PBS NewsHour - Segments

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Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what…

PBS NewsHour


    • Sep 24, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 6m AVG DURATION
    • 2,539 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from PBS NewsHour - Segments

    Biden again urges Congress to pass infrastructure, reconciliation bills amid stalemate

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 3:16

    The fate of the bipartisan infrastructure bill and a $3.5 trillion spending package is at risk amid Democratic infighting. On Friday, Biden acknowledged concerns, but urged Congress to pass both bills. Amna Nawaz begins our report, and joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: CDC approves boosters for older, high-risk Americans and frontline workers

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 6:33

    In our news wrap Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved booster shots for older and high-risk Americans, adding frontline workers to the list. Vice President Kamala Harris had her own COVID scare moments before an interview with ABC's "The View." A migrant encampment in Del Rio, Texas where thousands of Haitian migrants had converged this week has now been cleared. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How Arizona's election review is providing a national playbook for disgruntled politicians

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 5:17

    Republicans in the Arizona State Senate had commissioned a review of 2020 ballots in Maricopa County even though election officials found no large-scale fraud. But a partisan group called Cyber Ninjas undertook a controversial review of the vote and affirmed Joe Biden won Maricopa County and Arizona. Nate Persily, an election law scholar at Stanford University, joins William Brangham with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Germany faces tight race to replace Angela Merkel, with climate change as top voter issue

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 6:47


    Germany is one of America's most important allies. Nearly every American president since George W. Bush has worked closely with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. But for the first time since 2005, she will not be a candidate when Germans head to the polls this Sunday to vote for her successor. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant is in Berlin with a preview of this upcoming election. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    Jury begins deliberating in R. Kelly case after weeks of harrowing witness testimony

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 5:22

    PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Brooks and Capehart on Democratic infighting, raising debt ceiling, border crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 14:19


    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the divide among Democrats over the $3.5 trillion spending bill, the looming debt ceiling deadline, and the Biden administration's response to the Haitian migrant issue on the southern border. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    A Brief But Spectacular take on going from crisis to opportunity post-pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 3:58

    Whether teaching NYU marketing students or co-hosting the podcast "Pivot," Scott Galloway rarely misses an opportunity to share his insight on the effects of big tech. Tonight, he shares his Brief But Spectacular take on this country's response to the pandemic. It's also the subject of his latest book: "Post Corona: From Crisis to Opportunity." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Artist Shahzia Sikander's work explores a plethora of extraordinary realities

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 5:36

    Artist Shazia Sikander is straddling worlds and using her art to examine how we see the past and present, east and west. Jeffrey Brown has the story from New York for our art and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How 'fits and starts' of booster science, rollout may affect U.S. vaccination goals

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 5:49

    An advisory panel for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday recommended the Pfizer booster shots for people 65 and older, nursing home residents, and younger adults with underlying health issues. For a deeper look at that decision, Amna Nawaz is joined by Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo. She is a physician, epidemiologist and professor at the University of California, San Francisco. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: California bars worker productivity quotas used by Amazon, other warehouses

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 4:19

    In our news wrap Thursday, California is now the first state to bar Amazon and other giant warehouse employers from punishing or firing workers over productivity quotas. Democratic congressional leaders now say they have a framework deal to pay for a huge spending measure covering social and environmental programs. A shooting today in Tennessee left 2 dead -- including the gunman -- and 12 wounded. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Here's the latest on the fate of Haitian migrants in Texas, Biden response to backlash

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 5:14

    Daniel Foote, the U.S. special envoy to Haiti, resigned in protest Thursday, over the Biden administration's move to deport Haitian migrants back to their troubled home country. Foote called the handling of migrants in Del Rio, Texas, "inhumane" and "counterproductive." White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor broke the story of the special envoy's resignation and joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Lack of access, infrastructure and government accountability hurt Ugandan vaccine goals

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:28

    The U.S. plan to donate 500 million vaccines to developing countries aims to address the lopsided distribution and exacerbated impact of the virus. In Africa, Uganda is still struggling to vaccinate those most at-risk. It has recorded more than 120,000 cases of COVID-19 and over 3100 deaths, but the true toll is likely much higher. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Justice Breyer on 'procedural decision' behind Texas abortion law, politics on the bench

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 13:31

    Justice Stephen Breyer heads into a new supreme court term soon, facing a docket of hot-button issues and pressure from progressives to retire. The court's senior liberal justice, Breyer joined Judy Woodruff to talk about his role and new book, "The Authority of the Court and the Peril of Politics." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. and E.U. climate envoys on how China, developing nations can help combat crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:55


    The U.N. warns that unless the world acts faster than promised, Earth's temperatures will rise to catastrophic, irreversible levels. The U.S. calls the upcoming climate summit the last chance for the world to avoid disaster. Nick Schifrin discusses the crisis with John Kerry, the president's special envoy on climate, and Frans Timmermans, executive vice president of the European Commission. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    How artist Roberto Lugo is upending porcelain traditions with his personal, cultural roots

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 5:00

    Special correspondent Jared Bowen of GBH Boston brings us a look at artist Roberto Lugo, who puts family, tradition, and historical figures like Harriet Tubman at the center of his work in New Hampshire. It's part of our ongoing arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. plan to share Pfizer shots globally 'too little and too late,' ex-CDC director says

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 6:45

    The Biden administration announced Wednesday that the U.S. was purchasing an additional 500 million Pfizer COVID vaccines to donate to other nations. The move is what critics and organizations like the WHO have been calling for -- a much more robust effort on behalf of rich countries. Yet some are saying this still isn't enough. William Brangham discusses with Tom Frieden, former head of the CDC. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    China's vaccine faces scrutiny as Indonesians die despite shots, U.S. pledges donations

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 7:01

    As the U.S. commits to vaccine distribution, Indonesia has recorded more than 4 million COVID cases. More than 140,000 people have died. Initially, Indonesia turned to China for vaccine aid. But Nick Schifrin explores how the U.S. and its allies are trying to achieve vaccine inroads in China's backyard. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: Senate Dems, GOP end police reform talks, face stalemate over debt ceiling

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 4:35

    In our news wrap Wednesday, Democratic Senators say they ended bipartisan negotiations on police reform and collecting data on use of force. Senators have also reached a stalemate on the fight over the debt ceiling. There's word that large numbers of Haitian migrants in Texas are being released into the U.S. and told to report to immigration within 60 days. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    EU's top diplomat says it can deploy military forces without U.S., NATO approval

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 6:35

    President Joe Biden spoke with French President Emmanuel Macron Wednesday for the first time since France erupted with anger over a new Indo-Pacific defense alliance between the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. Nick Schifrin looks at European-U.S. relations with Josep Borrell, the high representative for foreign affairs and security policy and vice president of the European Commission. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Extending government funding and raising debt ceiling face uphill Senate battle

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 4:27

    Congress must act soon just to keep the federal government functioning. But Democratic leaders are navigating internal divides and logjams as they try to pass two bills that would together dole out trillions of dollars toward infrastructure, child care and combating climate change. The road ahead on all of these issues is bumpy. Lisa Desjardins walks us through what's happening on Capitol Hill. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Rep. Jayapal on progressive priorities, compromise on reconciliation and infrastructure

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 7:21

    Democratic Rep. Pramila Jayapal of Washington state, chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Congress' efforts around reconciliation and infrastructure. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Louisiana's parishes feel 'forgotten' in the dark weeks after Hurricane Ida

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 5:07

    Residents in Louisiana have begun the long process of recovery following Hurricane Ida, which destroyed or caused major damage for about 8,000 homes statewide. While the city of New Orleans has largely recovered, the coastal parishes of Lafourche and Terrebonne are struggling with prolonged power outages and a growing housing crisis. Community reporter Roby Chavez reports from the ground. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How America faced 'Peril' in final days of Trump presidency

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 9:00


    The first draft of history is being written about the final, chaotic days of Donald Trump's presidency and the earliest days of Joe Biden's. A new book by Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa reveals the alarm and lengths that then-president Trump's top advisors went to in order to prevent him from acting on his worst impulses. Woodward and Costa join Judy Woodruff with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    As Biden touts American democracy, here are the issues allies want U.S. to deliver on

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 9:37

    President Joe Biden on Tuesday delivered his first speech to the United Nations as part of its annual general assembly. Biden touted diplomacy and the endurance of democracy as he faces tensions with old allies, and global challenges, like COVID and climate change. Nick Schifrin reports from New York, and white house correspondent Yamiche Alcindor joins with more from the White House north lawn. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: White House continues deporting Haitian migrants in Texas as Dems decry move

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 4:27

    In our news wrap Tuesday, the Biden administration stepped up deportations of Haitian migrants gathered in Del Rio, Texas, on the border with Mexico. Johnson & Johnson says a booster for its single-shot COVID-19 vaccine triggers a strong immune response. The U.S. House of Representatives is set to fund federal operations into December and raise the debt ceiling. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How COVID-19's death toll and social impact compares to past U.S. pandemics

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 8:30

    The death toll from the COVID pandemic has put the U.S. at another tragic milestone -- more than 675,000 Americans, overall, have died of COVID as of Monday. That number surpasses the number of lives lost to the 1918 flu. The U.S. is averaging more than 2,000 daily deaths. William Brangham takes a wider look at COVID's toll on the country. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Bill Gates on vaccine equity, boosters, climate, his foundation and Epstein meetings

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 14:10


    With world leaders visiting New York this week for the United Nations General Assembly, Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates is calling on the world's richest nations to take what he says are urgent steps needed to end "the crisis phase of this pandemic." Judy Woodruff spoke with Gates about those steps earlier this afternoon in a wide-ranging discussion. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    Inmates released to home confinement during pandemic fear 'devastating' reincarceration

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 8:14

    Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Justice Department has released more than 30,000 non-violent inmates to home confinement to try to limit the virus' spread in prison. But, as John Yang reports for our ongoing "Searching for Justice" series, some of these men and women could be forced to return to prison once the pandemic ends. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    As high temperatures hurt Sicily's food production, rising sea levels threaten housing

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 6:44

    Climate change experts in Sicily, Italy are warning that rising sea waters are threatening some of the island's most crucial heavy industrial plants. They are also forecasting food shortages because crops are being destroyed. The island endured record temperatures this summer. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports from Sicily for NewsHour's climate change series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    As U.S. deports Haitian migrants, fate of DACA immigrants also hangs in the balance

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 8:20

    Thousands of migrants -- most of whom are from Haiti -- have been removed from an encampment in the town of Del Rio, Texas, along the U.S. southern border as U.S. officials have started to take more aggressive steps to stop the encampment from growing further. Major recent developments in Congress will also touch on the broader U.S. immigration policy. Yamiche Alcindor and Lisa Desjardins report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How the White House plans to combat the 'silent killer' of rising heat levels

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 6:50

    2021 had one of the hottest summers on record, with July being the hottest single month recorded. Extreme heat is expected to worsen with climate change. The Biden administration announced a plan Monday that would develop new workplace standards for Americans who work outdoors, prioritizing heat-related inspections. William Brangham and Gina McCarthy, White House national climate adviser, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Can Dems overcome Senate parliamentarian's blow to their immigration push?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 5:04

    As the Biden administration cracks down on immigrants at the southern border, Amna Nawaz takes a wider look at the status of immigration reform in this country, and what's at stake, with Marielena Hincapié, the executive director of the National Immigration Law Center. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How financial 'black swans' may be driving market drops

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 3:07

    A sell-off hit the financial markets Monday over Chinese real estate and U.S. federal reserve policy worries. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 614 points -- a 1.8% drop, its worst since July. The NASDAQ fell 330 points -- more than 2%. The S&P 500 lost 75 points, or 1.7%. Both NASDAQ and S&P saw the biggest percentage drops since May. Diane Swonk of Grant Thornton joins Judy Woodruff with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: U.S. to ease restrictions on vaccinated foreign travelers in November

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 4:15

    In our news wrap Monday, the Biden administration plans to lift restrictions on vaccinated foreigners flying to the U.S. as of November. India, the world's largest vaccine producer, says it will resume exports and donations of COVID shots to other nations next month. Russia's ruling party won parliamentary elections after barring most opposition candidates and amid widespread reports of fraud. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What pediatricians are prioritizing in Pfizer data about vaccinating kids ages 5 to 11

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 6:52

    Kids now account for more than one in five new COVID cases, and the highly contagious delta variant has put more children in the hospital than at any other point in the pandemic. While there is no vaccine available yet for children below the age of 12, that may change soon thanks to new data from Pfizer. Stephanie Sy looks at the prospects of vaccinating children with pediatrician Dr. Rhea Boyd. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Colombia's President Duque on environmental terrorism, migration and democracy

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 8:39

    The United Nations General Assembly gathers this week in New York to discuss the pandemic, climate change, and migration -- as more than 80 million people are displaced across the planet. President Ivȧn Duque of Colombia has been in office three years -- at a crossroads of South and Central America -- and manages all of these problems together. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the issues. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Biden immigration policy, reconciliation bill

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 7:43

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including the Biden administration's policy on immigration, and the fate of the $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. authorities accelerate removal of Haitian asylum-seekers from Texas-Mexico border

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 4:30

    Thousands of migrants, mostly from Haiti, have gathered under a bridge in the border town of Del Rio, Texas, where officials have declared a local state of emergency. The crisis has spotlighted Biden's continued use of a Trump-era deportation policy, and highlights the growing migration crisis triggered by multiple recent tragedies in Haiti. Texas Public Radio's Joey Palacios reports from the scene in Del Rio. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    In remote Sudan, the Darfur war remains present

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 10:30

    The Darfur genocide in Sudan received widespread media coverage across the world and led to the arrest of the country's former leader, Omar al Bashir. Traveling by car, by donkey, and on foot, Special Correspondent Benedict Moran and video journalist Jorgen Samso visited a rebel stronghold in Darfur's remote Jebel Marra mountains. There, they found rebels unwilling to put down their guns, and isolated communities for whom the war has never ended. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Four years after Maria, a church emerges as a community's biggest support

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 6:02

    It's been four years since Hurricane Maria made landfall and devastated parts of Puerto Rico, sparking the migration of thousands of people to the U.S. mainland and Florida. NewsHour Weekend's Ivette Feliciano spoke with Father Jose Rodriguez whose church has been helping with services and vocational training and has become a cornerstone for a community hit hard by Maria. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Gun laws, abortion rights: upcoming SCOTUS hearings to be impacted by RBG's death

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 5:34


    It's been a year since Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died. Her seat on the bench is now occupied by Justice Amy Coney Barrett, the third judge appointed by former President Donald Trump. On October 4th, the court will resume in-person hearings -- and will also be the first time the bench will meet since RBG's passing. Amy Howe, co-founder of SCOTUSblog, a website covering the Supreme Court, joins to discuss how the court has changed -- and what lies ahead. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    A new book examines ways to end unconscious bias

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 6:08

    When freelance writer Jessica Nordell started pitching under a gender neutral name, she suddenly found more of her pitches were accepted. She's since dedicated her work to examining solutions to unconscious bias, which affects everything from education to health care to criminal justice. She recently spoke to Special Correspondent Megan Thompson about her new book, "The End of Bias: A Beginning." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Pro-insurrectionists gather for a small, short rally at Capitol Hill

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 4:50

    A rally outside Capitol Hill drew only a few hundred protesters. Called "Justice For J6," the event was held in support of the January 6th insurrectionists who were detained and was organized by a member of Trump's re-election campaign. Police in riot gear lined the area and a temporary fence was re installed to prevent access to the Capitol. NewsHour's Lisa Desjardins joins to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Key FDA advisory committee rejects COVID vaccine boosters for the general population

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 5:13

    A key advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration overwhelmingly rejected vaccine boosters for the general U.S. population for now, but it voted unanimously in favor of giving boosters to those 65 and older as well as high risk individuals.The recommendations mark a pivotal moment in the debate around boosters. William Brangham joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Pentagon admits error in U.S. drone strike that killed 10 civilians in Afghanistan

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 3:58

    The U.S. military on Friday acknowledged that a drone strike in Kabul they initially said killed an ISIS suicide bomber had in fact killed only civilians. The strike took place three weeks ago as the U.S. and allies were evacuating following the Taliban takeover. Nick Schifrin joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: France recalling ambassadors from U.S., Australia over submarine deal

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 4:57

    In our news wrap Friday, France is recalling its ambassadors from the U.S. and Australia in a fury over a submarine deal, more than 170 people including some Americans boarded a flight out of Afghanistan, Republican Rep. Anthony Gonzalez says he won't run again after voting to impeach former President Trump, and a U.N. report found greenhouse gas emissions are set to rise 16 percent by 2030. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Thousands of migrants amass at the Texas border as federal authorities ramp up relief

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 4:55

    Over the last several days a crowd of migrants awaiting U.S. processing outside a Texas border community has grown to more than 10,000. The migrants, mostly from Haiti, have been sheltering under a major bridge as the Biden administration tries to speed up processing. Washington Post reporter Arelis Hernández joins Amna Nawaz from Del Rio, Texas to discuss the scene. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. Capitol Police prepare for far-right rally in support of Jan. 6 insurrectionists

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 4:20

    U.S. Capitol Police warned Friday there have been threats of violence ahead of this weekend's rally by Trump supporters. It's being staged to support more than 600 people charged in the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol, and Capitol Police Chief Thomas Manger says it's unclear how many people will show up, or just how serious the threats could be. Lisa Desjardins joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Russian government continues to silence rivals as parliamentary elections begin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 4:41

    Russians on Friday began three days of voting to determine their next parliament, with the outcome largely expected to be preordained. But there was an unexpected development Friday, when Google and Apple blocked Russians from downloading the main opposition party's app. As Nick Schifrin reports, it's just the latest successful attempt by the Russian government to silence its rivals. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Brooks and Capehart on border politics, Biden's job approval, U.S. and France tensions

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 11:30


    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week in politics, including immigration, President Biden's job approval ratings, and tensions between the U.S. and France over a nuclear submarine deal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    An inside look at Ken Burns' latest film 'Muhammad Ali'

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 11:46


    Ken Burns' latest four-part documentary "Muhammad Ali" will premiere Sunday on PBS for four nights. Jeffrey Brown visited Burns at his studio for a behind-the-scenes look at how he makes his films, and the larger context and conflicts in telling America's story in a time of racial reckoning. This report is part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


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