Three Rings Design, which is now defunct, unfortunately, but it was fairly typical ops questions of, “Yeah, here's an AWS account. Spin up a couple EC2 instances, load balance between them, have another one monitored. You know, standard op stuff. And because we don't believe in asking people to work for free, we'll pay you $300 upon completion of the challenge.”Which, again, it's not huge money for doing stuff like that, but it's also, this shows a level of respect for my time. And instead of giving me a hard deadline of when it was due, they asked me, “When can we expect this by?” Which is a great question in its own right because it informs you about a candidate's ability to set realistic deadlines and then meet them, which is one of those useful work things. And they—unlike most other companies I spoke with in that era—were focused on making it as accommodating for the candidate as possible. They said, “We're welcome to interview you during the workday; we can also stay after hours and have a chat then, if that's more convenient for your work schedule.”Because they knew I was working somewhere else; an awful lot of candidates are. And they just bent over backwards to be as accommodating as possible. I see there's a lot of debate these days in various places about the proper way to interview candidates. No take-home because biases for people who don't have family obligations or other commitments outside of work hours. “Okay, great, so I'm going to come in interview during the day?” “No. That biases people who can't take time off.” And, on some level, it almost seems to distill down to no one likes any way that there is of interviewing candidates, and figuring out a way that accommodates everyone is a sort of a fool's errand. It seems like there is no way that won't get you yelled at.Emma: I think there needs to be almost like a choose your own adventure. What is going to set you up for success and also allow you to see if you want to even work that kind of a job in the first place? Because I thought on paper, open-source maintainer sounds awesome. And upon looking into the challenges, I'm like, “You know what? I think I'd hate this job.”And I pulled out and I didn't waste their time and they didn't waste mine. So, when you get down to it, honestly, I wish I didn't have to write this book. Did it bring me a lot of benefit? Yeah. Let's not sugarcoat that. It allowed me to pay off my medical debt and move across a continent, but that being said, I wish that we were at a point in time where that did not need to exist.Corey: One of the things that absolutely just still gnaws at me even years later, is I interviewed at Google twice, and I didn't get an offer either time, I didn't really pass their technical screen either time. The second one that really sticks out in my mind where it was, “Hey, write some code in a Google Doc while we watch remotely,” and don't give you any context or hints on this. And just it was—the entire process was sitting there listening to them basically, like, “Nope, not what I'm thinking about. Nope, nope, nope.” It was… by the end of that conversation, I realized that if they were going to move forward—which they didn't—I wasn't going to because I didn't want to work with people that were that condescending and rude.And I've held by it; I swore I would never apply there again and I haven't. And it's one of those areas where, did I have the ability to do the job? I can say in hindsight, mostly. Were there things I was going to learn as I went? Absolutely, but that's every job.And I'm realizing as I see more and more across the ecosystem, that they were an outlier in a potentially good way because in so many other places, there's no equivalent of the book that you have written that is given to the other side of the table: how to effectively interview candidates. People lose sight of the fact that it's a sales conversation; it's a two-way sale, they have to convince you to hire them, but you also have to convince them to work with you. And even in the event that you pass on them, you still want them to say nice things about you because it's a small industry, all things considered. And instead, it's just been awful.Emma: I had a really shitty interview, and let me tell you, they have asked me subsequently if I would re-interview with them. Which sucks; it's a product that I know and love, and I've talked about this, but I had the worst experience. Let me clarify, I had a great first interview with them, and I was like, “I'm just not ready to move to Australia.” Which is where the job was. And then they contacted me again a year later, and it was the worst experience of my life—same recruiter—it was the ego came out.And I will tell you what, if you treat your candidates like shit, they will remember and they will never recommend people interview for you. [laugh]. I also wanted to mention about accessibility because—so we talked about, oh, give candidates the choice, which I think the whole point of an interview should be setting your candidates up for success to show you what they can do. And I talked with [Stephen 00:14:09]—oh, my gosh, I can't remember his last name—but he is a quadriplegic and he types with a mouthstick. And he was saying he would go to technical interviews and they would not be prepared to set him up for success.And they would want to do these pair programming, or, like, writing on a whiteboard. And it's not that he can't pair program, it's that he was not set up for success. He needed a mouthstick to type and they were not prepared to help them with that. So, it's not just about the commitment that people need. It's also about making sure that you are giving candidates what they need to give the best interview possible in an artificial environment.Corey: One approach that people have taken is, “Ah, I'm going to shortcut this and instead of asking people to write code, I'm going to look at their work on GitHub.” Which is, in some cases, a great way to analyze what folks are capable of doing. On the other, well, there's a lot of things that play into that. What if they're working in environment where they don't have the opportunity to open-source their work? What if people consider this a job rather than an all-consuming passion?I know, perish the thought. We don't want to hire people like that. Grow up. It's not useful, and it's not helpful. It's not something that applies universally, and there's an awful lot of reasons why someone's code on GitHub might be materially better—or worse—than their work product. I think that's fine. It's just a different path toward it.Emma: I don't use GitHub for largely anything except just keeping repositories that I need. I don't actively update it. And I have, like, a few thousand followers; I'm like, “Why the hell do you guys follow me? I don't do anything.” It's honestly a terrible representation.That being said, you don't need to have a GitHub repository—an active one—to showcase your skills. There are many other ways that you can show a potential employer, “Hey, I have a lot of skills that aren't necessarily showcased on my resume, but I like to write blogs, I like to give tech talks, I like to make YouTube videos,” things of that nature.Corey: I had a manager once who refused to interview anyone who didn't have a built-out LinkedIn profile, which is also one of these bizarre things. It's, yeah, a lot of people don't feel the need to have a LinkedIn profile, and that's fine. But the idea that, “Oh, yeah, they have this profile they haven't updated in a couple years, it's clearly they're not interested in looking for work.” It's, yeah. Maybe—just a thought here—your ability to construct a resume and build it out in the way that you were expecting is completely orthogonal to how effective they might be in the role. The idea that someone not having a LinkedIn profile somehow implies that they're sketchy is the wrong lesson to take from all of this. That site is terrible.Emma: Especially when you consider the fact that LinkedIn is primarily used in the United States as a social—not social networking—professional networking tool. In Germany, they use Xing as a platform; it's very similar to LinkedIn, but my point is, if you're solely looking at someone's LinkedIn as a representation of their ability to do a job, you're missing out on many candidates from all over the world. And also those who, yeah, frankly, just don't—like, they have more important things to be doing than updating their LinkedIn profile. [laugh].Corey: On some level, it's the idea of looking at a consultant, especially independent consultant type, when their website is glorious and up-to-date and everything's perfect, it's, oh, you don't really have any customers, do you? As opposed to the consultants you know who are effectively sitting there with a waiting list, their website looks like crap. It's like, “Is this Geocities?” No. It's just that they're too busy working on the things that bring the money instead of the things that bring in business, in some respects.Let's face it, websites don't. For an awful lot of consulting work, it's word of mouth. I very rarely get people finding me off of Google, clicking a link, and, “Hey, my AWS bill is terrible. Can you help us with it?” It happens, but it's not something that happens so frequently that we want to optimize for it because that's not where the best customers have been coming from. Historically, it's referrals, it's word of mouth, it's people seeing the aggressive shitposting I engage in on Twitter and saying, “Oh, that's someone that should help me with my Amazon bill.” Which I don't pretend to understand, but I'm still going to roll with it.Emma: You had mentioned something about passion earlier, and I just want to say, if you're a hiring manager or recruiter, you shouldn't solely be looking at candidates who superficially look like they're passionate about what they do. Yes, that is—it's important, but it's not something that—like, I don't necessarily choose one candidate over the other because they push commits, and open pull requests on GitHub, and open-source, and stuff. You can be passionate about your job, but at the end of the day, it's still a job. For me, would I be working if I had to? No. I'd be opening a bookstore because that's what I would really love to be doing. But that doesn't mean I'm not passionate about my job. I just show it in different ways. So, just wanted to put that out there.Corey: Oh, yeah. The idea that you must eat, sleep, live, and breathe is—hell with that. One of the reasons that we get people to work here at The Duckbill Group is, yeah, we care about getting the job done. We don't care about how long it takes or when you work; it's oh, you're not feeling well? Take the day off.We have very few things that are ‘must be done today' style of things. Most of those tend to fall on me because it's giving a talk at a conference; they will not reschedule the conference for you. I've checked. So yeah, that's important, but that's not most days.Emma: Yeah. It's like programming is my job, it's not my identity. And it's okay if it is your primary hobby if that is how you identify, but for me, I'm a person with actual hobbies, and, you know, a personality, and programming is just a job for me. I like my job, but it's just a job.Corey: And on the side, you do interesting things like wrote a book. You mentioned earlier that it wound up paying off some debt and helping cover your move across an ocean. Let's talk a little bit about that because I'm amenable to the idea of side projects that accidentally have a way of making money. That's what this podcast started out as. If I'm being perfectly honest, and started out as something even more self-serving than that.It's, well if I reach out to people in this industry that are doing interesting things and ask them to grab a cup of coffee, they'll basically block me, whereas if I ask them to, would you like to appear on my podcast, they'll clear time on their schedule. I almost didn't care if my microphone was on or not when I was doing these just because it was a chance to talk to really interesting people and borrow their brain, people reached out asking they can sponsor it, along with the newsletter and the rest, and it's you want to give me money? Of course, you can give me money. How much money? And that sort of turned into a snowball effect over time.Five years in, it's turned into something that I would never have predicted or expected. But it's weird to me still, how effective doing something you're actually passionate about as a side project can sort of grow wings on its own. Where do you stand on that?Emma: Yeah, it's funny because with the exception of the online courses that I've worked with—I mentioned LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters, which I knew were paid opportunities—none of my side projects started out for financial reasonings. The podcast that we started was purely for fun, and the sponsors came to us. Now, I will say right up front, we all had pretty big social media followings, and my first piece of advice to anyone looking to get into side projects is, don't focus so much on making money at the get-go. Yes, to your point, Corey, focus on the stuff you're passionate about. Focus on engaging with people on social media, build up your social media, and at that point, okay, monetization will slowly find its way to you.But yeah, I say if you can monetize the heck out of your work, go for it. But also, free content is also great. I like to balance my paid content with my free content because I recognize that not everyone can afford to pay for some of this information. So, I generally always have free alternatives. And for this book that we published, one of the things that was really important to me was keeping it affordable.The first publish I did was $10 for the book. It was like a 250-page book. It was, like, $10 because again, I was not in it for the money. And when I redid the book with the egghead.io team, the same team that did Epic React with Kent C. Dodds, I said, “I want to keep this affordable.” So, we made sure it was still affordable, but also that we had—what's it called? Parity pricing? Pricing parity, where depending on your geographic location, the price is going to accommodate for how the currency is doing. So, yes, I would agree. Side project income for me allows me to do incredible stuff, but it wasn't why I got into it in the first place. It was genuinely just a nice-to-have.Corey: I haven't really done anything that asks people for money directly. I mean, yeah, I sell t-shirts on the website, and mugs, and drink umbrellas—don't get me started—but other than that and the charity t-shirt drive I do every year, I tend to not be good at selling things that don't have a comma in the price tag. For me, it was about absolutely building an audience. I tend to view my Twitter follower count as something of a proxy for it, but the number I actually care about, the audience that I'm focused on cultivating, is newsletter subscribers because no social media platform that we've ever seen has lasted forever. And I have to imagine that Twitter will one day wane as well.But email has been here since longer than we'd been alive, and by having a list of email addresses and ways I can reach out to people on an ongoing basis, I can monetize that audience in a more direct way, at some point should I need them to. And my approach has been, well, one, it's a valuable audience for some sponsors, so I've always taken the asking corporate people for money is easier than asking people for personal money, plus it's a valuable audience to them, so it tends to blow out a number of the metrics that you would normally expect of, oh, for this audience size, you should generally be charging Y dollars. Great. That makes sense if you're slinging mattresses or free web hosting, but when it's instead, huh, these people buy SaaS enterprise software and implement it at their companies, all of economics tend to start blowing apart. Same story with you in many respects.The audience that you're building is functionally developers. That is a lucrative market for the types of sponsors that are wise enough to understand that—in a lot of cases these days—which product a company is going to deploy is not dictated by their exec so much as it is the bottom-up adoption path of engineers who like the product.Emma: Mm-hm. Yeah, and I think once I got to maybe around 10,000 Twitter followers is when I changed my mentality and I stopped caring so much about follower count, and instead I just started caring about the people that I was following. And the number is a nice-to-have but to be honest, I don't think so much about it. And I do understand, yes, at that point, it is definitely a privilege that I have this quote-unquote, “Platform,” but I never see it as an audience, and I never think about that “Audience,” quote-unquote, as a marketing platform. But it's funny because there's no right or wrong. People will always come to you and be like, “You shouldn't monetize your stuff.” And it's like—Corey: “Cool. Who's going to pay me then? Not you, apparently.”Emma: Yeah. It's also funny because when I originally sold the book, it was $10 and I got so many people being like, “This is way too cheap. You should be charging more.” And I'm like, “But I don't care about the money.” I care about all the people who are unemployed and not able to survive, and they have families, and they need to get a job and they don't know how.That's what I care about. And I ended up giving away a lot of free books. My mantra was like, hey if you've been laid off, DM me. No questions asked, I'll give it to you for free. And it was nice because a lot of people came back, even though I never asked for it, they came back and they wanted to purchase it after the fact, after they'd gotten a job.And to me that was like… that was the most rewarding piece. Not getting their money; I don't care about that, but it was like, “Oh, okay. I was actually able to help you.” That is what's really the most rewarding. But yeah, certainly—and back really quickly to your email point, I highly agree, and one of the first things that I would recommend to anyone looking to start a side product, create free content so that you have a backlog that people can look at to… kind of build trust.Corey: Give it away for free, but also get emails from people, like a trade for that. So, it's like, “Hey, here's a free guide on how to start a podcast from scratch. It's free, but all I would like is your email.” And then when it comes time to publish a course on picking the best audio and visual equipment for that podcast, you have people who've already been interested in this topic that you can now market to.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I'm not sitting here trying to judge anyone for the choices that they make at all. There are a lot of different paths to it. I'm right there with you. One of the challenges I had when I was thinking about, do I charge companies or do I charge people was that if I'm viewing it through a lens of audience growth, well, what stuff do I gate behind a paywall? What stuff don't I? Well, what if I just—Emma: Mm-hm.Corey: —gave it all away? And that way I don't have to worry about the entire class of problems that you just alluded to of, well, how do I make sure this is fair? Because a cup of coffee in San Francisco is, what, $14 in some cases? Whereas that is significant in places that aren't built on an economy of foolishness. How do you solve for that problem? How do you deal with the customer service slash piracy issues slash all the other nonsense? And it's just easier.Emma: Yeah.Corey: Something I've found, too, is that when you're charging enough money to companies, you don't have to deal with an entire class of customer service problem. You just alluded to the other day that well, you had someone who bought your book and was displeased that it wasn't a how to write code from scratch tutorial, despite the fact that he were very clear on what it is and what it isn't. I don't pretend to understand that level of entitlement. If I spend 10 or 20 bucks on an ebook, and it's not very good, let's see, do I wind up demanding a refund from the author and making them feel bad about it, or do I say, “The hell with it.” And in my case, I—there is privilege baked into this; I get that, but it's I don't want to make people feel bad about what they've built. If I think there's enough value to spend money on it I view that as a one-way transaction, rather than chasing someone down for three months, trying to get a $20 refund.Emma: Yeah, and I think honestly, I don't care so much about giving refunds at all. We have a 30-day money-back guarantee and we don't ask any questions. I just asked this person for feedback, like, “Oh, what was not up to par?” And it was just, kind of like, BS response of like, “Oh, I didn't read the website and I guess it's not what I wanted.” But the end of the day, they still keep the product.The thing is, you can't police all of the people who are going to try to get your content for free if you're charging for it; it's part of it. And I knew that when I got into it, and honestly, my thing is, if you are circulating a book that helps you get a job in tech and you're sending it to all your friends, I'm not going to ask any questions because it's very much the sa—and this is just my morals here, but if I saw someone stealing food from a grocery store, I wouldn't tell on them because at the end of the day, if you're s—Corey: Same story. You ever see someone's stealing baby formula from a store? No, you didn't.Emma: Right.Corey: Keep walking. Mind your business.Emma: Exactly. Exactly. So, at the end of the day, I didn't necessarily care that—people are like, “Oh, people are going to share your book around. It's a PDF.” I'm like, “I don't care. Let them. It is what it is. And the people who wants to support and can, will.” But I'm not asking.I still have free blogs on data structures, and algorithms, and the interview stuff. I do still have content for free, but if you want more, if you want my illustrated diagrams that took me forever with my Apple Pencil, fair enough. That would be great if you could support me. If not, I'm still happy to give you the stuff for free. It is what it is.Corey: One thing that I think is underappreciated is that my resume doesn't look great. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education, and I don't have any big tech names on my resume. I have a bunch of relatively short stints; until I started this place, I've never lasted more than two years anywhere. If I apply through the front door the way most people do for a job, I will get laughed out of the room by the applicant tracking system, automatically. It'll never see a human.And by doing all these side projects, it's weird, but let's say that I shut down the company for some reason, and decide, ah, I'm going to go get a job now, my interview process—more or less, and it sounds incredibly arrogant, but roll with it for a minute—is, “Don't you know who I am? Haven't you heard of me before?” It's, “Here's my website. Here's all the stuff I've been doing. Ask anyone in your engineering group who I am and you'll see what pops up.”You're in that same boat at this point where your resume is the side projects that you've done and the audience you've built by doing it. That's something that I think is underappreciated. Even if neither one of us made a dime through direct monetization of things that we did, the reputational boost to who we are and what we do professionally seems to be one of those things that pays dividends far beyond any relatively small monetary gain from it.Emma: Absolutely, yeah. I actually landed my job interview with Spotify through Twitter. I was contacted by a design systems manager. And I was in the interview process for them, and I ended up saying, “You know, I'm not ready to move to Stockholm. I just moved to Germany.”And a year later, I circled back and I said, “Hey, are there any openings?” And I ended up re-interviewing, and guess what? Now, I have a beautiful home with my soulmate and we're having a child. And it's funny how things work out this way because I had a Twitter account. And so don't undervalue [laugh] social media as a tool in lieu of a resume because I don't think anyone at Spotify even saw my resume until it actually accepted the job offer, and it was just a formality.So yeah, absolutely. You can get a job through social media. It's one of the easiest ways. And that's why if I ever see anyone looking for a job on Twitter, I will retweet, and vouch for them if I know their work because I think that's one of the quickest ways to finding an awesome candidate.Corey: Back in, I don't know, 2010, 2011-ish. I was deep in the IRC weed. I was network staff on the old freenode network—not the new terrible one. The old, good one—and I was helping people out with various things. I was hanging out in the Postfix channel and email server software thing that most people have the good sense not to need to know anything about.And someone showed up and was asking questions about their config, and I was working with them, and teasing them, and help them out with it. And at the end of it, his comment was, “Wow, you're really good at this. Any chance you'd be interested in looking for jobs?” And the answer was, “Well, sure, but it's a global network. Where are you?”Well, he was based in Germany, but he was working remotely for Spotify in Stockholm. A series of conversations later, I flew out to Stockholm and interviewed for a role that they decided I was not a fit for—and again, they're probably right—and I often wonder how my life would have gone differently if the decision had gone the other way. I mean, no hard feelings, please don't get me wrong, but absolutely, helping people out, interacting with people over social networks, or their old school geeky analogs are absolutely the sorts of things that change lives. I would never have thought to apply to a role like that if I had been sitting here looking at job ads because who in the world would pick up someone with relatively paltry experience and move them halfway around the world? This was like a fantasy, not a reality.Emma: [laugh].Corey: It's the people you get to know—Emma: Yeah.Corey: —through these social interactions on various networks that are worth… they're worth gold. There's no way to describe it other than that.Emma: Yeah, absolutely. And if you're listening to this, and you're discouraged because you got turned down for a job, we've all been there, first of all, but I remember being disappointed because I didn't pass my first round of interviews of Google the first time I interviewed with them, and being, like, “Oh, crap, now I can't move to Munich. What am I going to do with my life?” Well, guess what, look where I am today. If I had gotten that job that I thought was it for me, I wouldn't be in the happiest phase of my life.And so if you're going through it—obviously, in normal circumstances where you're not frantically searching for a job; if you're in more of a casual life job search—and you've been let go from the process, just realize that there's probably something bigger and better out there for you, and just focus on your networking online. Yeah, it's an invaluable tool.Corey: One time when giving a conference talk, I asked, “All right, raise your hand if you have never gone through a job interview process and then not been offered the job.” And a few people did. “Great. If your hand is up, aim higher. Try harder. Take more risks.”Because fundamentally, job interviews are two-way streets and if you are only going for the sure thing jobs, great, stretch yourself, see what else is out there. There's no perfect attendance prize. Even back in school there wasn't. It's the idea of, “Well, I've only ever taken the easy path because I don't want to break my streak.” Get over it. Go out and interview more. It's a skill, unlike most others that you don't get to get better at unless you practice it.So, you've been in a job for ten years, and then it's time to move on—I've talked to candidates like this—their interview skills are extremely rusty. It takes a little bit of time to get back in the groove. I like to interview every three to six months back when I was on the job market. Now that I, you know, own the company and have employees, it looks super weird if I do it, but I miss it. I miss those conversations. I miss the aspects—Emma: Yes.Corey: —of exploring what the industry cares about.Emma: Absolutely. And don't underplay the importance of studying the foundational language concepts. I see this a lot in candidates where they're so focused on the newest and latest technologies and frameworks, that they forgot foundational JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. Many companies are focused primarily on these plain language concepts, so just make sure that when you are ready to get back into interviewing and enhance that skill, that you don't neglect the foundation languages that the web is built on if you're a web developer.Corey: I'd also take one last look around and realize that every person you admire, every person who has an audience, who is a known entity in the space only has that position because someone, somewhere did them a favor. Probably lots of someones with lots of favors. And you can't ever pay those favors back. All you can do is pay it forward. I repeatedly encourage people to reach out to me if there's something I can do to help. And the only thing that surprises me is how few people in the audience take me up on that. I'm talking to you, listener. Please, if I can help you with something, please reach out. I get a kick out of doing that sort of thing.Emma: Absolutely. I agree.Corey: Emma, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Emma: Well, you can find me on Twitter. It's just @EmmaBostian, I'm, you know, shitposting over there on the regular. But sometimes I do tweet out helpful things, so yeah, feel free to engage with me over there. [laugh].Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:35:42]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I appreciate it.Emma: Yeah. Thanks for having me.Corey: Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify and oh, so very much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an incoherent ranting comment mentioning that this podcast as well failed to completely teach you JavaScript.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Softy & Dick Interviews
Joel Klatt on Oklahoma-Texas, Iowa-Penn State, CFB parity, UW-UCLA matchup ahead

Softy & Dick Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:44


Joel Klatt of FOX Sports joins Softy and Dick to discuss the crazy Oklahoma-Texas game last weekend, his game call between Iowa and Penn State, parity across college football this year, and previewing the Washington-UCLA matchup this weekend.

Parity Podcast
How to Discover and FLEX Your Authenticity at Work

Parity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 53:02


Women receive mixed messages to be authentic but also to conform, fall in line, fit in. It's a challenging tightrope to walk but we have solutions. In this episode, learn how to discover your own authenticity, and then how to FLEX so that you can contribute at work in a way that reflects who you are.   Subscribe!  Time-stamped show notes are below.    Intro 2:10 Women are told to be authentic but also to conform 2:29 We need to stop trying to change women 3:00 Mixed signals start at birth 5:05 Girls are trained to smile, be pleasant, play well with others 6:00 Sometimes we don't know who we are   Episode Breakdown 6:19 In today's episode we will discuss: What is authenticity and what are tips for you to best discover who you are Why is authenticity at work critical  How can you navigate between being authentic and the pressure to conform or fit in 6:40  Tracy J. Edmonds author of Wild Hair   Tips to Discover Your Authenticity 9:20  Definitions of authentic Webster's definition 10:35 Uncover authenticity by asking who or what you trust what you cherish what brings meaning and purpose to your life what gives you peace Dr. Nithila Peter of eiLeads 12:45 (Cathy), 16:12 (Deborah) Who or what you trust answers 18:22 (Deborah), 19:50 (Cathy) What do you cherish answers 22:20 (Cathy), 24:40 (Deborah) What brings meaning and purpose to your life answers 28:25 (Deborah), 29:28 (Cathy) What gives you peace answers 30:46 (Cathy), 32:05 (Deborah) 3 characteristics or values  35:05 Strengths Finder by Tom Rath 35:30 Women have to prove themselves over and over again How to Understand Unconscious Bias So We Can See Women   Why Authenticity Matters at Work 36:36 Inauthenticity akes you feel uncomfortable 36:58 Story of friend rated poorly because she was being authentic 38:15 ⅓ employees feel pressure to conform How to Be More Authentic at Work by Dr. Patricia Hewlin 38:30 Examples are: -parents downplay importance of parenting -employees won't wear clothing reflecting their religion  -people stay silent on social justice issues  -people don't speak up about inequity or workplace microaggressions 38:58 We learn when to smile, frown, nod How to Be More Authentic at Work by Dr. Patricia Hewlin 39:27 Being authentic improves marketing skills   How to Express Authenticity - Flexing 40:20 What is flexing 40:38 Tips for those early in career  40:52 Tips for interviews 41:40 Using authenticity to nudge culture in the right direction  42:01 Examples: -Don't like sports -Social justice issue matters to you -Challenges with parenting 42:28 Tip for allies 42:45 Flex through vulnerability 42:50 What is vulnerability Books by Dr. Brene Brown 43:30 Dr. Brene Brown 2010 Ted Talk: The Power of Vulnerability 43:44 Vulnerability births innovation, creativity, change Vulnerability is the birthplace of creativity, innovation, and change by Dr. Brene Brown 44:35 Importance of: Sharing new ideas at work Disagreeing with someone at work Admitting that you made a mistake 46:36 Risks of flexing authenticity 47:40 Leaders should model authenticity   48:20 Parity in Play 48:34 Afghan women and girls CSIS article 48:54 Girls barred from secondary school BBC article 49:10 Unconscious bias in the US How to Understand Unconscious Bias So We Can See Women Unconscious Bias: Hidden Forces Undermining Women at Work   Where You Can Find Us Website: www.par-ity.com  Follow us on Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn Co-Hosts: Deborah Pollack-Milgate and Cathy Nestrick  Contributor: Dr. Nithila Peter of eiLeads Email CathyAndDeborah@par-ity.com with questions or comments

Forever FAB Podcast
Interview with Brooke Harley: “Rebel with A Cause: Financial Equity, Parity, and Power for All” Part 1

Forever FAB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 50:18


Dr. Shirley Madhere is a NYC-based plastic surgeon and Founder of Holistic Plastic Surgery.  This philosophy is based on a whole-body, mind, and spirit approach to beauty and incorporates wellness, integrative nutrition, functional aesthetics, and complementary medicine.   Dr. Madhere's approach to optimal outcomes in plastic surgery is through a lens of wellness, and is grounded in science and backed by ivy league medical study, research, and extensive surgical training.  View her menu of services at ElementsandGraces.com.  Consultations are available in-office, virtually, and online via Click-lift.com.   Coming soon: Dr. Madhere offers beauty on call services through Jet Set Beauty Rx, a mobile medical aesthetics unit delivering beauty in the privacy of your own home.  Reserve at JetSetBeautyRx.com.   As a creative outlet and means to broaden the perspective on the “spectrum of beauty,”  Dr. Madhere created Forever F.A.B., a podcast dedicated to Fashion, the Art of living well (i.e., wellness), and all things Beauty.  Visit ForeverFABpodcast.com for past and new episodes.     If you enjoy listening to the Forever F.A.B. podcast, get more audio and visuals with a membership through Patreon.  Choose the Gold, Platinum, or Diamond tier for premium added content, special co-hosts, lifestyle videos, branded merchandise, and private access to Dr. Shirley's Clubhouse by visiting patreon.com/ForeverFAB.   This week's podcast episode features an interview with Brooke Harley.   Brooke Harley is the CEO and Founder of Class Rebel.  Class Rebel is “a modern education company that believes that education is a form of peaceful protest against class inequality.  Modern skillsets should be available and affordable to all.”  The company believes in longevity of learning; lifelong learning and development as a means to happiness; keeping pace with change; experiencing education live IRL; accessibility of skillsets; learning from being street-smart.   In her early career trajectory, Brooke worked as the Head of Business Development for Lululemon Athletica's international operations.   Prior to Lululemon, she was an M&A attorney.  She then transitioned to raising capital as a venture capitalist.   Brooke founded Campfire Capital in 2014. She raised $32 million USD from 50 consumer industry founders, CEOs, and executives and she has evaluated hundreds of early-stage consumers in the consumer space. When distributing funds, Brooke noticed the disparity between entrepreneurs from elite colleges and universities and everyone else.  To help close that gap, she created two courses—Fundraising 101 and Angels 101. Investing and fundraising, like many high-powered and lucrative fields, is a male-dominated space.  Brooke challenges the status quo by educating more female entrepreneurs in the venture-capital and angel investing.    Catch the latest episode of the Forever F.A.B. podcast on Apple podcasts, Spotify, YouTube, iheartradio, Podbean, and wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.  For past episodes featuring guest star interviews, beauty product reviews and innovations in plastic surgery, visit ForeverFABpodcast.com.   The F.A.B. Five according to Brooke Harley: Sometimes good things fall apart so better things can come together. Strong body; strong mind: exercise and keep your body fit. The quality of your life comes down to the quality of your relationships.  Invest in them. Helping people makes us happy. It's important to take care of something/someone other than yourself.   Get your financial life in highest order and sign up at classrebel.com. Follow on IG @ClassRebel.   ***** As always, if you liked this episode of the Forever FAB podcast, please share it and subscribe to the feed. Listen to past episodes or check out who's coming up next on foreverfabpodcast.com.   If you enjoy listening to the Forever F.A.B. podcast, get more audio and visuals with a membership through Patreon.  Choose the Gold, Platinum, or Diamond tier for premium added content, special co-hosts, lifestyle videos, branded merchandise, and private access to my Clubhouse by visiting patreon.com/ForeverFAB.   If you are the Founder of or represent a beauty brand and want to be featured on an episode of the Forever FAB podcast segment of Fifteen Minutes of FAB, send me some stuff.  Visit ForeverFABpodcast.com and fill out the Contact form.   For general holistic beauty tips or to set up an appointment with me to discuss your personalized options for leveling up your beauty, go to ElementsandGraces.com and sign up for my newsletter.   And for an online e-consultation on time, anytime and on your time, visit Click-Lift.com for your wellness, plastic surgery, and beauty questions on the go.   And… if you don't want to go anywhere or leave your home, look out for Jet Set Beauty Rx offering mobile aesthetic medical services, such as injectable fillers and multi-vitamin facial treatments.  Jet Set Beauty Rx is coming to your neighborhood soon.      If you'd like to be a guest or know a potential FABulous guest for the Forever FAB podcast, let us know at foreverfabpodcast.com.   Produced by www.oneofoneproductions.com Recorded, mixed, edited and original music by www.23dbproductions.com   Podcast Medical Disclaimer The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. It is no substitute for professional care by your doctor or your own qualified healthcare professional. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this podcast or in any linked materials. Guests who speak on this podcast express their own opinions, experience and conclusions, and Dr. Shirley Madhere neither endorses nor opposes any particular opinion discussed in this podcast. The views expressed on this podcast have no relation to those of any academic, hospital, practice, institution or other entity with which Dr. Shirley Madhere may be affiliated.

Fanalytics with Mike Lewis Podcast
#FreeBritney, NBA Anti-Vaxxers, & College Football Parity

Fanalytics with Mike Lewis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 56:27


We kick off this week's episode with a discussion of how the #FreeBritney movement has intensified fandom for Britney Spears. Professor Mike Lewis then breaks down the NBA's most recent dilemma as a few anti-vax players act in defiance of the league's messaging. In the show's final segment, Mike and his co-host Doug Battle discuss college football parity (or the lack thereof).

CFB Podcast with Herbie, Pollack & Negandhi
Enjoying the Parity; Cincinnati Carrying the G5 Flag; Mid-Week DEFCONs

CFB Podcast with Herbie, Pollack & Negandhi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 54:23


Kevin Negandhi and Booger McFarland discuss the key to Alabama-Ole Miss, the relationship between Nick Saban and Lane Kiffin, Notre Dame's deficiencies, why Georgia is a bad matchup for Arkansas and which team stocks they're buying through four weeks. Plus, Booger doles out his DEFCON levels for Clemson, Wisconsin and UNC.

Chiney & Golic Jr.
Hour 2: Is Parity Good?

Chiney & Golic Jr.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 39:20


Mike Golic Jr. and Chris Canty discuss the top 5 takeaways from the NFL season and if parity is good for college football.

The Andy Staples Show & Friends: A show about college football
Power Auer: Big Ten parity, Clemson's struggles & wishful thinking

The Andy Staples Show & Friends: A show about college football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 50:49


Nicole Auerbach and Stadium's Michael Felder discuss the competitiveness in the Big Ten this season. Penn State and Iowa are both ranked ahead of the undefeated Ohio State Buckeyes in what has quickly become the early surprise of the season. How good are Michigan and Michigan State? Is Clemson as bad as they looked vs. Georgia Tech? Texas A&M vs. Arkansas is one of the marquee games this weekend. Plus, last call! Follow Nicole @NicoleAuerbach Follow Michael @Inthebleachers Subscribe to The Athletic for 50% off: www.theathletic.com/nicole Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Catapulting Commissions with Anthony Garcia
116 - An Olympic Mentality w/ Lauren Gibbs

Catapulting Commissions with Anthony Garcia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 57:03


Thanks for joining us for another episode of the Catapulting Commissions Sales Talk with your host, Anthony Garcia. Our very first guest on the show is here again--Lauren Gibbs, Olympic medalist, conversationalist, sales guru, and manager. Today, she's back to share with us her growth and approach to success on every level.    The last time Lauren and Anthony spoke, Lauren had just won silver at the Olympics. Now, she's looking ahead to Bejing 2020. This time around, it looks a little bit different--she's at the end of her career, COVID has taken its toll, taking on a full-time job, among other pressures. Not only has she taken on so much, but she's performing at the highest possible level in everything she's doing. The training looks and feels different and requires a different mentality. It's one thing to reach a certain level of greatness, but it's a different beast to maintain that level of greatness. Now, the motivation is different. You have to find a reason to keep going, not get there. For Lauren, she wants to see how good she could be. Consistency, muscle memory, and being able to show up and be excellent at any point drives her. Success is identifying opportunities and running with them. You always have the power to leave whenever you want, but if you're going to do it, do it to the best of your ability. Otherwise, what's the point? Just like winning, quitting is habit-forming. That's the mentality.   It's hard to go from the highest level of competition back to everyday life. Lauren's advice to those who are next up to find massive success and return to normalcy is this: reflect. Think about the things you do and don't enjoy and identify what was integral to your success. Remember the work you had to do to get there, which can be scary, but find the little things you can do that can get you, and keep you, there. You can't skip steps.   Lauren is currently the Director of External Sales at Parity, where her mission is to improve the lives of athletes and their families and close the pay gap for female professional athletes' sponsorships. There, she connects with brands with women athletes to promote and amplify brands while getting women paid. Her process is the same no matter the scale--it's the sales professionals who overthink and muddy their sales process. Every level deserves the same effort.    Lauren's speaking career is a major part of how she motivates people. She did a TEDx talk, and from there she got herself out there. Through social media, LinkedIn, and other important connections, she was able to share her goals with others. Then, your network builds and feedback rolls in. When you surround yourself with great people, you do great things. LINKS   https://paritynow.co/   @lagibbs84 on Instagram and TikTok   LinkedIn: Lauren Gibbs

Parity Podcast
Only Wonder Women Need Apply: Solutions for Working Moms

Parity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 56:51


Juggling work and motherhood is a bone-weary challenge unless you're Wonder Woman. While women's skills grow after becoming mothers, we often face biases that stall careers. The pandemic made the situation more dire but now is a golden opportunity to find solutions with the Parity Prescription. Subscribe!  Time-stamped show notes are below.  Intro 00:27 Time for gender parity increased from 100 to 135 yrs; COVID widened the gender gap, CNBC 5:23 Need workplace support; Unfinished Business by Anne Marie Slaughter Unique Skills of Working Moms 8:29 Skills grow; Modern Family Index; Why Mothers Make Excellent Employees, DiversityQ 12:42 Skills developed as mothers 13:35 Remain calm under pressure 14:29 Improve communication skills 14:50 Hone negotiation skills  15:10 Improve creativity Biases Against Mothers 16:19 50% believe mothers are less committed to work; Modern Family Index 17:54 Mothers MORE devoted  18:25 Won't “half-ass” my job - kids are watching 19:08 Sleep deprived v. less interest  20:00 Moms lose opportunities  20:15 ‘She won't have time'  20:37 “Benevolent” leaders harm careers  20:42 Fathers face bias too 21:15 Women judged for flex schedules; Modern Family Index 21:32 Motherhood biases + regular biases against women; How to Understand Unconscious Bias So We Can See Women, Parity Podcast (Apple); How to Understand Unconscious Bias So We Can See Women, Parity Podcast (Spotify); Unconscious Bias: Hidden Forces Undermining Women at Work 12:03 Boss not supportive 22:20 Will mother return to work? 23:44 Miscarriage, morning sickness, breast pumping at work 25:02 Common questions causing guilt 27:44 Child crying on Zoom  28:30 Opportunities given to less qualified employees; The Wage Gap is Wider for Working Mothers; The Hazard of the Motherhood Penalty 29:16 Mothers MORE ambitious; For mothers in the workplace, a year (and counting) like no other, McKinsey 30:44  Women do more housework; Mothers' Careers Are At Extraordinary Risk Right Now, Atlantic Monthly 32:01 Work culture; 8 Signposts of Cultures Where Women Thrive, Parity Podcast (Apple); 8 Signposts of Cultures Where Women Thrive, Parity Podcast (Spotify) Impact of COVID 32:56 Job losses; OxFam International 34:10 Women overrepresented in low wage jobs; Women in Low-Wage Jobs are Underpaid and Overloaded, Atlantic Monthly 34:29 Working thru pandemic 36:22 Feeling judged; Mothers' Careers Are At Extraordinary Risk Right Now, For mothers in the workplace, a year (and counting) like no other Solutions 37:45 Parity Prescription helps; How the Parity Prescription Can Work for You 38:29 Recognize Unconscious Bias; How to Understand Unconscious Bias So We Can See Women, Parity Podcast (Apple); How to Understand Unconscious Bias So We Can See Women, Parity Podcast (Spotify); Unconscious Bias: Hidden Forces Undermining Women at Work 39:29 Focus on skills  40:51 Partner with Allies; How Male Allies Can Lean In for Measurable Gains to Achieve Parity, Parity Podcast (Apple); How Male Allies Can Lean In for Measurable Gains to Achieve Parity, Parity Podcast (Spotify) 41:15 Allies at home 44:15 Allies at work 49:19 Talk About the Issues; How to Have Tough Conversations at Work, Parity Prescription (Apple); How to Have Tough Conversations at Work, Parity Prescription (Spotify) Parity in Play 51:05 Some universities not supportive of women in STEM programs; The Parent Trap: Scholars find antagonism towards motherhood dissuades women from pursuing academic science careers, UC Santa Barbara, July 15, 2021 Where You Can Find Us Website: www.par-ity.com  Follow us on Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn Co-Hosts: Deborah Pollack-Milgate and Cathy Nestrick  Contributor: Dr. Nithila Peter of eiLeads Email CathyAndDeborah@par-ity.com with questions or comments

Pushin' Thru
All About the Art and NBA Parity

Pushin' Thru

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 35:23


BJ Armstrong and Tate Frazier discuss the artistry behind the music releases on the way and break down why this NBA regular season will be different than what we've seen in quite some time.

The tastytrade network
WDIS: Two Yutes - Beginner Options Trading - August 27, 2021 - Put-Call Parity and the ZEBRA

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 43:01


Bat steps in for Tom today and adds a few new tools to the two yutes' collective toolbelt. He first explains the concept of put-call parity which allows us to extract the extrinsic value of the in-the-money side of the options chain, from the out-of-the-money side (other type of option)... Example: DIDI's $5 call is worth $3.40. Most of this is intrinsic value since it's an ITM option. We can quickly figure out how much is extrinsic value but looking directly to the other side of the option chain at the $5 put option price. There is NO intrinsic value in this put because it's OTM. The bid and ask are at $0.15 and $0.20, so we know that the extrinsic value in the $5 call is somewhere around $0.15 or $0.20 (you can confirm this if you have your “Ext” column turned on). Bat then introduces the yutes to a new strategy: The ZEBRA (Zero Extrinsic Back Ratio). This strategy mimics a long stock position, but requires significantly less capital. The ZEBRA consists of:Two long 70 delta optionsOne short 50 delta option (of the same kind) It gives you about a 1:1 shot of making money, but your risk is defined to the downside and your profits unlimited to the upside (like owning stock!). Tony says it's good to keep selling premium, but every once in a while it's healthy to take a 50/50 shot where you can make a hefty profit. Watch to learn more about this fascinating strategy.

The tastytrade network
WDIS: Two Yutes - Beginner Options Trading - August 27, 2021 - Put-Call Parity and the ZEBRA

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 43:51


Bat steps in for Tom today and adds a few new tools to the two yutes' collective toolbelt. He first explains the concept of put-call parity which allows us to extract the extrinsic value of the in-the-money side of the options chain, from the out-of-the-money side (other type of option)... Example: DIDI's $5 call is worth $3.40. Most of this is intrinsic value since it's an ITM option. We can quickly figure out how much is extrinsic value but looking directly to the other side of the option chain at the $5 put option price. There is NO intrinsic value in this put because it's OTM. The bid and ask are at $0.15 and $0.20, so we know that the extrinsic value in the $5 call is somewhere around $0.15 or $0.20 (you can confirm this if you have your “Ext” column turned on). Bat then introduces the yutes to a new strategy: The ZEBRA (Zero Extrinsic Back Ratio). This strategy mimics a long stock position, but requires significantly less capital. The ZEBRA consists of:Two long 70 delta optionsOne short 50 delta option (of the same kind) It gives you about a 1:1 shot of making money, but your risk is defined to the downside and your profits unlimited to the upside (like owning stock!). Tony says it's good to keep selling premium, but every once in a while it's healthy to take a 50/50 shot where you can make a hefty profit. Watch to learn more about this fascinating strategy.

Dating Kinky
Equality VS Parity in relationships.

Dating Kinky

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 3:28


equality: the fact of being equal — parity: comparability of strength or intensity

Parity Podcast
8 Signposts of Cultures Where Women Thrive

Parity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 45:29


Business culture can make or break your career. It's that invisible but ever-present force that determines whether you are seen and heard, welcomed and respected. In this episode, you will learn the eight signposts of a robust culture where women-- and everyone --can thrive. You can find the resources that we used for this episode at www.par-ity.com and we would love to hear from you at CathyandDeborah@par-ity.com. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn, and subscribe to this podcast so that you don't miss a single episode. You can also find the hosts Deborah Pollack-Milgate and Cathy Nestrick on LinkedIn.  We hope to connect with you again soon so that we can make progress with the Parity Prescription!

EMS Today
More Parody Than Parity

EMS Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 52:59


Hosts Scot Phelps and Maria Werner talk about a potpourri of issues in EMS, everything from the San Diego (CA) Deputy Sheriff who allegedly OD'ed on fentanyl, raises coming to the FDNY EMS and COVID-19.

DataCast
Episode 69: DataPrepOps, Active Learning, and Team Management with Jennifer Prendki

DataCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 88:14


Show Notes(01:46) Jennifer shared her formative experiences growing up in France and wanting to be a physicist.(03:04) Jennifer unpacked the evolution of her academic journey in France — getting Physics degrees at Louis Pasteur University, Paris-Sud University, and Sorbonne University.(06:44) Jennifer mentioned her time as a Postdoctoral Researcher in Neutrino Physics at Duke University, where her research group lacked the funding to carry on scientific projects.(09:35) Jennifer discussed her transition from academia to industry, working as a Quantitative Research Scientist at Quantlab Financial in Houston.(13:31) Jennifer went over her move to the Bay Area, working for YuMe and Ayasdi — growing and managing early-stage data science teams at both places.(19:19) Jennifer recalled her foray into becoming a Senior Data Science Manager of the Search team at Walmart Labs. She managed the Metrics-Measurements-Insights team and the Store-Search team.(23:59) Jennifer shared the business anecdote that made her obsessed with measuring the ROI of data science.(28:46) Jennifer reflected on the opportunity to give conference talks and become a thought leader in the data science community (watch her first industry talk, “Review Analysis: An Approach to Leveraging User-Generated Content in the Context of Retail” at MLconf 2016).(31:10) Jennifer unpacked her interest in active learning and outlined existing challenges of making active learning performant in real-world ML systems.(36:58) After 1.5 years with Walmart Labs, Jennifer became the Chief Data Scientist at Atlassian. She shared the tactics to grow the Search & Smarts team of scientists and engineers from 3 to 17 people in less than 6 months across 3 locations.(40:31) Jennifer discussed the organizational and operational challenges with making ML useful in enterprises and the importance of data preparation in the modern ML stack.(47:24) Jennifer elaborated on the topic of “Agile for Data Science Teams,” which discusses that organizations that invest in ML but do not get the organizational side of things right will fail.(53:09) Jennifer went over her decision to accept a VP of Machine Learning role at Figure Eight, then a frontier startup that offers enterprise-grade labeling solutions to ML teams.(57:56) Jennifer went over the inception of her startup Alectio, whose mission is to help companies do ML more efficiently with fewer data and help the world do ML more sustainably by reducing the industry's carbon footprint.(01:04:32) Jennifer unpacked her 4-part blog series about responsible AI that calls out the need to fight bias, increase accessibility, and create more opportunities in AI.(01:09:06) Jennifer discussed the hurdles she had to jump through to find early adopters of Alectio.(01:11:03) Jennifer emphasized the valuable lessons learned to attract the right people who are excited about Alectio's mission.(01:14:38) Jennifer cautioned the danger of taking advice without thinking through how it can be applied to one's career.(01:17:09) Jennifer condensed her decade of experience navigating the tech industry as a woman into concrete advice.(01:19:19) Closing segment.Jennifer's Contact InfoLinkedInTwitterMediumAlectio's ResourcesWebsiteTwitterLinkedInWhat Is Alectio? (Video)Is Big Data Dragging Us Towards Another AI Winter? (Article)Mentioned ContentTalksThe Day Big Data Died (Oct 2020 @ Interop Digital)The Importance of Ethics in Data Science (Keynote @ Women in Analytics Conference 2019)Introduction to Active Learning (ODSC London 2018)Agile for Data Science Teams (Strata Data Conf — New York 2018)Big Data and the Advent of Data Mixology (Interop ITX — The Future of Data Summit 2017)The Limitations of Big Data In Predictive Analytics (DataEngConf SF 2017)Review Analysis: An Approach to Leveraging User-Generated Content in the Context of Retail (MLconf 2016)Articles1 — Women vs. The Workplace SeriesGender Discrimination (Oct 2015)Why Leading By Example Matters (Jan 2017)Data Scientist: the SexISTiest Job of the 21st Century? (Feb 2017)The Role of Motherhood in Gender Discrimination (March 2017)The Biggest Challenges of the Female Manager (May 2017)Parity in the Workplace: Why We Are Not There Yet (Dec 2017)The Pyramid of Needs of Professional Women (Dec 2017)2 — Management SeriesThe Secrets to Successfully Managing an Underperformer (June 2017)The Top Secrets to Managing a Rockstar (July 2017)The Real Cost of Hiring Over-Qualified Candidates in Technology (March 2018)Team Culture (May 2018)3 — Responsible AI SeriesHow We Got Responsible AI All Wrong (Part 1)Impact, Bias, and Sustainability in AI (Part 2)Increasing Accessibility to AI (Part 3)Creating More Opportunities in AI (Part 4)Book“Managing Up” (by Rosanne Badowski and Roger Gittines)NotesJennifer told me that Alectio is about to launch a community version that people will be able to compete to get the best model with the minimum amount of data this fall. Be sure to check out their blog and follow them on LinkedIn!About the showDatacast features long-form, in-depth conversations with practitioners and researchers in the data community to walk through their professional journeys and unpack the lessons learned along the way. I invite guests coming from a wide range of career paths — from scientists and analysts to founders and investors — to analyze the case for using data in the real world and extract their mental models (“the WHY and the HOW”) behind their pursuits. Hopefully, these conversations can serve as valuable tools for early-stage data professionals as they navigate their own careers in the exciting data universe.Datacast is produced and edited by James Le. Get in touch with feedback or guest suggestions by emailing khanhle.1013@gmail.com.Subscribe by searching for Datacast wherever you get podcasts or click one of the links below:Listen on SpotifyListen on Apple PodcastsListen on Google PodcastsIf you're new, see the podcast homepage for the most recent episodes to listen to, or browse the full guest list.

Datacast
Episode 69: DataPrepOps, Active Learning, and Team Management with Jennifer Prendki

Datacast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 88:14


Show Notes(01:46) Jennifer shared her formative experiences growing up in France and wanting to be a physicist.(03:04) Jennifer unpacked the evolution of her academic journey in France — getting Physics degrees at Louis Pasteur University, Paris-Sud University, and Sorbonne University.(06:44) Jennifer mentioned her time as a Postdoctoral Researcher in Neutrino Physics at Duke University, where her research group lacked the funding to carry on scientific projects.(09:35) Jennifer discussed her transition from academia to industry, working as a Quantitative Research Scientist at Quantlab Financial in Houston.(13:31) Jennifer went over her move to the Bay Area, working for YuMe and Ayasdi — growing and managing early-stage data science teams at both places.(19:19) Jennifer recalled her foray into becoming a Senior Data Science Manager of the Search team at Walmart Labs. She managed the Metrics-Measurements-Insights team and the Store-Search team.(23:59) Jennifer shared the business anecdote that made her obsessed with measuring the ROI of data science.(28:46) Jennifer reflected on the opportunity to give conference talks and become a thought leader in the data science community (watch her first industry talk, “Review Analysis: An Approach to Leveraging User-Generated Content in the Context of Retail” at MLconf 2016).(31:10) Jennifer unpacked her interest in active learning and outlined existing challenges of making active learning performant in real-world ML systems.(36:58) After 1.5 years with Walmart Labs, Jennifer became the Chief Data Scientist at Atlassian. She shared the tactics to grow the Search & Smarts team of scientists and engineers from 3 to 17 people in less than 6 months across 3 locations.(40:31) Jennifer discussed the organizational and operational challenges with making ML useful in enterprises and the importance of data preparation in the modern ML stack.(47:24) Jennifer elaborated on the topic of “Agile for Data Science Teams,” which discusses that organizations that invest in ML but do not get the organizational side of things right will fail.(53:09) Jennifer went over her decision to accept a VP of Machine Learning role at Figure Eight, then a frontier startup that offers enterprise-grade labeling solutions to ML teams.(57:56) Jennifer went over the inception of her startup Alectio, whose mission is to help companies do ML more efficiently with fewer data and help the world do ML more sustainably by reducing the industry's carbon footprint.(01:04:32) Jennifer unpacked her 4-part blog series about responsible AI that calls out the need to fight bias, increase accessibility, and create more opportunities in AI.(01:09:06) Jennifer discussed the hurdles she had to jump through to find early adopters of Alectio.(01:11:03) Jennifer emphasized the valuable lessons learned to attract the right people who are excited about Alectio's mission.(01:14:38) Jennifer cautioned the danger of taking advice without thinking through how it can be applied to one's career.(01:17:09) Jennifer condensed her decade of experience navigating the tech industry as a woman into concrete advice.(01:19:19) Closing segment.Jennifer's Contact InfoLinkedInTwitterMediumAlectio's ResourcesWebsiteTwitterLinkedInWhat Is Alectio? (Video)Is Big Data Dragging Us Towards Another AI Winter? (Article)Mentioned ContentTalksThe Day Big Data Died (Oct 2020 @ Interop Digital)The Importance of Ethics in Data Science (Keynote @ Women in Analytics Conference 2019)Introduction to Active Learning (ODSC London 2018)Agile for Data Science Teams (Strata Data Conf — New York 2018)Big Data and the Advent of Data Mixology (Interop ITX — The Future of Data Summit 2017)The Limitations of Big Data In Predictive Analytics (DataEngConf SF 2017)Review Analysis: An Approach to Leveraging User-Generated Content in the Context of Retail (MLconf 2016)Articles1 — Women vs. The Workplace SeriesGender Discrimination (Oct 2015)Why Leading By Example Matters (Jan 2017)Data Scientist: the SexISTiest Job of the 21st Century? (Feb 2017)The Role of Motherhood in Gender Discrimination (March 2017)The Biggest Challenges of the Female Manager (May 2017)Parity in the Workplace: Why We Are Not There Yet (Dec 2017)The Pyramid of Needs of Professional Women (Dec 2017)2 — Management SeriesThe Secrets to Successfully Managing an Underperformer (June 2017)The Top Secrets to Managing a Rockstar (July 2017)The Real Cost of Hiring Over-Qualified Candidates in Technology (March 2018)Team Culture (May 2018)3 — Responsible AI SeriesHow We Got Responsible AI All Wrong (Part 1)Impact, Bias, and Sustainability in AI (Part 2)Increasing Accessibility to AI (Part 3)Creating More Opportunities in AI (Part 4)Book“Managing Up” (by Rosanne Badowski and Roger Gittines)NotesJennifer told me that Alectio is about to launch a community version that people will be able to compete to get the best model with the minimum amount of data this fall. Be sure to check out their blog and follow them on LinkedIn!About the showDatacast features long-form, in-depth conversations with practitioners and researchers in the data community to walk through their professional journeys and unpack the lessons learned along the way. I invite guests coming from a wide range of career paths — from scientists and analysts to founders and investors — to analyze the case for using data in the real world and extract their mental models (“the WHY and the HOW”) behind their pursuits. Hopefully, these conversations can serve as valuable tools for early-stage data professionals as they navigate their own careers in the exciting data universe.Datacast is produced and edited by James Le. Get in touch with feedback or guest suggestions by emailing khanhle.1013@gmail.com.Subscribe by searching for Datacast wherever you get podcasts or click one of the links below:Listen on SpotifyListen on Apple PodcastsListen on Google PodcastsIf you're new, see the podcast homepage for the most recent episodes to listen to, or browse the full guest list.

SoundPractice
The Joint Commission, Patient Parity, and New Initiatives with Dr. Ana Pujols McKee

SoundPractice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 21:43


Dr. Ana Pujols McKee is the Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer for The Joint Commission. In this episode, we will talk with Dr. McKee about racial disparities in healthcare and ways to address those disparities. Vaccine hesitancy and general trust in medicine by the public are explored. Finally, we turn toward new initiatives and activities of The Joint Commission. This is an important episode featuring a national healthcare leader. Dr. McKee's keen insights and her experience are not to be missed. https://www.jointcommission.org/about-us/joint-commission-officers/ana-pujols-mckee/ amckee@jointcommission.org Learn more about the American Association for Physician Leadership at www.physicianleaders.org  

The Blockchain.com Podcast
Episode 34: Peter Mauric on the Polkadot network

The Blockchain.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 46:47


This month's Market Outlook event, we were joined by Pete rMauric, Head of Public Affairs at Parity, the team focused on building the technology for Polkadot. Our Co-Founder, Nicolas Cary, and Head of Research, Garrick Hileman, sat down with Peter to discuss the Polkadot network, parachains, how Polkadot is different from other blockchains like Ethereum, and much more. Enjoy!

Your World, Your Money
Sports & The New Era of Wellness: Achieving Real Parity for University Athletes

Your World, Your Money

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 46:39


Curtis Spence, Assistant Athletic Director at New York University, and Edona Thaqi, current university athlete at Fordham University, join us in our continuing conversation around sports, mental health, equity, and finance. In this episode, we dive into university athletes' real experiences and difficulties from the athlete's and the administrative perspectives. We talk the changes needed for parity, financial literacy, and overall health for athletes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The PFF Forecast
Josh Hermsmeyer on Nick Chubb's contract, Lamar Jackson, and parity in the NFL

The PFF Forecast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 82:46


What's been happening in the NFL this past week (0:00) Josh Hermsmeyer Intro (6:33) Nick Chubb's contract extension (8:43) Lamar Jackson extension (42:47) Does the salary cap increase parity (48:28) Recommendations and "Would You Rather"

Marketplace All-in-One
Twitter wants bounty hunters to help fix its image-cropping algorithm

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 8:56


Back in May, Twitter partially disabled an algorithm that cropped photos posted by users in ways that revealed certain biases. A company audit, and plenty of people on the internet, found the algorithm preferred white faces over Black faces, and men over women. Now, as part of the hacker conference DEF CON, which starts tomorrow, the company is offering a cash bounty to help fix the problem. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino speaks with Rumman Chowdhury, director of Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency and Accountability at Twitter. Before that, she was founder and CEO of Parity, which helped other companies identify bias in their algorithms. Chowdhury says the cropping algorithm was based on data tracking where real people tended to look in photos.

Marketplace Tech
Twitter wants bounty hunters to help fix its image-cropping algorithm

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 8:56


Back in May, Twitter partially disabled an algorithm that cropped photos posted by users in ways that revealed certain biases. A company audit, and plenty of people on the internet, found the algorithm preferred white faces over Black faces, and men over women. Now, as part of the hacker conference DEF CON, which starts tomorrow, the company is offering a cash bounty to help fix the problem. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino speaks with Rumman Chowdhury, director of Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency and Accountability at Twitter. Before that, she was founder and CEO of Parity, which helped other companies identify bias in their algorithms. Chowdhury says the cropping algorithm was based on data tracking where real people tended to look in photos.

Into the Adultverse
#54 - Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Head of AI Ethics @Twitter, on Building Ethical Artificial Intelligence

Into the Adultverse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 61:05


Timestamps 5:00 - What did being in academia teach you? 8:30 - How did you get rid of nerd #FOMO and focus on 1 thing? 14:00 - If you want to do good, can you still work in consulting or finance? 21:00 - Can you truly be ethical in a system that values profit above all else? 31:00 - Creating new metrics to drive ethical growth and improvement 36:00 - What Nazi Germany can teach us about unethical AI 43:30 - The story of Parity, an algorithmic audit company 53:00 - Haters as a Key Performance Indicator (KPI)

Parity Podcast
The Treasure Trove of Emotional Intelligence: An Interview with Dr. Nithila Peter

Parity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 49:03


Emotional Intelligence - understanding ourselves and relating to others - will help us achieve parity. Join us as we interview Dr. Nithila Peter of eiLeads to learn how to improve your emotional intelligence and how EI helps us implement the Parity Prescription. You can find the resources that we used for this episode at www.par-ity.com and we would love to hear from you at CathyandDeborah@par-ity.com. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn, and subscribe to this podcast so that you don't miss a single episode. You can also find the hosts Deborah Pollack-Milgate and Cathy Nestrick on LinkedIn. We hope to connect with you again soon so that we can make progress with the Parity Prescription!

Group Practice Tech
Episode 211 [Payment Parity] Telehealth Justice - New Hope out of Illinois

Group Practice Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 22:03


Welcome solo and group practice owners! We are Liath Dalton and Roy Huggins, your co-hosts of Person Centered Tech. In our latest episode, we're talking about HB 3308, new legislation out of Illinois, and why it matters for group practice owners everywhere.  We discuss payment parity, telehealth justice, mass scaling of telehealth through companies like Talkspace and BetterHelp, the cheapening of telehealth, clinicians making up the difference, client choice, the nuances of HB 3308, and how we can work together to effect change.  Listen here: https://personcenteredtech.com/group/podcast/ Stay tuned for future episodes! For more, visit our website. Resources: "Illinois permanently expands access to telehealth" HB 3308, full text Why payment parity is so vital! Episode 205: [Getting Paid] Fight the Cheapening of Telehealth Episode 206: [Getting Paid] Navigating Teletherapy Insurance Billing in a Post-COVID Future, with Barbara Griswold LMFT CE training, Telehealth Coverage and Billing in a Post-COVID Future with Barbara Griswold, LMFT CE training, "Cross-Border Practice in the Age of Telehealth: Interstate and International Mental Health Practice, 2021 Edition" FREE worksheet "Legality and Permissibility to Practice Across Jurisdictions in the United States for Mental Health Clinicians" Group Practice Office Hours (direct support and consultation service from PCT consulting team and teletherapy & HIPAA attorney Eric Strom, JD PhD LMHC) Teletherapy Practice Rules by State For Counselors, MFTs, Psychologists, and Clinical Social Workers 

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第四季*【EP. 175】#528 看經濟學人學英文 feat. 經濟學人新聞評論【大麥克指數、購買力平價 (purchasing power parity)、操縱貨幣 feat. 貿易匯率、匯率操縱國、每日單字精選】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 25:26


The Yearbook
What Parity Looks Like Kind Of Edition

The Yearbook

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 9:43


Some famous college football players are cashing in with endorsements, but so are athletes from less famous teams. Key Players: New York Knicks, Brooklyn Bollweg, University of South Dakota Women's Volleyball, Haley Cavinder, Hanna Cavinder, Fresno State Women's Basketball, Milwaukee Bucks, Phoenix Suns, University of Miami Football, Paige Bueckers, Scott Dixon, University of Nebraska Women's Volleyball, University of Connecticut Women's Basketball, LSU Women's Gymnastics, T.J. Newman, Torri Jan Newman, Toronto Raptors, Nicholls State Football

Drive Time Sports Podcast
7-21 HAS THE NBA FOUND PARITY?

Drive Time Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 17:46


Ryan explains how despite the recent run on new champions, the NBA still lags behind the other major sports when it comes to parity See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The MMQB NFL Podcast
NFC East Preview: Poor in Talent But... Rich in Parity? | NFL Deep Dive

The MMQB NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 49:24


As the division preview series moves on, Jenny, Conor and Gary arrive at the NFC East, the division with nowhere to go but up. A discussion of Ryan Fitzpatrick—maybe the missing piece, maybe a ticking time bomb—in Washington, and just how good the Football Team defense was and can be. A look at the kinda-but-not-really make-or-break year for Daniel Jones and Jason Garrett, now that the Giants have upgraded their weapons. The Cowboys bring back Dak—and bring in Hard Knocks—but it's the re-re-made defense that will decide Dallas's fate. And what exactly is going on with the Eagles' weird treatment of Jalen Hurts, who they seem already resigned to move on from as soon as they can? Plus, more Mad Libs, our NFC East predictions poll, an absolutely irresponsible comparison between the 2020 Bucs and the 2021 Football Team, and plenty more. Have a question for a future mailbag? Email themmqb@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 3: Brad Crawford, Would You Rather and Parity in the NBA

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 37:55


Mac and Bone bring in Brad Crawford to preview the upcoming football season in the ACC and SEC, play another game of Would You Rather and discuss whether or not they believe Adam Silver's comments that the NBA is entering a parity-filled era. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Parity Podcast
5 Steps to Achieve Increased Leadership by Women

Parity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 47:01


A majority of people rate women higher than men for leadership skills. Studies show that many of the core competencies necessary for success as a leader are competencies at which women excel. Despite these strengths as leaders, men are more often awarded the coveted positions of power. In this episode, we will explore why and propose 5 steps to promote women into more leadership roles. You can find the resources that we used for this episode at www.par-ity.com and we would love to hear from you at CathyandDeborah@par-ity.com. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn, and subscribe to this podcast so that you don't miss a single episode. You can also find the hosts Deborah Pollack-Milgate and Cathy Nestrick on LinkedIn. We hope to connect with you again soon so that we can make progress with the Parity Prescription!

High and Low
The Long Game, Parity Problems and an NBA Finalist Named Chris Paul

High and Low

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 49:48


In this episode, Ike Amaechi is joined by Ugo, Mitch Orsatti, Sean Khan and James Rathbone (Catch Up Podcast, Boosie Fade) to talk about Chris Paul's first NBA Finals, LeBron James on the anniversary of The Decision, trouble in Portlandia, and getting paid in the NCAA. Also, Mitch, James, Sean and Ugo attempt to prove Ike wrong when Ike shares some strong opinions on the NBA. Also, check out the High and Low YouTube channel for this week's Quick Bite segment. Check for bonus content on the channel every week. You can also talk to us in High and Low's Facebook group.Remember to enter the contest to win a chance at joining the High and Low group chat on Discord for a day in July. Follow/subscribe to everything High and Low and leave a review.Music featured on the episode is brought to you by Lyve of the Enjoy Music Group and Sonny Rocwell of The Goodness. Edited by Vonn August. Executive Producer is Ikenna Agu. Follow High and Low on Instagram and Twitter @morehighandlow.NEW High and Low City Series T-Shirtshttp://www.vonnabrahamm.com/storeHigh and Low at Vonn+Abrahammhttp://www.vonnabrahamm.com/high-low-podcastInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/gethighandlow/https://www.instagram.com/ikenna.andthepeople/https://www.instagram.com/esteban_roy/https://www.instagram.com/savage_decepticon/https://www.instagram.com/sean_khantroversy/Twitterhttps://twitter.com/morehighandlowhttps://twitter.com/IkennaCesarhttps://twitter.com/thirstyvillainhttps://twitter.com/Khantroverseyhttps://twitter.com/rattlebones

Against Better Judgement
Episode 15: Jon Rahm's US Open win, NBA Playoff Parity, Ranked Choice Voting, and Waffle House

Against Better Judgement

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 68:11


Nate and Jeff discuss how they (unsurprisingly) celebrated recent special days with their favorite fast foods....dive into Jon Rahm's US open win last weekend.....the current parity and superstar shortage in the NBA playoffs.....ranked choice voting and how it could improve American politics.....and finally, the Waffle House, another fine longstanding institution that's part of the fabric of our nation.

The Zach Gelb Show
Parity In The Playoffs (Hour 4)

The Zach Gelb Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 40:32


The unpredictable conference finals matchups l Mavericks reportedly set to hire Nico Harrison as their next GM l Other NBA players that could be traded this offseason See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Relay Chain
Former Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves on Blockchain Adoption and Internet Regulation

Relay Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 82:47


In this Relay Chain exclusive, Joe Petrowski (Technical Integrations Lead at Web3 Foundation) and Parity's Úrsula O'Kuinghttons speak with former President of Estonia Toomas Hendrik Ilves. Uniquely placed as one of few presidents who knows how to code, Ilves was responsible for implementing the digitization of the Estonian government, one of the first countries to adopt blockchain tech, and many other processes in the country from voting to registering a business. They discuss how Estonia, one of the smallest countries in the world, became one of the most entrepreneurial and tech-savvy, what led Estonia to go ‘digital', declare access to the internet as a basic human right, and mediate data integrity for their digital records via blockchain. Ilves talks about his concerns for the internet given its weaponization and populist exploitation, the problematic state of freedom of expression and accountability online, and governance of online communities beyond nation-states. Links Toomas Hendrik Ilves on Twitter (https://twitter.com/ilvestoomas) Úrsula 0'Kuinghtton on Twitter (https://twitter.com/ursulaok) X-Road introduction video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PaHinkJlvA) Cybernetica's website (https://cyber.ee) Highlights 00:00 Intro new co-host, Úrsula 0'Kuinghttons 03:00 Estonia as a global leader in the state adoption of technology 09:04 Digitizing a nation via open-source software and distributed systems 18:55 Access to the internet as a basic human right 25:24 The weaponization of the internet 30:22 Regulating social media 38:46 Defining order and proximity in the digital world 50:20 Governance of online communities 54:56 Social media platforms: responsibilities, and oversight 01:14:30 (e)Residency unbound by offline territorial borders Key Quotes "If you are going to have digital records you gotta have something to maintain integrity and the way to do it is blockchain. I mean, I don't understand how all of these companies in the world and governments have digital records and don't put them on blockchain just for security." "Question the need to use illiberal methods to preserve liberal democracy." Special Guest: Toomas Hendrik Ilves.

The Quarter-Lee Report
The Quarter-Lee Report Ep. 194 "Legacy Game"

The Quarter-Lee Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 104:19


This week on the pod, Armon weighs in on Ben Simmons. Where should he go? How much is he to blame for the 76ers failure & if he can be repaired. (02:01 - 45:48) The Brooklyn Nets were supposed to run away with the championship this year. Funny thing is, they didnt even make the Conference Finals. But how would you breakdown their season? (45:50 - 1:08:44) Plus American sports fans say they want "Parity" in the NBA. And this year they're gonna get it. We'll see if they were being honest, or just another code for why they don't like the best basketball in the world. (1:28:24 - 1:43:00)

Group Practice Tech
Episode 205: [Getting Paid] Fight the Cheapening of Telehealth

Group Practice Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 29:50


Welcome solo and group practice owners! We are Liath Dalton and Roy Huggins, your co-hosts of Person Centered Tech. In our latest episode, we're ready to fight against the cheapening of telehealth, and we're asking you to join us.   We discuss companies like Talkspace and BetterHelp, insurance providers, why group practice owners are concerned about these platforms, the shortage of therapists, making therapy cheap, impacts to quality of care, companies trying to scale mental health treatment, constructive ways to take action, reasons why therapists choose to work with these platforms, the need for accessible clinically effective teletherapy, celebrity spokespeople, business models vs evidence-based practice, how group practices can compete, telehealth parity, and advocating as a group.  Listen here: https://personcenteredtech.com/group/podcast/ Stay tuned for future episodes! For more, visit our website. Resources:  "New Senate Bill Seeks To Continue COVID-19 Telehealth Coverage" from Healthcare IT News   "A new bill before Congress would make permanent several emergency telehealth measures put in place to expand access and coverage during the COVID-19 public health emergency" "Providers face a magnetic pull toward in-person care, says ATA board chair" from Healthcare IT News "American Telemedicine Association Board Chair Dr. Joseph Kvedar called on clinicians, suppliers, payers and patients to play their part in fighting for long-term telehealth access." "House reps seek to permanently safeguard audio-only telehealth coverage" from Healthcare IT News "A bipartisan bill introduced this week would allow providers to offer audio-only telemedicine services to Medicare enrollees." "Texas Lawmakers OK Telehealth Expansion for Medicaid, Public Health Plans"  "The bill is one of dozens across the country – including several in Texas – that aim to expand telehealth access and coverage past the pandemic. A few states have chosen to extend emergency provisions for a while in hopes of seeing Congress set federal telehealth policy, but others are pushing ahead with their own laws, creating pockets of permanence around the country." Group Practice Office Hours (direct support and consultation service from PCT consulting team and Eric Strom, JD PhD LMHC) PCT's Group Practice Teletherapy Programs

Washed Up Walkons
Cease And Desist | WUW 224

Washed Up Walkons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 74:02


This episode starts as planned with a Drake and Tyler back and forth as Kevin is off being a responsible human but Kev ends up making a surprise appearance about 20 mins into the show. Once he shows up we dive head first into some Q&A from the fans on twitter which makes for some incredible banter. Topics include: -Kevin's success and home office -Favorite hype music on game day -Scheels ripping off our HBAM trademark -Our thoughts on the 12 team playoff potential -Parity at the top of CF -Craziest interactions with fans or teammates during a game -Some moments where we remember KF being the most pissed -The matchup we are most excited for this year and why -Tyler Goodson, the Wildcat formation, and its possibilities -A new segment called '5 Things'

The Game on 1350 KMAN
6/15/21 Hour 1 - Lack of parity in CFB coverage

The Game on 1350 KMAN

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 40:19


0:00 - Does lack of parity in CFB coverage ruin the sport for you? 14:52 - Old KSU national coverage/Kansas is a boring state 29:22 - Charles Barkley's wallet

Lift-Off With Energizing Results
043-Dr. Vivian Smith-Del Toro

Lift-Off With Energizing Results

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 18:33


Who's your ideal patient and what's the biggest challenge they face?What are the common mistakes people make when trying to solve that problem?What is one valuable free action that our audience can implement that will help with that issue?What is one valuable free resource that you can direct people to that will help with that issue?What's the one question I should have asked you that would be of great value to our audience?When was the last time you experienced Goosebumps with your family and why?Find out more information about The C-Suite Paradigm Project and what they do!Learn more about how Uwe helps in-demand professionals and their VIPs to get back their family mojo, double their financial security, and live in abundance in all areas of their life (without feeling guilty or constantly questioning themselves): Visit www.uwedockhorn.com. Or when you feel you'd be interested in working together you can Book A Chat With Uwe

Parity Podcast
How Male Allies Can Lean In for Measurable Gains to Achieve Parity

Parity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 39:47


Women are frequently encouraged to “lean in,” but we can only lean in so far before we lose our balance. Men, we need you to lean in as allies and meet us halfway because we cannot achieve parity without you. In this episode, we teach allies how to be effective by being mentors, sponsors,  partners, and collaborators with women, and we guide women on how to identify and partner with male allies. You can find the resources that we used for this episode at www.par-ity.com and we would love to hear from you at CathyandDeborah@par-ity.com. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn, and subscribe to this podcast so that you don't miss a single episode. You can also find the hosts Deborah Pollack-Milgate and Cathy Nestrick on LinkedIn. We hope to connect with you again soon so that we can make progress with the Parity Prescription!

Carolina Sports Talk
Playoff Parity Talk

Carolina Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 69:26


Big Cliff (@CarolinaSportsTalk) and DJ Highstar (@dj_highstar) recap the buzzerbeaters and scores of the NBA Playoffs and its effect on society and vice versa. With Quick Hits and your emails, this show is jam packed! Email cliff@carolinasportstalk.net with your top 5 Sports Journeymen! Listen to the show for more!!!!

The Solid Verbal
Recruiting & Parity with Ari Wasserman of The Athletic

The Solid Verbal

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 83:07


Ty and Dan welcome back Ari Wasserman from The Athletic to discuss the haves and have-nots in the recruiting game, and whether it's possible to reset the balance of the sport through expanded playoffs, budgets or marketing. (Apologies if you downloaded our first attempt at uploading this episode, because that one definitely had some funky editing.)