PBS NewsHour - Segments

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Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what…

PBS NewsHour


    • Jan 27, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
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    Latest episodes from PBS NewsHour - Segments

    Here's who may replace Justice Breyer, and what Democrats can do if Republicans oppose

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 8:28

    Justice Stephen Breyer's retirement announcement paves the way for President Joe Biden's promised nomination of a Black woman to the Supreme Court. White House correspondent Geoff Bennett begins the report, and congressional correspondent Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff with more on how the Senate may respond to his nominee options. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: U.S. economy grew 5.7 percent in 2021, fastest since 1984

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 4:21

    In our news wrap Thursday, the U.S. economy rebounded strongly in 2021, with the best growth since 1984. Russia said there's little room for optimism after the U.S. rejected its security demands, but said dialogue on Ukraine is still possible. The Pentagon put out new guidance on limiting civilian casualties from air strikes. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Examining Justice Breyer's legacy and how his retirement may change the court

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 8:36

    Justice Stephen Breyer leaves a storied legacy as he prepares to step down after more than 27 years on the bench. To reflect on what his absence will mean for the future of the Supreme Court, Judy Woodruff is joined by legal veterans Gregory Garre, a former U.S. Solicitor General who has argued in front of the court, and Neal Katyal, former acting U.S. solicitor general, who clerked for Breyer. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What's behind rising violent crimes in the U.S., and how they can be reduced

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 8:28

    Recent shootings in New York City have spotlighted a troubling rise in gun violence and homicide across the country. Amna Nawaz reports on why violent crime has increased and how cities can prevent it. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Many in Kentucky expect long struggle to rebuild, heal after damage from tornadoes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 8:08

    It's been seven weeks since a series of ferocious tornadoes tore through Western Kentucky and surrounding areas, killing 90 people, and making hundreds more homeless. Kentucky's governor, and President Joe Biden, have promised whatever is needed to rebuild. William Brangham recently returned to the town of Mayfield, and found a community struggling to get back on its feet. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    A Moderna official on COVID vaccines for kids, omicron-specific shot, waiving patents

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 7:21

    Moderna and Pfizer announced they are moving forward with trials of a new booster designed to guard specifically against omicron. This comes as the CDC reported Thursday that a third shot of either of those vaccines substantially reduced the risk of hospitalizations among people with weakened immune systems. Amna Nawaz speaks with a top Moderna scientist about several key vaccine questions. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Air strike threats don't deter these Syrian children from going to school

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 5:08

    Syria is in the throes of conflict. In the northeast, Syrian Kurdish forces are fighting ISIS militants who forced a prison break last week. It's the largest recent ISIS resurgence. The president and his Russian allies are continuing airstrikes in Northwest Idlib province. But Syrian children are determined to pursue their education, video journalist Abddulrazaq Alshani found. Ali Rogin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Jamaica's bobsled team qualifies for Winter Olympics for the first time in 24 years

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 1:52

    Viewers may remember the unlikely but true story of the Jamaican bobsled team that made it to the Olympics. It was a feat popularized in the 1993 film, "Cool Runnings." Now, Jamaica's bobsled team is back at it again. Lucy Watson from Independent Television News explains. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    A look at Justice Stephen Breyer's career and opinions on the bench

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 14:59

    New reports Wednesday indicate Justice Stephen Breyer plans to retire, raising questions about his replacement. President Joe Biden said he will wait for Breyer's formal announcement. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer cited the president's past words, indicating a desire to appoint America's first Black woman to the court. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said it's too soon to comment. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: U.N. sounds alarm over Afghan economy, says country has become a 'frozen hell'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 4:17

    In our news wrap Wednesday, the secretary general of the United Nations sounded a dire warning about Afghanistan. The Federal Reserve is ready to ratchet up interest rates in a bid to beat back inflation. The city of San Jose, California, has adopted the nation's first law to make gun owners carry liability insurance. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    The Fed aims to clamp down on inflation with rate hikes. Will it work?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 8:44

    The Federal Reserve is shifting its approach to the economy and monetary policy. It's a major change after holding interest rates at near zero levels. Given the pandemic, it's not without its own risks. But the Fed chairman said the state of the economy required changing course. Lisa Desjardins begins the report, with more from Greg Ip, chief economics commentator for The Wall Street Journal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S., NATO allies reject major Russian demands, offer different compromise

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 8:38

    The United States and NATO on Wednesday rejected Russia's demands that Ukraine never be allowed to become a member of NATO, and that the expansion of NATO since 1997 be rolled back. Russian officials said they would study the written response they received, but blamed the West for taking aggressive actions and said it will take the necessary retaliatory measures. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why the U.S. Postal Service is experiencing delays

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 7:41

    A key part of the Biden administration's plan to distribute free COVID tests depends heavily on the United States Postal Service. White House officials say that effort is going well, with tens of millions of tests now being shipped. But the U.S. Postal Service remains under intense scrutiny for its service, delivery, its finances and how its workforce is dealing with COVID. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    The Holocaust's quiet heroes, survivors honored in new book for children, teens

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 7:40

    People across Europe, Israel and the world marked International Holocaust Remembrance Day Wednesday to commemorate the genocide of European Jews by Nazi Germany. The day was created in 2005 by the United Nations to sustain public awareness, which studies show has rapidly declined in recent years. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro shows one creative attempt to educate younger generations. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Ukraine believes Russian invasion not imminent, but Western allies remain concerned

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 3:09

    Ukraine's leaders on Monday tried to reassure the country, despite more than 100,000 Russian troops deployed near the nation's northern and eastern borders, and despite new announcements of Russian training exercises. The West considers an invasion as possibly imminent, and that fear is being felt on Ukraine's frontlines. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: Pfizer starts clinical trial of omicron-based vaccine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 5:17

    In our news wrap Tuesday, Pfizer began a clinical trial of an updated COVID-19 vaccine designed to ward off the highly contagious omicron variant. The International Monetary Fund slashed its growth forecast citing the omicron variant and other factors. London's Metropolitan Police Service will investigate gatherings held at Prime Minister Boris Johnson's offices during a COVID lockdown in 2020. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Ukraine urges calm over invasion fears but asks U.S. to sanction Russia, send more weapons

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 8:13

    Ukraine's leaders on Monday tried to reassure the country, despite more than 100,000 Russian troops deployed near the nation's northern and eastern borders. Nick Schifrin speaks to Oksana Markarova, Ukraine's ambassador to the United States, about the country's tensions with Russia and intelligence on possible invasion. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How the 2020 census data has started new gerrymandering battles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 6:22

    All across the country, states are busy at work redrawing congressional lines that will help determine the balance of power in Washington for the next decade. To check in on the status of this reapportionment in some key states based on the new 2020 census data, Judy Woodruff is joined by David Wasserman of The Cook Political Report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Many Afghan women forced to quit careers, country in hopes of better life for their kids

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 8:22

    Since the Taliban took over control of Afghanistan last year, the future of the country's women has been in peril. Many girls are barred from receiving an education, and women are prevented from holding many jobs. Back in 2019, special correspondent Jane Ferguson met with a female doctor in Kabul, and she recently returned to find that same doctor now faced with a previously unimaginable choice. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Rising COVID hospitalizations in San Antonio burden fatigued health care workers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 6:29

    The highly contagious omicron variant has brought new daily COVID-19 case numbers to record highs this month. The magnitude of infections have again left many hospitals under tremendous pressure and on the brink. In Texas, where just 58 percent of the state is fully vaccinated, hospitalizations have risen dramatically -- by 80 percent in some cities like San Antonio. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Many Californians still 'trapped' years after PG&E fires. Has the company improved safety?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 8:50

    As the impact of climate change grows, so does the risk of ever larger and more frequent wildfires. No state knows that better than California. But the Golden State is also grappling with the role of one of the country's largest utilities in the matter, and whether the company will do what's needed to prevent or stop fires. Stephanie Sy explores. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Two years into the pandemic, students still struggle with mental health

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 5:17

    As students across the country continue to experience the many changes the pandemic has brought, some are struggling to adjust to their "new normal." As a part of NewsHour's Student Reporting Labs, student reporter Teri Bell followed up with school counselor Edith Porter at Caesar Rodney High School in Camden, Delaware, on her predictions for students' mental health in 2022 and how to help them. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. puts troops on high alert as Russia-Ukraine tensions escalate

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 4:07

    It's the most acute crisis between the West and Russia since the end of the Cold War, and both sides escalated their military deployments Monday. The United States is putting troops on higher alert, NATO says it will reinforce its eastern flank, and Russia is adding to its existing 100,000 troops on Ukraine's borders. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: Supreme Court rejects GOP challenge to proxy voting in the House

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 5:18

    In our news wrap Monday, the United States Supreme Court rejected a Republican lawsuit against proxy voting in the House of Representatives, but agreed to hear challenges to affirmative action in college admissions for the first time since 2016. Federal prosecutors in Minneapolis charged that three former police officers violated George Floyd's civil rights in failing to stop his murder. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Examining the U.S. response options to the Russia-Ukraine conflict

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 10:11

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization is increasing its troop presence in Eastern Europe, and the United States announced Monday it was putting 8,500 troops on high alert to deploy to the region. Judy Woodruff discusses the details of the latest developments with two experts. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What's behind the current stock market volatility?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 7:03

    At one point Monday, the Dow Jones was down more than a thousand points and the S&P 500, which is a wider gauge of the stock market, fell into correction territory -- a drop of 10 percent from its previous high. All of the major indexes finished on a positive note, but are down since the start of the year. Amna Nawaz discusses with economist Dana Peterson of the think tank The Conference Board. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Sinema censure, Biden presser and hot mic moment

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 10:26

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report with Amy Walter join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including the censure of Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, the president's hot mic moment from a White House presser, and voter confidence in the Biden administration. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Miami City Ballet tackles Swan Lake with a nod to history, special emphasis on acting

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 7:19

    As COVID-19 rages this winter, the Miami City Ballet continues to dance, preparing to perform "Swan Lake" in February, under the careful eye of celebrated choreographer Alexei Ratmansky. Jeffrey Brown spent a day with Ratmansky and dancers to see how they've brought this traditional ballet going back to its rediscovered historical roots. This report is for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    High school can be hard. Here's how one teacher helps her students skate through it

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 4:02

    The past two years of this pandemic have been especially difficult for students, who have experienced major disruptions to both their education and social lives. In a special program that premieres Tuesday, NewsHour's Student Reporting Labs team is exploring how many young people are dealing with the new normal. Here's a look at how one teacher has taken an unconventional approach to learning. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    A Brief But Spectacular take on immigrant justice in America

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 3:31

    Originally from Mexico City herself, Gaby Hernandez understands firsthand the challenges immigrants can face in the United States. As the executive director of the Long Beach Immigrants Rights Coalition in California, she empowers those in her community to push for better resources and protections at both the local and national level. She shares her Brief But Spectacular take on immigrant justice. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What Run-DMC, Peter Parker, and Linus have in common

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 7:22

    Since his earliest days on the mic, DMC, the co-founder of what many consider to be the greatest rap group of all time, has offered countless rhymes and tales--about what it was to be a kid from Queens who wore big glasses, loved reading books, and learned above all else, the importance and power of being yourself. So for Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels, writing a children's book came naturally--and offered the chance to help the next generation. Christopher Booker reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Urgent tri-state infrastructure project gets green light after long delay

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 2:43

    Before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, about 200,000 rode the train through the tunnel under the Hudson river between New York and New Jersey every day. The tunnel, built in 1910, is over 111 years old--and due to lingering damage from Superstorm Sandy, is getting more unstable each day. The project had been in a holding pattern, but now, with the passing of Biden's $1 trillion infrastructure package, the repairs can finally begin. Hari Sreenivasan reports from New Jersey. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    In Venezuela, confidence in the democratic process wanes as Maduro maintains power

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 4:12

    It's been three years since opposition leader Juan Guaido's party won Venezuela's presidential election. But despite international support for Guaido, President Nicolas Maduro continues to lead. With confidence in the democratic process waning, Venezuela is also undergoing a shrinking economy and a growing humanitarian and refugee crisis. Cynthia Arnson, director of the Wilson Center's Latin American program, joins from Washington, D.C. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How the U.S. could address confusing, shifting COVID-19 health directives

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 4:35

    Two years since the first lockdown in China, there have been great strides to combat COVID-19, but confusion and questions remain. From vaccinations to testing, to masking and how many days to isolate--there hasn't always been clarity. More collaboration between the CDC and the FDA would help, says Joshua Sharfstein, professor at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    COVID-19 latest: Omicron variant, herd immunity, worldwide vaccine access

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 6:32

    In order to expand testing access and help stop the spread of the omicron variant, the Biden administration announced this week that it would begin distributing millions of COVID-19 tests and masks to Americans for free. Infectious disease epidemiologist Jessica Malaty Rivera joins for more on the rollout of this plan and its potential impact, the latest public health recommendations, and what the future of COVID-19 may hold. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Black women in Mississippi demand state-level pay protections

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 5:40

    Mississippi is the only state in the nation without a law requiring equal pay for women--but that could be about to change. Ivette Feliciano sits down with Cassandra Welchlin, Executive Director of the Mississippi Black Women's Roundtable, to discuss her team's push for equal-pay legislation, and the current status of Mississippi's equal pay bill. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    A year into Biden's presidency, where does he stand?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 4:49

    President Biden marked his first year in office on a downbeat note: low approval ratings, a defeat of the Democrats' voting rights bill in the Senate, and the Build Back Better Bill stalled. But perhaps Biden's biggest political concern is how he fares within his own party. For a look at why this is crucial, along with some historical context, Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: Texas judge blocks Biden vaccine mandate for federal workers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 4:45

    In our news wrap Friday, a federal judge in Texas blocked nationwide enforcement of a COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal workers. Anti-abortion groups held their annual rally in Washington, D.C., buoyed by hopes of an abortion rights rollback. Rebels in Yemen say a Saudi coalition airstrike killed at least 70 inmates at a prison. Rock star Meat Loaf's fans are mourning after his death Thursday. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Despite warnings from U.S., Russia likely only weeks away from invading Ukraine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 8:43

    The United States on Friday agreed to submit written responses next week to Russia's demands over how to end the crisis over Ukraine. The announcement came during a high level diplomatic meeting in Geneva, as Russia maintains overwhelming force along the Ukrainian border, and has now deployed to neighboring Belarus. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Starving Afghan kids sold, forced into labor amid dire economic and humanitarian crises

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 6:20

    Ever since the withdrawal of the U.S. and its allies, and the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, the global community cut off non-humanitarian aid, froze assets abroad and imposed sanctions on the new government. Add to that crippling drought and harsh winter, Afghans are now going to desperate lengths to keep themselves and their family alive. John Ray of Independent Television News reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why Biden's pledges of free college, waiving student debt remain unfulfilled

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 4:59

    One year into President Joe Biden's tenure, we take stock of the status of some of his key campaign promises surrounding education, including the promise to reopen K-12 schools during the pandemic and provide two years of free community college. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Brooks and Capehart on Biden's wins, losses in year one and the Russia-Ukraine conflict

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 15:41

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including Democrats' inability to garner enough support to pass the White House's legislative priorities, and the tensions that remain between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How one artist's viral virtual art class is helping kids around the world

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 7:44

    Individual ingenuity has become a hallmark of the pandemic with artists producing an array of creative in-person and virtual innovations. Special correspondent Cat Wise has the story of how one San Francisco artist stepped in to help out during the early days and soon found a new calling. This report is part of our art and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    A photographer's Brief But Spectacular take on representation and the power of portraiture

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 3:43

    Since childhood, Jess T. Dugan has recognized the power of photography in documenting the world around them. As they grew into their gender identity, they began using photography and portraits to capture not only their own life, but the lives of other queer people. Tonight, Dugan shares their Brief But Spectacular take on representation and the power of portraiture. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: Jan. 6 panel seeks voluntary testimony from Ivanka Trump

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 5:34

    In our news wrap Thursday, the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol riot asked to interview Ivanka Trump. New unemployment claims jumped up by 55,000 last week, to 286,000 -- the most since October. Police in Britain arrested two people in connection with the Texas synagogue standoff Saturday. The CIA said most "Havana Syndrome" cases were not caused by a foreign governments. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    A closer look at Biden's first year performance and why he has low approval ratings

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 8:45

    President Joe Biden enters his second year in office fighting to pass his signature legislation in a divided Congress, and facing the lowest approval ratings of his tenure. Judy Woodruff assesses his job performance with Democratic Party strategists Faiz Shakir, an adviser to Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and Matt Bennett, who worked for both of Bill Clinton's presidential campaigns. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why NATO countries can't agree on how to respond to Russia-Ukraine conflict

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 10:03

    President Joe Biden on Thursday cleaned up comments he made a day earlier, to say any Russian incursion into Ukraine would lead to a severe and unified response by the United States and its allies. In Berlin, Secretary of State Antony Blinken also presented unity. But as Biden himself admitted Wednesday, the transatlantic alliance is not unified over how to punish Russia. Nick Schifrin explains. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Biden vowed to fix America's immigration system. Here's what he achieved in his first year

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 5:58

    One year into President Joe Biden's tenure, we take a look at the status of some of his key campaign promises surrounding immigration. President Biden came into office promising to undo the aggressive policies of the previous administration, and usher in a more humane approach. Amna Nawaz lays out how he's doing on that front. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What role did the 3 other cops play in George Floyd's murder?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 9:16

    Jury selection began Thursday in the federal trial of three former Minneapolis police officers charged in the killing of George Floyd. The charges and issues in this federal trial are different from those in the earlier state trial that ended in the conviction of Derek Chauvin. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro and John Yang report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    New report exposes former pope's inaction on child sexual abuse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 6:07

    A tough new report finds the retired Pope Benedict failed to deal adequately with sexual abuse cases when he was the leader of a German diocese decades ago. Stephanie Sy has the latest on these revelations and how they reflect on the Vatican's leadership. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    In 'Don't Look Up,' director Adam McKay makes allegorical plea to follow climate science

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 6:59

    Climate change and comedy might not seem like a natural pairing, but a new film combines the two to create a parable about how our society is responding to the climate crisis. William Brangham recently spoke to Adam McKay, director of comedies like "Anchorman," "Vice" and "The Big Short," about his latest hit, "Don't Look Up." This report is part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

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