Podcasts about Food

Substances consumed as nutrition

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Latest podcast episodes about Food

Wally Show Podcast
A Patriotic Moment You Were a Part of: December 2, 2021

Wally Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 46:22


TWS News 1: Outdated Trends – 00:33 Finish Each Other's Sandwiches Game – 4:14 What's Appening: FIXD – 9:38 TWS News 2: Giving Tuesday – 13:07 A Patriotic Moment You Were a Part of – 15:42 Christmas Music Story – 20:46 TWS News 3: iPad Groom – 24:08 Am I Weird Because – 27:08 What This Song Needs – 32:59 Least of These: Travel Fail Tweets – 36:53 Something Good from Covid – 38:46 You can sponsor a child through Food for the Hungry at www.fh.org/wallyshow You can join our Wally Show Poddies Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/WallyShowPoddies/.

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU
Worst of The RIOT for December 2, 2021

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 45:39


Hudson and Nikki discuss the perks of growing a beard and why it may be the healthier option. They also discuss the most popular pet names of 2021. Debt collectors in DMs, suing Folgers, deodorant recalls, and more on this episode of the Worst of The RIOT.

Wally Show Podcast
Aftercast: Pastor Chad's Celtic Prayer: December 2, 2021

Wally Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 28:21


Pastor Chad read a Celtic prayer at our party last night, a WWII bomb exploded next to a construction sight in Europe, Alec Baldwin claims that he never pulled the trigger in the drama surrounding a prop gun being fired on set, and we talk about the things that we never expected to be so expensive. You can sponsor a child through Food for the Hungry at www.fh.org/wallyshow You can join our Wally Show Poddies Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/WallyShowPoddies/.

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND
The Day Of Unpopular Christmas Songs

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 118:12


Pre-Friday with Elvis Duran and The Morning Show! Have you ever received a big check from a class action lawsuit?!?! What Christmas song do you HATE but EVERYONE else loves? Thursday also bring us Froggy's Food news. The show played a game with each other "Holiday Spelling Bee" Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Catholic Man Show
Advent Traditions

The Catholic Man Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 69:41


How do you prepare for Christmas during the Advent season? What are some of your family traditions? How do you keep your children focused on Christmas during the holiday madness? Let's chat. http://www.patreon.com/thecatholicmanshow (Become a Patron! Over 40 interviews, a course with Karlo Broussard, a 10 part series on the domestic church, a course on fitness and virtue by Pat Flynn, and free thank you gifts for supporting the show!) https://selectinternationaltours.com/catholicmanshow/ () Travel to Italy, the Holy Land, Scotland, or Europe. Take a Catholic pilgrimage cruise or mix in Faith and Food or Faith and Fitness. No matter where you travel with Select, you will be embraced by faith. All our trips feature daily mass, unparalleled access to sacred sites, local guides that speak your language, and excellent accommodations. We have been helping pilgrims put their feet in the places their faith began for over 30 years. We want to help YOU experience the fun and faith-enriching power of pilgrimage. https://selectinternationaltours.com/catholicmanshow/ (Click here) About our drink: https://thewhiskeywash.com/tag/kentucky-owl/ (Kentucky Owl) - Wiseman Bourbon The new bourbon is described as a blend of Kentucky Owl 4-year-old wheat and high-rye bourbons, along with 5 ½-year and 8 ½-year-old Kentucky-sourced bourbons. “The Wiseman Bourbon is an artful balance of soft wheat and spicy high-rye that provides a smooth but complex bourbon designed to drink neat, on the rocks or in a cocktail,” said John Rhea, Kentucky Owl master blender, in a prepared statement. “The product leads with a beautiful caramel flavor and aroma followed by notes of allspice, citrus fruit and a nudge of oak.” About our gear: Vices. What are some of the best vices to buy on the market? Also, David tells a crazy story of how he acquired his new vice. Here's what https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/tools/g37133758/best-bench-vises/ (popular mechanic)s has to say on the best vices to buy. About the Topic: How do you prepare for Christmas during the Advent season? What are some of your family traditions? How do you keep your children focused on Christmas during the holiday madness? We talk about that and more in this week's episode. CONGRATULATIONS TO The Catholic Woodworker FOR OPENING UP A NEW OFFICE BUILDING! WE ARE GRATEFUL FOR YOUR SUPPORT AND INCREDIBLY HAPPY FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUCCESS: Use promo code TCMS10 for 10% off all purchases. https://catholicwoodworker.com/collections/discount-rosaries () [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVOPTlueXyE] TIME CODES: If this is your first time listening to The Catholic Man Show, we do 3 things almost every episode:1.) Open, review, and enjoy a man beverage – Minutes 1-12.2.) Highlight a man gear – Minutes 12-24.3.) Have a manly conversation – Minutes 24-48If you haven't listened to The Catholic Man Show before, check out our previous episodes https://thecatholicmanshow.com/episodes/ (here). Subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5MhmMZZhEnrapVYUIkFHLg?view_as=subscriber ( YouTube channel) to watch past episodes. Want to help The Catholic Man Show? By giving us a rating on https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-catholic-man-show/id1128843873?mt=2 (iTunes, it helps others find the show.) Want to say up with The Catholic Man Show? Sign up for our mailing list: http://www.thecatholicmanshow.com/manly (Click Here) Looking for a prayer to pray with your wife? https://thecatholicmanshow.com/blog/looking-for-a-prayer-to-pray-with-your-wife-print-this-off-and-start-praying/ (Check this blog out.) Are you getting our emails? Sign up for our newsletter where we give you all bacon content – never spam.  http://thecatholicmanshow.com/manly/ (SIGN UP HERE:) https://thecatholicmanshow.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/tcms-email-ss.png () If you enjoyed this episode of The Catholic Man Show and are... Support this podcast

Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu
7 of the BEST Health TIPS of ALL TIME From the Worlds Leading Health Experts

Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 54:38


Check out our sponsors: Athletic Greens: Go to athleticgreens.com/impact and receive a FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase! BLUblox: Go to blublox.com/impacttheory for 15% off your order or use discount code ImpactTheory at checkout.Aura Frames: Go to auraframes.com and use code IMPACT to save $30. InsideTracker: Get 25% off their entire store at insidetracker.com/impacttheory Ombre Lab: tryombre.com/ImpactYou understand the importance of being healthy. No one ever strives for sickness and suboptimal health conditions. There is no shortage of advice, tips, tricks and hacks for your health. Sleep more, eat this, don't eat that, lift this, run more, drink more water, it feels like too much. Let's break this down and keep it as simple and relevant as possible to help you optimize your overall health. David Sinclair is sharing 3 levels to help you reset your biological clock. Dr. Rahul Jundial is explaining how to intermittent fast while understanding the effect food has on your mind. Liz Josefsberg, Dr Steven Gundry and Dr. Alan Goldhamer simplify food's relationship with your brain and gut health. Shawn Stevenson brings everything together to emphasize why diet and exercise amount to nothing without knowing how to sleep smarter. Check Out The Full Episodes Included Here:David Sinclair: https://youtu.be/IEz1P4i1P7sMike Mutzel: https://youtu.be/dNzCt2bzyqgRahul Jundial: https://youtu.be/x29hY6_8bDgLiz Josefsberg: https://youtu.be/YuR51ktq1k8Dr. Steven Gundry: https://youtu.be/Uklt4zVVtS0Dr. Alan Goldhamer https://youtu.be/5RT4qIO27uwShawn Stevenson: https://youtu.be/4Mtw3vBQYOg SHOW NOTES: 0:00 | Introduction Health Tips0:29 | Tip #1 Reset Your Biological Clock7:37 | Tip #2 Enhance Autophagy14:01 | Tip #3 Intermittently Fast22:07 | Tip #4 Better Relationships with Food30:29 | Tip #5 Improve Your Gut Health37:46 | Tip #6 Watch Your Salt Intake43:10 | Tip #7 Sleep better QUOTES: “We evolved to stay healthy and alive and fit to wear 40. And then the forces of natural selection decline after that” David Sinclair [2:04] “We need to realize that certainly our body can have perturbations, but it doesn't mean you're always going to manifest symptoms of that [...] the body and the mind and the diet and lifestyle are so powerful.” Mike Mutzel [12:35] “Food affects mind, food affects brain with that premise, we can talk about, okay, mine diet will hold off dementia, and intermittent fasting might make you feel like you've had a cup of coffee” Rahul Jundial [15:59] “Aging, to me, is either the quick or slow breakdown of the gut wall.” Steven Gundry [30:31] “When you think about the five pounds of bacteria that live in your gut, it may not be too good an idea to put too much of a preservative into that gut because it will alter the microflora” Alan Goldhamer [40:56] “Our sleep quality is more important than our diet and exercise combined. What it does for our health and also literally our physical appearance. Fascinating stuff how much more fat you lose when you get optimal sleep.” Shawn Stevenson [44:45] Follow Liz Josefsburg: https://www.lizjosefsberg.com/Follow Rahul Jundial: https://www.cityofhope.org/people/jandial-rahulFollow Shawn Stevenson: https://themodelhealthshow.com/Follow David Sinclair: https://sinclair.hms.harvard.edu/Follow Mike Mutzel: https://highintensityhealth.com/Follow Dr. Alan Goldhamer: https://www.healthpromoting.com/Follow Dr. Steven Gundry: https://gundrymd.com/

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu
7 of the BEST Health TIPS of ALL TIME From the Worlds Leading Health Experts

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 54:38


Check out our sponsors: Athletic Greens: Go to athleticgreens.com/impact and receive a FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase! BLUblox: Go to blublox.com/impacttheory for 15% off your order or use discount code ImpactTheory at checkout.Aura Frames: Go to auraframes.com and use code IMPACT to save $30. InsideTracker: Get 25% off their entire store at insidetracker.com/impacttheory Ombre Lab: tryombre.com/ImpactYou understand the importance of being healthy. No one ever strives for sickness and suboptimal health conditions. There is no shortage of advice, tips, tricks and hacks for your health. Sleep more, eat this, don't eat that, lift this, run more, drink more water, it feels like too much. Let's break this down and keep it as simple and relevant as possible to help you optimize your overall health. David Sinclair is sharing 3 levels to help you reset your biological clock. Dr. Rahul Jundial is explaining how to intermittent fast while understanding the effect food has on your mind. Liz Josefsberg, Dr Steven Gundry and Dr. Alan Goldhamer simplify food's relationship with your brain and gut health. Shawn Stevenson brings everything together to emphasize why diet and exercise amount to nothing without knowing how to sleep smarter. Check Out The Full Episodes Included Here:David Sinclair: https://youtu.be/IEz1P4i1P7sMike Mutzel: https://youtu.be/dNzCt2bzyqgRahul Jundial: https://youtu.be/x29hY6_8bDgLiz Josefsberg: https://youtu.be/YuR51ktq1k8Dr. Steven Gundry: https://youtu.be/Uklt4zVVtS0Dr. Alan Goldhamer https://youtu.be/5RT4qIO27uwShawn Stevenson: https://youtu.be/4Mtw3vBQYOg SHOW NOTES: 0:00 | Introduction Health Tips0:29 | Tip #1 Reset Your Biological Clock7:37 | Tip #2 Enhance Autophagy14:01 | Tip #3 Intermittently Fast22:07 | Tip #4 Better Relationships with Food30:29 | Tip #5 Improve Your Gut Health37:46 | Tip #6 Watch Your Salt Intake43:10 | Tip #7 Sleep better QUOTES: “We evolved to stay healthy and alive and fit to wear 40. And then the forces of natural selection decline after that” David Sinclair [2:04] “We need to realize that certainly our body can have perturbations, but it doesn't mean you're always going to manifest symptoms of that [...] the body and the mind and the diet and lifestyle are so powerful.” Mike Mutzel [12:35] “Food affects mind, food affects brain with that premise, we can talk about, okay, mine diet will hold off dementia, and intermittent fasting might make you feel like you've had a cup of coffee” Rahul Jundial [15:59] “Aging, to me, is either the quick or slow breakdown of the gut wall.” Steven Gundry [30:31] “When you think about the five pounds of bacteria that live in your gut, it may not be too good an idea to put too much of a preservative into that gut because it will alter the microflora” Alan Goldhamer [40:56] “Our sleep quality is more important than our diet and exercise combined. What it does for our health and also literally our physical appearance. Fascinating stuff how much more fat you lose when you get optimal sleep.” Shawn Stevenson [44:45] Follow Liz Josefsburg: https://www.lizjosefsberg.com/Follow Rahul Jundial: https://www.cityofhope.org/people/jandial-rahulFollow Shawn Stevenson: https://themodelhealthshow.com/Follow David Sinclair: https://sinclair.hms.harvard.edu/Follow Mike Mutzel: https://highintensityhealth.com/Follow Dr. Alan Goldhamer: https://www.healthpromoting.com/Follow Dr. Steven Gundry: https://gundrymd.com/

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
David Chang gets very honest with us

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 36:40


Today, we'll spend the show with food personality David Chang to talk about his new Hulu series, "The Next Thing You Eat," which — full disclosure — our host Gustavo Arellano appears in. We'll discuss what David found, why he thinks Southern California is such a great place for food, and also the future of the food industry in the era of COVID-19.He also has a raw conversation about how the harsh working conditions in restaurants can be improved, and about his own anger.More reading:Watch "The Next Thing You Eat" on HuluDavid Chang on restaurants and his own life: ‘The old ways just don't work anymore'David Chang doesn't want your compliments

Dad's Kitchen
112: BEVERAGES - Hot Chocolate

Dad's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 16:37


Forget the Swiss Miss! Chris and Phil discuss the world's greatest hot chocolate recipe, an even better homemade whipped cream, and a family tradition that is sure to get you in the holiday spirit. Follow Dad's Kitchen: @dadskitchenco

A New Beginning with Greg Laurie
The Refreshing Power of the Word of God: Spiritual Nourishment

A New Beginning with Greg Laurie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 25:04


Ever been so hungry you felt weak? Not just hunger pangs, not just in a “hangry” mood. You actually felt sluggish and powerless. Food is at the top of your mind. Well, we can start to feel weak spiritually . . . but so many times our spiritual food ISN'T at the top of our minds. Today on A NEW BEGINNING, Pastor Greg Laurie points out just what God's Word does for the weary traveler on the road of life. We'll see it gives us actual power for living. And we shouldn't deprive ourselves. View and subscribe to Pastor Greg's weekly notes. --- Learn more and subscribe to Harvest updates at harvest.org. A New Beginning is the daily half-hour program hosted by Greg Laurie, pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Southern California. For over 30 years, Pastor Greg and Harvest Ministries have endeavored to know God and make Him known through media and large-scale evangelism. This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Up Next In Commerce
Burger King's Head of CX On What It Takes to Bring the Best Experience to Quick-Service Restaurant Customers That Goes Beyond the Drive-Through

Up Next In Commerce

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 36:11


Picture this: You're driving down the road and you see a familiar sign that gets your stomach grumbling, so you quickly pull into the drive-through, place an order and, within minutes, you're enjoying a tasty bite of what you were craving. That's not a hard scenario to imagine. Odds are, we've all gone through that exact sequence of events in our lives. And that's great for those businesses, and even for other stores where the foot traffic drives people in to shop. But that kind of customer isn't the only one you should be relying on. Smart operators know that there are huge portions of the population who don't often find themselves in those serendipitous moments when they can make that impulsive decision to buy something on the spot. Angelo Frigo is one of those smart operators, and as the head of customer experience at Burger King, he is trying to move beyond the drive-through and reach customers in new, exciting ways — particularly online and through Burger King's digital app. On this episode of Up Next in Commerce, Angelo and I go into some of the ways businesses can think about targeting and engaging with customers outside of in-person and spur-of-the-moment experiences.  Plus, we also dug into Angelo's background, which is fascinating, and includes stops at McDonald's, Feeding America, and even the White House. Enjoy this episode!Main Takeaways:A Bigger Burden: In the government sector, customer experience is often boiled down to measuring the “burden” of something. And, thanks to an old school definition, “burden” is sometimes thought of literally as paperwork. So, reducing “burden” means reducing paperwork. As a result, the customer experience when dealing with government agencies hasn't been optimized in all the ways we're used to. Part of improving the customer experience at the government level begins with simply redefining what is included in the experience, and then removing friction at all points.Moving Beyond The Drive-Thru: Expanding reach beyond the drive-thru is one of the main areas of focus for chains like Burger King, which are attempting to market to people who traditionally only buy from quick-service restaurants when they see them close by and it becomes top of mind. To combat that, chains need to develop digital apps and ordering services with profiles, personalization, and creative marketing, design, and participation opportunities.Testing, Testing: It's important to think outside the box in all areas of the business. In the app space, you should look outside your industry for ideas and inspiration rather than copying what's most trendy or what's working with your immediate competition. Then create prototypes and test ideas whether that's with customers or with team members at all levels across your company.For an in-depth look at this episode, check out the full transcript below. Quotes have been edited for clarity and length.---Up Next in Commerce is brought to you by Salesforce Commerce Cloud. Respond quickly to changing customer needs with flexible Ecommerce connected to marketing, sales, and service. Deliver intelligent commerce experiences your customers can trust, across every channel. Together, we're ready for what's next in commerce. Learn more at salesforce.com/commerce---For a full transcript of this interview, click here.

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Lower Blood Pressure the Natural Way | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 47:35


Did you know that people with high blood pressure can often experience dramatic improvement by eating certain foods?   Dr. Neal Barnard reveals the best foods to lower high blood pressure when he joins "The Weight Loss Champion" Chuck Carroll on The Exam Room LIVE. Plus, they discuss the foods to avoid when treating hypertension, whether high blood pressure can be genetically driven, how big of a role table salt plays, and whether foods marketed as healthy can still contribute to elevated blood pressure.   Dr. Barnard also discusses the Omicron variant of the coronavirus and how it may be possible that a plant based diet could reduce the risk of becoming severely infected.   Chuck has details on a study about a special juice that is being shown to reduce inflammation.   This episode of The Exam Room™ Podcast is sponsored by The Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund, which supports organizations like the Physicians Committee that carry on Greg's passion and love for animals through rescue efforts, veganism, and wildlife conservation.   — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — Chuck Carroll Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/drnealbarnard Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB Your Body In Balance: https://amzn.to/2UvAfxW — — — 21-Day Vegan Kickstart App iOS: https://bit.ly/VegKStrt-iOS Android: https://bit.ly/VegKStrtAndrd Web: https://www.pcrm.org/kickstart — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

Harvest: Greg Laurie Audio
The Refreshing Power of the Word of God: Spiritual Nourishment

Harvest: Greg Laurie Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 25:04


Ever been so hungry you felt weak? Not just hunger pangs, not just in a “hangry” mood. You actually felt sluggish and powerless. Food is at the top of your mind. Well, we can start to feel weak spiritually . . . but so many times our spiritual food ISN'T at the top of our minds. Today on A NEW BEGINNING, Pastor Greg Laurie points out just what God's Word does for the weary traveler on the road of life. We'll see it gives us actual power for living. And we shouldn't deprive ourselves. View and subscribe to Pastor Greg's weekly notes. --- Learn more and subscribe to Harvest updates at harvest.org. A New Beginning is the daily half-hour program hosted by Greg Laurie, pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Southern California. For over 30 years, Pastor Greg and Harvest Ministries have endeavored to know God and make Him known through media and large-scale evangelism. This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Her Vibe Is Pretty
88. Ways to Heal Your Relationship to FOOD | Part 2 ✌

Her Vibe Is Pretty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 42:35


CLICK HERE for more deets on + to enroll in Diet Culture Dropout!Use code PRETTYVIBETRIBE by December 8th, 2021 to receive an extra $50 off!https://www.sarahjeanharken.com/diet-culture-dropoutWelcome to the Q&A (Part 2) on Your Relationship to Food with Sarah! Refer to the outline below to find out what topics where discussed. Per usual, a lot more wisdom poured out beyond the basic answer

Proof
So What Do You Feed the Dead?

Proof

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 30:53


Around the world and throughout history, we've celebrated the departed with rituals that involve food. Pharaohs were buried with feasts. We pour out drinks in honor of fallen friends and family. But the precision and thought that Zoroastrian priest Marziban Hathiram puts into preparing meals for the departed is in a league of its own. Author Varud Gupta takes us through the intricacies of the stum death ritual in Gujarat, India, and walks us through what foods are--and aren't--appropriate for the afterlife.Read more of Varud's journey in his book, Bagwaan Ke Pakwaan: Food of the Gods.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rut and River Pursuits Podcast
Friends-Giving 2021 - R2's In The Current

Rut and River Pursuits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 90:46


In this week's In The Current, the entire crew plus a few is around the table to celebrate our annual Friends-Giving feast.  Listen in as we recount the amazing food and fellowship the evening gave us.  We also get some updates from the field and look into what's coming ahead.  Check it out!!  Instagram: @rutandriverpursuits For more In The Currents go to https://rutandriverpursuits.com/ 

The Shaun Thompson Show
December 1, 2021

The Shaun Thompson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 98:54


Inflation is expected to last until next year, Shaun reacts. Then, Todd Chatman, Director of Cause and Ministry joins Shaun to discuss Food for the Poor. Plus, Paul Seegert on the new Omicron variant and the looming slew of new mandates. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
Understanding our caffeine threshold and mindset feat. Lakshmi Dasaka

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 24:18


This week on #TheHabitCoach, Ashdin Doctor continues the conversation with Lakshmi Dasaka, Co-founder at SLAY Coffee where they discuss how to understand our caffeine threshold and how to make coffee more palatable to us. Ashdin and Lakshmi talk about various benefits and awareness around coffee habits, how to do the habit stack, and current trends in the beverage industry. All this and much more on this episode of #TheHabitCoach with Ashdin Doctor.You can know more about SLAY Coffee: ( https://slay.coffee/ )Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/drinkslaycoffee )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/DrinkSlayCoffee/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/drinkslaycoffee/ )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/company/drinkslaycoffee/ )You can follow Lakshmi on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/LDasaka )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/lakshmidvs/ )Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 website: ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Food for Thought: The Joys and Benefits of Living Vegan Podcast
White Elephants and Gift Exchanges: What's the Connection?

Food for Thought: The Joys and Benefits of Living Vegan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 15:49


What do white elephants have to do with the popular holiday swap parties? All is revealed in this episode of Food for Thought. And I throw in a bonus about pink elephants and what they have to do with alcohol-related hallucinations.  Food for Thought is sponsored by listeners. Become a supporter today at patreon.com/colleenpatrickgoudreau

Coffee Sprudgecast
The One With Our Favorite Coffee Holiday Gifts

Coffee Sprudgecast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 23:37


Happy Holidays from everyone at the Coffee Sprudgecast! Hosts Zachary Carlsen and Jordan Michelman discuss a variety of topics in this episode: roasted fig coffee substitutes, white chocolate, charitable organizations worth supporting this season, and what they really want for the holidays. This episode of the Coffee Sprudgecast is sponsored by Pacific Barista Series, Fellow, Tea Pigs, and DONA. Hit the links below to dive deeper into the topics discussed in this episode. Show notes and links: FigBrew Askinosie Chocolate Monsoon Chocolate GoFundBean Compassion Access Project + Getchusomecare Coffee Coalition For Racial Equity Glitter Cat Barista Onyx Advent Calendar  

Wally Show Podcast
New Christmas Traditions: December 1, 2021

Wally Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:30


TWS News 1: Gifts for Difficult People – 00:33 New Christmas Traditions – 2:39 Flashback Friday Promo – 7:44 TWS News 2: Upping Your Light Game – 12:09 Favorite Number – 15:25 Email – 19:50 TMI – 23:57 Creative Gift Ideas – 27:06 Least of These: Michael J. Fox on Being Grateful – 35:11 A Hallmark Film in Three Words – 38:21 Ready Set Google – 42:17 You can sponsor a child through Food for the Hungry at www.fh.org/wallyshow You can join our Wally Show Poddies Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/WallyShowPoddies/.

Wally Show Podcast
Aftercast: Rodeo Clown Betty: December 1, 2021

Wally Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 21:43


We talk about whether we're stressed or excited for Christmas, a band is getting attention for their name, Omicron, which is the same name as the new covid variant, The Facts of Life is getting a live rendition, and we talk about what sports we'd want to play. You can sponsor a child through Food for the Hungry at www.fh.org/wallyshow You can join our Wally Show Poddies Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/WallyShowPoddies/.

The Leading Voices in Food
What Food Policy Advocates Can Learn from Tobacco Industry Strategies

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:43


This is "The Leading Voices in Food" podcast but today we're speaking with a leading voice in tobacco control. "How come," you might ask, "why?" So I believe for many years that the parallels between the tobacco industry and food industry practices are nothing short of stunning, and that our field would do very well to learn lessons learned from the pioneers in the tobacco wars. Our guest today is Dr. Kenneth Warner, Distinguished Emeritus Professor and former Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. Ken's research focuses on the economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Interview Summary   So Ken, you and I have a long history, and I thought it might be instructive to mention just a little bit of it because you really helped shape some of the ways I think about addressing food policy. So I first became familiar with your work long before I met you in person, when I was teaching classes at Yale. I was assigning papers you wrote on tobacco control and I was especially interested in work that you'd done on tobacco taxes. It really gave me the idea of pushing ahead with food-related taxes. Then finally I got a chance to meet you in person at a meeting that was hosted by the first President George Bush in Kennebunkport, Maine, on cancer control. You and I got to talking about similarities between the tobacco industry behavior and the way the food industry was behaving. We were both struck by the similarities. That led us to write a paper together that was published in 2009 in "The Milbank Quarterly." And I have to say, of all the papers I've published over my career, this was one of my favorites because I really enjoyed working with you. I learned a ton from it, and it really, I thought, made some very important points. And I'd just like to mention the title of that paper because it pretty much summarizes what it found. So the title was, "The Perils of Ignoring History: Big Tobacco Played Dirty and Millions Died. How Similar Is Big Food?" In my mind, the playbooks are still very similar, and that's why it's really interesting to talk to you today, get a little sense of what's happening more recently, and importantly, think about what lessons are learned from tobacco control. I wanted to bring up one thing from that paper that I always found fascinating, which was the discussion about something called "The Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers." Could you describe what that was and what role you think it played in history?   Sure. Just to give you some context for it, the first two major papers that implicated smoking in lung cancer were published in major medical journals in 1950. In December of 1952 there was an article in the "Reader's Digest," which incidentally was the only major magazine that did not accept cigarette advertising, that was entitled, "Cancer by the Carton." And this was the American public's first real exposure to the risks associated with smoking, and it led to a two-year decline in cigarette smoking, a very sharp decline, something that was unprecedented in the history of the cigarette. Following that there was some research published on mice and cancer. And needless to say, the tobacco industry was getting pretty nervous about this. So the executives of all the major tobacco firms met in New York City in December of 1953, and they collaborated on what became a public relations strategy, which drove their behavior for many years thereafter. The first thing they did was to publish "A Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers" in January of 1954. This "Frank Statement" was published in over 400 magazines and newspapers, and it reached an estimated audience of some 80 million Americans, which would be a very good percentage of all Americans in those years. And they talked about the fact that there was this evidence out there, but they said, "We feel it is in the public interest," this is a quote, "to call attention to the fact that eminent doctors and research scientists have publicly questioned the claimed significance of this research." Then they went on to say, and I quote again, "We accept an interest in people's health as a basic responsibility, paramount to every other consideration in our business. We believe the products we make are not injurious to health and," and this is the kicker, "we always have and always will cooperate closely with those whose task it is to safeguard the public health," end quote. They went on to say that they would support research on smoking and health, and, of course, that they would always be the good guys in this story. This was designed as part of a strategy to obfuscate, to deceive the public, basically, to lie about what they already knew about the health hazards associated with smoking. And it was essentially a first very public step in a campaign that, one could argue, in many ways has persisted ever since, although, obviously, now the tobacco companies admit that they're killing their customers and they admit that smoking causes cancer and heart disease and lung disease and so on. But that was kind of the beginning of the strategy that drove their behavior for decades.   You know, that was one of the issues we raised in our paper. How similar were the big food companies in talking about concern for the health of their customers, planting doubt with the science, pledging to make changes that were in the interest of public health, agreeing to collaborate with public health officials? All those things played out in the food arena as well. And that's just one of many places where the food industry behave very, very similar to what the tobacco industry has done. But boy, is it interesting to hear that particular anecdote and to learn of the cynical behavior of the industry. So fast forward from there, and you think about the tobacco industry executives testifying before Congress that nicotine wasn't addictive, and you have that same process playing out many years later. These similarities are really remarkable.   So let's talk about your work and some of the issues that I think apply to the food area, and let's talk about taxes at the beginning. So I worked for years on the issue of soda taxes, and these taxes now exist in more than 50 countries around the world and in a number of major cities in the US, including San Francisco, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Oakland. And these taxes have been shown to have really positive effects, and they seem to be growing around the world. And I'd like to understand what you see as the overall findings from the work on tobacco taxes. But before we do that, you have a very interesting story to tell about how the tobacco control community responded when you first began speaking about taxes. It turns out to be taxes on tobacco have had whopping effects. But what was the initial reaction to people in that field?   Yeah, it is kind of an interesting story. So around 1980, when I first started writing and talking about tobacco taxation as a method of reducing smoking, I used to have public health audiences booing me. If they had rotten tomatoes with them, they would have been throwing them.   You know, Ken, it's hard to imagine because now these taxes are completely routine and accepted.   Yes, they're not only routine and accepted, they are a first principle of tobacco control. They are enshrined in the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. So they really are kind of the first thing we turn to because we know that they work. We know that they reduce smoking.   But let me give you a story about how I learned that this is not only a phenomenon with people smoking. It's a phenomenon with people using all other drugs, and it turns out it's a trans-species law, the Law of Demand. And that law says, basically, that if you increase price, the demand for the commodity will decrease. Well, in the beginning, the public health audiences believed two things. They believed that smokers were so addicted that they would not be affected by price, so it was ridiculous to even think about it. And they said, you have to have intrinsic motivators to get people to quit smoking. They have to care about their kids. They want to see their kids grow up, their spouses, and so on, and not extrinsic forces like a tax. So those were their two objections. So the story that I think is really kind of fun. I was on a plane flying to a small conference in Kansas City. This is sometime in the early '80s. And I happened to be seated next to Jack Henningfield, who is probably the preeminent psychopharmacologist dealing with nicotine, maybe in the world. And we were talking about price response, the fact that cigarette taxes work. And he said, "You know, I've got something I want to show you here." And he pulled out some what are called response cost curves from the psychology literature. And this is where you take a laboratory animal, in this instance addicted to narcotics or other addictive substances, and you give them a challenge to get their drugs. So first, I should note that these animals are so addicted that if they're given the choice between food and their drug, they will choose their drug, and they will in fact end up dying because they place a preference for the drug over food. But it turns out that when you increase the price of the drug to them, they decrease the amount that they consume. So what do I mean by that? If they have to push a lever, a bar, a certain number of times to get a dose of their drug, and you raise the number of bar pushes per dose, they will dose themselves with fewer doses. I took a look at these curves, and basically, a response cost curve for these lab animals is essentially a demand curve as we economists see it. And I calculated the price elasticity of demand, which is our standard measure of the responsiveness to price. And it turns out that addicted laboratory rats have essentially the same price elasticity of demand, the same price responsiveness that human beings do to cigarettes.   That's an absolutely fascinating story. And, you know, I know Jack, and have admired his work, as you have, and it's amazing to think about that conversation on a plane, and what sort of scientific work it led to, and how that, in turn, found its way into policies that exist around the world. So tell us then about tobacco taxes, and how high do they have to be in order to affect consumption in an appreciable way, and have they worked in reducing tobacco use, and what's your overall take on that?   So we have, quite literally, hundreds of studies in countries around the world, and we know a lot but we don't know everything. So we don't know, for example, if there's a particular price above which, you know, nobody will use the product. We don't have even really good data suggesting of, you know, what's the minimum increase in price that you have to have to have a noticeable impact. Overall, the literature suggests that if you increase the price of cigarettes by 10%, you will decrease the quantity demanded by 3 to 4%. Now, what this means is that roughly half of that decreased demand reflects decreases in the number of cigarettes that continuing smokers use, while the other half represents decreases in smoking, people quitting or kids not starting. So the demand is what we call price inelastic. The price change itself is larger, proportionately, than the decrease in consumption. But that decrease in consumption is still substantial and it's enough to have a large impact.   Now, cigarette prices vary all over the world, and cigarette prices vary primarily because of taxation differences. So if you go to the Scandinavian countries, you'll find that a pack of cigarettes will run $15 or more. If you go to Australia, you're looking at $30 or more a pack. In the US, currently, we're looking at an average price in the range of about 7 to $8. In some jurisdictions, like New York City, it's $10 or more. But the prices in the US are actually relatively low among the more developed nations in the world. Any tax increase will have an impact but obviously the larger tax increases will have larger impacts. And there's some good and bad news in tobacco taxation, particularly in a country like ours, and this is, again, true for most of the developed world. Smoking is now concentrated in marginalized populations. I'm talking about low socioeconomic groups, the LGBTQ community, and racial minorities, in particular. If you think of this as an economic phenomenon, when you raise the price on cigarettes, you're going to hit the worst-off economically segments of the population hard. That's the bad news. The good news is that those people, precisely because they are poor, tend to be much more price responsive than high-income smokers, and more of them will quit. So we have this problem that the tax is regressive, it imposes a larger burden on the poor, but the health effect is progressive. It will reduce the gap between the rich and poor in terms of smoking rates. And of great importance, there's an enormous gap between the rich and poor in this country in life expectancy, and as much as half of that may be differences in smoking rates.   Ken, there's a hundred follow-up questions I could ask, and I find this discussion absolutely fascinating. One thing that came into my mind was that some years ago I looked at the relationship of taxes, state by state in the US, and rates of disease like lung cancer and heart disease. And there was plenty of data because there was a huge range in tobacco taxes. Places like New York and Rhode Island had very high taxes, and the tobacco Southern states, like North Carolina, had very low taxes. But what's the sort of recent take on that, and the relationship between taxes and actual disease?   Well, it's still true. And there are, in fact, what you suggest, the southeastern block of tobacco states have unusually low rates of taxation. And I haven't seen any recent data but one presumes that they are suffering more from smoking-related diseases because their smoking rates are higher. I mean, that has to be true. So I don't know that we have any particularly good data recently, but there have been studies that clearly relate tobacco or cigarette prices to health outcomes associated with smoking.   I'm assuming US scientists have played a prominent role in producing the literature showing the negative health consequences of using cigarettes, and yet you said the United States has relatively low taxes compared to other developed countries. Why, do you think?   I think we're going to get into a very philosophical discussion about the US right here. It has to do with individual responsibility. We know for sure that the initial reason the taxes were so low was that the tobacco block was so influential in the Senate, particularly in the days when Jesse Helms, the senator from North Carolina, was in the Senate. He was the most feared senator by the other senators, and if you wanted to get anything done for your cause, you had to go along with his cause, which was keeping cigarette prices low and doing everything they could to support smoking. So there's clearly been a built-in bias in the Senate, and basically in the Congress as a whole, against tobacco policy. You see a huge variation from state to state in tobacco policies, and it's reflective of basically their political leanings in general.   You brought up this issue of personal responsibility, and boy, does that apply in the food area. You know, the food companies are saying: if you have one sugar beverage every once in a while, it's not going to be harmful. And it's not use of the products but it is overuse of the products. Thereby saying, it's not corporate responsibility we're talking about here, it's personal responsibility. That same argument was made by the tobacco industry, wasn't it?   It was. They would be less inclined to do that today, for a couple of reasons. One is that we know that even low levels of smoking are harmful and indeed cause many of the diseases that we were referring to earlier. And I think all the companies have now admitted publicly that smoking does cause all of these diseases that we've long known it causes. And all of them are claiming that they would like to move away from a society with smoking to one that has alternative products that would give people choices and ways to get their nicotine without exposing themselves to so much risk. I mean, we have to remember, the fact that cigarettes kill their consumers is a real drawback as far as the industry is concerned because they're losing a lot of their consumers, you know, 10, 20 years before they normally would, and they have to deal with all these lawsuits. So it's unfortunate for them. Having said that, cigarettes are the goose that lays the golden egg. They cost very little to manufacture. The industry is sufficiently oligopolistic that the profits are enormous, and their profitability has continued even while smoking has dropped rather precipitously ever since the mid-1960s.   Is that because the markets outside the US have been growing?   They certainly have helped. Although now, and this is only true within the last few years, the aggregate cigarette sales in the world are declining. They've actually started dropping. So we were seeing a relatively stable situation as smoking decreased in the developed world and was rising in the developing world. The only place now where we're seeing increases in smoking are areas in Africa, which, by the way, is the one place in the world where we might be able to forego the tobacco epidemic because smoking rates are still quite low in most of the countries, not all of them, and also parts of the Middle East. But elsewhere we've been seeing smoking declining all over the world. That doesn't mean the profits have to drop because one thing that the companies can do, is, they can raise their prices. Now, if prices go up because of taxes that hurts the companies. But if they raise their own prices because demand is inelastic, what that means is that the percentage increase in the price is larger than the percentage decline in the demand for cigarettes. So they're actually adding to their profitability by doing that. They've always played this very interesting game for years of keeping price below what we would think to be the profit-maximizing price. And I think the reason for that has to do with addiction because they know that they have to have what are called replacement smokers, kids coming in to take the place of the smokers who are dying or quitting. And for years, I think, they kept their prices down because they didn't want to discourage young people from smoking. Now, I think they see the writing on the wall. Smoking is declining very rapidly. Smoking prevalence, which was 45% in the mid, early-1960s, is now a little over 12% in the US, and I think they're raising their prices with the understanding that they want to take as much advantage of the opportunity with the addicted smokers, the adults, as they possibly can, even though smoking among kids is becoming vanishingly small.   I think of so many parallels with the soda taxes that now exists in a number of places, and the companies have responded somewhat differently. And perhaps it's the level of addiction issue that kicks in here, and the need to have replacement customers. Maybe that's another key difference. But with the soda taxes, the companies have not increased prices beyond the level of the tax. You know, to delight of public health experts, the companies have tended to pass along the entire tax so the companies are not eating that difference in order to keep prices the same. Higher tax gets reflected in the ultimate price that they charge, but they're not increasing prices beyond that. Do you think it might be the addiction issue that's different here?   I don't know. I mean, that certainly could be an element of it. The other thing is that they're manufacturing other drinks that are being used in place of some of the sodas. So they've got waters, they've got juices. I mean, obviously these sugary juices are no better, but they do make other products. They make the diet drinks. And to the extent that they can find substitutes for those products within their own companies, it may be that they're content to allow people to make those substitutions.   Interesting comment. The results so far on the soda tax suggest that the most common substitution as people drink less soda, is water, which is of course better than a lot of the alternatives that people might be consuming, so that's a bit of really good news. Even though the companies do sell water, Coke and Pepsi have Aquafina and Dasani, for example, they face a basic problem. Number one is that these companies are the biggest sellers of sugary beverages but not bottled water. That happens to be Nestle. So if people migrate to bottled water, they're likely to migrate from the big companies, like Coke and Pepsi, to Nestle. Also, people tend not to be very brand-loyal to water. They tend to buy whatever is on sale or whatever they find available to them, and that creates a problem for these companies like Coke and Pepsi that do rely on brand loyalty for their marketing. So it's very interesting. And also, I wonder, based on the research on food and addiction, if the companies don't take a hit if people switch from full sugar beverages even to diet beverages that they might sell because there wouldn't be as much addictive potential, and therefore the customers wouldn't have to have as much just to keep the habit going. So it's really interesting to think this through.   That's certainly very plausible. The whole thing would also depend on the price elasticity of demand for sodas, and specifically for the brands that they're concerned about. If there is greater elasticity there than what we observe for cigarettes, then raising those prices aren't necessarily going to help them all that much.   You mentioned that the elasticity estimates for tobacco suggested that a 10% increase in price led to a 3 to 4% reduction in consumption, and the numbers are even more positive in the case of the sugar beverages, where if you get a 10%, 15% increase in price, you end up with 10, 15% reduction in consumption. So that's good news in the food arena.   That's good news but it also means that they can't do as easily what the tobacco industry can do, which is to raise their prices and expect to see profits rise. Because if they're losing as much in sales as they're gaining in price, it's no win.   So Ken, let's talk about product formulation because you mentioned that earlier, and this is a really interesting issue that, again, connects tobacco and food products. So you think about the tobacco companies mainly selling cigarettes, but now there's vaping, there's cigarettes with things like menthol and other flavors, or low-fat foods, or artificial sweeteners. The list of product reformulations in order to attract customers goes on and on and on. So I know a controversial topic in your field has been e-cigarettes. Can you explain what these are?   E-cigarettes have been around now for about a decade, let's say. Basically, they're devices that allow people to inhale nicotine and other substances, but the purpose is to give them their nicotine without combustion. And we know that the major problem associated with smoking is the products of combustion. There's 7,000 chemical compounds in cigarette smoke. 70 of them are known human carcinogens, causes of cancer in humans. Many of them are cardiotoxic. They cause lung disease and so on. The e-cigarettes have about two orders of magnitude fewer toxins in their emissions than do cigarettes. And it turns out that the amount of the comparable toxins, when they are in fact comparable, that you find in the e-cigarette emissions is much lower, usually a 10th to a 400th, of what you find in cigarette smoke.   So logically, and based on a fair body of evidence at this point, vaping, use of e-cigarettes to get nicotine, is substantially less dangerous than is cigarette smoking. However, the controversy here is incredible. This is the most divisive issue that I have witnessed in my 45 years of working in the tobacco control field. It has torn the field asunder. The mainstream of public health, and by that I'm including governmental agencies, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the Truth Initiative, the American Cancer Society, heart and lung associations, all of mainstream public health is strongly opposed to e-cigarettes, and for one reason. They're concerned about kids' uptake of e-cigarettes, which has been substantial. It's been decreasing the last couple of years, but it has been substantial. And there are a number of things they're concerned about in that regard, and they're completely ignoring the fact that there's pretty good evidence that e-cigarettes are increasing smoking cessation for a subset of smokers. And a number of us on the science side of this, believe that the net effect of e-cigarettes is beneficial, that it's actually, possibly, a tool to add to the armamentarium of things like cigarette taxation, like smoke-free workplaces, like restrictions on advertising, and that it will help a group of inveterate smokers, those who either can't quit nicotine or don't want to, to move to a less dangerous alternative to smoking. I am not saying that e-cigarettes have no risk associated with them. They almost certainly do. But it is substantially lower.   Now, historically, this is divisive within the field in part because all of the earlier attempts at, quote-unquote, tobacco harm reduction have been produced by the major cigarette companies, and they've been fraudulent. So cigarette filters were manufactured and sold, starting in the 1950s, in response to the scare that I referred to earlier about cancer. And they were sold with a message that the filters block the dangerous stuff but let the flavor through. And people bought this. That decrease in smoking in the early 1950s reversed, smoking went up sharply, as sales of filtered cigarettes went up. By the way, the first successful filtered cigarette was Kent, and it used what it referred to as the miracle Micronite filter. Well, that miracle Micronite filter turns out to have been made of asbestos. And there are lawsuits continuing to the present day by workers in the factories that made the filter tips for Kent cigarettes, who themselves ended up with lung cancer or other diseases due to the asbestos. Then came low-tar and nicotine cigarettes, and we actually have ample evidence from the documents that had been revealed by lawsuits, that the industry knew that this was a public relations device. It was not a harm reduction device. And in fact, because people believed that low-tar and nicotine cigarettes were less dangerous, it's likely that it actually increased the toll of smoking because people who would have quit, switched to low-tar and nicotine cigarettes instead. So there's some pretty awful history here that makes people legitimately concerned about alternative products. A critical element of this story is that the alternative products, in this case, the e-cigarettes were introduced by non-cigarette, non-tobacco companies, and their goal was to replace smoking. Now the major companies are all making their own e-cigarettes as well because they have to do it from a defensive point of view, but basically they don't have any great interest in slowing up the sale of cigarettes. They want to benefit from that as long as they can.   So I should know the answer to this but I don't, but are e-cigarettes taxed? And wouldn't it be optimal to tax e-cigarettes but less than regular cigarettes so you discourage use of both but discourage the use of regular cigarettes more?   That is very insightful. Two colleagues and I actually published a paper saying that in 2015 in "The New England Journal of Medicine," that we should be taxing e-cigarettes modestly, the reason being that we want to discourage kids from using them, and kids are far more price-sensitive than our adults. Kids have a very elastic response to cigarette prices. Adults do not, and in particular, older adults have even lower price responsiveness. So yes, there should be some taxation of e-cigarettes to discourage youth use of it but that taxation should be dramatically lower than the taxation of cigarettes. Some states are now taxing e-cigarettes. Not all of them. The federal government is actually looking into a proposal to double the tax, the federal tax, on cigarettes, which would take it up to $2.01 a pack, and at the same time, to establish an equivalent tax, similar to the $2 tax, on all vaping products. This would be a disaster because it would definitely discourage kids from vaping, but it would also discourage adults from using e-cigarettes as an alternative to smoking, and the most addicted, the inveterate smokers, those are the ones that need these alternatives. So that's a bad policy proposal. A much better one would be to increase the cigarette tax by more than a dollar, raise it to 3 or $4 or something, and impose a modest tax on e-cigarettes. This would discourage people from smoking, both adults and kids, but especially kids. It would discourage kids from using e-cigarettes but it would create a price differential that would encourage the inveterate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. Now, part of the problem, and this has gotten worse over time, is that the American public believes that e-cigarettes, that vaping, is as dangerous and even maybe more dangerous than cigarette smoking. Nothing could be further from the truth but so far the mainstream of public health has sold that message to the public, and the public, including smokers, believe it.   That's a fascinating story about how the public health field might be getting in its own way with this.   And maybe doing damage to public health.   So let's loop back a little bit to the behavior of the tobacco industry. So in 2017, the Phillip Morris Company funded and launched an organization called Foundation for a Smoke-Free World. So I think, hmm, a tobacco company saying they want less smoking, and one could view this with pretty high cynicism but what do you think about it?   I've always shared your sense of cynicism about it. There's an interesting anecdote related to this. The individual who negotiated the deal by which Phillip Morris offered $1 billion over a 12-year period to establish this foundation, that individual was the main actor in the World Health Organization during the development of the global treaty on tobacco control, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. He also became director of the organization and served in that capacity until just the other day. He has stepped down from being director. But let me give you a little context for it. Philip Morris International that needs to be distinguished from Altria and Philip Morris Domestic, but Philip Morris International sells the leading brand of what is known as heated tobacco products, HTPs. These are products that actually have tobacco in them. E-cigarettes have no tobacco in them but these products actually have tobacco in them. But instead of burning the tobacco, they heat it. They volatilize it, and the nicotine is inhaled. Like e-cigarettes, they appear to be substantially less dangerous than smoking, although it's not clear that they're as less dangerous as, than, e-cigarettes. But they're produced only by the major cigarette companies. Philip Morris is now selling these products successfully in many countries, many cities around the world. While they actually have the authorization to sell an older version of the product in the US, it's not very popular at this point. But in Japan, over the last four years there's been a drop in cigarettes sold of about a third at the same time that there's been this great increase in the use of these heated tobacco products manufactured by Philip Morris International and by Japan Tobacco. They have a product called Ploom. Philip Morris' product is called IQOS, I-Q-O-S, which, I was told, originally stood for I Quit Ordinary Smoking. So they are the leader of the theme song that the industry is singing these days about how they want a smoke-free world and they want to move toward one. But the only way they're ever going to do that, willingly, is if they can sell other products like these heated tobacco products and make large sums of money on them. Philip Morris has a good start at that. They claim that about a third of their revenue now is coming from IQOS, this heated tobacco product.   So whether that foundation ultimately has beneficial effects or not, forget corporate beneficial effects but on the public good, would pretty much depend on who's choosing to use these e-cigarettes, I'm imagining. That if it's people switching from normal cigarettes to them, or using them instead of normal cigarettes, it's one thing. But if they're recruiting new people who otherwise wouldn't smoke, then it would be a bad thing. So how do you think that'll all play out?   That's actually a critically important question, Kelly. And one of the great concerns that the opposition to e-cigarettes has, is that they're addicting lots of kids to nicotine, and that many of them will go on to smoke, and that that will reverse the progress that we made on smoking. Now, it turns out that there is no evidence to support the latter contention. And in fact, there's evidence to the contrary. I think it's entirely possible that some kids who would not have touched a cigarette otherwise are vaping and then trying cigarettes in the future. Whether they become regular smokers, remains to be seen. But I think there certainly are some kids like that. But what we do know is that the rate of smoking among kids, what we call current smoking, and smoking among kids means that they've had at least one puff on a cigarette in the last 30 days, that number has plummeted over the last quarter century, and, and this is the interesting thing, it has gone down at its fastest rate precisely during the period in which vaping has been popular among kids.   So one theory is that vaping is displacing smoking to some extent. That kids who would've smoked are vaping instead. It's a very complicated area and we don't know the answer. Among adults who vape, and they are relatively few in number except for very young adults, we observe mostly dual use, but the question is how much of this is a transition to vaping only, and then, maybe, a transition to nothing after that. In the UK, where vaping has been advertised by the health organizations as a way to quit smoking, and they have encouraged its use, and they use it in their smoking cessation clinics, and you'll even find it in hospitals, in the UK we have seen that more than half of the people who have quit smoking by using e-cigarettes have also quit vaping. So it is no longer the case in the UK that a majority of the people who vape are also currently smoking.   In the US, the data have been moving in that direction but it's still a majority who are dual users rather than vaping only. But we have evidence of four or five completely different kinds of studies, commercial data, other products in other countries, that all lead to the conclusion that vaping is already increasing the rate of smoking cessation in the US and in the UK by probably 10 to 15%. That's a hard thing to see in the data but it is something that, if you dig into the data, you will see it, and as I say, we see it all over the place. Let me give you one example of the tobacco harm reduction story that's fabulous. 40 to 50 years ago, large numbers of Swedish males started using a smokeless tobacco product called snus, S-N-U-S. It's a relatively low nitrosamine product, nitrosamine being a carcinogenic element, and they substituted it for cigarettes largely because cigarette taxes were going way up and there weren't any significant taxes on snus. So what you observe today, some three, four decades or more later, is that Swedish males have the lowest male smoking rate of any country in Europe, and maybe in the world. They do not have a low tobacco use rate. Their tobacco use rate is pretty typical but it consists mostly of snus. And they also have by far the lowest rate of tobacco-related diseases, like lung cancer, of men in all of the European Union countries, and the second lowest is typically a rate twice or more that of what you see in the Swedish males. Swedish females, who did not quit smoking in large numbers and did not take up snus until fairly recently, have rates of lung cancer and other diseases that are average or above-average for the European Union. So that's a great example of tobacco harm reduction in action, and it's one that's been around now, as I say, for decades.   Ken, this is a remarkable history and you're just bringing it alive beautifully. But let me ask you one final question. So given that you've been working in this field for more than four decades now, and have really been a pioneer, a leader, a warrior, and a hero, all those things could be applied to you and your work, if I asked you to sum up what's been learned from all these decades of work on tobacco, what would you say?   There are a lot of lesson. Certainly, we have learned specific kinds of interventions that really matter. You and I spoke about tax at some length. That's the preeminent one. Smoke-free workplaces, including smoke-free restaurants and bars, have not only themselves had a direct impact on health but have also set the tone for a more smoke-free society. So we have seen quite dramatic changes. I mentioned we're going from a 45% rate of smoking for the nation as a whole down to a little over 12%. That, however, has taken us six to seven decades. So it's kind of a good news, bad news story. It's a very complicated area. Tobacco control was ranked by CDC as one of the 10 most important public health measures of the 20th century, and also the first decade of the 21st century. And I think that's completely legitimate, and it is something about which all of us who care about public health can feel very proud about. The problem still remains. It is an enormous problem, as you alluded earlier, in many parts of the developing world, the low- and middle-income countries, and it's a growing problem in some of those countries, and it's just not going to disappear real fast. The lesson that I've taken most recently has been a discouraging one, and that's how divisive our field has become. We really have a chasm between the people who are opposed to tobacco harm reduction and those who are supportive of it. They're good people on both sides, they believe what they're saying, but they can't talk to each other civilly at this point. I hope that that will not become the case for those of you who are fighting the good fight in dealing with unhealthy foods.   Bio   Kenneth E. Warner is the Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Public Health and Dean Emeritus at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. A member of the faculty from 1972-2017, he served as Dean from 2005-2010. Presented in over 275 professional publications, Dr. Warner's research has focused on economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Dr. Warner served as the World Bank's representative to negotiations on the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO's first global health treaty. He also served as the Senior Scientific Editor of the 25th anniversary Surgeon General's report on smoking and health. From 2004-2005 he was President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT). He currently serves on the FDA's Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. In 1996 Dr. Warner was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Surgeon General's Medallion, the Luther Terry Award for Exemplary Achievement in Tobacco Control, and the Doll-Wynder Award from SRNT. Dr. Warner earned his AB from Dartmouth College and MPhil and PhD in economics from Yale University.  

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU
Worst of The RIOT for December 1st, 2021

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:59


Hudson and Nikki discuss why if you have the opportunity for a "stay interview" you should shoot for the stars. They also talk about why your Christmas gifts may be coming later or not at all this year. The College Football Playoffs, new Oreo shapes, banned greeting cards, and more on this episode of the Worst of The RIOT.

The Dirobi Health Show
Balanced, Beautiful, and Abundant! With Rebecca Whitman

The Dirobi Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:57


Rebecca Whitman is a Success Mentor. She is the host of the Balanced, Beautiful and Abundant podcast."I am passionate about empowering women to courageously practice Self-Love so that they may experience ABUNDANCE, FREEDOM and RESILIENCE in life."Combining metaphysical teachings, 12 Steps of AA, my time at Princeton and the business savvy I picked up as a top producing salesperson, I help people like you, get extraordinary, long term results.She teaches SEVEN pillars of success, which we will discuss today!See all show notes and links at:https://blog.dirobi.comThis show is for informational purposes only. None of the information in this podcast should be construed as dispensing medical advice. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

HSCT Warriors
Revisit meeting Ahna and be inspired to heal from the inside out (S3 replay

HSCT Warriors

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 58:59


Warrior: Ahna Crum AI: Multiple Sclerosis HSCT: April, 2016 in Moscow Russia Superpower: Shapeshifting What motivates you to find curiosity in life? Have you ever been let down by a one-size-fits-all approach? How equipped are you to adapt? After suffering significant relapses from an early age, in her late twenties Ahna found HSCT through her research trying to avoid moving into an assisted living facility. With great determination and a positive mindset, Ahna found Moscow to be a welcoming, supportive place. As someone who leaped into HSCT without any doubts, Ahna found the recovery rollercoaster to be quite the challenge. Tune in to find out more about the post-transplant complications that Ahna faced, how she was able to find her own solutions to heal her body, and how she found her passion to become a partner for HSCT warriors along their journeys. Be sure to visit our website, HSCTWarriorsPodcast.com where you can find notes from today's episode, submit ideas or feedback, or connect with HSCT Warriors, Inc. to “Talk with a Warrior”, find the latest research and resources, or explore the world map. Special thanks to musical genius Billy Alletzhauser for sharing his superpowers to produce the soundtrack, and engineer the audio to make this podcast possible. You can find us both when you subscribe on SoundCloud, iTunes or wherever you find your podcasts. It has been great to connect with Warriors worldwide so reach out if you're interested in sharing your story. We would definitely love to learn how the podcast has helped your journey with autoimmune disease… if you could take a moment to share your story, leave us a comment on instagram or share feedback on our website. We hope you'll tune in next Wednesday for another episode, highlighting another HSCT Warrior. Until then, be a snowflake and embrace your superpowers. Be kind. Be well. Resources: What the Heck Should I eat? by Mark Hyman Psychobiotic Revolution: Mood, Food, and the New Science of the Gut-Brain Connection by Scott C. Anderson MS Gym Podcast _________________________________ Jen Stansbury Koenig and the producers disclaim medical influence and responsibility for any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. If you think you have a medical problem, please contact a licensed physician immediately.

The Darin Olien Show
Sprouting the Seeds of Persistence | Doug Evans

The Darin Olien Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 65:32


Being an entrepreneur of any kind means you're going to have to get used to hearing no. However, if you make persistence part of your DNA, those big no's will eventually lead to a giant yes that could change your life.    Doug Evans, a plant-based entrepreneur, has had his share of both failure and success. But today, he's a bit obsessed with sprouts. His book, The Sprout Book, details how you can grow nature's perfect food in your own kitchen with minimal supplies.  || LINKS || www.thesproutbook.com | www.trybite.com/darin | https://barukas.com/ | Full Show Notes -

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Writer , Activist, Comedian Negin Farsad & Dr. and Comedian Priyanka Wali Episode 488

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 126:10


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more also please donate to GiveWell.org/StandUp 35 MINUTES Negin Farsad was named one of the 53 Funniest Women by Huffington Post, named one of the 10 Best Feminist Comedians by Paper Magazine, and was selected as a TEDFellow for her work in social justice comedy where she gave a TEDTalk that has been seen by millions. She is the author of  How to Make White People Laugh (Thurber Prize nominated), and host of Fake the Nation, a round-table comedy podcast. She is a regular panelist on NPR's Wait Wait Don't Tell Me. You've also seen her on season 2 & 3 of HBO's High Maintenance, Nat Geo's Year Million, and as a series regular on BIrdgirl on HBOMax. She also wrote and directed The Muslims Are Coming! (Netflix) with Jon Stewart, Lewis Black and David Cross and 3rd Street Blackout (Amazon) with John Hodgman, Janeane Garofalo, and Ed Weeks. 1:34 Named by Refinery29 as a "50 Female Stand-Up Comedians You Need to Know”, Dr. Priyanka Wali is a stand-up comic, a licensed and practicing physician, and co-host of the podcast HypochondriActor alongside actor Sean Hayes (Will & Grace). In each episode, Wali and Hayes welcome a celebrity guest to discuss an incredible medical story. New episodes are available every Wednesday on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Wali performs routinely throughout the United States and abroad, including at corporate gigs, casinos, and comedy clubs. She has been featured on KFOG Radio, Women's Health Magazine, The Today Show, Business Insider, UPROXX, Cosmopolitan, India Currents Magazine, and Healthline. She is currently the A believer that laughter is truly the best medicine, she still likes to cover her bases as a board-certified practicing physician in Internal medicine and Obesity medicine. Wali graduated cum laude from the University of Southern California and continued there for medical school. She completed her residency in internal medicine at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. Her philosophical approach to medicine stems from holistic concepts primarily that "Food is Medicine" and that many medical illnesses arise from disconnection of natural-occurring phenomenon. She encourages dietary therapies that can help manage, if not reverse, common conditions. Wali is particularly interested in health optimization for individuals of all ages and demographics and has a passion for solving medical conundrums. She's also fucking hilarious. Twitter: @WaliPriyanka Instagram: @WaliPriyanka Get your holiday gifts from one of the sponsors of the show! TommyJohn.com/STANDUP GetQuip.com/STANDUP Indeed.com/STANDUP   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Positive on Publishing Podcast
POP093 - Eat and Live from Your Highest Soul Self with Traysiah Spring

Positive on Publishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:12


I welcome a long-time friend Traysiah Spring to the show to discuss her new book and love project, Clean Green Eating, Plant-Based to Feel Great! We discuss mutual friends that have been on the show (see references at the end) and how she's excited to help others eat clean, feel peace, and feel more powerful in your body. We uncover eight fun nuggets that will help you find more joy in both preparing and savoring your food: #1: Make food fun (mindset). This page has numerous resources for making food fun: https://makeeverythingfun.com/book/ #2: Let Food Be Thy Medicine. (For more information please see: https://makeeverythingfun.com/let-food-be-thy-medicine-covid/) #3: Food is about gaining lifeforce. #4: Eating clean allows you to have clarity and own your power. #5: Food is about much more than what is on your plate (it is about your relationships, the media you consume, and what you allow into your energetic sphere). #6: A rice cooker can be your best friend. #7: A slow cooker can also be your best friend (especially in the colder months). #8: Find creative ways to add raw foods to your diet to benefit from the lifeforce, intelligence, and enzymes (“under 105 to be alive”). About Traysi Traysiah Spring is an international meditation facilitator, Ayurvedic consultant and author, who is passionate about exploring and sharing - how to live a consciousness-based lifestyle, for the purpose of waking up to our highest awareness and potential. She trained and worked with Dr. Deepak Chopra at the Chopra Center for Wellbeing, in San Diego, California, for many years, alongside her husband, Tom. They are both certified Ayurveda and Meditation Instructors. Traysi also spent many years going to the Optimum Health Institute, studying how food can profoundly affect our life experiences. Tom and Traysiah started a non-profit organization - "Deep Peace Adventures Foundation" - where they host an international online meditation community and offer a variety of weekly classes, that explore living a conscious life. Including, offering regular video demonstrations of cooking tips and recipes from their new book - Clean Green Eating - Plant-based to feel great! What's fun for Traysi: Playing with recipes and discovering new plant-based foods that are surprisingly delicious and that I feel good eating. Links Cleangreeneating.org Deeppeaceadventures.org References Nurture (my nonprofit that we reference during the interview): https://makeeverythingfun.com/nurture/

Modern Persian Food
Connecting to our Culture through Food with special guest Cynthia Banafsheh Samanian

Modern Persian Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:34


Join Bita and Beata in today's culinary conversation about connecting to our culture with special guest Cynthia Banafsheh Samanian.  Cynthia is an expert in experiential marketing, teaches cooking class business school, and runs a podcast.  Cynthia is a great example of a woman who has built on her bi-cultural up-bringing to help others come together at the table, both literally and figuratively.   What is your mission with regards to experiential marketing with regards to your culture? “At the end of the day I am all about helping people share their culture and share their stories around food”   Is there a MPF podcast episode that you particularly connected with and why? Yes!  Episode 31, Caspian Chef Mom is from “shomal”, Farsi for the northern region of Iran and I had never heard anyone speak of the specialty foods of this region that I grew up eating   Favorite family foods - Cynthia's folks used to overnight the following Persian foods to her! Mirza ghassemi (and fresh eggs to cook and enjoy along side) Seer torshi Khoresh bademjoon   Persian foods Cynthia likes to cook: Sabzi polo Salad shirazi Cotlet Ghormeh sabzi Loobia polo Kookoo seebzamini   What do you hope to pass down to your young kids with regards to Persian-French (husband is French American) food culture? A rice cooker that makes perfect tahdig! A remembrance of Cynthia's mom's saying, “you can tell that a house is warm when the kitchen is busy” Side note:  Cynthia's parents (like many of ours) were immigrants - food was a way to bring people into their home and introduce them to Persian culture and to connect   Ask the Beats Cynthia asks the Beats:  If you could teach someone one thing, what dish would it be and why? How to make the perfect tahdig, tahchin, and an appetizer sampling platter Let us know if you are interested in Bita and Beata hosting their own cooking class!   Contact us at hello@modernpersianfood.com or Instagram   Resources and recipes from this episode: Episode 31:  Cultural Spotlight Caspian Regional Foods with Special Guest The Caspian Chef   Find Cynthia at: The Experiential Table Podcast | Food Marketing Podcast Hidden Rhythm: Teach Online Cooking Classes Culinary Marketing Coach (@hiddenrhythm) • Instagram photos and videos Bita's recipe links: Salad Shirazi | Persian Cucumber and Tomato Salad Persian Tahdig How to Prepare Persian Rice in a Rice Cooker Tah-cheen Baked Persian Chicken and Rice Casserole Tahchin Bites   Beata's recipe links: Persian Salads: Maast-o-Khiar with Shallot and Salad Shirazi Katte Persian Rice with Tahdig Persian Jeweled Tahchin All Modern Persian Food episodes can be found at: Episodes Co-host Beata Nazem Kelley blog: BeatsEats – Persian Girl Desperately Addicted to Food! Co-host Bita Arabian blog: Oven Hug - Healthy Persian Recipes | Modern Persian Recipes   Podcast production by Alvarez Audio

Kweencast
The unlock to navigating food & the holidays

Kweencast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 8:44


Now that it's officially December 1, I *finally* feel comfortable saying Happy Holidays

CruiseTipsTV Unplugged - Cruise Tips and More
Navigator of the Seas Review

CruiseTipsTV Unplugged - Cruise Tips and More

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 35:18


Today we'll be reviewing Royal Caribbean's Navigator of the Seas. Navigator of the Seas is sailing year round from Los Angeles' World Cruise Center with a variety of itineraries. You can choose from 3 night Ensenada, 4-night Catalina & Ensenada, 5-night Cabo San Lucas & Ensenada, or 7 Night Cabo, Vallarta & Mazatlan itineraries. We'd LOVE if you'd leave a review where you listen to this podcast, and screen shot the show and share it on Instagram using the hashtag #cttvunplugged. Download our shore day bag checklist, and more cruise packing and planning checklists & videos by joining the CruiseTipsTV Academy at https://academy.cruisetipstv.com

Cereal Killers
Bowl Chat - Butts by the Bump

Cereal Killers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 63:06


Scotty B is convinced that he is hip and cool because of his job. Do we really believe that to be true? He teaches Andy all about what cigarettes he used to smoke, the difference between mailing and shipping a package are and even mentions his dream of becoming a garbage man. Oh yeah, the guys try bread in a can and eggnog too.

The mindbodygreen Podcast
355: The biggest misconceptions about multivitamins | Ashley Jordan Ferira, Ph.D., RDN

The mindbodygreen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:14


Ashley Jordan Ferira, Ph.D., RDN: “Taking a multivitamin [is like] brushing your teeth. If you don't brush your teeth daily, whole body health is going to break down pretty quickly." Ferira, mbg's Director of Scientific Affairs, joins mbg co-CEO, Jason Wachob, to discuss the multivitamin red flags you shouldn't ignore, plus: - The connection between multivitamins & longevity* (14:28) - Why you should avoid gummy multivitamins (22:38) - How to know if your multivitamin is actually high-quality (24:07) - Why gender- or age-specific labels don't make sense (31:24) - The best time of day to take a multivitamin (36:05) Referenced in the episode: - mbg Podcast episode #347, with Ferira on vitamin D. - A study showing people who used multivitamins daily had a significant reduction in multiple micronutrient inadequacies.* - Abstract for COSMOS trial multivitamin study at the Clinical Trials on Alzheimer's Disease 2021 conference. - NHANES data demonstrating national nutritional gaps for many essential vitamins and minerals. - A study showing multivitamins' positive effects on cognitive function, specifically memory.* - A study showing multivitamins' positive link with telomere length & longevity.* - Physician's Health Study II assessing clinical trial effects of multivitamins on health.* - Ferira's mbg article on common mistakes multivitamins make. Don't forget to use the code MULTIPOD to save 25% off mbg's ultimate multivitamin+. Our premium, comprehensive, and gentle formula optimizes the dose and bioavailability of each ingredient to promote nutritional sufficiency for life—a one-stop shop, if you will.* To learn more, visit mindbodygreen.com/multivitamin. Enjoy this episode! Whether it's an article or podcast, we want to know what we can do to help here at mindbodygreen. Let us know at: podcast@mindbodygreen.com. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. 

The Best Life Podcast
Ep. 242: Business Partnerships: Yay or Nay?

The Best Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 28:30


We had a listener ask the question: should you start a business with a friend? And while this might sound funny coming from us, our answer is a resounding HELL NO! We might seem like the dream team now, but we've both had some failed business partnerships in the past that met sticky ends. But if you're really considering it, there are a few questions you need to ask. Sure, business partnerships can work, but it's going to take a lot of extra thought.   Don't partner your business with a friend! [1:39] The Sweaty Betty's Divorce [3:55] Jill's failed partnership [6:54] The conversations we had ahead of launching the podcast [10:06] The willingness to let it go, if need-be [12:17] Can the other person contribute the way you can? [14:59] Never go 50/50 [17:29] Do it as long as you love it [19:47] Never assume the other will do things just like you do [23:41] Is it worth the risk of losing the relationship? [24:33]   thehappinessdiet.com   Get 20% OFF Organifi products at organifi.com using code ‘thebestlife'   Don't forget to leave us a review and subscribe so you never have to miss an episode! Comments and questions can also be sent to info@thebestlifepodcast.com, and you can head to thebestlifepodcast.com to join our Facebook Group.   FOLLOW US ON IG: @TheBestLifePodcast FOLLOW JILL: @jillfit FOLLOW DANNY J: @dannyjdotcom   You can also follow us on Facebook @Jill Coleman @Danny-J

Balance365 Life Radio
Episode 196: The Secret To Staying Consistent Longer Than 3 Weeks

Balance365 Life Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:02


Episode Overview What happens when you start working on new healthy habits and inevitably wake up one day and the “new and shiny” has worn off? It happens to everyone, typically around 3-5 weeks in. It's what we refer to as the 3-5 week slump, and it's something we ALL need to plan for when approaching changes to our health and wellness. Join us today to learn how to make your habits stick when the motivation starts to wear off. If you need that extra support to push through things like the 3-5 week slump, then Balance365 is for you! Doors are currently closed but if you hop on our waitlist, you can get first dibs when we open again in January! Click here: https://www.balance365.com/waitlist Key Points What is the 3-5 week slump and why does it happen What Jen did to overcome her own recent 3-5 week slump The difference between process-based goals vs outcome-based goals Our top tips for what to do when life hits hard and motivation disappears at 3-5 weeks The things we see in successful members when they hit their 3-5 week slump Mentions Balance365 Waitlist Episode 152: The Balance365 Fat Loss Formula Related Content Episode 166: How Jasmine Learned To Trust In Herself + Her 50lb Weight Loss Story Episode 157: Can I Lose Weight While Eating Like A Normal Person? Episode 133: What vs How You Eat And Why It Matters For Fat Loss Transcript Download a copy of this episode's transcript here.

Mystery Recipe
Week Eight, Episode Two: Stop, Drop, and Roll

Mystery Recipe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:01


Today Suzie is back for some true or false in Tricky Trivia. Then we're talking with someone special in Ask a Grown Up! And finally Andrea is here with more cooking advice in How To Time!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Wellness that Works
84: One Month of PersonalPoints™

Wellness that Works

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 36:19


It's been almost a month since the launch of PersonalPoints™ and we're joined by WW Coach Suzie Stirling on the podcast this week to talk all about it! She shares how her members have responded to the new plan, her top tips for success and her own amazing wellness journey. Suzie is a prime example of the incredible support we can offer across studios, virtual workshops and online so make sure to tune in!

Her Vibe Is Pretty
88. Ways to Heal Your Relationship to FOOD | Part 1

Her Vibe Is Pretty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 67:57


CLICK HERE for more deets on + to enroll in Diet Culture Dropout!Use code PRETTYVIBETRIBE by December 8th, 2021 to receive an extra $50 off! https://www.sarahjeanharken.com/diet-culture-dropoutWelcome to the Q&A (Part 1) on Your Relationship to Food with Sarah! Refer to the outline below to find out what topics where discussed. Per usual, a lot more wisdom poured out beyond the basic answer

Add Passion and Stir
Rachel Sumekh on Swiping Out Hunger on College Campuses

Add Passion and Stir

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 37:12


Rachel Sumekh, Founder & CEO of Swipe Out Hunger, discusses hunger on Swipe Out Hunger campuses and the value of activism. “One in three college students in the US today is food insecure. We pitch education and we pitch going to college as a pathway to get out of poverty, and yet our students get there and we cannot deliver on that promise,” says Sumekh. Swipe Out Hunger is the leading nonprofit addressing hunger among college students with a range of anti-hunger programs in more than 140 colleges. Their flagship program, ‘The Swipe Drive,' enables students to donate meals to their peers facing food insecurity on campus. “How we define the work really matters… If we see our work as a greater vision of building a world where everyone who wants to get an education has food in their stomachs and has an educational experience that makes them feel welcome and whole and complete… we build a different world.” Sumekh, who founded the organization with her friends as a college student, encourages listeners to get involved with issues important to them. “This is such an incredible time in our country's history to be an activist, so follow that spark, even if no one in your family understands what that means,” she advises.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ingredient Insiders: Where Chefs Talk
Lemons: Ruth Reichl & Manicaretti Italian Foods

Ingredient Insiders: Where Chefs Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 56:28


From the juicy pulp to the zesty peel, lemons balance the flavors of both sweet and savory dishes, adding acidity and brightness to just about every meal. It is one of the most essential ingredients for novice cooks and professional chefs alike. Acclaimed food writer Ruth Reichl discusses why lemons are always a staple in her pantry, the "magical properties" of lemons and why she prefers organic lemons over Meyer lemons. She shares some of her favorite lemon recipes and talks about the evolution of sustainable ingredients over the last several decades. Rolando Beremendi, founder of Manicaretti Italian Imports, reveals why argumato lemon olive oil is a perfect condiment, and shares his story behind importing Italy's finest artisanal products to the US: pasta, olive oil, vinegar and more. Follow @ruthreichl @manicaretti_italian @autentico_cookbookhttps://www.manicaretti.com/In partnership with The Chefs' Warehouse, a specialty food distributor that has been purveying high-quality artisan ingredients to chefs for over 30 years @wherechefsshophttps://www.chefswarehouse.com/Produced by HayNow Media @haynowmediahttp://haynowmedia.com/

The News with Shepard Smith
Merck's Covid Treatment, Omicron Latest & Cyber Crime

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 49:44


A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel has narrowly endorsed the use of Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics' oral Covid treatment pill, despite questions about the drug's effectiveness, safety and whether it would help the virus mutate into even more dangerous variants. CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports on questions about the safety of a Merck antiviral pill intended to fight Covid. Brown University School of Public Health Dean Dr. Ashish Jha also discusses the omicron Covid variant and just how impactful current vaccines could be against it. Drug lord El Chapo's wife Emma Coronel Aispuro has been sentenced to three years in prison after she pleaded guilty to money laundering and helping her husband's cartel traffic cocaine, meth and heroin into the U.S. WEYI reporter Stephanie Parkinson reports on another school shooting, this one in Michigan, where a 15-year-old killed three students and wounded 8 more people, including a teacher. Former Notre Dame football coach heading to LSU and Oklahoma's Lincoln Riley leaving for big, big money with USC in Los Angeles. Author and ESPN commentator Paul Finebaum joins Smith to discuss. Plus, CNBC's Eamon Javers reports on hackers that are offering holiday deals for illegal items on the dark web.

Tailgate Guys BBQ Podcast
Tailgate Guys BBQ Podcast, Episode 142: KCBS elite backyard pitmasters

Tailgate Guys BBQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 56:46


We shine the spotlight on some of the nation's best KCBS Backyard pitmasters on Episode 142 of the Tailgate Guys BBQ Podcast. Backyard Chicken Team of the Year Brian Walker and Jay Honea of Alabama's Hickory Hangover - along with Ribs Team of the Year Ted Rasky of Alabama's Veteran Pork Pullers - join us for a segment. They discuss how they got started in the backyard division and why they are in no big hurry to move up into the Masters Division. Then Ryan Cain of Kansas City's Damn Fine Beef & Swine tells us about his rookie season of competing in Backyard, where he proved a quick study. Ryan finished a close second in Team of the Year points in both Chicken and Ribs. Meanwhile, co-hosts Lyndal and Steve recap the Thanksgiving holiday and turn an eye toward Christmas grilling and smoking plans. They even discuss the crazy world of college football, where big-time coaches are on the move. Thanks to our great sponsor/marketing partners who make our show possible: Blues Hog BBQ Sauce, Royal Oak Charcoal, The Butcher Shoppe, Iowa BBQ Store, Affordable Financial Services, Arkassippi Smoke Live and The Arkassippi Combo, Vietti Marketing, In the Garden of Eden, Pro Technology Solutions, Gray Wolf Smokers and The BBQ League. Have a great BBQ Week! #SmokeEmIfYouGotEm

The Sustainable Futures Report
Food:What a Waste!

The Sustainable Futures Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 20:27


This week I'm talking to Michelle Marks about how one part of the world is starving while another part is wasting food. Michelle is a sustainability consultant. She's owner of Coral Mountain and founder of Speak Carbon, an organisation dedicated to raising carbon literacy through training.

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
How to be more consistent with your habits? Hot Seat with Payal Merchant (Listener Special)

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 6:59


In this listener special episode of #TheHabitCoach Podcast, Host Ashdin answers an interesting question from Payal Merchant - She asks, "I have been a failure of being consistent on the certain task of life. To be more clear working out, consistent on diets, so basically being consistent."Ashdin answers by explaining the common problem of maintaining consistency in most of our routines and shares a question that can help us understand the change. Further, he shares a golden rule to maintain consistency for any habit and much more!You can listen to The Habit Coach Kannada Podcast here: ( https://ivm.today/3j0Libf )Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 website: ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal
Food banks are being squeezed by inflation too

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:10


Food banks saw increased demand at the height of the pandemic. Now, as inflation limits what your buck can buy at grocery stores, demand is rising yet again. But food banks are dealing with those higher costs too, as well as supply chain issues that mean longer wait times for their orders and fewer donations. Also on today’s program, how Substack has changed the media landscape, what the omicron variant might mean for consumer confidence and why the U.K. aspires to be a green hydrogen powerhouse. Giving Tuesday challenge: Give now to help us reach $100k in donations and unlock another $100k from the Investors Challenge Fund.

Marketplace All-in-One
Food banks are being squeezed by inflation too

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:10


Food banks saw increased demand at the height of the pandemic. Now, as inflation limits what your buck can buy at grocery stores, demand is rising yet again. But food banks are dealing with those higher costs too, as well as supply chain issues that mean longer wait times for their orders and fewer donations. Also on today’s program, how Substack has changed the media landscape, what the omicron variant might mean for consumer confidence and why the U.K. aspires to be a green hydrogen powerhouse. Giving Tuesday challenge: Give now to help us reach $100k in donations and unlock another $100k from the Investors Challenge Fund.

Wally Show Podcast
Bathroom Planner: November 30, 2021

Wally Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 52:14


TWS News 1: Reverse Porch Pirating – 00:35 Your Black Friday Cyber Monday Deal – 2:43 Mind Blown – 8:56 TWS News 2: New Covid Variant – 12:42 Vacation Quiz – 15:49 Good News Giddy Up – 23:07 Where It's At – 25:15 TWS News 3: Ikea Apartment – 28:59 Times You Needed Extra Grace – 32:00 Good News Giddy Up – 36:39 Least of These: George Clooney's Experience – 40:11 Bathroom Planner – 42:59 Free Bible Quiz – 48:31 You can sponsor a child through Food for the Hungry at www.fh.org/wallyshow You can join our Wally Show Poddies Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/WallyShowPoddies/.

Wally Show Podcast
Aftercast: Very Sneaky Sir: November 30, 2021

Wally Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 32:05


We recap our vacations, Wally tells us about his cruise, Bradley Cooper got held up at knife point, we talk about unwritten rules we have at work. You can sponsor a child through Food for the Hungry at www.fh.org/wallyshow You can join our Wally Show Poddies Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/WallyShowPoddies/.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 334: The Meaning of Fasting

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 24:13


Fr. Mike highlights the importance of prayer and fasting, instructing us how to fast and empty ourselves to feel our spiritual need for Christ. He also discusses faithfulness in vocations and living out the life God has called you to as the path to holiness. Today's readings are from Acts 13, 1 Corinthians 7-8, and Proverbs 28:4-6. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.