Podcasts about Ballard

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  • 1,455PODCASTS
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  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Ballard

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Latest podcast episodes about Ballard

Green Industry Podcast
Simple Numbers, Straight Talk, Big Profits! Reviewing Greg Crabtree's Business Potential Book

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 38:28


In today's episode I reviewed the popular business book by Greg Crabtree: Simple Numbers, Straight Talks, Big Profits! 4 Keys to Unlock Your Business Potential. I share my key takeaways from this phenomenal book that specializes in accounting, profitability and what it truly takes for your business to reach its fullest potential.  Simple Numbers, Straight Talk, Big Profits Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers To save 50% off your registration, you can register here: Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP GPS Trackit Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guest: https://www.simplenumberscri.com/greg-crabtree

Make Believe Ballroom
Make Believe Ballroom - 8/8/22 Edition

Make Believe Ballroom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 58:02


Join us in the Make Believe Ballroom this week as we look at the music we play on our virtual turntable and real turntable in the Crystal Studio. Also on the show, a big band era stalwart discusses his take on the longevity of swing music through a story that appeared in a 1939 edition of Down Beat magazine. In addition, a music packed hour featuring some of your favorite bands and singers.

Wavelength Community Radio
Episode 006: The Drop In Sessions - Rochelle Ballard

Wavelength Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 40:01


As we dive into a further five episodes, our next guest is a true groundbreaking pioneer in women's surfing. Hawaii-based Rochelle Ballard electrified the world of surfing when she emerged onto the competitive circuit, with her fearless barrel riding, progressive big wave surfing and dedication to the sport making her an icon for the ages.“If you're meant to succeed in whatever you're meant to succeed at in life, you're going to break through any sort of challenge that there is…” (Rochelle Ballard) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Green Industry Podcast
Mid-Season Lawn Care Business Update With Tony Rudolph

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 78:15


On today's program special guest Tony Rudolph from Lake Country Lawn Care shares a mid-season lawn care business update. Tony also previews the upcoming 2022 Equip Exposition in Louisville, Kentucky and explains how the lawn care community has influenced his business.  To save 50% off your registration, you can register here: Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP GPS Trackit Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guest: Tony's Lawn Care

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance
The Green Finance Podcast Ep. 6: Financial discrimination with BetaBank CEO Seke Ballard

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 19:28


Last week we wrapped our first Banking on the Planet conference, we had a great lineup and it was really a lot of fun. If you missed it, all the session videos are available to watch for free here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHAcPK-SOiNXjjUtN4qmQmfcL1XWApQdK. And now we're on to our next event, this time finally in person! We are holding Tearsheet's Power of Payments Conference on September 15th, 2022 at Current, Chelsea Piers, NYC We will bring together the top professionals and brands in the payments space to discuss the challenges and opportunities presented by an undeniable need to stay ahead of the curve of a rapidly changing landscape. We have a great lineup here as well, so make sure to check it out by clicking on this link: https://bit.ly/3b1pyLF Moving on to today's podcast episode, we are talking about financial equity and how today's system is simply still discriminatory. Sustainable finance means inclusive and non-biased finance, allowing equal opportunities for everyone, which is why I want to explore this topic today. My guest is Seke Ballard the founder and CEO of BetaBank, a digital black-owned bank built to serve SMBs equally, aiming to fill the gap left behind by traditional banks.

Green Industry Podcast
All About Sod Installations - Things You Need to Know

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 37:01


On today's show we talk all about sod installations. Host Paul Jamison discusses the importance of distinguishing between the different types of turfs, how to measure the square footage of an area, how to grade and prep your work area, how to install the sod and what prices to charge for a sod installation.  To save 50% off your registration, you can register here: Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP GPS Trackit Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast

The Dirt Bike Burrito Podcast
Ep.327 Geoff Ballard - Part 1

The Dirt Bike Burrito Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 67:30


that is right Burrito crew. We caught the  G.O.A.T. The man himself, Geoff Ballard. In this Part 1 episode we sit down with Geoff and begin his tale with motorcycles. With so may stories you knew it was never going to be just one episode.

InnovaBuzz
Elle Ballard, The Value of Cross-Cultural Communities – InnovaBuzz 534

InnovaBuzz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 54:54


Our guest in this episode is Elle Ballard, a certified Leadership and Personal Brand Coach, best-selling Author, and Speaker and founder of the Women of the World Network, where she is building a legacy of powerful women and making a positive mark in the world to benefit all humanity. When Elle came to the U.S. she had to start everything from scratch while supporting her family at the same time. She completed her MBA in Marketing and built a successful marketing career. She left the corporate world to pursue her true passion of impacting and helping people realize their true potential. Despite all the challenges she faced, she always wanted to maintain her authenticity and who she is, this is a core reason for creating the Women of the World Network. Elle believes in developing diversity-aligned and happy women leaders who then positively impact future generations. In our conversation Elle talked to me about The value in a community of like-minded people where you can share and talk openly about any issues in a safe environment. How running virtual meetings online has enabled rapid geographic growth of the Women of the World Network. Why it's vital to take time away to recharge so you come back to regular activities fully re-charged, re-energized and joyful. Lynn Howard in https://www.innovabiz.com.au/podcast/lynn-howard-innovabuzz-467/ (episode 467) introduced us to Elle. Listen to the podcast to find out more.

Green Industry Podcast
How Much Should You Charge for Your Landscaping Services?

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 26:31


In today's episode Paul Jamison shares about how to price services in a lawn care and landscaping business.  To save 50% off your registration, you can register here: Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP GPS Trackit Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast  

Converge Media Network
CMN The Day With Trae! Aug. 2, 2022 | Guest Host Proof & UmojaFest News

Converge Media Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 28:03


--Proof N The Play | Guest Host -- This morning Proof is joined by Unika Guilmet who is the Volunteer Coordinator for UmojaFest 2022. Unika will be giving a sneak preview of what we can expect this weekend. Proof will also be joined by Justice Jones who is the owner of Rooftop Hemp Shop in Ballard as well as Black Pages Seattle.

The Good-Good Golf Podcast
Ep 115: Emma Ballard at The Women's Open

The Good-Good Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 61:04


It's the final major of the year this week and what a fitting end to a fabulous run of Grand Slam events with the world's best women set to take on the Muirfield golf course in Scotland. Women and Golf Editor Emma Ballard is on site for the week and joins the pod to set the scene for what promises to be a great event. Links mentioned on this episode: Women & Girls Golf Week: My career in golf https://womenandgolf.com/news/women-and-golf-features/women-and-girls-golf-week-my-career-in-golf Women & Girls Golf Week: Volunteering at The Open https://womenandgolf.com/news/women-and-golf-features/women-and-girls-golf-week-volunteering-at-the-open John Huggan: Muirfield's long, bumpy and often tense road to hosting its first Women's British Open https://www.golfdigest.com/story/aig-womens-british-open-2022-preview-muirfield-long-bump-embarrassing-road Emma Ballard on Twitter / Twitr https://twitter.com/EmmaOffTwitr Women and Golf on Twitter https://twitter.com/WomenandGolf

MLS: The Call-Up
The Woman Behind the 2022 MLS All-Star Game Pres. by Target

MLS: The Call-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 33:40


MNUFC President Shari Ballard joins the show. In 2021, Ballard joined the few but growing number of female MLS club presidents. After 25 years at the highest ranks of Best Buy, she says the club “feeds her soul.” Listen to her fascinating story & get set for the 2022 All-Star Game Presented by Target in Minnesota!

Green Industry Podcast
Mitchell's Lawn Care's Annual Equip Expo Trade Show Preview

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 55:13


In today's episode special guest Mitchell Gordy shares some updates about his lawn care business. Mitchell and Paul also preview the upcoming 2022 Equip Exposition trade show in Louisville, Kentucky. Mitchell shares his schedule and gives some tips for planning your trip and what to do while attending the Equip Expo. To save 50% off your registration, you can register here: Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP GPS Trackit Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guest: MitchellsLawnCareLLC YouTube

Pro-Fit Golf Conditioning Podcast
Women and Golf with Emma Ballard S05 Ep 7

Pro-Fit Golf Conditioning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 64:20


Emma Ballard is the Editor of Women & Golf, once a magazine but now an entirely online platform for Women and Golf. I'm a female golfer so there are many issues and topics that interest me personally.  The big question we try to answer in this episode is how we get more girls and women into golf and create life-long golfers from them. Take a look at Women & Golf here: https://womenandgolf.com Do remember to check Off Scratch Golf - Performance Coaching for ALL Golfers - head over to https://offscratchgolf.com If you have enjoyed this episode please like, follow leave 5 stars on Spotify and of course comment.  You can find me socially at: https://www.instagram.com/pro_fitgolf  

Green Industry Podcast
Why Systems and Processes Are Vital to Increase Your Sales w/ Joshua Gillow From Yes Express

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 47:51


In today's episode Joshua Gillow from Yes Express shares some tips of how to improve systems and processes. Joshua's design build landscaping business does over $4,000,000 a year in revenue. One of his keys to better sales is by having excellent processes and systems. To save 50% off your registration, you can register here: Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP GPS Trackit Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guest: https://www.yes.express/

Never a straight answer
185# Return to Skinwalker | Magnetic anomalies

Never a straight answer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 113:56


185# Return to Skinwalker | Magnetic anomalies This week we return to the Skinwalker Ranch, also known as Sherman Ranch, located southeast of Ballard, Utah, that has a reputation for paranormal and UFO-related activities.[1] Its name is taken from the skin-walker of Navajo legend concerning vengeful shamans. UFO reports in the Uintah Basin were publicized as early as the 1960s.[1] UFO and paranormal Claims about the ranch first appeared in 1996 in the Salt Lake City, Utah, Deseret News,[2] and later in the alternative weekly Las Vegas Mercury as a series of articles by investigative journalist George Knapp. These early stories detailed by family who occupied the property. We're going to look at what's new on the ranch as new information, paranormal events and UFO sightings ramp up on skin walker. HelloFreshUK are extending their flash sale, Details are as follows: Offer: 50% off 1st box & 20% off next 3 boxes Code: HFAFF60 https://hellofresh-uk.648q.net/Qmq5M MERCH STORE Our new merch is available on tee public! stickers, buttons, mugs and masks all with our sweet new design! #MERCH #Sales #NASAScience #PodernFamily #teepublic https://teepublic.com/en-gb/t-shirt/21303964-nasa-beam-me-up… GET YOURS TODAY! CONTACT US!! Get in touch! Have a question for us or a comment or suggestion you can email us Website Neverastraightanswer.co.uk Email Neverstraightanswer@gmail.com NEVERASTRAIGHTANSWER.CO.UK #NASA #theadamproject #timetravel #BTTF #Spacetime Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0noBaIL4CkiSrjESHAY3lk https://linktr.ee/Neverastraightanswer --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/neverastraightanswer/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/neverastraightanswer/support

The High Stakes Fantasy Football Hour
12-Time FFPC League Winner & 2022 Pros Vs. Joes Drafter Liz Ballard

The High Stakes Fantasy Football Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 68:00


Eric Balkman and Kentucky Fantasy Football State Championship (KFFSC) commissioner Ferrell Elliott banter with 12-time FFPC and Footballguys Players Championship league champ and 2022 Pros Vs. Joes drafter Liz Ballard. They go over her Footballguys drafts this year and her plans on how she will try to win a $1,000,000 in the 2022 Fantasy Football Players Championship (FFPC) Main Event. Plus, they look at the newest ADP in 2022 FFPC Best Ball Drafts; give you some roster management ideas in 2022 FFPC Dynasty Leagues and what's going on right now in 2022 FFPC Best Ball Tournament drafts and the 2022 FFPC Superflex Best Ball Tournament. Apple - https://tinyurl.com/bdfj6yyh Spotify - https://tinyurl.com/2p874v9h Website - https://www.MyFFPC.com

Michigan's Big Show
* Amber Ballard, Public Relations & Social Media Manager at Firekeepers Casino Hotel

Michigan's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 2:51


SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
* Amber Ballard, Public Relations & Social Media Manager at Firekeepers Casino Hotel

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 2:51


Green Industry Podcast
The Origin Stories - How a Lawn Care Community Was Made

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 33:45


In today's episode host Paul Jamison takes a trip down memory lane to share the incredible and inspiring stories of how the lawn care community started and began to grow. Paul shares how these relationships have positively influenced his business and life. Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guests: Lawn Care Nut YouTube Channel Lawn Care Life YouTube Channel

The Dan Dakich Show Podcast
Dan is live from Grand Park for Day 2 of Colts Camp, Colts OL Danny Pinter takes us through training camp, Jason Benetti reacts to officially becoming a broadcaster for Fox Sports,Stacey Dales talks covering the Colts at the national level, Kent Sterling

The Dan Dakich Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 148:02 Very Popular


(00:00-24:08) –Thursday's show opens with Dan live from Colts Camp Day 2 sharing reactions at Grand Park. Plus, the great Kent Sterling joins the show to take us through his thoughts on the Colts chances in 2022 and discuss what needs to happen from Frank Reich and Chris Ballard tomorrow.        (24:08-41:12) –Dan brings Kent back into the fray for another segment at Grand Park. Plus, they are joined by NFL Network's Stacey Dales who talks on how the national media cover the Colts. (41:12-50:22) –Hour one concludes with Dan and Kent talking more on the Colts and sharing their thoughts on the team moving up training camp practices times to make sure their bodies are right for Week 1. Plus, Dan and Kent chat about whether or not the Colts will bring back TY Hilton.    (50:22-1:14:29) –WISH-TV Sports Director Anthony Calhoun stops by the show to take us through his thoughts and reactions to Day 2 of Colts Camp. Plus, AC looks back at why Carson Wentz failed here in Indy. Later, AC shares where he feels the Colts need to be for Reich and Ballard's job security. Plus, Dan and AC discuss the importance of winning and why WISH-TV will air two Colts Monday Night Football games this fall. (1:14:29-1:34:28) –Starting right guard Danny Pinter joins the show to take us through the first few days of Colts training camp. Plus, Dan asks Danny about his best friend who is currently dating Dan's daughter. Also, Danny talks on how the approach for camp changes when you're a projected starter. Later, Danny goes over what his goals are for getting better each days and what the challenges that training camp present for a lineman.       (1:34:28-1:39:22) –Dan draws comparisons to politicians with the way Chris Ballard and general managers as a whole navigate the media.       (1:39:22-2:07:04) –The talented Jason Benetti, the TV Voice of the Chicago White Sox, joins the show to update us on the Chi Sox with the trade deadline 5 days away. Plus, Stacey Dales of NFL Network returned to discuss Coach Knight and other sports stories. Also, we throw flowers to Jason Benetti as he has officially been announced as a play by play broadcaster for Fox Sports. Benetti shares what his new role will be and what he's most looking forward to. Plus, Benetti talks on his longtime friendship with Dan and why he appreciates him so much. (2:07:04-2:19:23) –The great Alan Cashman of TheCashmanWins.com stops by to dish out his best bets for tonight's slate. Plus, Cashman hands out a college football futures bet. (2:19:23-2:27:51) –Thursday's show ends with Dan asking show producer Jimmy Cook for the JCook Plays of the Day. Also, Dan evaluates Kyle Murray's comments to the media.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hacks & Wonks
36th LD State Representative Position 1 Primary Candidate Forum

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 87:41


On this bonus episode, we present our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with Tyler Crone, Nicole Gomez, Jeff Manson, and Julia Reed - all running for State Representative Position 1 in Seattle's 36th Legislative district, which covers northwestern Seattle, including the neighborhoods of Ballard, Magnolia, and Queen Anne. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 13th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd!  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii.   Resources Register to Vote, Update Your Registration, See What's on Your Ballot: MyVote.wa.gov   36th LD Primary Candidate Forum Video and Transcript: https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/36th-ld-candidate-forum-2022   Hacks & Wonks - Julia Reed, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (April 26, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/julia-reed-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Nicole Gomez, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (May 10, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/nicole-gomez-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Jeff Manson, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (May 24, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/jeff-manson-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Tyler Crone, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (June 21, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/tyler-crone-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Hello everyone, this is Crystal Fincher, host of Hacks & Wonks. This is a bonus podcast release of our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with candidates for State Representative Position 1 in Seattle's 36th Legislative district. This covers northwestern Seattle, including the neighborhoods of Ballard, Magnolia, and Queen Anne. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 13th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd! Hello everyone. We are here for the 36th Legislative District candidate forum. My name is Crystal Fincher - I'm a political consultant and the host of the Hacks & Wonks podcast, and I'm honored to welcome you to tonight's candidate forum. I'm so excited to hear from our guests - all running for State Representative Position 1 in the 36th Legislative District. Before we begin tonight, I would like to do a land acknowledgement. I would like to acknowledge that we are on the traditional lands of the first people of Seattle, the coast-Salish peoples, specifically the Duwamish people, past and present. I would like to honor with gratitude the land itself and the Duwamish Tribe. So welcome to the Hacks & Wonks 2022 Primary Candidate Forum for Legislative District 36 Position 1. We're excited to be able to livestream this series on Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, we are recording this forum for rebroadcast and later viewing. We invite our audience to ask questions of our candidates. If you're watching a livestream online, then you can ask questions by commenting on the livestream. You can also text your questions to 206-395-6248. That's 206-395-6248, and that number will scroll intermittently at the bottom of the screen. The candidates running for 36th Legislative District Representative Position 1 with us tonight are - in alphabetical order - Tyler Crone, Nicole Gomez, Jeff Manson, and Julia Reed. A few reminders before we jump into the forum: I want to remind you to vote. Ballots will be mailed to your mailbox starting today - ballots were mailed. You can register to vote still, update your registration still, and see what will be on your ballot at MyVote.Wa.gov. So please take advantage of that and double check that everyone you know is also. I want to mention that tonight's answers will be timed. Each candidate will have one minute to introduce themselves initially and 90 seconds to answer each subsequent question. Candidates may be engaged with rebuttal or follow up questions and will have 30 seconds to respond. Time will be indicated by the colored dot labeled "timer" on the screen. The dot will initially appear as green, then when there are 30 seconds left it will turn yellow, and when there are 10 seconds left it will turn red. You will be muted as soon as time is up. I want to mention that I'm on the board for IDF or, The Institute for a Democratic Future. Jeff Manson is an IDF alum and Nicole Gomez was the program director for the most recent IDF class. We've not discussed any details of their campaigns or of this forum. In addition to tonight's forum, Hacks & Wonks is also hosting a 47th Legislative District State Rep Position 2 candidate forum, in South King County, for next Wednesday, July 20th at the same time - 6:30-8p. Now we'll turn to the candidates who will each have one minute to introduce themselves, starting with Tyler Crone, then Nicole Gomez, then Jeff Manson, finally Julia Reed. And we will proceed immediately to a lightning round of Yes/No questions following that. So starting with Tyler Crone. [00:04:14] Tyler Crone: Hi, I'm Tyler. I'm a global public health leader, human rights advocate, public school parent for 14 years and counting, and a mama bear of three. I'm not an ordinary candidate and this is not an ordinary time. The stakes are extraordinarily high. We are at an inflection point for shared prosperity and progress. We continue to live through a pandemic. We are experiencing an historic rollback of our rights, self-determination, and even our collapse of our church and state separation. COVID-19 has shown us that global health is local and public health is essential. Advancing sexual reproductive health and rights has been what I have done throughout my career and it is needed now more than ever with the overturn of Roe. And ultimately I had to jump into this race as transgender kids and their families, just like mine, are being criminalized across our country. I spent my lifetime making a difference for others, partnering with impacted communities, and centering those most impacted. And so I look forward to your questions and I see this as the leadership our state needs now. Thank you. [00:05:20] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next. [00:05:26] Nicole Gomez: Hi everyone. Hello, I'm Nicole Gomez and I'm a mom, an advocate, a community leader, and I'm running to be your next State Representative here in the place I'm really proud to call my home and where I've chosen to raise my family, the 36th District. I'm running to be the next State Representative of the 36th because I would like to help create an economy that works for everyone. And that means addressing our regressive upside-down tax code, healthcare for everyone, fully funded public education, affordable housing, addressing the climate crisis, and so much more that's important right now in the 36th and across the entire state. At age five, I went from living in a secure house and lifestyle to quickly losing a home simply due to the illness of a parent. And from that moment I learned everything I can to navigate complex systems. And so I've been quietly doing this work behind-the-scenes through my healthcare nonprofit that works on transformative policy. I currently sit on the Universal Healthcare Commission and I'm the Executive Director of IDF, and I look forward to talking to you more. [00:06:27] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and now Jeff. [00:06:31] Jeff Manson: Hi everyone. I'm Jeff - I'm a state administrative law judge, labor leader, and disability community advocate. And as an administrative law judge, I see every day how state laws and budgets affect people and I'm tired of underfunded government that tends to prioritize the wealthy and corporations over working people and the most vulnerable in our state. And although administrative law judges are state employees - for almost 40 years, we did not have the right to collectively bargain. So a few years ago, I organized my colleagues to successfully lobby the Legislature to extend collective bargaining rights to us. And then we formed our new union with 85% of my colleagues signing union authorization cards. I'm endorsed by the King County and 36th District Democrats, the Washington State Labor Council, the Environment and Climate Caucus of the Washington State Democrats, and Mary Lou Dickerson, who represented this district in the house for 18 years. And for those who are watching who are registered voters in the 36th - would be honored to have your vote. [00:07:30] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Julia. [00:07:32] Julia Reed: Thanks - my name is Julia Reed and I'm running for the State House to advocate for a Washington State where everyone can belong and everyone can have a place. I'm a workforce policy expert, an advocate for youth and racial justice, and a lifelong Seattleite - and I love my hometown. I love the 36th District. But I know that if my public school educator parents were moving to Seattle today, they couldn't afford to live here. As a millennial, my peers and I are living the housing crunch, the high cost of living, lack of childcare, and the threat of climate change. These aren't policy hypotheticals to us, it's about fighting for the future - for our future and the future of other young people. I know we can make different choices in Olympia that will build a vibrant, empowering, equitable economy, where everyone can participate and everyone can thrive. As someone who bridges old and new Seattle, I wanna help create a future of shared prosperity and possibility for generations to come and I'm excited to get your questions. [00:08:41] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. So now, we are actually gonna start right off with the lightning round portion. Candidates - get your Yes/No paddles ready to respond to questions. After the lightning round is complete - with all of the questions - you'll each get one minute to provide any further explanation of any of your votes or waffles or anything that happens like that. So we've got a number of questions to dive into - they go pretty quickly and we will attempt to announce the votes as they happen, so if anyone is listening along, you can hear that. So starting off - first question, do you support calling a special session this year to codify reproductive rights and access into law? That is a Yes from everyone, and it looks like we have some background interference with green in that, for those of you who have that. So please make an extra effort to make sure that your green check is visible, but everybody appears to be a Yes for that. Are there any instances where you would support sweeps of homeless encampments? I see Nicole Gomez, Julia Reed, and Jeff Manson have said No. Elizabeth Tyler Crone has said Yes. We'll move to the next one. Would you vote to end single-family zoning to address housing affordability? I see that - I see Nicole Gomez and Julia Reed have answered Yes. Jeff Manson, Elizabeth Tyler Crone have answered No. Would you vote to end the statewide ban on rent control and let localities decide whether they want to implement it? Everyone has answered Yes to that question. Would you vote in favor of Seattle's, or will you vote in favor of Seattle's social housing initiative, I-135? Everybody is a Yes vote for social housing. Would you have voted for the Legislature's police reform rollbacks in the last legislative session? Everybody is a No. Should the Legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? It's taking a long time to get those Yes and Nos up. This is - looks like everybody's waffling on this - so you can address this in your one minute afterwards. So we have a districtwide waffle on this. Should we continue to limit the circumstances under which law enforcement is authorized to perform vehicular pursuits? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support a state law that would remove obstacles, like qualified immunity, when suing police officers for violating a person's civil rights? Everybody is a Yes on that. Should we offer tax credits or rebates for the purchase of electric bikes? Another Yes from everybody. Would you vote for any bill that increases highway expansion? Nicole Gomez is a No and the only one to answer definitively so far. Julia Reed says No. And Jeff and Tyler look like they have a more nuanced answer to this. Will you vote to ensure that trans and non-binary students are allowed to play on the sports teams that fit with their gender identities? Everybody is a Yes. For people wanting to change their name to match their gender, do you support removing the cost and need to see a judge for legal processing name changes and gender marker changes? Everybody is a Yes. To provide relief from inflation, should we temporarily suspend the gas tax? I see everybody as a No. Would you vote to enact a Universal Basic Income in Washington? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support a wealth tax? Nicole, Julia and Jeff are Yes. Tyler was a little bit after the Yes, but it's a Yes. Should we increase taxes on large corporations? Everybody's a Yes. Should we increase taxes on small businesses? Everybody's a No. Should we lower taxes on small businesses? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support implementing ranked-choice voting in Seattle? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support moving elections from odd years to even years to significantly increase voter turnout? Uniform Yes. In 2021, did you vote for Bruce Harrell? We've got three Nos, except from Julia Reed who just came in with a No. In 2021, did you vote for Lorena González? We have uniform Yeses. In 2021, did you vote for Nicole Thomas-Kennedy for Seattle City Attorney. I've got a Yes from Nicole Gomez, a No from Jeff Manson, No from Tyler Crone, a Yes from Julia Reed. In 2021, did you vote for Ann Davison for Seattle City Attorney? Nicole Gomez, Tyler Crone, Julia Reed, and Jeff Manson all say No. Is your campaign unionized? We've got uniform Nos. If your campaign staff wants to unionize, will you voluntarily recognize their efforts? Everybody says Yes. Would you vote to provide universal healthcare to every Washington resident? Everybody says Yes. There's more uniform agreement than I thought we were gonna have. The Legislature just passed a law that will cap insulin at $35 a month for out-of-pocket costs for Washington residents. Would you vote to expand price caps to other commonly used drugs? Uniform Yeses. Will you vote for a budget that increases funding for charter schools? Everybody is a No. Right now, money raised by PTAs and parent organizations can be donated to their individual school. Should we require that this money instead be distributed equally across all similar schools in the district? Nicole, Jeff. Okay. So Julia and Jeff are Yeses, Nicole Gomez and Tyler Crone say No. That concludes our lightning round today. So thank you - just kicks off, sets a baseline for where folks are and what they have. So moving into these questions, and we will begin the questions starting with Nicole Gomez. First question is we've seen significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, yet people are saying they're not seeing the problem get much better despite a significant increase in funding. Do you agree that our homeless crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? Starting with Nicole. [00:17:00] Nicole Gomez: Great. I think that - so the homelessness and - [00:17:08] Crystal Fincher: Oh! [00:17:08] Nicole Gomez: Wait, did we get to respond to our answers before we move on? [00:17:11] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, you did. I totally forgot that - thank you for that reminder, Jeff Manson. Yeah, you guys get to explain your waffles and there were a number of them. I just jumped into the other section. So pause on that, Nicole - thank you so much for your flexibility in that. And we will start the explanations starting with Nicole on that one. Anything you wanna clarify about your answers, waffles, your unique Nos? [00:17:35] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So I think the only one that was a unique No was the requiring PTAs or PTSAs to distribute equally to other schools as a requirement. I believe that individual PTAs should be allowed to make that decision. And the only reason is that back when my kid was at Salmon Bay K-8, that did come up as a topic. And so we were really interested in exploring it further and were able to vote on it together as a team. Parents have kids in their schools and so sometimes they would like to donate the money to their school specifically and other times not. So I think it's more democratic process to allow them to have that opportunity to vote. We ended up with a vote to share. [00:18:32] Crystal Fincher: Thank you, and now we move to Jeff. [00:18:36] Jeff Manson: Yeah, so a couple answers I'd like to discuss. One was collective bargaining rights for police officers. There have been a couple things that have been addressed. One is making the collective bargaining sessions open to the public, which I am opposed to, because I think that would undermine public sector unions beyond just police officers. And I don't think the benefit we would get would be worth that risk. It's been a right-wing, anti-union idea for years and I think we'd just be handing them something if we did that. In terms of - the other thing that's been discussed is the discipline process. I do think that law enforcement are in a unique position of power that other public employees like myself are not in. And so if we're careful about how it's written, there could be some aspects of the discipline process that we could look at. The other is highway expansion - should be our lowest priority, but wouldn't absolutely vote No. [00:19:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Tyler. [00:19:39] Tyler Crone: Yes, so the collective bargaining - I do not know enough to make a sweeping statement on that. Regarding eliminating single-family zoning, I think we all agree that there needs to be more density. We have affordability and housing as a middle-class crisis, but I am not in favor of eliminating single-family zoning all together. It needs a more thoughtful approach. The sweeps piece - I couldn't make an absolute statement to say, I would never agree to that, because there have been instances where there are encampments in schools and other places where children and families need to go and we need our civic space. Regarding the PTAs and the schools, we need to fully fund education so that our PTAs do not provide our specialists, our librarians, our counselors, our nurses, our arts. So I will fully support fully funding education. I understand that parents are desperate for options around - [00:20:35] Crystal Fincher: It looks like that is your time. And we'll go to Julia. Oh, Julia, you're gonna have to unmute yourself - there you go. [00:20:47] Julia Reed: Oh, sorry. There we go, I'm unmuted. I was just gonna say on the police bargaining question, I think that I have seen from working in City Hall, the challenges and obstructions that can come from police unions and sometimes that run counter to police officers' own wishes around wanting to implement reforms. So I'd like, but I'd also as someone who's endorsed by the Washington State Labor Council, I wanna be sure that any actions we're making regarding collective bargaining or something that the labor community feels is right and is not going to undermine overall labor rights across the board. And I thought Tyler's answer just now was excellent on the need to fully fund public education, so I feel like I wanna change my position on that question. She definitely convinced me, made a great argument. I think that fully funding our schools is essential. We shouldn't be relying on PTAs to fill the gap. [00:21:46] Crystal Fincher: And that is the time. Thank you so much. And now - thank you for your flexibility. We are heading into the general question portion. So restating the question and we will start this time with Jeff, we've seen significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, but people are saying that they're not seeing the problem get better yet despite the increase in funds. Do you agree that the homelessness crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? [00:22:24] Jeff Manson: Yeah, so I think we have - the City and the County make a lot of decisions about homelessness programs and contracts and parcel by parcel, but the state provides a lot of the funding for shelters, for tiny homes, for permanent supportive housing, for low income housing. And I think the - what the pandemic in the last few years have shown is that we've underinvested in these areas in recent decades. I do think that the services and the housing options are getting better. I just think during the pandemic, the lack of housing was rising faster than the services for homeless could keep up. So I think we're heading in the right direction, I think we are slowly seeing improvements, I think we're finding models that work. I think having peer navigators start with people when they're on the streets and looking through the whole process, I think tiny house villages are a good first stop for people. I think we've relied too much on our emergency shelters. As a housing option, they're great when it's subfreezing or 108 degrees but not as much as a night-to-night housing option. But a tiny house village is a good first stop and the majority of people there are placed in permanent housing within a few months. And I think permanent supportive housing is the gold standard. It's permanent housing, but with mental health therapists and other social workers on site for people who can't fully live on their own. And the Legislature put money in for about 2,000 more units statewide this last session, which should be coming online later this year, which is great, but it's not enough. We need a round two. [00:23:56] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. And now we head to Tyler. [00:24:04] Tyler Crone: Thank you. I know that the issue of homelessness is top of mind. I was out door knocking today in Ballard and that's the major concern. I have seen us spend a ton of money. I do not know what the results are and we've been calling it a protracted crisis for a very long time. I think it is the moment to accelerate and strengthen our partnerships at a city, county, and state level. Coordination was one of the key takeaways from an article in The Seattle Times about what we needed to strengthen our response. One, housing is a human right - we do not currently have enough shelter to put those who are unsheltered on the streets somewhere safe overnight. We need more immediate shelter options. Two, that long-term work towards affordable housing is critical. Right now, housing insecurity now is a middle class issue. Three, we do not have a sufficient mental and behavioral health system. That is top of mind for me - that both, we need to have a place where people can go and people can be safe, but we also need to be taking care of those who are most vulnerable amongst us. And currently our sweeps are happening without necessarily a place for people to go and that is not okay, so circling back to an earlier point that I made. The last piece I'll make is that it needs to be a regional approach. Thank you. [00:25:33] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much - now Julia. [00:25:36] Julia Reed: Yeah, I think that - so when I was working in City Hall, one of the things that I remember - what came up in the conversations we had around the original start of the Regional Homelessness Authority was that actually the system within the greater Seattle area is exiting thousands of people and thousands of families from homelessness every year. The challenge is that tens of thousands of more are entering homelessness every year because of the high cost of living, the shortage of affordable rental property, the stagnant wages that we experience all across our country that mean that every person is really just one medical emergency or one sudden event away from finding themselves homeless. I understand that people's frustration is that we put money into it, it seems like it's getting worse. But I think that we invest comparatively little in our homelessness response. If you look at the billions of dollars we might put into roads and bridges, we don't invest a comparable amount in our human infrastructure in our state. And as a legislator, that is gonna be one of my big focuses - not just housing, mental healthcare - but also human infrastructure, like childcare, green spaces, access to healthy food. All of these things contribute to a safer, healthier community for everyone and particularly contribute to addressing our homelessness challenge in a permanent and lasting way. [00:27:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now Nicole. [00:27:11] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So I think of homeness as a phenomenon that also should be contextualized with systemic issues, right? Racism or ableism, education access - there's a lot of different things that go and contribute to homelessness. So while it might seem like our numbers have been increasing, we've also been in the middle of a pandemic. And that, in addition to the high cost of housing overall, has been - exasperated the problem. Our unhoused individuals are carrying an immense amount of pain and trauma and we need to be looking at the programs that are also supporting - we've been underfunding a lot of them for decades. And so it's really time for us to think about what our true north is again - and make universal housing a goal - making sure that we are housing everyone and make it a priority. And I think that we're on the right track, we just need to get there in the long run. It's an issue and a problem for a really long time and it's gonna take a while to fix. [00:28:40] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. For the next question - last year, Washington experienced a natural disaster in the form of our record breaking heat wave that left hundreds dead. Due to human-caused climate change, we're guaranteed to see more disasters like this. What will you do as a legislator to prepare our state and your district for future crises? And we are going to begin this question with Tyler. [00:29:13] Tyler Crone: Thank you. So to prepare our state for future crises - this is an urgent and top-of-mind response issue for me - accelerated climate action and the climate impacts must be embedded into all of the decision making we make. One of the things that was top-of-mind related, Crystal, to the heat dome question as I entered this race was how smoke season has come up as a issue in the very short time that my youngest child has been alive. I see a way forward as - one, bringing my public health expertise and prioritizing that as what are the health impacts of these climate emergencies and how are we centering frontline communities? Two, the UN report on the climate crisis has suggested a very important strategy and that is something that we have an abundance - is centering Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous leadership. That is another key priority and approach of mine. Three, it is again about planning and coordination. Do we have the systems in place to keep people safe and healthy? Four, there is a piece of - do we have the funds available to help people recover from these climate emergencies and navigate them? And five, I would say it is about leaning into the bold innovation and leadership across our state so that we are all working together. As a young student said to me, "It's Earth Day, and I don't know what to do to make a difference." Thank you. [00:30:50] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next we're headed to Julia. [00:30:53] Julia Reed: Thanks. When I was working in City Hall, a group of Parks Department staffers came to me early in the spring and said, "We really wanna work on getting ready for wildfire season early. Can you help us?" And as a mayor's policy person, I was able to help elevate that issue. We created the first ever Smoke Ready Communities Day, which was a four-countywide event across King, Pierce and Snohomish county that tried to create awareness and information about preparing for wildfire smoke, especially for low-income communities, because these climate emergencies - they touch all of us, but they hit our low-income communities, our communities of color, our working people who have to go out to work the hardest and first. It's one of the reasons I'm proud to be endorsed by Puget Sound Sage and one of the reasons why I've been talking about wildfire smoke resiliency from the start of my campaign. I really want to see the state use some of our cap-and-invest funding to create a grant program for small cities to increase their climate resiliency and to help create a strategy for those cities as well - because large cities like Seattle have the staff and the expertise to create their own filtration systems as we did when I was in the mayor's office, but smaller cities and towns don't have that support and their folks are suffering right now and they need the state to step in and help them understand what to do and help them afford to make the retrofits to keep their community safe. [00:32:22] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:32:25] Nicole Gomez: Sure. Our communities are being attacked, are being destroyed every day by the climate or impacts of climate change. And we're seeing this in the forms of the flooding, the wildfires, droughts and we're being threatened by the inaction that's been not taken. So I think Washington should lead on reducing the carbon emission through more sustainable, like transportation, construction and consumption. Also, one of the secret weapons - I've read articles - one of the secret weapons against climate change is affordable homes. And it's a problem that I think that if we think about it in a more holistic way and look at the larger overarching systems, I think we can come up with some really good ideas for tackling our goals, our climate goals. And then also with the creation of the HEAL Act that's just been put into place - and that's engaging community through our state agencies and being able to make those recommendations from the bottom-up will really help also with that environmental justice aspect as well. [00:33:52] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now, Jeff. [00:33:54] Jeff Manson: Yeah, I agree with what everyone else has said. I would just add, in addition to smoke season that we have now and the heat waves, which are gonna be more common, we also have a water crisis that's coming - and that's both our drinking water, it's our agricultural water, it's our electric power. So we need to be preparing for not only the disasters we're already experiencing, but the ones that we should be anticipating 5, 10, 20, 30 years from now. And we also need to keep leading on preventing these worse outcomes. Washington - the good news is Washington State has been a leader among states and among countries in terms of pushing our pro-climate policies to reduce our carbon footprint. The bad news is it's not enough. Even if every jurisdiction in the world copied exactly what we're doing, they're not gonna meet - none of us are gonna meet our climate goals of halving, cutting in half our carbon emissions by 2030 and even more by 2050. We had some low-hanging fruit this last legislative session - we had electric vehicle subsidies, which we can bring back - also support the electric bike subsidies, redoing our building code to promote electricity over natural gas. There was also a bill to include climate effects in the Growth Management Act comprehensive plans. So it's easy, low-hanging fruit to pick up next session, but we need to keep investing in green infrastructure and clean energy to prevent the worst from happening. [00:35:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Our next question will be an audience-submitted question. Pat in Greenwood wants to know what actions can the Legislature do to protect reproductive care with the Dobbs decision coming down from the Supreme Court, but our right already codified in state law here - but a constitutional amendment seems unlikely given the makeup of the chambers. So what actions can happen to protect reproductive care? And we are going to start with Julia. [00:36:04] Julia Reed: Yeah, I think that I want to just push back a little bit against the concept that a constitutional amendment is unlikely. I think that it'll be challenging - maybe we can do income tax and reproductive rights in the same push. But I think that we have to start thinking about a constitutional amendment. Our rights are legally protected, but that law is only as good as long as we have Democratic majorities in the Legislature and a Democratic governor. And that could change and I don't feel comfortable leaving our rights up to that kind of risk, especially not in this day and age. I also think another thing we can do is - in Washington State, we have legally protected access to abortion. But in many parts of the state, there are no accessible abortion clinics and hospital systems have merged with Catholic hospital systems that restrict access and information about abortion. So there are people in Washington State who have legal access to abortion, but they lack actual access to abortion. I think it's really critical that we ensure that we're regulating state hospital mergers and Catholic hospital mergers to ensure that everyone's access continues to be protected in our state. And I also think helping to support and create funding for people who may be coming here from other states - I want to applaud the governor's work limiting the State Patrol's ability to be pulled into investigations of people coming to seek abortion care in our state. [00:37:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:37:40] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so since the start of the campaign, I've been talking about the Keep Our Care Act, which is something that I worked on last session and I'm looking forward to continuing the work on it in the upcoming session. And that's similar - it's the bill that would ensure those health entity mergers, acquisitions, and contracting affiliations to improve rather than harm access to that affordable, quality care within the community. And it would, like Julia mentioned, put that prohibition on those consolidations that diminish that access to affordable quality care, including our reproductive rights. That is one very small thing that we can do right now. As Executive Director of Institute for a Democratic Future, one of the things that I heard a lot about when visiting the areas along neighboring states like Idaho was that we're going to need additional funding for those health providers that are right along the border there in order to appropriately have that intake of new, potentially new patients coming into the state to seek care. And so that's something I look forward to continuing to work on in the future. [00:39:10] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Jeff. [00:39:12] Jeff Manson: Yeah - again I agree with what both Julia and Nicole have said. I do agree that we need to push for a constitutional amendment. We, at the federal level - I think a lot of people thought that Roe was settled law, Roe v. Wade was settled law and we had a constitutional right to abortion access. And it took the right wing 50 years, but unfortunately they were successful and I don't think we can take anything for granted here. I feel rather confident that our current legislature is in the right spot, our current Supreme Court's in the right spot, but you never know what's gonna happen 5, 10, 20, 50 years from now - so we should push for a constitutional amendment for an explicit right to abortion access. In terms of what we can do, this last legislative session the Legislature did pass a bill to expand the types of providers who can perform services, anticipating that Roe may fall, which is great. That helps expand access, but I really think funding is gonna be a major issue. We need to make sure that we are fully funding our clinics and other providers 'cause people are already - even before Roe - people from Texas were already coming here for services as they were being further restricted across the country. And we should be a safe haven for people, we should be a place that people can come and feel safe, no questions asked and have access to services. And if that means also funding for their stay or transportation, I'm open to that as well. And I also agree that we need to - [00:40:48] Crystal Fincher: Oh, thank you - and now Tyler. [00:40:55] Tyler Crone: I've served on the board of Cedar Rivers, which is an independent feminist abortion provider in our state and one of the best in the country. I've also been on the frontlines of advancing safe, legal abortion around the world. This is an urgent moment, it is an all-hands-on-deck moment and is one of the key reasons why I'm running. One, we have to codify Roe - we have to do it. Two, we have to invest in the infrastructure of care - the services, the providers, the clinics. We have a desperate shortage in eastern Washington and in the 36th legislative district, you cannot get abortion care at a hospital because of the mergers. Just so you know, it is here at home that you cannot get the care you need. I also am deeply invested in increasing and expanding the funding that has already been initiated by Dow Constantine, by the governor, by our mayor to overcome barriers and to ensure access to care for everyone who is seeking abortion care in our state. We also have to think about upstream - let's ensure that we're scaling up our access to reversible, long-acting contraception such as IUDs - that will take the burden off of our limited clinic and service facilities. We need to invest in training - all of these rollback of Roe means that all those states where abortion is not legal, you cannot train to provide that care. And I guess I would like to say one last point - this is just the beginning. I hope you look to commentaries by my law school classmate, Melissa Murray - [00:42:30] Crystal Fincher: Appreciate that. And for the next question - the pandemic exposed our healthcare system's limited capacity - which has grown even worse, continues to grow worse and more limited - and our state's unequal access to health services. What action do you propose to increase our state's capacity to respond to a health crisis, including behavioral health crises, and what will you do to make sure that our response supports our most vulnerable communities? And we are going to start this with Nicole. [00:43:03] Nicole Gomez: Oh, Crystal - can you please repeat the question one more time? [00:43:06] Crystal Fincher: Sure. [00:43:07] Nicole Gomez: Thank you. [00:43:08] Crystal Fincher: The pandemic exposed our healthcare system's limited capacity and our state's unequal access to health services. What action do you propose to increase our state's capacity to respond to a health crisis, including behavioral health crises, and what will you do to make sure that our response supports our most vulnerable communities? [00:43:28] Nicole Gomez: Okay, thank you. One of the - I work on healthcare policy quite a bit at the state level, that's what I do. And one of the things that we have done to help increase access to medical care has been, like this last session, we got additional funding to help cover our undocumented population and we're seeking additional funding for that. So that was something that that was done during the pandemic because we saw the huge inequities in the way medical coverage and care is provided. I've been working on the Universal Healthcare Commission - I was appointed by Governor Inslee there - and so we are in the current talks of trying to figure out what the nuts and bolts of a comprehensive healthcare plan for Washington State would look like. [Noise of object hitting ground] And I just dropped my little thing. At any rate, we are currently in the process of doing that right now - to ready the state for a potentially single-payer program. And that's something that my nonprofit has been working strenuously on, and I'm hoping that by being there as an elected official, I'd be able to continue that work in a different capacity. [00:44:56] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Jeff. [00:45:00] Jeff Manson: Yeah. I support universal healthcare, universal coverage, health insurance coverage. Ideally the federal government would take the lead on this, but we can't and shouldn't wait for the federal government to get its act together and need to do it here in Washington. I supported the creation of the Universal Healthcare Commission and I want to give a shout out to Nicole for all of her great work on this issue. If elected, I'll be relying on her on healthcare access issues. We need to take the lead here and if federal government maybe could follow our example in how we set things up here. But we don't just need health insurance coverage. I do Medicaid hearings as an administrative law judge. These are people who are covered by Medicaid, which was expanded under Obamacare, which is great. But often there are not sufficient providers for a lot of different types of services, including behavioral health services. And often, I think they would say the reimbursement rates aren't high enough to be able to cover people. So we need to not just provide universal coverage, we need to be providing the funding so that the actual services are available for those with insurance coverage. So it's attacking it from all angles and really it comes back to - are we gonna raise progressive revenue through progressive revenue sources in order to fund the services that people need and deserve. [00:46:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Tyler. [00:46:34] Tyler Crone: First, I want to start with where you started - the pandemic exposed - the pandemic is not over. We need to be learning from where we fell short, what we did right, what we do better next time - that is the first pillar of continuing to navigate and recover from COVID-19. Too many of us are sick, too many of us have had our lives disrupted. A key piece of this, for me, is bringing that pandemic expertise coupled with investment and fortification of our public health systems, our public health leadership, and our public health infrastructure. A next piece of this for me, that is top-of-mind, is about how are we taking care of those who keep us healthy? We have an incredible nursing staffing shortage in our state, our healthcare workers are exhausted and overstretched, and we need to keep that top-of-mind if we're thinking about how we're navigating a crisis and who takes care of us. Likewise, we have frontline responders who are overstretched, such as our firefighters. I'd like to make sure those stay top-of-mind as well. I think the piece that I will close with here is how I would legislate and how I lead. I lead from behind centering those who are most impacted. A key question you asked is about how would those who are most vulnerable not be excluded - they would be partners in the solutions. Thank you. [00:47:59] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - Julia. [00:48:03] Julia Reed: I'm really proud to just recently have been endorsed by SEIU 1199 Northwest, which represents thousands of nurses and behavioral healthcare workers all across the state. It's an honor after all of the work that they've put in to keep us safe, that they've put in to keep us safe every day to have their support in this race. And one of the - we talked about two things in the endorsement process. One is the essential need for safe staffing. Too many of our hospitals in healthcare settings are being run at staff-to-patient ratios that are unsafe - that put the medical staff at risk, that put patients at risk, that put care at risk, that put our whole system at risk when there are stresses like pandemic. The other thing we talked about is the really important need to grow our healthcare workforce pipeline. I'm one of the only candidates in this race who has worked on and built workforce development programs and that includes having done work with the Somali Health Board to try to advocate for greater access for immigrant and refugee doctors. We have a lot of excellent medical, trained medical personnel in our state who, because of government regulations, aren't able to do the work that they're trained to do. And I want to work with SEIU 1199 Northwest Multi-Employer Training Fund to help grow our next generation of healthcare workers, especially women and people of color. Because to ensure they aren't excluded, we have to have, you have to have providers available who come from your community, who look like you. [00:49:40] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. According to a recent Crosscut/Elway poll, Seattle voters were asked what they think are major factors in the crime rates. The top three answers were: at 85% lack of mental health and addiction services, at 67% homelessness, and at 63% economic conditions. And when asked specifically if they could direct where their tax dollars were spent, the top three responses were: at 92% addiction and mental health services, 81% said training police officers to deescalate situations, and 80% said programs to address the root causes of crime. Given that the Legislature has already voted to increase public safety funding, largely devoted to policing and prisons, do you feel that we should increase funding for behavioral health resources, non-police intervention services, and rehabilitation services before passing further increases for police spending? And we will start with Jeff. [00:50:45] Jeff Manson: Yes, I do. I think in terms of where we have underinvested in recent years, mental health and behavioral health services and interventions is where we are the farthest behind, where we need to invest the most. The Legislature did increase some funding this past year, but I think it's just a start, it's just a drop in the bucket. And I was trying to type up the numbers and I'll have to look it up later - and I think I generally agree with the respondents to the poll. I think mental health and addiction is a major contributor to criminal activity, and we need to make sure that we have these services available and that we are directing people who enter the criminal justice system into services, when they're properly identified to need those services. Drug Court is a huge success, other alternatives to incarceration for those with addiction issues and other mental health issues have been a real success story. But there are stories of Drug Court telling prosecutors not to - don't send as many referrals, we don't have enough providers to provide services for as many people who are wanting to come over to Drug Court. So we need to make sure that we're providing that funding so that the services are available. I do think that is the - one of the main causes of criminal activity and the cheapest way to reduce it. [00:52:12] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Tyler. [00:52:18] Tyler Crone: Investing in the criminal legal system does not work. It does not help us solve the problems of today. I'd like to put forward and agree with many in Seattle who do feel concern, grave concern, about our public safety situation at present and push you back, Crystal, a little bit and say it has to be nuanced. We are currently facing a public health and public safety crisis. And so I am not going to pit two things against each other of saying - absolutely, we need to be investing in mental health, we need to be investing in behavioral health. And those are some of my key priorities - bringing forward a public health and a harm reduction approach to both. But you said - would you say you would do this rather than - I'm not sure we're at a moment where we can say rather than. As much as I'd love to put forward public safety as public health, I recognize we have Starbucks closing down, I recognize that my child who worked at Majestic Bay had to shoo out a person using drugs from the entrance who lurched at them and they had to call out a manager. And my daughter last night had someone break a bottle on her car. So just to say we are facing a moment that is complex and nuanced and is going to take a lot of integrity, thought, and care to center human dignity and put the services that we need to prevent these types of scenarios. So thank you so much. [00:53:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And just clarifying the question - it's would you fund those things before passing other ones, not necessarily instead of. With that, we will go to Julia. [00:54:05] Julia Reed: I think safety, public safety, is the issue we hear about on the doors - all of us - the most every day. I think everyone deserves to be safe, but I think we can see that doubling down on our current system, which is broken, is leading to the results we're having in our streets. As someone who's worked in government my whole career, I really try to be led by data in making decision making. And I think the data shows us that we have solutions that work here in our City. I'm proud to be endorsed by Dominique Davis, the CEO and founder of Community Passageways, which is one of the leading examples of community-based, evidence-backed, non-incarceral, non-police-related solutions to public safety that create lasting safety in our City. I've also been a longtime board member for the YMCA Social Impact Center which sponsors the Alive and Free program, which similarly is a community-based program, community-based response to crime that has shown real measurable results. I want to see us investing in the solutions that work. I want to see us investing in things like Community Passageways, Alive and Free, greater access to advocates for victims of violence, of sexual assault, and addressing the scarcity and poverty that drives a lot of low-level crime, including the lack of mental and behavioral healthcare. [00:55:33] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:55:37] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so on the topic of behavioral health, I actually will - first, to answer the question - yes. But on the topic of behavioral health specifically, the Legislature just recently put in a really large package of behavioral healthcare funding because it is a top issue - top-of-mind not just here in the Seattle area, but across the entire state and nation, quite frankly. And there still needs to be additional investments. This past session - something that I'm proud to have helped pass was this budget proviso that one of my, one of the local nonprofits came to me and said, Hey, can you help with this? And we ended up passing a proviso for a pilot program that - mental health providers were coming to them and saying, Hey, I would love to volunteer my time, but there's no way that we can figure out how to pair patients with providers. There needs to be a screening process that's easy for us to manage. And so we helped pass that through, so it's a pilot in King, Snohomish and Pierce. And with innovative ideas like that, if it works - let's see if we can continue to do it, especially now that we have telehealth, that could potentially help get providers across the state specifically in the areas where there's a lack. There's a huge lack of mental health providers statewide. [00:57:15] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And with that, it's 7:30, it is a hot evening, there's a lot going on. We are going to take a quick two-minute break just to give people the chance to grab some ice, refill water, do whatever you need to do. So we will start that two-minute countdown now, which goes by pretty quick. So we will start that break and then be back shortly. Excellent. So it looks like we are back - I'm waiting for, there we go - we're all back. So this next question is a combination of two - a combination of a preexisting question and one sent in from a viewer. Starting off - Washington's facing housing affordability crisis - lots of conversation about ending exclusionary zoning, making further investments in the Housing Trust Fund, but also balancing concerns of different constituents. One in particular writes in asking, citing a King 5 story where Seattle has lost 11,500 rental property units in the past year, mostly smaller locally-owned properties, according to this and suggested by the King 5 article. They're wondering if you're gonna pursue similar regulations at the state level, which they feel greatly disfavor and disincentivize mom-and-pop landlords. So that's question one. And question two - in addition to what you plan to do for landlords or not, what needs to happen to address this housing affordability crisis beyond expanding zoning and investing in the Housing Trust Fund? And we are going to start with Tyler. [00:59:07] Tyler Crone: Thank you. So I think that the first question piece was about these smaller landlords and what are we doing to find strategies that work? I think that we are at a extraordinarily difficult moment because one, we're facing a homelessness crisis that will only be exacerbated when we lift an eviction moratorium. This eviction moratorium is placing a disproportionate burden on some of these small landlords who are an important part of the solution. And so what I would look to do would be to one, bring these stakeholders around the table to see where have our actions had unintended consequences, or that article, Crystal - I just saw it on Twitter before we hopped on - where we're losing critical space where people are selling their units and it is impacting our housing availability. So one, that partnership with landlords looking for practical solutions, exempting small landlords from some of these onerous regulations. To that piece of affordability, we have to be finding smart ways forward around density, around building with that urban village model, increasing density along our secondary arterials and seeing it as a strategy for inclusive, safe, healthy neighborhoods. [01:00:38] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Julia. [01:00:41] Julia Reed: Yeah, it's hard for me to speak to that specific article without having read it and dug into the data a little bit more. I, like I said, I like to be driven by the data and I know sometimes television news can can create packages for clicks as opposed to things that are more nuanced. I am very concerned about the loss of rental property in our City and the lack of affordable rental property. The University of Washington researchers just put out a book that I've been deeply reading for this process called Homelessness is a Housing Problem - the thesis is in the title of the book. And one of the things that they identify is that the lack of affordable rental property is the number one most determinative factor in the rates of homelessness in a particular area. So it's a huge concern. I'm really focused on this rising trend around LLCs and corporations buying up homes as investment properties to increase corporate profits. I want to explore what that looks like in our state and see if we can regulate that to ensure that our market can remain something that individuals can buy into for their own ownership. And that's really gonna be, I think, a big focus of mine in the Legislature. [01:02:04] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [01:02:07] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So like others, I have not had an opportunity to read the article that was posted, but what I would say is that this is exactly the reason why we need different options for housing. Aside from being able to lift the ban on rent control or something of that nature, we would also need to look at limiting predatory fees. There's other ways in which we can work through making sure that we have more affordable housing. I was thinking about an article that I read - I think it was regarding Amsterdam and there's a 40-40-20 rule that they use there. And so essentially what that is - is you have 40% of regulated rent, and then you have another 40% of medium-term rental, and then 20% would be an expensive rent option. And looking at other countries who are tackling this problem and are doing it in a successful manner could be helpful in helping guide the work that we do. We're in a - oh, there's time. Thank you. [01:03:34] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Jeff. [01:03:36] Jeff Manson: Yeah, our housing affordability crisis, I think, is related to a lot of the issues we all hear at the door and I think we're all experiencing ourselves. I think in terms of the role the state can play in that - there's twofold - one is direct state investment at the lower end of the market. This would be the Housing Trust Fund, other direct investments. The other is we need more density. We need - we're tens of thousands of housing units behind where we need to be. People are moving here faster than we're building new units and that's causing the - one of the main reasons that prices are rising. Seattle has taken steps in recent years to increase density - it could do more - but other cities in the region haven't done nearly as much. I think another thing is people who are wanting to build more housing units are having a lot of trouble with just basic things like permitting. I hear, of course, at the doors about Seattle's process and we need to make sure that our municipalities have the resources, are able to raise the resources they need to process permanent applications expeditiously. In terms of small landlords, I also haven't read the article. I would say my overall approach is that we need to respect tenant's rights, but also need to make sure that we aren't disincentivizing providing rental units so much that we don't have any housing for everybody. So I do think it's a balance and it's complicated. But those are the two things I would be looking at in any of this legislation. [01:05:07] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Now we go to a audience-submitted question. What would make Washington's tax code more fair for the poor and working families? And how much funding would you look to raise for needed services in Washington? And we're gonna start with Julia. [01:05:28] Julia Reed: That's a great question. One of the things that makes our tax codes so regressive is that poor and working families who purchase more of their goods and consumables are paying a lot of money in sales tax. Tons of money in sales tax. Also, we talked about the gas tax earlier in the lightning round. People who have older cars, less fuel-efficient cars are paying more in gas tax than people who are buying - well, people who are buying Teslas in general aren't paying gas tax. So it's just another example of how working families are carrying the load for our parks, our roads, our schools, our infrastructure - and wealthy folks are getting a free pass. I think what we need to do in our state is - I'd like to see us create a statewide income tax. While we are working towards that, dealing with constitutional issues, I really support the wealth tax that Noel Frame who held this seat before has proposed - which she proposed a 1% tax on wealth over a billion dollars. I think you could even bring that threshold down a little bit. I also would like to see us increase the estate tax on large estates and use that as an opportunity to lower the estate tax on smaller estates so that families of color can afford to create generational wealth and that all working families can try to bring some generational wealth to the next generation. [01:07:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [01:07:04] Nicole Gomez: This is the billion dollar question. So I've been working with the Balance Our Tax Code coalition over the past few years. And we've been working in detail on this very issue. There's a lot of different ideas that are floating out there. We did pass the capital gains tax, so that was one effort. I do think we need to tax excessive wealth - that is something that we've been working on and will continue to work on it. That 1% tax on the value of stocks, bonds, and the other financial intangible assets over $1 billion, which again, I do also think that should be lowered. And I believe that they're working on a number that might be a little - a different number perhaps, or a different way of looking at it - but that only affects like a hundred people in Washington State. It's time that the wealthy do pay their fair share. There's also other ideas like a guaranteed basic income program I've seen out there. Baby bonds has also been floated where you're giving funds to - I think the bill was like $3,200 to give funds to people, to kids who are on the state's Medicare Apple Health program. And then that money grows over time and they get it when they're an adult, which is a good way to eliminate or to address the wealth gap. And I have so many more - I could talk about this topic for hours. So thanks. [01:08:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Jeff. [01:08:39] Jeff Manson: Yes - as I'm sure this is a very informed audience and everyone's aware that we have the most regressive tax structure in the whole country. It is by far the worst, and we're really feeling it right now with inflation and the affordability crisis - the sales and property taxes that are so regressive. That's one thing I hear at the doors all the time. So I support capital gains tax and am cautiously optimistic our State Supreme Court will find it constitutional. Same with higher earners income tax and a wealth tax. We need to be pursuing all of these progressive revenue sources. And once we raise enough money to fund the services that we say that we need, then we could provide some relief from the more regressive taxes. The second part of the question was how much more revenue do we need? I don't know if I can put a number on it, but it's definitely in the billions - like billions and billions. Think about all the things that we've all been talking about, we mostly agree on that we need - we've been talking about healthcare, we've been talking about behavioral health and mental health, we've been talking - we haven't talked about childcare, but that's really expensive and requires direct state subsidies. We're talking about low-income housing and Housing Trust Fund and permanent supportive housing - and fully funding education. All of these things cost money besides the basic government services that we already have - often, which are not acting at full capacity. So we have not enough revenue and the revenue that we have is being collected too aggressively. So we need more - [01:10:20] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now Tyler. [01:10:24] Tyler Crone: Thank you. My approach to this question, which is a critical question, is that we need to be closing corporate loopholes. We need to put our weight behind a move to an income tax. And I would like to see that income tax ultimately reduce our sales tax or move us away from sales tax, which I think Julia made a really good case of how that disproportionately impacts working people and people with less income. I am also very concerned about how our property taxes are affecting our seniors, our single moms - it's a concern that's raised to me, time and again, at the doors of how do we manage this and provide the supports we need with such an upside-down tax structure. A question that has been raised to me when I've asked it to colleagues is about a wealth tax. Will people move out of state? Is that something that we need federal leadership around or is it something that Washington can lead on? That's an outstanding question for me, but I just want to underscore the critical, critical need to fully fund our schools, to increase our investments in making high-quality childcare, and a strong start in life available - that we have and we see, as we've talked about throughout this call, a need to lift kids out of poverty and a need to really reinforce our behavioral and mental health systems and services. Thank you. [01:11:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. You just talked about childcare a bit, Tyler and Jeff. You were a little bit prescient in saying we haven't talked about childcare yet, but this question is about childcare. We are experiencing a childcare crisis. It was already out of reach for many Seattle families - exceeding $1,600-1,800 a month in the City of Seattle per child for many families and only got worse during the pandemic, with many counties in this state reporting a 40% loss of childcare providers since the start of the pandemic - causing costs to rise even further and access to lower and become even harder. What can be done specifically to make childcare more affordable and more accessible to all parents in Washington? And we are starting with Nicole. [01:12:41] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so I recall this - even pre-pandemic - my nine years, wait how old is my son now? Oh my gosh - he's 12 - 12 years ago. When we first started looking for a daycare

Green Industry Podcast
The Weed Control and Fertilizer Experts - Allyn Hane and Jason Creel

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 40:04


In today's episode lawn care experts Allyn Hane (the Lawn Care Nut) and Jason Creel join the show to share some humor and fertilizer and weed control tips.  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guests: Lawn Care Nut YouTube Channel Lawn Care Life YouTube Channel

The Dan Dakich Show Podcast
Alec Pierce joins the show following his first practice! Plus Matt Taylor breaks down what he witnessed today and Curt Cavin explains the Alex Palou/Chip Ganassi Racing lawsuit.

The Dan Dakich Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 144:50 Very Popular


(00:00-25:15) – The Dan Dakich Show opens up on a hump day with Dan questioning why people didn't question Chris Ballard about the public quotes of Shaq Leonard and Kenny Moore of a locker room rift and the difference between the current Colts regime and past regimes. (25:15-38:27) – Dan returns from break and starts pondering if the Colts are going to be any better than they were last year, how GM Chris Ballard stood up from himself regarding the Colts signing another WR, and what concerns him about the Colts. (38:27-50:29) – Dan closes out the first hour of today's show by sharing a few nuggets on what is happened at Colts Training Camp today, sharing some comments from Jaguars players on the difference from last year to this year, and asking producer Eddie Garrison which quarterback's he would take Jimmy G over. (50:29-1:16:12) – ESPN's Seth Greenberg makes his weekly appearance on the Dan Dakich Show to answer whether or not he has recruited any players for college basketball that went into the NFL, what he has tonight in the TBT, explains the spat that Dan and Coach Greenberg had since their last conversation, and the future of the Big Ten following Commissioner Kevin Warren's comments yesterday. Plus Colts WR Alec Pierce joins fresh off the Colts practice field to discuss if Tim Doyle's grass mowing story is true, how his first day on the field went with the full team for the first time, is it challenging learning a new play book, and if the family would give their dad a tough time with his mom being the better athlete.    (1:16:12-1:27:12) – Dan follows up his conversation with Alec Pierce be replaying some audio from Chris Ballard's press conference yesterday pertaining to the wide receiver room and applauds Ballard for going at the media room when they asked about bringing in a veteran WR. (1:27:12-1:37:44) – Dan closes out the second hour of today's show by discussing the barbecue he had last night on his way to Dayton with producer Eddie Garrison and then they transition into some of their favorite restaurants that isn't a major chain. (1:37:44-1:58:42) – The final hour of the Dan Dakich Show kicks off with Curt Cavin of the NTT IndyCar Series joins Dan to break down the lawsuit that was filed today between Alex Palou and Chip Ganassi Racing, what happens with Palou's contract with McLeron, and if there is any chance Palou races for Chip Ganassi. (1:58:42-2:19:02) – Voice of the Indianapolis Colts in Matt Taylor joins the Dan Dakich Show after the first day of training camp to detail what happened today, the benefits of bringing back the mandatory minicamp, how many slip ups he will have when calling Shaquille Leonard by Darius, and if this Colts defense can be a top ten defense. 2:19:02-2:24:39) – The final segment of the Dan Dakich Show on a Tuesday is with producer Jimmy Cook joining the show to give his bets ahead of tonight's MLB slate and which quarterbacks he would Jimmy G take over.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sports Rush with Brett Rump
Hour 1: Zach Osterman

Sports Rush with Brett Rump

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 44:27


Ballard takes the mic as Colts camp is set to begin, the Big Ten may not be done expanding and a look at the four most likely candidates, State of the Program: IU, and Zach Osterman of the IndyStar joins to discuss takeaways from IU at Big Ten Football Media Day and expectations for the Hoosiers this upcoming season. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Michael Kay Show
TMKS Hour 4: Becton, Ballard, '85 Bears and more

The Michael Kay Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 21:13


The guys wonder how the Giants should handle Daniel Jones at the end of the upcoming season. Plus, Ballard has a pretty wild take about his beloved Green Bay Packers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Green Industry Podcast
How to Prepare Your Landscaping Business for the Inflationary AGE

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 29:48


On today's episode host Paul Jamison talks about ways we can overcome inflation and raising costs. Paul addresses some of the pros and cons of being a lawn care business owner in these unique times. Along with providing practical financial strategies for your landscaping business Paul also discusses the importance of having courage in the days ahead.  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10% Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast  

Perpetual Chess Podcast
EP 289- Tony Ballard- A Convicted Felon on How Chess has Changed His Life

Perpetual Chess Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 55:53 Very Popular


This week on Perpetual Chess, Tony Ballard, who is serving a 294-month prison sentence for attempted murder, tells the remarkable story of how chess has changed his life. Tony joined me via phone from a minimum security rehabilitation facility in Wichita, Kansas, where he currently lives. As you will hear Tony discuss, he had a difficult upbringing, and made some very regrettable choices in his early years, but while in prison, a love for chess took hold, and Tony credits the game as a transformative tool in his life. Tony is now working with a non-profit called The Gift of Chess. Their goal is to promote chess as a learning tool both within the prison system, and outside of it. Tony is taking online university classes and hopes to work in youth outreach when he is fully released from prison in 2025. This is a truly inspiring story of the many ways that chess can impact one's life! Please read on for timestamps and links referenced.  0:00- We discuss Tony's background, especially as it relates to chess.  3:00- Tony discusses his difficult early childhood, and the events that led to his receiving a 294 month prison sentence. Mentioned: Tony's Zoom lecture for the non-profit organization, The Gift of Chess, Linktree for more info about The Gift of Chess non-profit, Russell Makofsky of the Impact Coaching Network  14:00- Perpetual Chess is brought to you in part by Chessable.com. You can find IM Andras Toth's new course, IM Irina Bulmaga's, as well as so many others, here: https://www.chessable.com/courses/ 16:00- Tony describes his passion for chess, which blossomed once Tony was in prison.  23:00- Patreon mailbag question: “Is Tony able to play chess online within his minimum security facility?”  27:00- How is chess perceived in prison? What would it take to grow chess in prisons?  35:00- What are Tony's favorite openings? What's his chess style?  38:00- What chess books did Tony read? Mentioned: Chess by Laszlo Polgar  40:00- Perpetual Chess is brought to you in part by Aimchess.com. Aimchess' algorithm reviews your games and gives you actionable advice on how to improve your game. Check it out for free, and if you choose to subscribe you can use the code Perpetual30 to save 30%. Or use this link for the same discount: https://aimchess.com/try?ref=benjohnson12 41:00- Tony discusses why he has been working on his endgames.  https://linktr.ee/thegiftofchess 44:00- What are Tony's chess plans, and what plans does he have for his life after his full release from prison? His release could happen by 2025?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Green Industry Podcast
How to Follow Up with Customers After They Contact You About a Lawn Care Job w/ Chris Hollis From Trifecta Landscaping

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 35:05


On today's episode Chris Hollis from Pure Marketing/Trifecta Landscaping shares a story about how their business recently missed out on a new customer because of poor follow up. This leads to a conversation about how we can stay on top of new inquiries and turn those potential customers into happy customers.  Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) GetJobber.com/Paul The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com Get Roll by ADP Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our guest: @puremarketingteam

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling
Indianapolis Colts - Darius Leonard now Shaq! Kenny Moore ready! Nyheim Hines hungry! Ballard honest

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 15:40


The Maniac is now the ManiShaq! Darius told the media that he has always hated being called Darius! Kenny Moore is ready to play - and is not thinking about a contract. Nyheim Hines wants a personal best in catches - which means more than 63! Chris Ballard says reports he spoke to anyone about Julio Jones were wrong, but that the door is still open to a possible return of TY Hilton. Kwity Paye was hampered as a rookie by a bad left eye. It has been corrected, and so he expects to be better as a sophomore! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-kent-sterling-show/support

Green Industry Podcast
Part 2 of Interview with Fill's Lawn Care

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 59:53


In today's episode Fill's Lawn Care returns for part two. Fill and Paul chat about the lawn care industry, fitness, nutrition and much more!  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) GetJobber.com/Paul The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com Get Roll by ADP Rain Bird The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our guest: TikTok - @fillslawncare Fill's Lawn Care YouTube Channel

Green Industry Podcast
How to Persuade Customers to Buy From You - Strategies to Make Your Customers Feel Comfortable and Happy w/ Dr. Frank Holleman

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 34:31


In today's episode fan favorite Dr. Frank Holleman returns for a new Friday with Frank episode! On today's program Dr. Frank dives deep into the psychology of how to persuade customers to purchase our services. If you are looking to boost sales in your lawn care business take a listen to today's show.  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast  

Green Industry Podcast
Fill's Lawn Care Shares Some Breaking News (And It's Not the One You think It Is)

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 77:57


On today's show Fill's Lawn Care returns to share some exciting updates about his business and future plans! Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guest: YouTube - Fills Lawn Care TikTok - @fillslawncare

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling
Indianapolis Colts - Ballard & Reich NOT on hot seat for GREAT reason! James Harden gets $21M raise!

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 16:19


Frank Reich & Chris Ballard are not going to be fired - regardless of what happens this season! What if Aaron Bailey caught the Hail Mary in the 1995 AFC Championship Game? What if Peyton manning was kept, and the Colts traded the #1 overall pick in 2012? You won't believe who could still be playing for the Horseshoes! (at 12:45) James Harden did not take a paycut to re-sign for the 76ers in Philly - he got another $21.2M for playing fat guy hoops! (at 14:28) Kyler Murray got paid as an elite young QB. Is he elite? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-kent-sterling-show/support

Green Industry Podcast
NEW Rain Bird Controller Saves Water, Time and Money w/ Joe Porrazzo and Steve Barendt

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 40:10


On today's episode Joe Porrazzo and Steve Barendt from Rain Bird share about the unique RC2 controller and how it is an absolute game-changer for the irrigation industry. With Quick Pair technology and the Rain Bird® mobile app, you will have instant access to customize a watering schedule from anywhere! The mobile-first interface provides homeowners with the convenience they have come to expect while offering contractors the easiest and fastest programming experience available. Building upon Rain Bird's legacy, the RC2 controller delivers the expertise of an irrigation company and the vision of a leader to  save time, water and money. Tune in to hear about the RC2 controller and what else is new at Rain Bird.  The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com Rainbird.com/connected GetJobber.com/Paul Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast    

Green Industry Podcast
How to Save Time Screening Customers in Your Business w/ Chris Gentry

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 42:39


In today's episode special guest Chris Gentry discusses how to vet customers more efficiently. Chris owns a home service based businesses called Happy Cans where they clean trash cans in the Charleston, South Carolina area. Route density is of the utmost importance to Gentry's efficiency and profitability. Tune in to hear how he Chris saves times in the vetting process and recruits the best customers.  The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com My Service Area GetJobber.com/Paul Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our guest: https://myservicearea.com/paul

Georgia Bulldogs
Matt and Chuck Cross Talk w Wiley Ballard and Dylan Short July 18 2022

Georgia Bulldogs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 18:27


Matt and Chuck are live from the College Football Hall of Fame for SEC Media Days. They talk about what is different from Hoover to Atlanta. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Green Industry Podcast
SWOT Analysis: The Best Ways To Grow Your Profits w/ James Manske from Elkhorn Lawn Care

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 43:18


On today's episode special guest James Manske from Elkhorn Lawn Care shares about how his team uses the S.W.O.T analysis to grow their lawn care business. SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats, and so a SWOT analysis is a technique for assessing these four aspects of your business. SWOT Analysis is a tool that can help you to analyze what your company does best now, and to devise a successful strategy for the future. The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our guest: @james_manske

Green Industry Podcast
How a 25-year-old Built His $300,000 Side Hustle

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 24:36


On today's show Douglas from Statesboro, Georgia shares about his side hustle. Douglas does over $300,000 in revenue on this side doing construction, remodeling, land clearing and landscaping. He currently works 40 hours a week for a construction business, but once he is off the clock he is getting to work building and creating for his own business. Tune in to hear Douglas share his entrepreneur story.  The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online   Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers   Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our guest: https://b-m.law/attorneys

Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: July 15, 2022

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 59:20


On this Hacks & Wonks week-in-review, Crystal is joined by former Seattle mayor and current Executive Director of America Walks, Mike McGinn. Mike starts off discussing what he looks for in candidates. Then Mike and Crystal spend time talking about the Seattle City Council putting ranked choice voting on the ballot, how that impacts the conflicting approval voting initiative, and the differences between both systems. Next, they break down reporting on how the lack of housing is actually the leading cause of homelessness, and what it will take to properly make an impact on our state's homelessness crisis. Finally, Crystal and Mike ask why elected leaders continue to politicize, ignore and defund public safety programs that have proven to be effective.   As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, Mike McGinn, at @mayormcginn. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources Vote by August 2nd! Need to register to vote or update your registration? Go here: https://vote.wa.gov   “People Power Washington's 2022 Policing and Public Safety Voter Guide” https://www.wethepeoplepower.org/wa-state-legislature-2022   Available now for State Legislature primary races! https://www.wethepeoplepower.org/washington-state-legislature-candidates-2022 -------------------------- “Seattle City Council puts ranked-choice voting on the ballot” by Melissa Santos from Axios: https://www.axios.com/local/seattle/2022/07/15/seattle-city-council-ranked-choice-voting-ballot    “Cause of homelessness? It's not drugs or mental illness, researchers say” by Gary Warth from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/cause-of-homelessness-its-not-drugs-or-mental-illness-researchers-say/    “Homelessness is a Housing Problem,” by Gregg Colburn & Clayton Page Aldern   “Mayor Harrell Wants to Give Cops an Extra $30,000 to Work in Seattle” by Hanna Krieg from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/07/13/76404101/mayor-harrell-wants-to-give-cops-an-extra-30000-to-work-in-seattle    “King County Expands Public Health Approach In Response to Rising Gun Violence” by Natalie Bicknell Argerious from The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2022/07/14/king-county-expands-public-health-approach-in-response-to-rising-gun-violence/    “Seattle Might Soon Defund a Promising Police Alternative” by Will Casey from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/06/23/75477450/seattle-might-soon-defund-a-promising-police-alternative    Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today we are continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a cohost. Welcome back to the program, friend of the show - one of our favorites - activist, community leader, former Mayor of Seattle and Executive Director of America Walks: the popular Mike McGinn. [00:00:57] Mike McGinn: I think we need to add a little more to that intro - I think we need more, I think we need more. Glad to be here, thank you so much. [00:01:05] Crystal Fincher: Glad to have you here. This past week, we actually hosted a couple of candidate forums - one in the 37th legislative district, another in the 36th legislative district - because ballots are arriving, you should probably have your ballot, or get it tomorrow if you don't have it yet because the election on August 2nd is upon us. In one of those forums, one candidate that you had endorsed got emotional talking about your endorsement meaning a lot to them, so certainly popular with a number of people - largely, just because of the work that you have done. So appropriate that we're here talking to someone who has gone through many campaigns himself, right as we have so many people going through that same process, and everyone is receiving their ballots so they can vote. What's your take on ballots dropping? What are you looking out for? What are your thoughts? [00:02:08] Mike McGinn: Yeah, it's so I - number one, I'm appreciative and maybe I shouldn't advertise this, but when people call me and ask me about running for office, I almost always speak with them. I guess - call me before you announce is my one thing - as I tell people, there's only two times when you're pretty much guaranteed coverage in a race - when you announce you're in it and when they announce the election results. So you really wanna get out the gate well, and I think a lot of people tend to think - well, I just need to get in the race, I need to start telling my friends, and I need to start raising my money - they haven't really thought through what it is they're doing and why they're running. And that's the thing I look for the most in a candidate - is there values - and I think we have a tendency, and sometimes Democrats in particular have this tendency, to look for the policy positions and someone's depth of knowledge on policy issues. And I think that's important, but to me, the policy positions are usually important because they're gonna reveal something about the underlying values of the person - what really matters to them, what do they choose to highlight, and how do they choose to approach it? So I don't expect, particularly first-time candidates for office, to have depth of knowledge on a wide variety of issues. I think that's unrealistic, and I think you're just rewarding the facile mind or the person who reads the - the policy wonk type who reads everything all the time. I'd be looking for who's the person who really has been engaged and has put their values into action, shown where their heart lies by what they've chosen to work on and how they've chosen to work on it. And you might be able to forgive a little policy difference here or there if you feel like their heart's really in the right place, 'cause people can tell you the right thing when they're running 'cause they know what'll ring the bell, but what will happen when it gets hard? What will happen when the pressure hits? Will they stick with that, or will they move somewhere else? And so that also leads to one of my favorite questions for a candidate - tell me a time you did something hard, even if it might have been unpopular. Tell me, and what was, it? And that's another thing I look for. So it matters to me what people have chosen to work on over the years and where they come from, and that's what I tend to base my endorsements on. Are they gonna be able to do something hard when the pressure of office gets in there? 'Cause if you don't do something hard before you get elected, you're probably not gonna do it after you get elected - the pressure's too much. [00:04:48] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, you will not do it after you get elected. And we've talked about this a bit before, but absolutely that, and a lot of times people look at running as - oh, this is really hard, once I just win this election, then I can to the work of governing and - but no, it gets harder, it gets much harder. The work begins once you finish your campaign, which is a scary thought for people going through all of the ups and downs and work of - it's certainly a lot - but it does not get easier, the scrutiny and the accountability only grows from there. And so I'm similar - after all of the time that I've spent just paying attention and watching candidates up close and seeing how they operate before they run, during the campaign - translates to how they govern. 'Cause a lot of the things that you do when you're actually running for office don't translate to the job of governing and meeting the needs of your constituents. And it really is this issue that I think we're facing all over the place - how can we have Democratic majorities, Democratic governor, leadership House and Senate, Congressional majorities, yet be stuck on what we need to pass, even on things just like - hey, we need to act to codify women's right to abortion services, people's right to privacy in law - and we don't have the votes to do that in Congress. And even calling a special session here, within a Democratic majority, and so a big question is not just - Hey, are you progressive? Are you a Democrat? Do you know what the right policy is? - 'cause every single one of those people running and people we see running in the state do know the right answers, right? The answers that will make people nod their heads and agree with them and - okay, they like it. But when Congressional leadership and House leadership is saying - Hey, we're close to passing this bill, we just need - this isn't gonna fly - so-and-so member over here doesn't want this provision that is key to serving people in your community who you know need it, we just need you on the Yes vote, don't hold this up, don't be difficult, don't do that, you're not playing that kind of stuff. Are you going to say - No, this is important and I'm a No without that, or I'm going to need this in, or how do we work this in, we can continue to talk but this needs to be in and we need to figure out how to get there - where those things are not going to be compromised away. Because we've done a lot of the easy stuff - a lot of the problems that continue to get worse, like housing affordability, we're seeing rights recede, we're seeing income inequality continue to get worse. And the action needed to solve those problems, the action needed to solve homelessness, the action needed to solve to make our streets safer - that's the hard stuff. That's the stuff where there is not uniform agreement among Democrats or progressives. That's the stuff where there is not agreement from leadership in these bodies to say - okay, let's do that. That's the controversial stuff. And we need people who will stand up and say - We have compromised that away before - we've taken action on all that other stuff, it's time to move on this stuff that we know is critical to making our future better and not just perpetuating these same things. That's my feeling. [00:08:38] Mike McGinn: Well, we've got this - you're previewing an issue that we're gonna talk about - housing and homelessness - I almost wanted to jump right in there with that, but I'm also really intrigued by what has happened with, as folks may know, there was signatures collected to put approval voting on the ballot this year. Meaning a change in the system by which candidates are elected in Seattle would be put into the City Charter and apply in future elections. And the basic concept of approval voting was that in the primary you could select every candidate that you approved of. And that has a certain appeal when you have, as we do here in legislative races or City Council races coming up next year, you'll have seven or eight candidates and you don't wanna waste your vote on someone that doesn't stand a chance of winning. And so that was the appeal. And as background, there's a sizable contingent of folks who've been proponents of ranked-choice voting and who've opposed approval voting. But they have spoken to the City Council, and the City Council is now - City Council has a choice when something collects enough signatures to go on the ballot - the City Council can either just put it into law, they can send it to the ballot, or they can send it to the ballot with an alternative. And the City Council has approved an alternative, which is to use ranked-choice voting, to select your top two. So you get to select, I don't know how many ranks they're gonna put in, but you'll be able to rank the candidates in the race. And the lowest-ranked candidate - they count multiple times - so everybody goes like 1-5 for their candidates, or whatever the number is here. And once they tally the first round of votes, the lowest-ranked candidate gets knocked out and everybody who voted first for that person, you look to their second-choice votes and add them in. And you keep doing that until somebody - until in this case - until you reach top two for the primary. So in one case you just - everybody I like. In the other case, you go - here are the people I like in the order I like 'em, and that will end up picking our top two. And it's just - I'm sorry, I know I'm doing a lot of explaining here - but the other part of it that's fascinating is the way the ballot is is - Do you think we should do something different? is the first question. Should we consider an alternative? And if you say yes, then they will ask - Which one do you like? Do you like the approval voting or do you like the ranked-choice voting? So we're gonna have a great discussion here about - 'cause let me tell you something - ranked-choice voting advocates and approval voting advocates both really, really care about why their system is better than the other. So we're gonna hear a ton of that, but I think there's a fundamental question, which is - Why change what we have? Because that's the first vote. And so - [00:11:44] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, that is the first vote. [00:11:45] Mike McGinn: That's the first vote. And I don't know - I'll put my cards on the table - I'm definitely voting Yes, that let's change what we have. We can talk about why. And I don't know - I wanna hear all the arguments about which is better than the other as this debate progresses, because I do think - I personally think both would be better - that's my take. [00:12:07] Crystal Fincher: I have a different take. We talked about this a little bit before in the program - I do have a different take. We have been discussing ranked-choice voting, there's been a movement for ranked-choice voting for quite some time in our state from a lot of community advocates in a lot of areas across the state. This is something that has had support on the ground from within different communities and different counties across the state. I will tell you that I do like ranked-choice voting and if the vote were up to me, I would choose to do that. But I will also say that we've tried ranked-choice voting in Pierce County before and it didn't go very well. And not because there was a flaw with ranked-choice voting, but because we need to invest in the voter education that it takes to do that. It's one thing for very online people - people who live and breathe politics and policy who are going through and know what the ballot question is gonna look like from the Council, and we got the update on the Council decision. Most people do not have the time, or even know where to begin to look, or have the inclination to figure all that out, right? And they're dealing with elections pretty much when they see their ballot arrive in their mailbox. And there are lots of people in different situations - there are lots of people who do not have home internet access - the majority of my neighbors do not have home internet access where I live. They're looking at stuff on their phones, they're doing different things, but it's not like they're getting a lot of information online. And for people who are not plugged in online and getting all of the alerts from government - there actually isn't great outreach person-to-person, through the mailbox, people - hey, this is gonna change. And if someone gets a ballot and they don't know what to do with it, the decision that they most often make is not to vote. And that confusion is just a bad feeling for people who do want to vote. And that causes a - hey, what what do I even do with this, I don't know. And so I think ranked-choice voting is excellent. And I think that we have to make sure that there is a planned investment and strategy to make it work, to outreach to every community, to reach out to people in language, to work through community centers, to work through churches, to work through everywhere - to make sure that the community understands that this change is coming and this is how to work through it. And not just a - hey, we're gonna have some news coverage as ballots drop and that kind of thing. But months and months beforehand to do that - that is what it takes to really enfranchise people. Or else we're gonna see really low-turnout elections and a lot of frustration and a lot of pushback that reflects on the system, when really it's a reflection on the implementation. And that would be the case for either one of these initiatives, really - that's not just tied to ranked-choice voting. I think that was a lesson that we learned that would apply to any kind of change. So I personally would just implore anyone working on this to have a plan that isn't reliant on the news getting the word out, that isn't reliant on people learning online what to do - that you are going out and educating the people about the change because in order to empower the people and to enfranchise the people who are most frequently left out, that step is critical. [00:15:45] Mike McGinn: I think that's absolutely right. And a few different thoughts - one is that there is that threshold question of why change. And one of my fears in this process is that the proponents of either approach will focus on the - why is my - what's the difference? And it's natural in campaigns for - just campaigns don't like gray, they like black and white. And so the opportunity here for the proponents of one to say that the other one would in fact be an unmitigated disaster, if approved, is gonna be really strong. But that leads to a really interesting point because - what is the goal of the proponents of each? Is it to get a change, or is it to actually - or would they prefer that the voters not approve the threshold question? And I don't know, I'm not trying to - I'm not, this isn't coming from any place of knowledge, of motivations of anybody - on my part. But that could be a concern - is that the voters could say - we're just gonna vote No to the change at all. And that would put the idea of change further in the rear-view mirror, or further off in the horizon to actually get a different system in the future. I do think the advantage of both - just to go to the threshold question - is just in fields where you have five or six candidates who feel like there are gradations of difference, or maybe there's a couple in that camp and a few in that camp - the ability to say these are the people in my camp that I would be happy with. And again, under the system, you can just bullet vote approval voting - I'm just gonna vote for one, I'm not gonna vote for anyone else 'cause I don't wanna - this is the one I really want and I don't wanna help anyone else. Or you could say three or four are acceptable - I suppose in ranked-choice voting you could do the same - I'm just gonna vote for 1, 2, 3. [00:17:50] Crystal Fincher: You can choose to not rank. [00:17:50] Mike McGinn: Yeah. Or you can choose - I'm just gonna vote for one, I'm just gonna bullet vote for one 'cause I really don't wanna help anyone else. But that's less likely 'cause you probably wanna show who you're saying your choices are - yeah. And so I think that gives - I think that puts more power in the hands of the voters. It is a little discouraging that it's in August of an odd-year - so it's a small number of voters expressing their preference, as opposed to a general election or at least an even-year election where you've got a big turnout for Governor or President or Senator or Congress and the like, compared to the odd-year. [00:18:31] Crystal Fincher: Well, I think the approval voting forced that hand because I do think that, and I think lots of people and the Council made the case when they approved this yesterday - that the people, especially for the length of time that people have been advocating for ranked-choice voting here in this area, that people do deserve a choice. And we were at the point with approval voting that they may not have had a choice about the kind of change that they wanted. So hey, if we're gonna vote on a change, let's actually have a conversation about the change. And I do think that the approval voting making it on the ballot helped that. You talk about, you mentioned - what is the motivation, do people actually want the change, do people not? I think that's a multi-layered and very interesting question. And I think, as we've talked about with candidates lots of times, and I think applies here is - well, who supports it? Where is the support coming from? Who is launching these initiatives? Do they have a history in this community? Is it external? Are these big-money interests who have a history of donating to causes and you can see their alignment with you or not? I think a lot of people are questioning, I know a lot of people are questioning that with the approval voting initiative. And the question about - do we want change? I think a lot of people are questioning, given some of the really big-money interests involved, is that - are they enacting change now to prevent further change? Is really one of the big questions, saying - Hey, we see the polling about where age groups are, where the increase of renters, where increasing number of people are not just getting more progressive, they're like, okay we gotta flip this system, and we need to fundamentally transform a lot of these systems that we're seeing. That is not a negligible percentage in Seattle and it's on the precipice - they can win City Council seats. We have a Socialist winning City Council seats, we have other very strong progressives winning City Council seats, and they're getting closer and closer to being able to win Mayor once again. And so I think that everyone sees that coming, and we're seeing a national movement in the same way that they see demographic shifts happening that makes it less likely that the Republican Party would maintain control without enacting legislation that limits things that expand the numbers of people who are enfranchised to vote. I think this is similar in that we see this change coming and it's unnatural - Let's make a change and make it sound progressive and do that - that's certainly what a lot of people are talking about. [00:21:25] Mike McGinn: I hear that, I hear that - but sometimes what people think they're doing and what they're actually doing aren't the same thing. And I would think about district elections in the City of Seattle. Do you remember who brought us district elections - turned out to be, it was Faye Garneau and it was Eugene Wasserman and - [00:21:46] Crystal Fincher: Wasserman - that's right. And another Ballard - [00:21:50] Mike McGinn: Yeah, and these were - they were business-aligned people who - I knew all of them, of course, 'cause they were really active in their communities and in ways that were positive, even if I didn't agree with - [00:22:10] Crystal Fincher: Positive and negative - I agreed with them on some stuff, disagreed on others. [00:22:12] Mike McGinn: Disagreed on others, but yeah - Eugene Wasserman didn't didn't like the bike lane on Nickerson - he represented the North Seattle Industrial Association. But he did appreciate - he was trying to, he was working to protect businesses in Ballard and that was his motivation and it was a fine motivation. But I think that - the reason I bring this up and I really do appreciate that those individuals - is that they were in some degree responding to the fact that the downtown business community had so much influences compared to the local, the business districts and business people outside of downtown. And it had that effect, but it also had the effect then of reducing the influence of the Chamber of Commerce, even though they're spending tons of money still - in fact, the reason they're spending more is 'cause they have to spend more to deal with the fact that somebody can get elected in a City Council race by knocking on a lot of doors and having a better grassroots effort and it costs less money. So I think that while they were hopeful it would lead in one direction, it actually led in a somewhat different direction. So I tend to look more closely at what would happen under approval voting than what might be the motivation. And I almost regret bringing up motivation because I think it puts people in a hard spot - I think what I was trying to get at earlier was, if you're campaigning for ranked-choice voting, are you okay with nothing getting through and we'll come back with ranked-choice voting later, or do you really want to get a Yes on the first vote and get it through. And I think the same thing is true of the approval voting advocates - are you okay with getting the Yes vote on the threshold question of, Should we change?, even if it means that ranked-choice voting comes in as opposed to what you prefer. And I think that that might change how either side approaches that threshold question in the case they make. Will they be more interested in saying what's wrong with the other guy's approach or the other person's approach, as opposed to really laying the groundwork for why we need a better system and why we should be looking at the two of them? [00:24:27] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think that's interesting. I also think - and I don't know how that's gonna turn out, I think it's gonna be fascinating to see what the goal is. I do think it's telling, looking at the strategy, that certainly approval voting felt more comfortable on the primary ballot than in the general just to get it over the finish line in a lower turnout election. I do, even on that one, I do think there's - I don't think the business community is a monolith. I absolutely think there's value in not letting our mega-corporations that happen to reside here dictate policy, because that does contradict what a lot of neighborhood business associations, local business associations, what small business wants, which - there are lots of small business organizations and Seattle Chamber organizations that support the JumpStart Tax - it has a ton of help in there for small businesses. However, Amazon has a different take on it. And so those interests are not often aligned. And while looking at the amount of businesses that are facing lease increases and citing that as a reason that they're going outta business, there is an income inequality conversation in the business community that is very similar to the one in the personal community. And I do think we should talk a lot more about that, just in general, 'cause those interests are not - they're not aligned and small businesses are increasingly saying we're being harmed by the practices and impacts of big corporations and what they're doing and the effects that their practices are having within the community. That said, we'll continue to follow this - I think it is gonna be a lively conversation and I do appreciate the points that you raise about it. And it is true - sometimes people think they're doing something and it turns out a little bit differently. So it'll be interesting to see. And I think - [00:26:35] Mike McGinn: I think it's a worthwhile debate too. I think this is a good debate to be had really between the two systems and I've heard points from both sides that are worthy - everybody's worthy of taking consideration of. I have to just say - I guess I'm just, as a pure primary voter in Seattle myself, I like the idea of being able to pick more than one person in a race or rank them in a race. I just like having a little more agency in this selection process than picking one outta seven or eight candidates and hoping that I made a good, hoping I made a strategic vote as opposed to being able to vote a little more with my heart. [00:27:16] Crystal Fincher: I also like the idea of having more agency. If I could choose between nothing, approval voting, or ranked-choice voting, I would choose ranked-choice voting. You mentioned politics likes black and white, but reality is in shades of gray. And to me that's another difference between approval voting and ranked-choice voting. And it allows you to know everybody - generally people don't like everyone equally, and you might have - oh, there's a couple who I really like and a number of others that aren't there, or a situation where the person who I like does not look viable and I do actually want progressive policy to pass. And that can be a different situation. But in just a binary approval - binary voting - like, Hey one Yes - you're only voting for one person and that's it. You do have to make additional considerations to say - my vote - I may be able to get maybe not my first choice, but my second choice across the finish line - they, I think, can win. But if I vote for this other person I'm really taking away a vote from the person who can win. With ranked-choice voting, you could say - I know my first choice may not be the person who is on top of the polls right now, but this is who I prefer, this is who my heart says to vote for, they're my number one. And my number two, if they don't make it, I can at least know that my vote wasn't wasted and not going towards a candidate who could take down the moderate-industrial complex. And my interests and where that would be, it would be - I can still have a number two and I know that my vote will still count and not go towards not getting a more aligned interest across the finish line. So I like - I have a ranking, I wanna reflect that ranking. It's my thing. [00:29:23] Mike McGinn: Okay. Where to next? [00:29:25] Crystal Fincher: Well, let's talk about this article that was written this week in The Seattle Times by Gary Warth - the cause of homelessness - it's not drugs, it's not mental illnesses. Researchers say it's the lack of homes, which probably if you're listening to this podcast, probably if you've been involved in this kind of policy for a while, you're going - okay, we knew this. But if you look at the general conversation of the public and what we see on the evening news and what we see in headlines in our local papers and the recall elections for progressive district attorneys going on, there certainly is a strong narrative countering that - oh, it's addiction. It's people who are just lawless and who can't follow the norms of society. It's people who are beyond help. It's a choice that people are making. And no, not everybody who is homeless is in that situation. The one thing that everyone who is homeless lacks is a home - that's the biggest issue. It seems obvious, but there are so many things that seem obvious that unfortunately are not believed by some powerful and big-money interests who can control a lot of narratives and characterizations. And so I think the more we talk about this, the better. [00:30:52] Mike McGinn: It's a - first of all, the authors of the book just deserve a lot of credit because they really dug into the data and what the data showed them. And it's one of those things that you really dig into the data and then you get to the finish line and it then sounds obvious. But the work matters when you do this, which is that - it turns out that there's not dramatic differences in mental illness or substance abuse rates amongst different cities. So the single most explanatory factor was housing prices. Detroit has extremely low housing prices because it's lost jobs and it's been a - people have been leaving town. Now this is a place where you'd think that addiction and mental health issues would be serious, right? People are struggling, people are dealing with hard things - but they don't have the homelessness issue because whatever means of support are out there for people are sufficient for them to afford housing in a way that's not true in Seattle. We have people in Seattle who are working and can't - and are living in their car, they can't cobble something together to get shelter. And I think we also forget the way in which it works in the opposite direction. That if you don't have housing, if you don't have stability in your life - to escape for a little while into alcohol or drugs - geez, those of us with housing and with an income don't mind having a glass of wine in the evening and forgetting everything and just enjoying the moment. What must it be like for somebody who's struggling on a day-to-day basis? And so it's - I think it's just this - we do this thing as humans where when we see misfortune fall upon another, we wanna try to figure out why it's occurring to them and not to us and so we look to some type of personal behavior factor. Well, that's happening to them because of something they did. And I'll - I won't do those things and it won't happen to me. And it blinds us, I think, to the larger systemic factors that - so I grew up in the New York area, I'm a little older, and I just remember people in New York explaining why they didn't get mugged. Because they had a unique set of walking in the city skills, in terms of being alert and looking around and exuding confidence and fearlessness. It's just, they're just making stuff up, right? They're just making stuff up - it is something that could happen to them if - in certain circumstances. I think we tend to do that - attribute our good fortune to our behavior and other people's bad fortune to their behavior, and in so doing blind ourselves to the systemic factors at play. So again, real kudos to the researchers here for saying - look, we've looked at the data, multiple cities - looked at all the potential causes. And the one thing that really has a high degree of correlation is housing prices between - correlation between homelessness rates and housing prices. And it also then becomes an excuse for us to not allow more housing, right? [00:34:11] Crystal Fincher: Yeah - to not act, to do anything to fix it. [00:34:14] Mike McGinn: Right. It also enables us to say - well, we don't have to fix this, we don't have to allow an apartment building or backyard cottages or mother-in-laws. We don't have to allow, we don't really - for some people, in this case, this would be more the well-off corporations in town - we don't have to pay more for affordable housing for people who live in a nice neighborhood. There'd be like - well, this is just a problem of individual behavior and my opposition to new housing in my neighborhood has nothing to do with this. And so it's just a way to blame the victims and avoid accountability and responsibility for the systems we've built. And again, real kudos to these researchers for laying it out and I hope more people can be moved by that and have the logic of that overcome, I think, what is just our human nature. I just hope we can rise above that. [00:35:13] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and we will link this book in the show notes - it's "Homelessness is a Housing Problem" with co-authors Clayton Page Aldern and Gregg Colburn, who've done a great job. And your point about - we love making excuses for why the things that we see with our eyes that are horrible problems that should not happen are things that we don't have a responsibility to help to fix, because someone did something wrong to wind up in that position. And it really reminds me, as we talk about COVID, as we're still in this pandemic - well, you didn't do this and you didn't do that. And someone's choosing to do this and either - well, this person can just choose to do something different. I don't need to take a precaution because I'm gonna be fine and if you don't feel like you're gonna be fine, you can choose to stay home. So that's a choice that you have and we don't have to take any other action in order to fix that. Or even with sexual assault - so frequently focuses on the actions of the woman. Well, what were you wearing? Why were you even in his hotel room or around him at that time? Did you lead him on? Well, you were out on the - why did you start to do anything with them? And it has nothing to do with the person who has been sexually assaulted - so the cause of rape is rapists. It's not anything that the woman is doing. It's the person who is perpetrating that sexual assault and our focus is so often in the wrong direction. Or victims of domestic violence - well, did you make him mad? Did you - what did you do? We're always looking for what someone did to wind up in that situation to basically justify why they deserve to be there, why they are not worthy as a person of anything better. And often that then goes to tying it - so since you are an unworthy person, since we have deemed you somehow immoral or undeserving, then you need to do these menial works and jump through all these hoops to prove to us - to basically purify and cleanse yourself back into worthiness again. And then - which is how we get means testing, it's how we get all of these programs that - well, you can't be in the condition that you are now, you're gonna have to clean up and take these classes and go to church service if you are going to be worthy of a spot in housing for us. Otherwise you're just kinda stuck out on the street. So it's - we have to get beyond blaming individuals for what research repeatedly shows are systemic problems. And this is a problem with homelessness, this is a problem with public safety, this is a problem with our public safety net, and issues like that. So I just - I'm happy this came out, I'm happy this is being exposed to more people. Lots of people when they encounter this are just immediately - obviously, this is the case. Or no, it's not - these people are choosing to be blah, blah, blah, blah, all the stuff. But there are people who are just like - okay well, I see that it's wrong. And if there is something that we can do to fix it, why wouldn't we do that? It's to all of our benefits. [00:38:37] Mike McGinn: And I think one of the things that deserves to be mentioned in here too is that stable housing turns out to be an extraordinarily great treatment for people with mental health or substance addiction issues. 'Cause I think another piece of just the throwing up of the hands - what can you do with somebody who has mental health issues who doesn't want housing? What can you do with somebody who's fallen into addictive patterns? We all know how hard it can be to change that behavior for an individual, whether it's a personal experience with people closer to us. Well, stable housing does a hell of a lot to help with that and that's - the data shows that as well - that that alone, without any other supportive services, can be extremely helpful to changing somebody's trajectory and how they deal with the world. [00:39:30] Crystal Fincher: You're absolutely right. You're absolutely right. [00:39:32] Mike McGinn: And lot more cost effective than the systems we have. [00:39:35] Crystal Fincher: Well, absolutely. The city of Houston in Texas - we know that Texas is dealing with a lot and their leadership has a lot of challenges. But Houston, Texas housed 25,000 unhomed people with a Housing First policy with exactly that - they know that housing is a stabilizer, they know that if we can get people into housing, it actually increases the likelihood that they can successfully address any other co-occurring complicating issue. Getting 25,000 people off the street in Houston, Texas - you're telling me Texas can do this and Seattle can't? Washington can't? We see these examples of success all around us and we're really willing to throw up our hands and say - Ugh, it is happening elsewhere but not here, but let's enact this sweep and invest all of this money into doing that when we know these people just wind up at another park, in another encampment, and further destabilized from this. It just doesn't make any sense and these things do need solutions, but we need to stop doing things that we know don't work and start moving towards where the mountains of evidence point to success. It is possible to do this. It is possible. [00:40:57] Mike McGinn: Well, it seems to me, you've segued into our third topic here. [00:41:00] Crystal Fincher: We have definitely segued into our third topic and it is - in the realm of public safety, as we were just talking about, this week news came out that Mayor Harrell wants to give cops an extra $30,000 to work in Seattle - an article in The Stranger written by Hannah Krieg talking about further investments in trying to address the shortage of police that Seattle is saying it has and trying to do this. And in this - one, there's lots of conversation about - is this even an effective intervention for the police hiring problem? Even if it was, this is - we can't hire cops and have them on the street for at least a year. This is a solution - even if this were to work to make people safer, even if - hey, this is what we need to do - this isn't a solution until late 2023, 2024. And we have gun violence escalating, we have all sorts of crimes and people being victimized, and people rightly justifiably saying - We need action taken now to make our streets safer, to make - to keep people's property from being broken into, to keep people from being victimized. And we keep talking about things like hiring police that have nothing to do with improving public safety today. And on top of that, this is coming on the heels of news that gun violence is extremely high - there was an article this week by Natalie Bicknell Argerious in The Urbanist. And also on news that Seattle is actually defunding an alternative response to public safety that actually was working and making people safer. The JustCare We Deliver Care program resulted in a 39% reduction in 911 calls - people on the ground are seeing things improve, there's less things happening that need intervention. This - if the police department was achieving these numbers, we would get that touted in every news release in the world, right? If any program was doing this. There was something that was working and it's being defunded. Why are we defunding public safety that works? I do not understand that - to then invest more in things that don't even have a chance to work for a year at best. It just is - I don't understand why we continue to invest in this. And the people in Seattle - we've seen that poll where when asked where - public safety is on the top of people's minds. And they're saying - what do you want done about it? If you could invest your money, where would it be? They're saying in behavioral health and addiction treatment services - treating the root cause of these issues. The people understand what is really needed and they understand the deficits, but it seems like we have this administration and several of them, frankly, that are just refusing to acknowledge or respond to that. [00:44:21] Mike McGinn: I would love to see the City Council hold hearings on and bring in experts on what are the most effective ways to reduce shootings and look at this from multiple perspectives. 'Cause what you see is when shootings go up or when crime goes up, it's just the pounding the fist on the table of we need more police. And we spend so much on police and we see where we're at. Let's try, let's really try the spending on the other things. I was looking at the statistics on this - the number of young people that are showing up in emergency rooms with gunshot wounds has just skyrocketed in King County. And what happened to the youth violence prevention initiatives that were started under Greg Nickels, expanded under - during my administration. We've had a lot of reporting on the number of police officers, or 911 response times, or why the police are unhappy and disgruntled, and whose fault it is that the police feel underappreciated? Is that the fault of the public for protesting or the fault of the City Council for suggesting that things should be defunded? Just 10% of that ink was spilled on what works to reduce shootings - okay, I'll ask for 50% of the ink be spilled on that. What really works? What are the proven programs? What's not working? And putting some of that pressure on the elected officials to show progress on this. And I think that the debate of number of police officers, and again, I believe personally that you do want an officer to respond in a timely way to a crisis, but that's not the only function of policing and it's certainly not the only thing of public safety. We also see - not surprising during a pandemic where people's lives were turned upside down, where people were stuck at home - we've seen a rise in domestic violence. So what are the strategies here? What would effective interventions look like? And I don't have an answer to that off the top of my head, but I tell you - if I were in this position, whether City Council or Mayor, that's what I'd be calling people in. Not debating the size of the bonus, right? And the amount of time we've spent in hearings on this question - 'cause it plays, I get it, it plays. But really calling folks in. And I think I'm repeating myself here, but this is a great place for Mayor Harrell to call a summit across the spectrum. What will it take to do this and call in the people in the City who are on the frontlines of working with youth, working with those in distress, working with domestic violence victims - and really just let's get all of the strategies on the table and let's start putting price tags to those. Tell me the programs that you think are working, tell me the programs that you think we don't have, tell me the programs you think that are not as effective as they could be, right? Or just tell me your needs and we'll invent a program for that need. This is the time really and it's - when there's a crisis like this and it is a crisis - the number of shootings in the City is a crisis. When you have this many gunshots, when you have this many people being wounded, there's a lot of pressure on elected officials to have the answer, to come forward - I've got something for you. But the danger of that is, is if you come forward and you say - I have an answer and we're gonna do this thing - it may work in the moment with the media or with the voters - Oh okay, well he's acting on it or she's acting on it. But if it doesn't actually change the trajectory of the issue, then it's just gonna come back around and get you as an elected official a couple of years later. And that's - and will also the effect the issues of trust in government and right track/wrong track. And we already have a lack of trust in institutions - the right track/wrong track numbers nationwide are horrible, last mayoral election they were terrible in this City. I don't see anything that's turned that around. And so this is a place where if you're gonna build trust and start moving those, start moving more people - those right track/wrong track numbers to a better place - this is really - this is not the time for - I've got the answer that plays well today in the media. This is the time for - I've got an answer that's gonna work over a longer term. So, public safety summit - pull everybody in and make it real, not for the cameras, make it real, make it multiple sessions and really come out with a series of initiatives around that - would be my recommendation to the mayor. And the City Council can jumpstart that by holding in-depth hearings on these topics - topic at a time, bring in the experts, really start building the pressure for looking at this. [00:49:49] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think that's really important. And I think your point about - look, this is not for the cameras. This is not the time to score political points. You can take it completely out of the political realm. It doesn't have to be where the mayor's at versus where the council is at. We happen to have a wonderful university smack dab in the middle of Seattle - more than one. And the University of Washington is a tremendous research university with criminologists who study this, whose job it is to look at the data. And as we talk, and as Mayor Harrell talks about how important it is to examine the data about what works - public safety is broader than just policing, it's broader than just community response. It involves a lot and to have people and to always include the voice of people who are truly experts on public safety and everything that encompasses - that's not an interview with the police actually, in the same way it's not the interview with a councilmember or an interview with the mayor. That's an interview with experts in crime and what reduces crime. And experts in safety and what increases that. So why do we not see criminologists quoted more frequently in The Times or interviewed by our evening news? Why are we not seeing that happen more frequently - that to your point - we have hearings and interviews and advisory groups and summits with people who are truly experts who understand and can share what is working across the country. What is working globally? What has worked locally and what is not working? What kinds of results, what kind of investment, what kind of return are we getting financially and in terms of safety and benefit to the community? I get frustrated that we keep this conversation so small and so limited and just this tiny focus in and repeated focus, unfortunately, right now on - well hiring, just hiring and there's so much more to it than that. Even if that is an ingredient, there's so much more to it that we just are ignoring while people are dying, while people are being victimized, while there's problems getting worse. And it's time someone actually steps up - just take this out of the political realm, talk to the experts and act. [00:52:21] Mike McGinn: I would include - when I say experts, I would include the community members who are - I think this is really important. [00:52:29] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. [00:52:29] Mike McGinn: I think this is something we have to remember - that police are not the only guardians of the community. There are lots of people in communities who are acting as guardians - not in the sense of walking around with a gun and the opportunity and the monopoly on the use of force. No, in the sense of we care about the people here, we're trying to figure out how to help young people mature and get good jobs, in terms of we're trying to make sure that our neighbors are fed, that we're welcoming new immigrants into the community and helping set them on their feet and move forward. There are all of these people who really dedicated themselves to the idea that their community should be a better and stronger place. And they are - they have a lot of knowledge. They have a lot of knowledge and are experts as well in this regard. And bringing them in - and I think that's something we forget - is that public safety is a partnership between all of the guardians of the community. And when we're in this situation right now where - and this is one of the reasons why excessive use of force by police, or biased policing, or let's be really clear - or the public calling for biased policing, right? There are elements of the public that are calling for - we need to move the homeless out of downtown. Or I see somebody in my neighborhood who doesn't look like he belongs, which often means that they might be a Black person walking through a white neighborhood. All of these things where the public calls upon the police to do these things - that breaks down trust between community and police. And I think that's another piece of that - of restoring the partnership - it's why the police department needs to be different than how it is. And it's critical to success. And I think this reliance on policing as the guardians of the community is just destined to failure because it's just not how the world works. We don't - policing alone does not keep community safe. It cannot keep community safe by itself, yet that's the discussion we have when public safety comes up and we don't have a meaningful discussion about all the other elements. [00:54:55] Crystal Fincher: I completely agree. So we will continue to keep an eye on what's happening at the City. I hope the conversation does expand. I do completely agree with your call for a summit - bring in experts from within communities in Seattle, make use of the experts at the University of Washington, and get down to what actually does make people more safe. And goodness, don't defund things that we have wonderful evidence are doing the exact kinds of things that people are calling for to happen that make people more safe. And that frankly reduce the workload for SPD. We talk about a 39% reduction in 911 calls at a time when 911 calls are being cited for a reason that police, that Seattle police, are not investigating sexual assaults, they're not processing rape kits. This is a crisis. Why in the world would we defund something that is helping and making that more possible? It just seems like we are determined to run in the wrong direction to placate people's sense of retribution through punitive solutions that really are just backfiring in a way that won't be good politically. This is not the kind of record you wanna run on - what's going right now - you wanna have something that you can say - we did invest in the things that were working and it's paying off. And so it'll just be interesting to see how this conversation evolves. [00:56:35] Mike McGinn: And one of the articles you referenced at the beginning here, which is the police alternative program called We Deliver Care - that's exactly what we're talking about. These are people acting as guardians of the community, who aren't police officers but through their relationship with people who are experiencing homelessness or that are in distress - yeah, they've reduced 911 calls because they are able to deal with it through the services they directly provide. Yeah, this is - let's just put aside whether you're compassionate or not compassionate, whether you think one approach, where your ideology starts about what you think is the right thing or not. If this is delivering better results for less money, let's - maybe that'll move you, right? If this is delivering results, then let's do this. And that's I think what the We Deliver Care folks have been showing 'cause it's expensive to respond to 911 calls. It's expensive and if we can free up those officers for other work - solving crimes, getting through the backlog of cases that they need to investigate, breaking up burglary rings, breaking up theft rings - there's work that police can do that they're better suited for. And for people who are dealing with folks that are homeless - that are in distress and need help - let's get the right people for the job for that too. [00:58:08] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And with that, we thank you for listening to Hacks & Wonks on this Friday, July 15th, 2022. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistant producers Shannon Cheng and Bryce Cannatelli. Today, we are thankful that our cohost Mike McGinn, who is an activist community leader, former mayor of Seattle and current Director of America Walks - you should totally follow America Walks, great work happening - he's here. We're thankful that he was here with us today. You can find Mike on Twitter @mayormcginn. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, and now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever podcasts are - we are there. Just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar, be sure to subscribe to get the full versions of our midweek show and our Friday almost-live shows delivered to your podcast feed. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

KUOW Newsroom
Fleet Foxes, festivals in West Seattle and Ballard should make for a stunning music weekend in Seattle

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 5:29


Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times music writer Michael Rietmulder about his live music picks for the weekend.

Green Industry Podcast
Attorney Daniel Barham Interview

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 26:16


On today's episode our special guest is attorney Daniel Barham. Helping co-host today's show is Jeremiah Jennings from the Growing Green Landscapes Podcast. Daniel was one of the guest speakers at the 2022 Together in the Trades event in Nashville, Tennessee and on today's show Daniel recaps what he talked about at the event. The eye-opening information Daniel shares about is important for small business owners to consider to protect their businesses and family.  The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com GetJobber.com/Paul Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online   Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers   Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our guest: https://b-m.law/attorneys

David Jackson Productions
Mind Your Business - Senator Deanna Ballard - NC State Budget & Impact on Watauga County

David Jackson Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 28:02


North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper signed the proposed FY22 NC State Budget into law recently. How does this budget specifically impact Watauga County? This week's Mind Your Business features NC Senator Deanna Ballard, who represents Watauga County in the State legislature, and was very involved in crafting this year's spending plan. Hear details about what this budget means on a State-wide level in terms of allocations and savings plans for the year ahead. We'll also hear about budget impacts for State employees and educators as well as the allocations for numerous Watauga County agencies and interests.Mind Your Business is produced weekly by the Boone Area Chamber of Commerce in partnership with High Country Radio. This podcast is sponsored by Appalachian Commercial Real Estate, providing sales, leasing, consulting, and appraisal services to users of commercial real estate in the High Country.Support the show

Green Industry Podcast
Growing Pains: A Business Owner's Guide to Starting a Lawn Care Business w/ Aaron Strunk

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 30:49


In today's episode friend of the show Aaron Strunk from Aaron's Lawn Care returns. Aaron has shared his lawn care business journey on the show before but today Aaron explains some of the growing pains he is currently going through as he is building his business. Aaron talks about how he is positioning his systems, processes, vehicle and equipment in efforts to become as efficient and profitable as possible.  GetJobber.com/Paul The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online   Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers   Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our guest: @aarons_lawncare

Daily Prophet: Talks from leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
President Ballard: Missionary Service Blessed My Life Forever (Apr 2022)

Daily Prophet: Talks from leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 14:49


I pray that you young men and young women and your parents will see and know how missionary service will forever bless your life.

Green Industry Podcast
Best Tips to Upselling Service to Existing Customers w/ Cody Owen

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 43:42


In today's episode special guest Cody Owen shares some tips on how to increase revenue by upselling services to existing customers. Cody shares practical strategies of how to market upsell. Cody loves marketing and thinks now is the time to start upselling services for the fall.  Cody Owen is the owner at Lightspeed Social Agency. At Lightspeed, they implement hyper-local strategies to create density in your routine service areas. They are not blasting zip codes or a whole suburb - they help multiply your efforts to dominate individual neighborhoods. This is how they grow your business faster and more profitably. Connect with Cody: Lightspeed YouTube Channel lightspeedsocialagency.com   The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online   Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers   Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast

Green Industry Podcast
This is How to Transform Your Business w/ Eric Triplett The Pond Digger

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 34:29


On today's program our special guest is The Pond Digger Eric Triplett. The Pond Digger owns a nationally recognized construction company specializing in Koi Ponds and Disappearing Waterfall Supplies. The Pond Digger specializes in constructing ecologically friendly, low-maintenance water features for fish and aquatic plants, but more importantly, for people! Information, Education and Inspiration is the backbone of Eric's company. He can't get enough and in today's show he talks about how he can't GIVE enough. He believes this is why his organization is recognized year after year (for more than two decades now) as one of the countries cutting edge waterscape and design construction companies. Tune in to hear how Eric's transformed his business and his advice for how you can transform your business too!   Connect with Eric Triplett: twtcontractorcoaching.com   The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online   Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers   Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison   Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison   Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison   Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast

Green Industry Podcast
Interview with Lawn Care Business Owner Lamont Hairston

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 44:17


In today's episode special guests Lamont Hairston from Hairston Property Management and Ben Neyman from Ben Neyman Lawn Care join host Paul Jamison in downtown Nashville to share how their season is going. This interview took place at the 2022 Together in the Trades event. This episode is full of laughs and Ben and Lamont share their strategies for how they are managing their lawn care business in the face of inflation, rising gas prices and increasing expenses.  The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guests: @hairstonpropertymanagementllc @ben_neyman_lawncare__llc

Green Industry Podcast
The Missing Ingredient in Most Marriages w/ Jeff Joiner

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 28:19


In today's episode special guest Jeff Joiner shares the missing ingredient in your marriage. Jeff summarizes the talk he gave at the 2022 Together in the Trades event in Nashville, Tennessee. Whether you are single or married this important message from Jeff will help improve your marriage or future marriage if you are single.  The Resource Center at GreenIndustryPodcast.com Register for the 2022 Equip Exposition here:  Equip Exposition Registration (Coupon Code: PAUL saves 50% off) GetJobber.com/Paul Get Roll by ADP The Landscaping Bookkeepers Website Services: Pure Marketing Team Kujo.com (Pauls10 Saves 10%) Ballard-inc.com (Coupon Code: PAUL Saves 10%) Quickbooks Online Paul's Audiobooks: Cut That Grass and Make That Cash 101 Proven Ways to Increase Efficiency and Make More Money in Lawn Care Best Business Practices for Landscapers Follow us on YouTube: Green Industry Podcast Paul Jamison Follow us on Instagram: @greenindustrypodcast @pauljamison Follow us on TikTok: @pauljamison Follow us on Facebook: @greenindustrypodcast Connect with our Guests: @jeffreyjoiner

10% Happier with Dan Harris
470: An Episode About Anger | Jacoby Ballard

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 70:34 Very Popular


In this episode, the social justice educator and activist Jacoby Ballard talks about a universal, or near universal, issue: anger. And, he offers us two mental skills that can help channel anger into something even more powerful and effective. Those skills are forgiveness and equanimity. Ballard is a meditation and yoga teacher and the author of a new book called, A Queer Dharma: Yoga and Meditations for LiberationContent Warnings: There are some brief references to sensitive topics, including trauma and suicide. In this episode we talk about: How he went from an activist largely fueled by anger to a dharma teacher with a very different approachThe sometimes useful role of anger in activism and the danger of being stuck in anger modeThe subtle but powerful move of getting in touch with what is beneath our angerUsing annoyance as a jumping off point for inner investigationWays to work with anger and learning to discharge the energy in our body Forgiveness, including forgiving ourselvesGetting over our need to be rightEquanimity, or as Jacoby calls it, his “tussle with equanimity”Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/jacoby-ballard-470See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.