Podcasts about subcommittee

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Body of one or more persons that is subordinate to a deliberative assembly

  • 324PODCASTS
  • 1,789EPISODES
  • 1h 9mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • May 20, 2022LATEST
subcommittee

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about subcommittee

Show all podcasts related to subcommittee

Latest podcast episodes about subcommittee

The Lawfare Podcast
UAPs, UFOs, WTF?

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 47:39


Congress this week held its first public hearing on unidentified flying objects in more than 50 years, as the House Intelligence Committee's Subcommittee on Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence and Counterproliferation hosted two Department of Defense officials to discuss military encounters with unexplained objects.David Priess sat down with the Washington Post's Shane Harris—who has been watching this issue for quite some time and who watched the hearings quite closely—to talk about the long U.S. government history with UFOs (now called unidentified aerial phenomena), the recent move toward more transparency, and the legitimate reasons, having nothing to do with aliens, why some things will remain classified.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ghosts That Hunt Back TV - True Ghost Bigfoot and UFO Stories
Congress holds historic open hearing on UFOs

Ghosts That Hunt Back TV - True Ghost Bigfoot and UFO Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 84:56


Congress holds historic open hearing on UFOsHouse Intelligence Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee to hold open hearing on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena.

RSLASH: Best Of Reddit Stories 2022
Congress holds historic open hearing on UFOs

RSLASH: Best Of Reddit Stories 2022

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 84:56


Congress holds historic open hearing on UFOsHouse Intelligence Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee to hold open hearing on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena.

Indianz.Com
Ramona Charette Klein (Turtle Mountain) / Boarding School Survivor

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:30


House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1334M Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair NOTE: The audio tracks below have been run through a noise reduction filter to eliminate background noise. On Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1334 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.5444, the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act. The bill requires the federal government to investigate the Indian boarding school era through a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in the United States and a Truth and Healing Advisory Committee. Witness List James LaBelle, Sr. 1st Vice President and Boarding School Survivor National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Anchorage, Alaska Matthew War Bonnet Boarding School Survivor Rosebud Sioux Tribe Snohomish, Washington Dr. Ramona Charette Klein Boarding School Survivor Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Medina, North Dakota The Honorable Ben Barnes Chief Shawnee Tribe Miami, Oklahoma Deborah Parker Chief Executive Officer National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Minneapolis, Minnesota Dr. Janine Pease, D. Ed. Founding President and Faculty Member Little Big Horn College Crow Agency, Montana House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_may-12-2022

Indianz.Com
Matthew War Bonnet (Rosebud Sioux) / Boarding School Survivor

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 7:50


House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1334M Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair NOTE: The audio tracks below have been run through a noise reduction filter to eliminate background noise. On Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1334 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.5444, the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act. The bill requires the federal government to investigate the Indian boarding school era through a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in the United States and a Truth and Healing Advisory Committee. Witness List James LaBelle, Sr. 1st Vice President and Boarding School Survivor National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Anchorage, Alaska Matthew War Bonnet Boarding School Survivor Rosebud Sioux Tribe Snohomish, Washington Dr. Ramona Charette Klein Boarding School Survivor Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Medina, North Dakota The Honorable Ben Barnes Chief Shawnee Tribe Miami, Oklahoma Deborah Parker Chief Executive Officer National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Minneapolis, Minnesota Dr. Janine Pease, D. Ed. Founding President and Faculty Member Little Big Horn College Crow Agency, Montana House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_may-12-2022

Indianz.Com
Deborah Parker / National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:27


House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1334M Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair NOTE: The audio tracks below have been run through a noise reduction filter to eliminate background noise. On Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1334 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.5444, the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act. The bill requires the federal government to investigate the Indian boarding school era through a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in the United States and a Truth and Healing Advisory Committee. Witness List James LaBelle, Sr. 1st Vice President and Boarding School Survivor National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Anchorage, Alaska Matthew War Bonnet Boarding School Survivor Rosebud Sioux Tribe Snohomish, Washington Dr. Ramona Charette Klein Boarding School Survivor Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Medina, North Dakota The Honorable Ben Barnes Chief Shawnee Tribe Miami, Oklahoma Deborah Parker Chief Executive Officer National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Minneapolis, Minnesota Dr. Janine Pease, D. Ed. Founding President and Faculty Member Little Big Horn College Crow Agency, Montana House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_may-12-2022

Indianz.Com
Opening Remarks

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:16


House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1334M Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair NOTE: The audio tracks below have been run through a noise reduction filter to eliminate background noise. On Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1334 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.5444, the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act. The bill requires the federal government to investigate the Indian boarding school era through a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in the United States and a Truth and Healing Advisory Committee. Witness List James LaBelle, Sr. 1st Vice President and Boarding School Survivor National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Anchorage, Alaska Matthew War Bonnet Boarding School Survivor Rosebud Sioux Tribe Snohomish, Washington Dr. Ramona Charette Klein Boarding School Survivor Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Medina, North Dakota The Honorable Ben Barnes Chief Shawnee Tribe Miami, Oklahoma Deborah Parker Chief Executive Officer National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Minneapolis, Minnesota Dr. Janine Pease, D. Ed. Founding President and Faculty Member Little Big Horn College Crow Agency, Montana House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_may-12-2022

Indianz.Com
James LaBelle, Sr. (Inupiaq)/ National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:27


House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1334M Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair NOTE: The audio tracks below have been run through a noise reduction filter to eliminate background noise. On Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1334 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.5444, the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act. The bill requires the federal government to investigate the Indian boarding school era through a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in the United States and a Truth and Healing Advisory Committee. Witness List James LaBelle, Sr. 1st Vice President and Boarding School Survivor National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Anchorage, Alaska Matthew War Bonnet Boarding School Survivor Rosebud Sioux Tribe Snohomish, Washington Dr. Ramona Charette Klein Boarding School Survivor Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Medina, North Dakota The Honorable Ben Barnes Chief Shawnee Tribe Miami, Oklahoma Deborah Parker Chief Executive Officer National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Minneapolis, Minnesota Dr. Janine Pease, D. Ed. Founding President and Faculty Member Little Big Horn College Crow Agency, Montana House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_may-12-2022

Indianz.Com
Ben Barnes / Shawnee Tribe

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:16


House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1334M Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair NOTE: The audio tracks below have been run through a noise reduction filter to eliminate background noise. On Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1334 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.5444, the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act. The bill requires the federal government to investigate the Indian boarding school era through a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in the United States and a Truth and Healing Advisory Committee. Witness List James LaBelle, Sr. 1st Vice President and Boarding School Survivor National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Anchorage, Alaska Matthew War Bonnet Boarding School Survivor Rosebud Sioux Tribe Snohomish, Washington Dr. Ramona Charette Klein Boarding School Survivor Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Medina, North Dakota The Honorable Ben Barnes Chief Shawnee Tribe Miami, Oklahoma Deborah Parker Chief Executive Officer National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Minneapolis, Minnesota Dr. Janine Pease, D. Ed. Founding President and Faculty Member Little Big Horn College Crow Agency, Montana House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_may-12-2022

Indianz.Com
Janine Pease / Little Big Horn College

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 7:56


House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1334M Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair NOTE: The audio tracks below have been run through a noise reduction filter to eliminate background noise. On Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1334 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.5444, the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act. The bill requires the federal government to investigate the Indian boarding school era through a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in the United States and a Truth and Healing Advisory Committee. Witness List James LaBelle, Sr. 1st Vice President and Boarding School Survivor National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Anchorage, Alaska Matthew War Bonnet Boarding School Survivor Rosebud Sioux Tribe Snohomish, Washington Dr. Ramona Charette Klein Boarding School Survivor Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Medina, North Dakota The Honorable Ben Barnes Chief Shawnee Tribe Miami, Oklahoma Deborah Parker Chief Executive Officer National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Minneapolis, Minnesota Dr. Janine Pease, D. Ed. Founding President and Faculty Member Little Big Horn College Crow Agency, Montana House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_may-12-2022

Indianz.Com
Q&A

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 43:52


House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1334M Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair NOTE: The audio tracks below have been run through a noise reduction filter to eliminate background noise. On Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1334 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.5444, the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act. The bill requires the federal government to investigate the Indian boarding school era through a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in the United States and a Truth and Healing Advisory Committee. Witness List James LaBelle, Sr. 1st Vice President and Boarding School Survivor National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Anchorage, Alaska Matthew War Bonnet Boarding School Survivor Rosebud Sioux Tribe Snohomish, Washington Dr. Ramona Charette Klein Boarding School Survivor Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Medina, North Dakota The Honorable Ben Barnes Chief Shawnee Tribe Miami, Oklahoma Deborah Parker Chief Executive Officer National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Minneapolis, Minnesota Dr. Janine Pease, D. Ed. Founding President and Faculty Member Little Big Horn College Crow Agency, Montana House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_may-12-2022

Congressional Dish
CD251: BIF: Driving Dangers Sustained

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 80:59


The recently signed infrastructure law continues the United States' over-reliance on the most dangerous way to travel: driving a vehicle. Did Congress make sufficient safety improvements to decrease the dangers posed by driving in the United States? This episode will examine all vehicle-related safety provisions to help you weigh your own transportation options. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! View the Show Notes on our Website at https://congressionaldish.com/cd251-bif-driving-dangers-sustained/ Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD246: BIF: Appalachian Chemical Storage CD247: BIF: The Growth of US Railroads CD240: BIF: The Infrastructure BILL CD021: Trailblazer vs. ThinThread Why You Should Be Afraid of Cars “Number of worldwide air traffic fatalities from 2006 to 2021.” Apr 12, 2022. Statista. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Mar 2022. “Overview of Motor Vehicle Crashes in 2020.” U.S. Department of Transportation. “Number of deaths / injuries directly linked to boating accidents in the U.S. from 2002 to 2020.” Jun 2021. Statista. Injury Facts. “Railroad Deaths and Injuries.” National Safety Council. Jon Ziomek. Sept 28, 2020. “Disaster on Tenerife: History's Worst Airline Accident.” Historynet. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Distracted Driving.” U.S. Department of Transportation. Problems the Law Does (and Does Not) Address Jake Blumgart. Nov 15, 2021. “The Infrastructure Bill May Not Be So Historic After All.” Governing. Self Driving Cars Neal E. Boudette. May 3, 2022. “Paying customers could hail driverless taxis in San Francisco later this year.” San Francisco Examiner. Natasha Yee. Apr 1, 2022. “Waymo Bringing Driverless Vehicles to Downtown Phoenix ... Soon.” Phoenix New Times. “24 Self-Driving Car Statistics & Facts.” Feb 20, 2022. Carsurance. Neal E. Boudette. Jul 5, 2021. “Tesla Says Autopilot Makes Its Cars Safer. Crash Victims Say It Kills.” The New York Times. Clifford Law Offices PC. May 5, 2021. “The Dangers of Driverless Cars.” The National Law Review. Katie Shepherd and Faiz Siddiqui. Apr. 19, 2021. “A driverless Tesla crashed and burned for four hours, police said, killing two passengers in Texas.” The Washington Post. Riley Beggin. Jan 15, 2021. “Self-Driving Vehicles Allowed to Skip Some Crash Safety Rules.” Government Technology. Faiz Siddiqui. Oct 22, 2020. “Tesla is putting ‘self-driving' in the hands of drivers amid criticism the tech is not ready.” The Washington Post. Niraj Chokshi. Feb 25, 2020. “Tesla Autopilot System Found Probably at Fault in 2018 Crash.” The New York Times. Michael Laris. Feb 11, 2020. “Tesla running on ‘Autopilot' repeatedly veered toward the spot where Apple engineer later crashed and died, federal investigators say.” The Washington Post. Alex Davies. May 16, 2019. “Tesla's Latest Autopilot Death Looks Just Like a Prior Crash.” Wired. Neal E. Boudette and Bill Vlasic. Sept 12, 2017. “Tesla Self-Driving System Faulted by Safety Agency in Crash.” The New York Times. Rachel Abrams and Annalyn Kurtz. Jul 1, 2016. “Joshua Brown, Who Died in Self-Driving Accident, Tested Limits of His Tesla.” The New York Times. Alcohol Detection Systems Isaac Serna-Diez. Nov 23, 2021. “Alcohol Detection Systems Will Now Be Mandatory In All New Cars To Prevent Drunk Driving. YourTango. Keyless Entry Carbon Monoxide Deaths “Toyota Introduces Automatic Engine Shut Off to Prevent Carbon Monoxide Deaths.” Jun 20, 2019. Kelley Uustal Trial Attorneys. “Toyota Has the Most Keyless Ignition Related Deaths, But Takes no Action.” Jun 7, 2019. KidsAndCars.org. Kids Left in Cars Morgan Hines. Aug 2, 2019. “There's science behind why parents leave kids in hot cars.” USA Today. Scottie Andrew and AJ Willingham. July 30, 2019. “More than 38 kids die in hot cars every year, and July is the deadliest month.” CNN. John Bacon. Jul 28, 2019. “'He will never forgive himself': Wife defends husband in devastating hot car deaths of twins.” USA Today. Eric Stafford. May 6, 2019. [“Children Can Die When Left in the Back Seat on a Warm Day—and 800 Already Have. “Children Can Die When Left in the Back Seat on a Warm Day—and 800 Already Have.” Car and Driver. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Child Heatstroke Prevention: Prevent Hot Car Deaths.” U.S. Department of Transportation. Motorcycle Helmets “Motorcycle helmet use laws by state.” May 2022. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. “Facts + Statistics: Motorcycle crashes.” Insurance Information Institute. Adam E. M. Eltorai et. al. March 16, 2016. “Federally mandating motorcycle helmets in the United States.” BMC Public Health. Truck Safety “How Many Miles Do Semi Trucks Last?” Rechtien. Non-motorist Safety “Pedestrian Traffic Fatalities by State: 2020 Preliminary Data.” Governors Highway Safety Association. “Pedestrian Traffic Fatalities by State: 2020 Preliminary Data.” [Full Report] March 2021. Governors Highway Safety Association. John Wenzel. Jan 6, 2020. “Bollard Installation Cost.” Saint Paul Sign & Bollard. Richard Peace. Feb 20, 2019. “Why You Don't Want a Superfast Electric Bicycle.” Electric Bike Report. 911 System Upgrades Mark L. Goldstein. January 2018. “Next Generation 911: National 911 Program Could Strengthen Efforts to Assist States” [GAO-18-252]. Government Accountability Office. National 911 Program. December 2016. “2016 National 911 Progress Report.” U.S. Department of Transportation. CD021: Trailblazer vs. ThinThread Followup “Michael Hayden, Principal, Strategic Advisory Services.” The Chertoff Group. “Board of Directors.” Atlantic Council. Tim Shorrock. Apr 15 2013. “Obama's Crackdown on Whistleblowers.” The Nation. The Law H.R.3684 - Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act Senate Version Law Outline DIVISION A: SURFACE TRANSPORTATION TITLE I - FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS Subtitle A - Authorizations and Programs Sec. 11101: Authorization of Appropriations Authorizes appropriations for Federal-Aid for highways at between $52 billion and $56 billion per year through fiscal year 2026 (over $273 billion total). Authorizes $300 million for "charging and fueling infrastructure grants" for 2022, which increases by $100 million per year (maxing out at $700 million in 2026) Authorizes between $25 million and $30 million per year for "community resilience and evacuation route grants" on top of equal amounts for "at risk coastal infrastructure grants" Authorizes a total of $6.53 billion (from two funds) for the bridge investment program Sec. 11102: Obligation Ceiling Caps the annual total funding from all laws (with many exceptions) that can be spent on Federal highway programs. Total through 2026: $300.3 billion Sec. 11111: Highway Safety Improvement Program Adds protected bike lanes to the list of projects allowed to be funded by the highway safety improvement project Adds "vulnerable road users" (non-motorists) to the list of people who must be protected by highway safety improvement projects If 15% or more of a state's annual crash fatalities are made up of non-motorists, that state will be required to spend at least 15% of its highway safety improvement project money on projects designed to improve safety for non-motorists. Each state, by the end of 2023, will have to complete a vulnerable road user safety assessment that includes specific information about each non-motorist fatality and serious injury in the last five years, identifies high-risk locations, and identifies possible projects and strategies for improving safety for non-motorists in those locations. Sec. 11119: Safe Routes to School Creates a new program to improve the ability of children to walk and ride their bikes to school by funding projects including sidewalk improvements, speed reduction improvements, crosswalk improvements, bike parking, and traffic diversions away from schools. Up to 30% of the money can be used for public awareness campaigns, media relations, education, and staffing. No additional funding is provided. It will be funded with existing funds for "administrative expenses". Each state will get a minimum of $1 million. Non-profit organizations are eligible, along with local governments, to receive and spend the funding. Non-profits are the only entities eligible to receive money for educational programs about safe routes to school. Sec. 11130: Public Transportation Allows the Transportation Secretary to allocate funds for dedicated bus lanes Sec. 11133: Bicycle Transportation and Pedestrian Walkways Adds "shared micromobility" projects (like bike shares) to the list of projects that can be funded as a highway project Electric bike-share bikes must stop assisting the rider at a maximum of 28 mph to be classified as an "electric bicycle" Subtitle B - Planning and Performance Sec. 11206: Increasing Safe and Accessible Transportation Options. Requires each state, in return for funding, to carry out 1 or more project to increase accessible for multiple travel modes. The projects can be... The enactment of "complete streets standards" (which ensure the safe and adequate accommodation of all users of the transportation system) Connections of bikeways, pedestrian walkways, and public transportation to community centers and neighborhoods Increasing public transportation ridership Improving safety of bike riders and pedestrians Intercity passenger rail There's a way for State's to get this requirement waived if they already have Complete Streets standards in place Subtitle D - Climate Change Sec. 11404: Congestion Relief Program Creates a grant program, funded at a minimum of $10 million per grant, for projects aimed at reducing highway congestion. Eligible projects include congestion management systems, fees for entering cities, deployment of toll lanes, parking fees, and congestion pricing, operating commuter buses and vans, and carpool encouragement programs. Buses, transit, and paratransit vehicles "shall" be allowed to use toll lanes "at a discount rate or without charge" Subtitle E - Miscellaneous Sec. 11502: Stopping Threats on Pedestrians By the end of 2022, the Secretary of Transportation needs to create a competitive grant pilot program to fund "bollard installation projects", which are projects that raise concrete or metal posts on a sidewalk next to a road that are designed to slow or stop a motor vehicle. The grants will pay for 100% of the project costs Appropriates only $5 million per year through 2026 Sec. 11504: Study of Impacts on Roads from Self-driving Vehicles By early 2023, the Transportation Department has to conduct a study on the existing and future effects of self-driving cars on infrastructure, mobility, the environment, and safety. Sec. 11529: Active Transportation Infrastructure Investment Program Creates a grant program authorized for $1 billion total that will fund walking and biking infrastructure projects that each cost $15 million or more and connect communities to each other, including communities in different states, and to connect to public transportation. The Federal government will pay for 80% of the project costs, except in communities with a poverty rate over 40% (the Federal government will pay 100% of the project costs in impoverished communities). TITLE III - MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY Sec. 23010: Automatic Emergency Braking: Automatic Emergency Braking A Federal regulation will be created by November 2023 which will require new commercial vehicles to be equipped with automatic braking systems and there will be performance standards for those braking systems. Sec. 23022: Apprenticeship Pilot Program Creates a three year pilot program, capped at 3,000 participants at a time, for people under 21 to be trained by people over the age of 26 to become commercial truck drivers. Drivers under the age of 21 are not allowed to transport any passengers or hazardous cargo Sec. 23023: Limousine Compliance With Federal Safety Standards A Federal regulation will be created by November 2023 requiring that limousines have a seat belts at every seating position, including side facing seats. TITLE IV - HIGHWAY AND MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY Subtitle A - Highway Traffic Safety Sec. 24102: Highway Safety Programs Prohibit the Federal Government from withholding highway safety money to the states that refuse to require helmets for motorcycle drivers or passengers who are over the age of 18. Sec. 24103: Highway Safety Research and Development Creates a grant program (by November 2023) that will fund states that want to create a process for notifying vehicle owners about any open recalls on their cars when they register their cars with the DMV. The state receiving the money is only required to provide the notifications for two years and participation in general is voluntary. Creates financial incentives for states to create laws that prohibit drivers from holding "a personal wireless communications device" while driving, has fines for breaking that law, and has no exemptions for texting when stopped in traffic. There are exceptions for using a cell phone for navigation in a "hands-free manner" Creates financial incentives for states to create laws that require curriculum in driver's education courses to include information about law enforcement procedures during traffic stops and the rights and responsibilities of the drivers when being stopped. The states would also have to have training programs for the officers for implementing the procedures that would be explained to drivers. Sec. 24113: Implementation of GAO Recommendations Requires the Secretary of Transportation to implement all of the national-level recommendations outlined in a 2018 GAO report by the end of November 2022. Subtitle B - Vehicle Safety Sec. 24201: Authorization of Appropriations Authorizes a little over $1 billion total for vehicle safety programs from 2022 through 2026 Sec. 24205: Automatic Shutoff By November 2023, the Transportation Department will have to issue a regulation requiring fossil fuel powered vehicles with keyless ignitions to have an automatic shutoff system to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. The amount of time that must trigger the shut off will be determined by the regulators. If the regulation is issued on time, this would go into effect most likely on September 1, 2024. Sec. 24208: Crash Avoidance Technology The Secretary of Transportation must issue a regulation establishing minimum standards for crash avoidance technology that must be included in all vehicles sold in the United States starting on a date that will be chosen by the Secretary of Transportation. The technology must alert the driver of an imminent crash and apply the breaks automatically if the driver doesn't do so. The technology must include a land departure system that warns the driver that they are not in their lane and correct the course of travel if the driver doesn't do so. Sec. 24215: Emergency Medical Services and 9-1-1 Repeals the part of the law that required the Transportation Department to publish criteria that established timelines and performance requirements for anyone who got a grant to implement the Next Generation 9-1-1 project. Sec. 24220: Advanced Impaired Driving Technology By November 2024, the Secretary of Transportation will have to finish a regulation that requires passenger motor vehicles to be standard equipped with "advanced and impaired driving prevention technology" The technology must be able to monitor the performance of a driver and/or their blood alcohol level and be able to prevent or limit the car's operation if impairment is detected or if the blood alcohol is above the legal limit. This will apply to new cars sold after November 2030 at the latest. Sec. 24222: Child Safety By November 2023, the Secretary of Transportation must finish a regulation requiring all new passenger vehicles to have a system alerting the driver visually and audibly to check the back seat when the car is turned off. Says it will be activated "when the vehicle motor is deactivated by the operator" Hearings The Road Ahead for Automated Vehicles House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Highways and Transit February 2, 2022 Overview: The purpose of this hearing is for Members of the Subcommittee to explore the impact of automated vehicle deployment, including automated trucks and buses, on mobility, infrastructure, safety, workforce, and other economic and societal implications or benefits. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

Teleforum
Ten Years On: The America Invents Act and the role of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board in resolving patent disputes

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 60:03


On September 16, 2011, President Obama signed the American Invents Act (AIA) into law. The first major overhaul of the U.S. patent system since the 1952 Patents Act, the AIA received overwhelming bipartisan support in both chambers when enacted. But, with the recent ten-year anniversary of the AIA, a new director poised to take the helm at the USPTO, and Congress ramping up debate on reforms to the AIA, is now the time for a reexamination? Our speakers will consider the role of the PTAB in resolving patent disputes and the legality of the exercise of significant discretionary authority by the USPTO Director to implement policy outside the authority granted the director under the AIA.Featuring:-- Joseph Matal, partner in the Intellectual Property Practice Group in the Washington, D.C. office of Haynes and Boone, LLP-- Paul Brian Taylor, who served over 20 years as Counsel and Chief Counsel for the House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice. He also served as Senior Counsel at the House Committee on Oversight.-- Moderator: Hon. Bob Goodlatte, Former Congressman, United States House of Representatives

City and County of San Francisco: Building Inspection Commission Audio Podcast
Client Services Subcommittee Meeting-20220428 2305-1 - Apr 28, 2022

City and County of San Francisco: Building Inspection Commission Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022


California Ag Today
USDA Pollinator Subcommittee Application Closes May 31

California Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022


If you enjoy and know a lot about pollinators or honeybees in particular, there may be an opportunity for you to help represent the industry with a new USDA subcommittee.

Your Financial Editor
Your Financial Editor - Laura Ries Director Border Security for Homeland Security - 4/30

Your Financial Editor

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 46:47


Lora is director of the Border Security and Immigration Center and a senior research fellow for Homeland Security at The Heritage Foundation. She has over 25 years' experience in the immigration and homeland security arena. Ries twice worked at the Department of Homeland Security on management and immigration policy and operations issues, most recently as the Acting Deputy Chief of Staff. She also worked in the private sector as a homeland security industry strategist and in government relations. Ries previously worked in the legislative branch as Counsel for the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration and Claims. She started her career at the Department of Justice's Board of Immigration Appeals and the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Ries' commentary and analysis have been published and quoted in multiple print media, including The National Interest, FoxNews.com, Roll Call, and The Hill. She has done numerous radio and TV interviews, and has testified before Congress. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Indianz.Com
Sheri Buretta / Chugach Alaska Corporation

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 5:01


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

Indianz.Com
Misty Napeahi / Tulalip Tribes

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 5:07


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

Indianz.Com
Q&A

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 38:04


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

Indianz.Com
Donald Gentry / Klamath Tribes

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 5:22


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

Indianz.Com
Tamara St. John / South Dakota State Representative

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 5:12


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

Indianz.Com
Cheryle A. Kennedy / Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 6:23


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

Indianz.Com
Douglas G. Lankford / Miami Nation

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 4:24


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

Indianz.Com
Opening Remarks

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 18:31


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

Indianz.Com
Tom Wooten / Samish Nation

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 5:27


Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in room 1324 Longworth House Office Building (Hearing Room) and online via Cisco Webex, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a hybrid legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.437, a bill to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to exclude payments to Alaska Native elders for determining eligibility for need-based federal programs and services. • H.R.6063, a bill to authorize the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to hear a land claim from the Miami Nation, headquartered in Oklahoma. The tribe has a treaty-based claim to 2.6 million acres in the state of Illinois. • H.R.6181, the Samish Indian Nation Land Reaffirmation Act. The bill confirms the acquisition of 6.7 acres in Washington in trust for the Samish Nation. A draft discussion of an an amendment in the nature of a substitute [ANS] has been offered. • S.314, A bill to repeal the Klamath Tribe Judgment Fund Act. The Klamath Tribes, headquartered in Oregon, are seeking to repeal a termination-era law that affects their trust funds and trust assets. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.559, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to address lands held in trust in Oregon for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 10. • S.789, the Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act. The bipartisan bill repeals outdated racist and discriminatory laws that were imposed on tribes and their citizens. The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs approved the bill at a business meeting on March 24. Witness List The Honorable Douglas G. Lankford (H.R. 6063) Chief The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Miami, Oklahoma The Honorable Tom Wooten (H.R. 6181) Chairman Samish Indian Nation Anacortes, Washington The Honorable Donald Gentry (S. 314) Chairman The Klamath Tribes Chiloquin, Oregon The Honorable Cheryle A. Kennedy (S. 559) Chairwoman Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Grand Ronde, Oregon The Honorable Sheri Buretta (H.R. 437) Chairman of the Board Chugach Alaska Corporation Anchorage, Alaska The Honorable Misty Napeahi (H.R. 6181) Vice-Chairwoman Tulalip Tribes Tulalip, Washington The Honorable Tamara St. John (S. 789) South Dakota State Representative 1st District Sisseton, South Dakota Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/scip-hybrid-legislative-hearing_april-27-2022

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
New Cabinet sub-committee to oversee Ukrainian refugee assistance

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 6:45


We hear from our political correspondent, Paul Cunningham.

Joint Subcommittee Meeting
Joint SubCommittee Meeting #20: It's 4/20 aka Stoner Christmas

Joint Subcommittee Meeting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 71:02


Joint SubCommittee Meeting #20: It's Stoner Christmas, have another new episode!We talk about our plans for 4/20, reminisce about our road trip in 2020 with our friend Connor to the Washington coast and smoking in Tokeland, WA at 4:20pm, cannabis trends with strains, and Tranquil Forest's B Buds versus the competition.Cannabis smoked:Pancake a la ModeFire BrosGelato #41Tahoma Flavors

Joint Subcommittee Meeting
Joint SubCommittee Meeting #19: Happy 4/20, it's a new episode!!!

Joint Subcommittee Meeting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 56:05


This episode we talk about the Borderlands series, The Radahn boss fight in Elden Ring, dogs and dog breeding, and McDonald's. We also spark the debate between Sweet n Sour or Honey Mustard  with McNuggets.Cannabis smoked:Southern SugarGreen & GoldHype BeastTranquil Forest

Joint Subcommittee Meeting
Joint SubCommittee Meeting #18: Cereal and Cereal Milk from Subdued Excitement.

Joint Subcommittee Meeting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 71:22


Another episode that we recorded a while ago, but this time it was January of this year. This episode we smoke Cereal Milk #17, a Limited Edition drop from Subdued Excitement. We talk about cereal, eating hot food cold, infused pies, and our friend @conniekills stripper name… Tukwila Hazelnut. 

Over the Lege, The Live Podcast!
Ha Ha Haggadah - A Very Special PassOver The Lege

Over the Lege, The Live Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 74:35


Why is tonight different from all other nights? Because Stephanie Chiarello, Aaron Salinas, and Amy Lowry recorded this podcast episode on Passover! And the were joined by two very special guests - Texas State Representative Erin Zwiener and Austin Area Funny Man Jeremy Lamb!   Rep. Erin Zwiener holds a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resource Conservation, a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, and is a three-time Jeopardy! Champion.Rep. Zwiener serves on the House Committees on Public Health, House Administration, and Appropriations, where she is the Vice-Chair of the Subcommittee on Article III (Education). She is a member of the House Democratic Caucus, LGBTQ Caucus, Criminal Justice Reform Caucus, Women's Health Caucus, and IT Caucus. In January of 2021, Rep. Zwiener established the Caucus on Climate, Environment, and the Energy Industry and currently serves as its Chair.She lives in Driftwood with her husband Quincy, daughter Lark, a dog, three horses, a mule, a pony, a pig, and too many chickens. Jeremy Sweetlamb is a lifelong student, director, actor, teacher, promoter, producer, and defender of improvised theatre.For 25 years he has lived and trained in Chicago, LA, and New York before returning to his native Austin, TX. He has recorded a comedy album: 'Beardedlamb Sings Along to the Urban Cowboy Motion Picture Soundtrack.' He has performed with Bill Hader and Bob Odenkirk at the Just for Laughs festival in Montreal.Jeremy started one of the biggest comedy festivals in the country in Out of Bounds. He continues to embrace failure gracefully by teaching middle school theatre and trying to be a good partner and Dad to two lil bitties.Champion,theyCast:Host: Stephanie ChiarelloComedians: Aaron Salinas & Jeremy SweetlambSpecial Guest: Rep. Erin ZwienerAnnouncer: Amy LowreyPodcast Editor: Tom BookerWriters:Stephanie Chiarello, Amy K.

Tamil Language Podcast in Rathinavani90.8, Rathinam College Community Radio, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.
Rathinavani 90.8 Community Radio | World Health Day Podcast | Knowledge Awareness and Preventive Practice of Dengue | By Ms. Sathiyapriya | TNSF Education Sub Committee

Tamil Language Podcast in Rathinavani90.8, Rathinam College Community Radio, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 50:35


Rathinavani 90.8 Community Radio | World Health Day Podcast | Knowledge Awareness and Preventive Practice of Dengue | By Ms. Sathiyapriya | TNSF Education Sub Committee | Event organized by Department of Microbiology | Health and Hygiene Club | NSS | Rathinam CAS

Joint Subcommittee Meeting
Joint SubCommittee Meeting #17: Tom Yum Pizza, Spotify Year In Review, and sandwiches.

Joint Subcommittee Meeting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 66:00


Joint SubCommittee Meeting #17: Tom Yum Pizza, Spotify Year In Review, and sandwiches.Another older episode we recorded at the end of 2021, meant to be the follow up to the pizza episode. I promise we'll be back to new episodes soon.In this episode we talk about eating the Tom Yum pizza Sisi Kay Thai, my first experience eating Moto Pizza, our Spotify Wrapped for 2021, and sandwiches. We also get kind of goofy high smoking Obama Runtz from Green & GoldScotti Piffin from Tranquil ForestJSCM Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jscm206/

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Cabinet sub-committee on health to discuss latest Covid-19 wave of infection

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 3:05


Michéal Lehane, Political Correspondent on rising energy costs, the current Covid wave & other issues raised in the Dáil today

Indianz.Com
William J. Nicholas, Sr. / Passamaquoddy Tribe - H.R.6707

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 6:27


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Rep. Jared Golden (D-Maine) - H.R.6707

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 5:58


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Opening Remarks

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 9:46


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Edward Peter-Paul / Mi'kmaq Nation (Aroostook Band of Micmacs) - H.R.6707

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 2:51


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Patrick Strauch / Maine Forest Products Council - H.R.6707

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 4:58


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Clarissa Sabattis / Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians - H.R.6707

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 5:53


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Charles P. Rose / Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation - H.R.5715

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 5:15


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Q&A

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 35:20


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Kirk Francis / Penobscot Nation - H.R.6707

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 5:30


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Indianz.Com
Joseph T. Byrd / Quapaw Nation - H.R.4715

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 6:06


House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing on H.R.4715, H.R.5715 & H.R.6707 Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – March 31, 2022 Date: Thursday, March 31, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: • H.R.4715, the Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021. The bill authorizes the appropriation of $137.5 million to settle the federal government's mismanagement of assets held in trust for citizens of the Quapaw Nation. • H.R.5715, a bill to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund to ensure that the Udall Foundation can continue to award scholarships to Native students. • H.R.6707, the Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act. The bill ensures that the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Penobscot Nation are treated in the same manner as other Indian nations in terms of law and policy. A land claim settlement currently imposes hurdles on the tribes when it comes to their sovereignty. Witness List Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Jared Golden Maine, 2nd District Panel II The Honorable William J. Nicholas, Sr. (H.R. 6707) Chief Passamaquoddy Tribe Princeton, ME The Honorable Edward Peter-Paul (H.R. 6707) Chief Mi'kmaq Nation [Note: Aroostok Band of Micmacs] Presque Isle, Maine The Honorable Clarissa Sabattis (H.R. 6707) Chief Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Littleton, Maine The Honorable Kirk Francis (H.R. 6707) Chief Penobscot Nation Indian Island, Maine The Honorable Joseph T. Byrd (H.R. 4715) Chairman Quapaw Nation Quapaw, Oklahoma Mr. Charles P. Rose (H.R. 5715) Chair, Board of Trustees Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Tucson, Arizona Mr. Patrick Strauch (H.R. 6707) Executive Director Maine Forest Products Council Augusta, Maine This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For hearing materials and schedules, please visit U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Repository at docs.house.gov/. Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/remote-scip-legislative-hearing_-march-31-2022

Clause 8
Phil Warrick on Working with Sen. Coons to Improve Patent System

Clause 8

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 64:56


How is patent policy made in Congress?  Few know better than Philip Warrick.  Phil served as Senator Coons' top IP advisor after Coons helped restart the Senate's IP Subcommittee. In that role, Phil helped lead the subcommittees' efforts to improve America's patent system, including legislation to fix the patent eligibility mess.  Those efforts were a dramatic departure from Congress's previous fixation on the “patent troll” narrative.  After Coons friend and fellow Delawarean, Joe Biden, was elected as president, the innovation community was hopeful that Coons would use his top role on the Subcommittee to prioritize patent issues within the Biden administration and Congress.  However, Democrat Senator Leahy had other ideas and took over as the top Democrat on the Subcommittee.  Since that time, the Subcommittee has moved in a very different, anti-patent direction and Leahy's views have won out in seemingly every major administration decision related to patents. Yet, in another twist, Leahy has announced that he is retiring and won't seek re-election in ‘22.  So, Coons is likely to return to his role as the top Democrat on the IP Subcommittee. On this episode, Eli talks to Phil about what it was like to work for Senator Coons, how to effectively lobby on patent issues, and big tech's influence on patent policy. Episode Highlights: [00:07] Meet the expert: Few know IP law better than Philip Warrick. [01:53] Getting to know patents: As an undergraduate student, Warrick knew he had an interest in law. The interest led him to his first job in the field — before he ever set foot in law school. [04:54] A career curveball: Warrick never planned to work on Capitol Hill, but things changed when opportunity knocked. [11:38] Creating a network: Warrick shares one of the most important lessons he learned on the Hill, an environment where many are chasing their own agenda. [14:59] Working across the aisle: Warrick discusses the bills and initiatives he worked to push forward with representatives across the political spectrum, including with former podcast guest Brad Watts.  [18:35] Finding a solution: Coons' team hoped drafting legislation would clarify Section 101 of U.S. patent code, a clause often confused with Section 112. The hearings didn't go the way he hoped. [28:35] Hope for a better solution: The drafted bill didn't quite achieve the outcome they had hoped for, but that doesn't mean the future is bleak.   [32:09] Building stronger patents: An ongoing challenge at the forefront of Sen. Coons' concerns for patents in America is getting the Stronger Patents Act passed. The law would make it easier and less costly for patent holders to enforce their patents.  [40:41] Finding common ground: Warrick discusses the dynamic between Sen. Coons and Sen. Tillis, who were on opposite sides of the aisle and how it affected their efforts on patent law. [42:58] The future of IP in the Senate: As Sen. Patrick Leahy, current chair of the IP subcommittee, plans to retire in two years, Warrick hopes conversations around patent law will remain in conversations on the Hill. [43:58] A patent-unfriendly administration?: The Biden administration has taken a position far from what Sen. Coons would have chosen, Warrick says.  [46:56] A complex dynamic: The most surprising thing to Warrick was the complicated relationships and dynamics between offices and staffers. “And there certainly are situations where people are looking to get things done, they want to cut deals … [and] where you're not debating one bill in isolation.” [51:52] A voice in the debate: For companies and organizations with patents, even minor changes in patent law could have a major impact. Collaboration goes a long way in ensuring your voice is heard when these issues are on the table. [55:28] Know the playing field: If an organization wants to influence legislation, the foremost important factor is understanding the debate and the issue's impact. That way, they can propose a viable solution.

Congressional Dish
CD249: A Few Good Laws

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 108:45


We have some new laws! In this episode, a brief overview of the government funding law that (finally) funds the government for 2022 and provides money and weapons to Ukraine, a new law that protects drinking water, a new law that slightly reduces the corruption of Puerto Rico's financial oversight board, and a new law that guarantees you rights that corporate contracts have been taking away. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Executive Producer Recommended Congressional Dish Episode CD076: Weapons for the World Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD248: Understanding the Enemy CD244: Keeping Ukraine CD229: Target Belarus CD170: Electrifying Puerto Rico CD147: Controlling Puerto Rico CD128: Crisis in Puerto Rico Recommended Congressional Dish YouTube Videos What is the World Trade System? Revolution of Dignity or Regime Change? Ukraine 2014 Explained. Earmarks Jamie Dupree on Twitter Jamie Dupree. Mar 10, 2022. “Russian oil ban heads to Senate.” Regular Order by Jamie Dupree. Continuing Resolution Mary Ellen McIntire. Mar 9, 2022. “House Democrats' retreat upended by spending bill delays.” Roll Call. Ballotpedia. Updated February 11, 2021. “Election results, 2020: Incumbent win rates by state.” Red Hill Water Contamination Sophia McCullough. Mar 7, 2022. “Pentagon to permanently shut down leaking Red Hill fuel tank facility.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Scott Kim. Mar 4, 2022. “Tap water declared safe for 3 more Pearl Harbor neighborhood zones.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Sophia McCullough. Mar 1, 2022. “Confused about the timeline for the Red Hill fuel storage facility and contaminated water? Read this.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Associated Press, HPR News Staff. Nov 22, 2021. “Navy says 14K gallons of fuel and water leaked from a 'drain line' near the Red Hill facility.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Scott Kim and Catherine Cruz. Oct 27, 2021. “Navy says operator error was the cause of a May fuel leak from the Red Hill storage facility.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Lead Pipes Karen Pinchin. Sep 10, 2019. “The EPA Says Flint's Water is Safe — Scientists Aren't So Sure.” Frontline. Brittany Greeson. “Lead Pipes Are Widespread and Used in Every State.” Natural Resources Defense Council. Puerto Rico Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico. Feb 18, 2019. “Informative Motion Regarding Publication and Filing of Final Investigative Report – McKinsey & Company, Inc.” Case: 17-03283-LTS. Forced Arbitration Matt Stoller. Mar 7, 2022. “Monopolies Take a Fifth of Your Wages.” BIG. Laws H.R.2471 - Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2022 House Vote Senate Vote Law Outline DIVISION C: DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Title VII: General Provisions Sec. 8139: $300 million from the "Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide" account must be used for the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative The money can be used for "salaries and stipends" of Ukraine's military in addition to equipment and support Sec. 8140: Prohibitions against Russia will not be lifted until "the armed forces of the Russian Federation have withdrawn from Crimea, other than armed forces present on military bases" agreed upon by the Russian and Ukrainian governments. Sec. 8141: "None of the funds made available by this Act may be used to provide arms, training or other assistance to the Azov Battalion. DIVISION K - DEPARTMENT OF STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS Title VII: General Provisions Sec. 7047: "None of the funds appropriated by this Act may be made available for the implementation of any action or policy that recognizes the sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea or other territory in Ukraine." This will end when the Secretary of State certifies that "the Government of Ukraine has reestablished sovereignty over Crimea and other territory in Ukraine under the control of Russian-backed separatists." DIVISION N: UKRAINE SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT Title I: Department of Agriculture $100 million for Food for Peace grants Title III: Department of Defense $195.5 million for US military personnel $213 million for Air Force procurement $5.5 billion for operations and maintenance $3.5 billion of this is for replacing weapons given to Ukraine and for "defense services" and "military eduction and training" provided to the Government of Ukraine. Title VI: Department of State Authorizes $4 billion for direct loans to Ukraine and NATO countries, along with permission to reduce or cancel their obligations to pay us back. Amount provided this way "shall not be considered assistance for the purposes of provisions of law limiting assistance to a country" $2.65 billion to countries housing Ukrainians refugees for emergency food and shelter $1.4 billion for refugees $1.12 billion for Ukraine and "other countries" - Poland and Hungary in particular - that are enacting IMF economic reforms and expanding the private sector $650 million for the "foreign military financing program" for Ukraine "and countries impacted by the situation" $647 million for the "Economic Support Fund" which can be transferred to fund activities "related to public engagement, messaging, and countering disinformation." Expands the emergency powers of the President in 2022 to allow him to provide $3 billion in military equipment, services and money to foreign countries and international organizations, instead of the usual limit of $100 million per year Increases the amount of weapons that are allowed to be exported from $2.05 billion to $3.1 billion $120 million for "Transition Initiatives" H.R.6617 - Further Additional Extending Government Funding Act Law Outline DIVISION A - FURTHERING ADDITIONAL CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2022 Sec. 101: Extends government funding at 2021 levels until March 11, 2022. Allows the Department of Defense to spend their Operations and Maintenance and emergency funds to respond to the Red Hill Bulk Storage Facility spill but caps the spending at $53 million. Adds $250 million to their budget for 2022 to address drinking water contamination caused by the spill. Adds $100 to their budget so they can comply with the Hawaii state order to remove the fuel from the Red Hill facility. H.R.1192 - Puerto Rico Recovery Accuracy in Disclosures Act of 2021 House vote: 429-0 Senate: Unanimous Consent Law Outline Sec 2: Disclosure by Professional Persons Seeking Approval of Compensation Under Section 316 or 317 of PROMESA Requires attorneys, accountants, appraisers, auctioneers, agents, and other professional persons to file a disclosure listing their conflicts of interest with debtors, creditors - or their attorneys and accountants - and the oversight board members, directors, and employees. Failure to file the disclosure, or an incomplete disclosure, will prevent that person from being paid. Being "not a disinterested person" or having an "adverse interest" will also disqualify that person from compensation. This will only apply to cases filed AFTER enactment of this law (January 20, 2022) H.R.4445 - Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act of 2021 Committee Report House Debate Law Outline Sec. 2: Predispute Arbitration of Disputes Involving Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment. Invalidates predispute arbitration clauses in contracts if the person alleging sexual harassment or sexual assault or a representative of a class action lawsuit elects to go to court instead of use arbitration. This will apply whether the case is to be filed in Federal, Tribal, or State court. The decision over where the case will be heard will be made by a court, not by an arbitrator regardless of what is in the contract. Sec 3: Applicability Will only apply to any dispute or claim that "arises or accrues" on or after the date of enactment. Hearings and Debate House Debate on H.R. 1192: Puerto Rico Recovery Accuracy in Disclosures Act of 2021 February 23, 2022 Highlighted PDF of debate on the house floor Clips 1:19:09 Jennifer Gonzalez-Colon: Representative Velazquez and myself have proposed this bipartisan initiative in the last two congresses having achieved passage in the house during the last session Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX): In response to dire fiscal issues facing Puerto Rico at the time, Congress passed the Puerto Rico oversight management and economic stability Act, or Preska in 2016. That legislation established the financial oversight and management board with control over Puerto Rico's budget laws, financial plans and regulations and the authority to retain professionals to assist the board in executing its responsibilities. Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D-NY): The Puerto Rico recovery accuracy in disclosures act of 2021 or product eliminates a double standard currently facing Puerto Rico. On the US Code and federal bankruptcy procedure. Any conflicts of interest or even the perception of such conflict between those working on the bankruptcy and the debtor there are required to be disclosed. However, a loophole in the current law prevents this requirement from being extended to the people of Puerto Rico. Rep. Dan Bishop (R-NC): Most significantly the gap in the 2016 law created a potential for undisclosed compensation terms and undiscovered conflicts of interest visa vi parties and interest for professional serving in Puerto Rico's bankruptcy. Resident Commissioner Jenniffer González Colon: Learning that someone was involved in businesses of one of the parties in the case only after they are named and working on the case does not create assurance of their commitment to the best interest of Puerto Rico or even managing the depth. Rep. Dan Bishop (R-NC): This builds disclosure and oversight requirements increase the likelihood that conflicts of interest will be caught and timely addressed before compensation decisions are made. Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D-NY): While we can have different opinions on how effectively the oversight board is carrying out its mission, one thing should be clear. The island's residents should be entitled to the same rights and protections of any debtor on the mainland. House Debate on H.R.4445 - Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act of 2021 February 7, 2022 Highlighted PDF of debate on the house floor Clips 9:21 Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN): If H.R. 4445 becomes law contracts will be far less likely to include the option to arbitrate. 10:28 Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN): Why are some in Congress so intent on taking this legislation forward today? For years, Democrats have tried to gut arbitration agreements for all kinds of different claims and plaintiffs. If Democrats had their way, everyone from consumers to civil rights plaintiffs, to those with antitrust claims, to individuals using financial service products and others would not be able to contract in advance to resolve disputes through arbitration. 47:33 Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH): We know that if parties can't agree in advance to arbitrate then they are unlikely to agree to arbitrate after there has been a dispute. As a result, the plaintiff may never get to arbitration. Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility: The Current Crisis, the Response, and the Way Forward House Armed Services Committee, Subcommittee on Readiness January 11, 2022 This hearing conducted oversight into the Navy's maintenance of the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility, the Navy's investigation into and response to the November 2021 release of fuel from Red Hill facility impacting drinking water, its impacts on service members and civilians, clean-up and remediation efforts, and next steps forward. Witnesses: Vice Admiral Yancy Lindsey, Commander, Navy Installations Command Rear Admiral Blake Converse, Deputy Command, U.S. Pacific Fleet Rear Admiral John K. Korka, Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command Chief of Civil Engineers Rear Admiral Peter Stamatopoulos, Supply Corps, United States Navy, Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command and 49th Chief of Supply Corps Captain Michael McGinnis Pacific Fleet Surgeon, Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet Clips 9:05 Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA): Why does Red Hill exist in the first place? Even before the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States had grown concerned about the vulnerability of above ground fuel storage tanks in 1940. The construction began on the Red Hill bulk fuel storage facility, a one in a kind engineering innovation that secured the fuel from enemy aerial attack. The facility holds 250 million gallons of fuel in 20 steel lined underground tanks encased in concrete. These tanks are connected to three gravity fed pipelines, running two and a half miles to Pearl Harbor fuel appears. However, a statistic less commonly quoted by the DoD is that the facility is also 100 feet above the groundwater aquifer that provides water to the residents of Oahu. Thus, it has always been the responsibility of the military to ensure that these tanks are maintained in a manner that not only protects the wartime fuel supply, but the people have a Oahu water supply 18:45 Rear Admiral Blake Converse: I want to start by saying that the Navy caused this problem, we own it, and we're gonna fix it. 19:45 Rear Admiral Blake Converse: Beginning on November 28, residents of certain neighborhoods on our Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam here in Hawaii in military housing began recording vapors, discoloration and contamination of the water provided by the Navy. The Red Hill shaft well, which sits near the Navy's Red Hill bulk fuel storage facility was immediately suspected to be the source of this contamination as that was the source of the drinking water for those affected neighborhoods. So it was shut down that evening, November 28. And it just remained isolated since that day. Later, samples from the Red Hill shaft well would confirm the presence of petroleum contamination. 39:40 Captain Michael McGinnis: Medical teams have screened over 5900 patients during this event. The vast majority were conducted within the first two weeks of our response. patient's symptoms were consistent with an acute environmental exposure event. patient's symptoms consistent with the following nausea, vomiting, headache, diarrhea, skin or eye irritation. Once patients were removed from the water source, the symptoms rapidly resolved. 42:12 Rear Admiral Blake Converse: Our best information is that this recent spill was due to operator error. 1:31:45 Rep. Kaiali'i Kahele (D-HI): Tanks number three, number four and number 11 have not been inspected for approximately 40 years. So my question to Navy Supply Systems Command is why are these tanks still in operation? And how can you assure this committee and the people of Hawaii that tanks three, four and 11, that have not even been looked at in the last 40 years, are safe to use and meet current API 653 guidelines for bulk fuel storage underground facilities. Rear Admiral Peter Stamatopoulos: Yes, sir. Thank you for the question. Yes, you are correct. There are tanks, as you mentioned, that have been out of periodicity for quite a long time. 1:41:27 Rep. Jackie Speier: Are the commanding officers and our executive officers that are assigned to Red Hill trained in petroleum management? Rear Admiral Peter Stamatopoulos: I'll take that question ma'am. The answer is no. Impact of Continuing Resolutions on the Department of Defense and Services House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Defense January 12, 2022 Witnesses: General David H. Berger, Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps General Charles Q. Brown, Jr., Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force Admiral Michael Gilday, Chief of Naval Operations of the U.S. Navy General Joseph M. Martin, Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army Mike McCord, Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) General John W. Raymond, Chief of Space Operations of the U.S. Space Force Clips 29:51 Mike McCord: First, as I believe you're all aware a full year CR, we reduce our funding level below what we requested and what we believe we need. On the surface at the department level as a whole, the reduction to our accounts would appear to be about a billion dollars below our request, which would be significant. Even if that was the only impact. The actual reduction in practice will be much greater. Because we would have significant funding that's misaligned, trapped or frozen in the wrong places and unusable because we don't have the tools or flexibilities to realign funds on anything like the scam we would need to fix all the problems that the chiefs are going to describe. 30:27 Mike McCord: I know all of you are very familiar with the fact that virtually all military construction projects in each year's budget including the FY 22 budget are new starts that cannot be executed under a CR. 34:00 Mike McCord: The six longest CRs in the history of the Defense Department have all occurred in this last 12 year period. We have turned a 12 month fiscal year into an eight month fiscal year in terms of our ability to initiate new starts and enter contracts. This should be unacceptable and not the new normal. It's hard to see this full impact because or in the inefficiency from looking from outside because the organization has of course adapted to its circumstances just as organisms do. Nobody plans to enter into contracts in the first quarter of a fiscal year now because the odds that we would actually be able to do so are so low. Therefore we in turn, have no significant contract delays to report to you when we're under a CR. 1:44:02 Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI): This is about decreasing domestic spending and increasing defense spending. 1:44:20 **Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN):**This was my effort to quash those who are talking about year long CRs. No one on the Appropriations Committee is, yet you see things in the news. And unfortunately, sir, it's usually from your side of the aisle, and I'll pull it again. And it's a December 1 quote, and I can get you the gentlemen, the person who said it. Republicans should be in favor of a CR until Biden is out of office, so they're not going to talk about a one year CR. That would be the proper Republican thing to do. And anybody saying otherwise is deeply foolish. I know you and I, sir, do not agree with that sentiment. And my my goal here is to educate other members who don't understand the appropriations process as well as you and I, and many other of our colleagues that we serve alongside with. Silenced: How Forced Arbitration Keeps Victims of Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment in the Shadows House Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law January 16, 2019 Witnesses: Eliza Dushku, Actor/Producer & Graduate Student Myriam Gilles, Professor of Law, Paul R. Verkuil Chair in Public Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Lora Henry, Canton, OH Andowah Newton, New York, NY Sarah Parshall Perry, Legal Fellow, Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, The Heritage Foundation Tatiana Spottiswoode, Law Student, Columbia Law School Anna St. John, President and General Counsel, Hamilton Lincoln Law Institute Clips 30:59 Anna St. John: Instead, it's worth considering that taking away the possibility of arbitration for these victims is a top-down, heavy handed approach that denies them the advantages of arbitration as a means of adjudicating their claims. 41:04 Sarah Parshall Perry: Since the 1980s, the progressive leadership of this and the upper chamber has sought to curtail the protections of the Federal Arbitration Act through bills including the Arbitration Fairness Act, Arbitration Fairness for Students Act, Consumer Mobile Fairness Act, Fairness and Nursing Homes Act, Sonsumer Fairness Act, Restoring Statutory Rights and Interests of the States Act, the Forced Arbitration Justice Repeal Act and many, many more. 47:13 Sarah Parshall Perry: arbitration agreements are not mandatory. No one, and the Supreme Court has held, is forced to sign a contract. But curtailing access to arbitration would injure, in the end, the very people that Congress has sought for nearly a century to protect. 54:50 Myriam Gilles: First, the entire regime is shrouded in secrecy. And not just because victims want to keep these issues confidential, which by the way is up to them, right? They should have the autonomy and the choice to decide. But because companies want to keep this stuff under wraps, they want to hide and shield sexual predators, and they don't want their business in the public eye. They don't want to deal with regulators or even with lawsuits. The secrecy here on its own just makes this a terrible way to deal with sexual harassment because it means that victims of sexual violence in the workplace who bravely tried to come forward are prohibited from telling their stories in a public forum. Instead, they're forced into this private process where everything is under wraps and siloed. Right, so this is the second bad thing. Victims can join together, even when their injuries stem from the same wrongdoing, even when they've occurred at the hands of the same perpetrator. Even when the company's tolerance for sexual harassment is structural and pervasive. Victims have to go it alone, never knowing about one another. They have to go into arbitration single file. I don't know where all these statistics are coming from about how great arbitration is how people win it all the time, because the truth is, no one goes into arbitration because it's siloed because it's secret because they don't know about what else is going on in the workplace. The secrecy that blankets these individualized proceedings prevents one victim from ever learning whether others right in the cubicle next to them might have experienced the same, the same tragedies, the same traumas and when vid when survivors are in the dark about cases filed by others in the workplace that makes coming forward that makes being the first person to come forward that much harder. As a corollary, and this is an important corollary, the relief that is available to the individual claimant doesn't prevent the wrongdoer from preying on other women doesn't prevent the predator from having all sorts of misconduct against other women in the workplace. The proceedings are one on one and the relief that arbitrators are allowed by contract to grant is individualized. They can't ever order any changes beyond what can help this one individual that happens to have the courage to come before them. I mean, can you imagine a worse system for dealing with toxic corporate culture because I can't. Third, and I think this is really important and all the survivors who've spoken about this forced arbitration is a system where the employers write the rules, and they pick the arbitral provider. Which means that victims of sexual harassment are shunted into a regime that stacked against them from the get go. First, because the arbitrators economic interest is to be very good to the repeat player employer so that they can be chosen for another arbitration next time. So the repeat player problem has been well documented, and I think it's alive and well in arbitration. And the secrecy protects that. And second, because the employer designs the entire arbitration process, it does so to serve its interests, not the interests of its workers, but its interests which again, are to keep discrimination and harassment under a veil of secrecy and out of the public eye. So given all of these things, given how bad this system is for victims of sexual harassment, it's no wonder that so few ever decide to go into private arbitration. I wouldn't. I think it sounds terrible. 1:04:00 Myriam Gilles: When an arbitration complaint is filed, it's filed in secret. In other words, the only entities that know that the arbitration has even been filed are the the employer, the employer, the complaining employee and the arbitration entity. The AAA or JAMS are one of these arbitration providers. Nobody else knows. Contrast that with court. I go down to the DC District Court today and I file a complaint, that complaint is on the public record. Right. And so as the defendants answer or motion to dismiss all the pleadings, their public litigation in the public court system, it has power, and the power it has is the power of signaling, not only to the defendant that I've sued, but to all similarly situated defendants that this is a wrong. This person has complained about something she's told her story, and she plans to prove it. None of that happens in arbitration from the beginning. It is private throughout the entire proceeding, which is held in a secret location, no public no press. All of it is private. Arbitrators don't write decisions. There are only three states in the union that currently require minimal disclosure of arbitrations pretty redacted and hard to read. If you're a researcher like I am about these issues. Other than that, everything that happens in arbitration is a black box. 1:32:18 Tatiana Spottiswoode: And the forced arbitration is so unfair. Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA): I understand you you think forced arbitration is unfair, that's great. Most of the people on that side want to eliminate it for everything not just situations like this. Other representative: will the gentleman yield for a question? Rep. Darrell Issa: I will not. 1:49:15 Myriam Gilles: The FAA was enacted in 1925. But it was enacted so that sophisticated business people could negotiate for arbitration provisions and those provisions would be respected by courts. It was never intended to be imposed via standard form contract. And in fact, if you read the legislative history, if you read the legislation, it accepts and exempts employees. So the idea that the FAA applies to employees is something that was created by a conservative majority of the Supreme Court in 1991, in a case called Circuit City, sorry, first actually was Gilmer and then Circuit City, I can't keep all the bad cases straight. And those are the cases in which the Court interpreted, I would say misinterpreted, the FAA to apply to employees like this. So that now employers can just stick these clauses into job applications, orientation materials, even an innocuous email from HR can include a forced arbitration clause. That was not what the 1925 Congress intended they they'd be rolled, they should be rolling in their in their grades. This is not what they intended. This is what a Supreme Court intent on protecting corporations intended beginning in the 1990s. 2:39:26 Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN): You know what's happened to so many women and others in the workplace is terrible but I really am concerned that by involving the government in these contracts between adults in the area of sexual harassment and assault we're opening a door for more government involvement in other areas of contracts. 2:42:09 Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN): And I would argue that you have you sign it it is not you know even though we use the it's forced arbitration as people are saying it's not really you you have signed something that you have agreed to it. Justice Denied: Forced Arbitration and the Erosion of Our Legal System House Committee on the Judiciary November 16, 2021 Witnesses: Gretchen Carlson, Journalist and Advocate Myriam Gilles, Paul R. Verkuil Chair in Public Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Phil Goldberg, Managing Partner, Shook, Hardy & Bacon L.L.P. Deepak Gupta, Founding Principal, Gupta Wessler PLLC Andrew Pincus, Partner, Mayer Brown L.L.P. Lieutenant Commander Kevin Ziober, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy Reserves Clips 26:35 Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R-WI): You'll hear a different view from me. Eliminating arbitration achieves one thing, it enriches trial attorneys. 29:11 Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R-WI): The AAJ, or American Association for Justice, is the nice sounding name of the plaintiffs attorneys lobbying organization. It also happens to be a huge donor to Democratic candidates, contributing millions of dollars each cycle to their campaigns. 29:52 Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD): Mr. Chairman, point of order. Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) What is your point of order? Rep. Jamie Raskin: My question is just can we impute the policy positions that members of the committee take to campaign contributions? Because if so, I think I'd be doing it a lot more frequently. I thought that's something that we don't do. Rep. David Cicilline: It's an excellent point of order, I'm sure Mr. Sensenbrenner didn't intend to communicate that in that way. Rep. Jamie Raskin: We're gonna be hearing a lot more of that in our committee if that's permissible, but I'm just curious. Maybe we can have some research done. Rep. James Sensenbrenner: Will the gentleman yield? Rep. David Cicilline: I think we don't need to engage with you. I this is an important issue with strongly held beliefs on both sides. [crosstalk] 36:00 Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY): We used to have a concept in law. When I went to law school they still taught it called contracts of adhesion where a contract was unenforceable if one party had no choice in entering into it. All of these arbitration clauses almost are contracts of adhesion. You try when you want to get a credit card, try crossing out the fine print if you can find it without the magnifying glass that that says that you will settle all all disputes in arbitration, cross it out, see if you get the credit card. See if you get the bank loans if you get the mortgage. You have no see if you get the car loan, you have no choice. 1:42:00 Gretchen Carlson: arbitration means that you have no way of knowing that anyone else is facing the same thing within the confines of the workplace structure. There's no way to know because the whole process is secret. And as I described during my testimony, if you do muster up the courage to go and complain, and you have an arbitration clause, that's a good day for the company, because no one will ever know anything about your story. The worst ramification of all of this is that the perpetrator gets to stay in the job. And I think one of the reasons that we've seen this cultural revolution that we're experiencing right now is because the American public was actually so angry about hearing about these stories, and they were wondering, why didn't we know about this? And the reason they didn't know about it, is because of forced arbitration. 2:00:30 Deepak Gupta: I've gone back and looked at the history of the act from 1925. People weren't blind to the possibility of abuse. They raised these concerns before this, this committee, in fact, and the and the architects of the legislation were clear, this is about letting businesses have equal bargaining power that want to resolve their disputes out of court, letting them do that, and I have no objection to that. That makes perfect sense. But but the the drafters were clear this is not about foisting this on people who don't consent through, take it or leave it contracts. And in fact, Congress put in a provision section one of the Federal Arbitration Act that says this shall not apply to any class of workers. Remarkably, the Supreme Court has read that language to mean precisely the opposite. And now it can apply to any class of workers. And so so we have just we've strayed so far away from what Congress intended in 1925. And that's why only this body Congress can set things right. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)