Podcasts about second treatise

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Best podcasts about second treatise

Latest podcast episodes about second treatise

PODCAST: “Hexapodia” is þe Key Insight! XLVI: Þe One Where We Talk About Everything, wiþ Special Guest Miles Kimball

"Hexapodia" Is the Key Insight: by Noah Smith & Brad DeLong

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 64:11


Key Insights:* Yes, it is possible to talk about everything in an hour…* We are not very far apart on what the Fed is doing and should be doing—there is only a 100 basis-point disagreement…* Miles would be 100% right about the proper stance of monetary policy if he were in control of the Fed…* Miles is not in control of the Fed…* Thus Brad thinks that asymmetric risks strongly militate for pausing for six months, and then moving rapidly…* Smart people need to think much more about how to increase love…* Remember Robot Tarktil!* Noah Smith's mother is a good friend of “Murderbot” author Martha Wells…* Hexapodia!!References:* Robert Barsky, Christopher House, & Miles Kimball: Sticky-Price Models and Durable Goods * Daron Acemoglu & James Robinson: The Narrow Corridor * Mancur Olson: The Rise & Decline of Nations * Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan * John Locke: Second Treatise of Government * Edward Bellamy: Looking Backward * Robin Hanson: The Age of Em * Ruchir Agarwal & Miles Kimball: The Future of Inflation”: in Finance & Development ; IMF Podcasts * Miles Kimball: Bibliographic Post on Negative Interest Rate Policy: "How and Why to Eliminate the Zero Lower Bound: A Reader's Guide” * Miles Kimball: How a Toolkit Lacking a Full Strength Negative Interest Rate Option Led to the Current Inflationary Surge ; * Miles Kimball: How Having Negative Interest Rate Policy in Its Toolkit Would Make the Fed Braver in Confronting Inflation with Needed Rate Hikes—A Tweetstorm” * Miles Kimball: Brad DeLong Confirms that Not Having Negative Interest Rate Policy in the Monetary Policy Toolkit Makes People Afraid of Vigorous Rate Hikes to Control Inflation” ; * Miles Kimball: Serious silliness: * Miles Kimball: On the Fed's 3/4% hikes:* Miles Kimball: ”Next Generation Monetary Policy” * Miles Kimball: Tweetstorm of Favorite Passages from Noah Smith's Review of Brad DeLong's book Slouching Towards Utopia * Miles Kimball: On the Age of Em * Miles Kimball: On Consciousness * Miles Kimball: The Decline of Drudgery and the Paradox of Hard Work * Miles Kimball: The Potential of a National Well-Being Index * Miles Kimball: My Experiences with Gary Becker * Miles Kimball: Benjamin Franklin's Strategy to Make the US a Superpower Worked Once, Why Not Try It Again? * Miles Kimball: Life Coaching * Miles Kimball: Odious Wealth * Miles Kimball: Oren Cass on the Value of Work * Miles Kimball: Janet Yellen is Hardly a Dove—She Knows the US Economy Needs Some Unemployment * Miles Kimball: How and Why to Expand the Nonprofit Sector: A Reader's Guide * Miles Kimball: On John Locke's Second Treatise +, of course:* Vernor Vinge: A Fire Upon the Deep Start writing today. Use the button below to create your Substack and connect your publication with Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality Get full access to Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality at braddelong.substack.com/subscribe

New Books in the History of Science
Lorraine Daston Rules the World (EF, JP)

New Books in the History of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 45:34


Lorraine Daston, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). Historian of science Lorraine Daston's wonderful new book, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). is just out. Daston's earlier pathbreaking works include Against Nature, Classical Probability in the Enlightenment and many co-authored books, including Objectivity (with Peter Galison) which introduced the idea of historically changeable "epistemic virtues." In this Recall this Book conversation, Daston--Raine to her friends--shows that rules are never as thin (as abstract and context-free) as they pretend to be. True, we love a rule that seems to brook no exceptions: by the Renaissance, even God is no longer allowed to make exceptions in the form of miracles. Yet throughout history, Raine shows, islands of standardized stability are less stable than they seem. What may feel like oppressively general norms and standards are actually highly protected ecotopes within which thin rules can arise. Look for instance at the history of sidewalks (Raine has)! Raine, Elizabeth and John dive into the details. Implicit and explicit rules are distinguished in the case of e.g. cookbooks and monasteries--and then the gray areas in-between are explored. When students unconsciously ape their teachers, that is a tricky form of emulation--is it even possible to "follow but not ape"? Perhaps genres do this work: The Aeneid is not the Iliad and yet older writers are somehow internalized in the later ones. Mentioned in the Episode Karl Polanyi, 1944) The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time, on the embeddedness of markets in norms and rules. John Locke's Second Treatise on Government (1690) denounces the "arbitrary will of another," an early case of seeing will simply qua will is unacceptable. Arnold Davidson sees genre variation (like Milton learning from Homer) also happening in musical invention. Michael Tomasello works on children's rule-following and enforcement against violations, Johannes Huizinga's Homo Ludens (1938) with its notion of demarcated "sacred spaces of play" is a touchstone of rule-following Lorraine and John both adore. Recallable Books The Rule of Saint Benedict (516 onwards) Irma Rombauer, Joy of Cooking (1931 onwards) As Elizabeth says, it's from following the rules that joy emerges.... Walter Miller's Canticle for Liebowitz Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground (1864) an instance of the notion that one establishes free will by caprice or defiance against natural laws ("damnit, gentleman, sometimes 2+2=5 is a nice thing too!") Read the transcript here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

NBN Book of the Day
Lorraine Daston Rules the World (EF, JP)

NBN Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 45:34


Lorraine Daston, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). Historian of science Lorraine Daston's wonderful new book, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). is just out. Daston's earlier pathbreaking works include Against Nature, Classical Probability in the Enlightenment and many co-authored books, including Objectivity (with Peter Galison) which introduced the idea of historically changeable "epistemic virtues." In this Recall this Book conversation, Daston--Raine to her friends--shows that rules are never as thin (as abstract and context-free) as they pretend to be. True, we love a rule that seems to brook no exceptions: by the Renaissance, even God is no longer allowed to make exceptions in the form of miracles. Yet throughout history, Raine shows, islands of standardized stability are less stable than they seem. What may feel like oppressively general norms and standards are actually highly protected ecotopes within which thin rules can arise. Look for instance at the history of sidewalks (Raine has)! Raine, Elizabeth and John dive into the details. Implicit and explicit rules are distinguished in the case of e.g. cookbooks and monasteries--and then the gray areas in-between are explored. When students unconsciously ape their teachers, that is a tricky form of emulation--is it even possible to "follow but not ape"? Perhaps genres do this work: The Aeneid is not the Iliad and yet older writers are somehow internalized in the later ones. Mentioned in the Episode Karl Polanyi, 1944) The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time, on the embeddedness of markets in norms and rules. John Locke's Second Treatise on Government (1690) denounces the "arbitrary will of another," an early case of seeing will simply qua will is unacceptable. Arnold Davidson sees genre variation (like Milton learning from Homer) also happening in musical invention. Michael Tomasello works on children's rule-following and enforcement against violations, Johannes Huizinga's Homo Ludens (1938) with its notion of demarcated "sacred spaces of play" is a touchstone of rule-following Lorraine and John both adore. Recallable Books The Rule of Saint Benedict (516 onwards) Irma Rombauer, Joy of Cooking (1931 onwards) As Elizabeth says, it's from following the rules that joy emerges.... Walter Miller's Canticle for Liebowitz Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground (1864) an instance of the notion that one establishes free will by caprice or defiance against natural laws ("damnit, gentleman, sometimes 2+2=5 is a nice thing too!") Read the transcript here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/book-of-the-day

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast
Lorraine Daston Rules the World (EF, JP)

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 45:34


Lorraine Daston, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). Historian of science Lorraine Daston's wonderful new book, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). is just out. Daston's earlier pathbreaking works include Against Nature, Classical Probability in the Enlightenment and many co-authored books, including Objectivity (with Peter Galison) which introduced the idea of historically changeable "epistemic virtues." In this Recall this Book conversation, Daston--Raine to her friends--shows that rules are never as thin (as abstract and context-free) as they pretend to be. True, we love a rule that seems to brook no exceptions: by the Renaissance, even God is no longer allowed to make exceptions in the form of miracles. Yet throughout history, Raine shows, islands of standardized stability are less stable than they seem. What may feel like oppressively general norms and standards are actually highly protected ecotopes within which thin rules can arise. Look for instance at the history of sidewalks (Raine has)! Raine, Elizabeth and John dive into the details. Implicit and explicit rules are distinguished in the case of e.g. cookbooks and monasteries--and then the gray areas in-between are explored. When students unconsciously ape their teachers, that is a tricky form of emulation--is it even possible to "follow but not ape"? Perhaps genres do this work: The Aeneid is not the Iliad and yet older writers are somehow internalized in the later ones. Mentioned in the Episode Karl Polanyi, 1944) The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time, on the embeddedness of markets in norms and rules. John Locke's Second Treatise on Government (1690) denounces the "arbitrary will of another," an early case of seeing will simply qua will is unacceptable. Arnold Davidson sees genre variation (like Milton learning from Homer) also happening in musical invention. Michael Tomasello works on children's rule-following and enforcement against violations, Johannes Huizinga's Homo Ludens (1938) with its notion of demarcated "sacred spaces of play" is a touchstone of rule-following Lorraine and John both adore. Recallable Books The Rule of Saint Benedict (516 onwards) Irma Rombauer, Joy of Cooking (1931 onwards) As Elizabeth says, it's from following the rules that joy emerges.... Walter Miller's Canticle for Liebowitz Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground (1864) an instance of the notion that one establishes free will by caprice or defiance against natural laws ("damnit, gentleman, sometimes 2+2=5 is a nice thing too!") Read the transcript here.

New Books in Intellectual History
Lorraine Daston Rules the World (EF, JP)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 45:34


Lorraine Daston, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). Historian of science Lorraine Daston's wonderful new book, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). is just out. Daston's earlier pathbreaking works include Against Nature, Classical Probability in the Enlightenment and many co-authored books, including Objectivity (with Peter Galison) which introduced the idea of historically changeable "epistemic virtues." In this Recall this Book conversation, Daston--Raine to her friends--shows that rules are never as thin (as abstract and context-free) as they pretend to be. True, we love a rule that seems to brook no exceptions: by the Renaissance, even God is no longer allowed to make exceptions in the form of miracles. Yet throughout history, Raine shows, islands of standardized stability are less stable than they seem. What may feel like oppressively general norms and standards are actually highly protected ecotopes within which thin rules can arise. Look for instance at the history of sidewalks (Raine has)! Raine, Elizabeth and John dive into the details. Implicit and explicit rules are distinguished in the case of e.g. cookbooks and monasteries--and then the gray areas in-between are explored. When students unconsciously ape their teachers, that is a tricky form of emulation--is it even possible to "follow but not ape"? Perhaps genres do this work: The Aeneid is not the Iliad and yet older writers are somehow internalized in the later ones. Mentioned in the Episode Karl Polanyi, 1944) The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time, on the embeddedness of markets in norms and rules. John Locke's Second Treatise on Government (1690) denounces the "arbitrary will of another," an early case of seeing will simply qua will is unacceptable. Arnold Davidson sees genre variation (like Milton learning from Homer) also happening in musical invention. Michael Tomasello works on children's rule-following and enforcement against violations, Johannes Huizinga's Homo Ludens (1938) with its notion of demarcated "sacred spaces of play" is a touchstone of rule-following Lorraine and John both adore. Recallable Books The Rule of Saint Benedict (516 onwards) Irma Rombauer, Joy of Cooking (1931 onwards) As Elizabeth says, it's from following the rules that joy emerges.... Walter Miller's Canticle for Liebowitz Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground (1864) an instance of the notion that one establishes free will by caprice or defiance against natural laws ("damnit, gentleman, sometimes 2+2=5 is a nice thing too!") Read the transcript here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Lorraine Daston Rules the World (EF, JP)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 45:34


Lorraine Daston, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). Historian of science Lorraine Daston's wonderful new book, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). is just out. Daston's earlier pathbreaking works include Against Nature, Classical Probability in the Enlightenment and many co-authored books, including Objectivity (with Peter Galison) which introduced the idea of historically changeable "epistemic virtues." In this Recall this Book conversation, Daston--Raine to her friends--shows that rules are never as thin (as abstract and context-free) as they pretend to be. True, we love a rule that seems to brook no exceptions: by the Renaissance, even God is no longer allowed to make exceptions in the form of miracles. Yet throughout history, Raine shows, islands of standardized stability are less stable than they seem. What may feel like oppressively general norms and standards are actually highly protected ecotopes within which thin rules can arise. Look for instance at the history of sidewalks (Raine has)! Raine, Elizabeth and John dive into the details. Implicit and explicit rules are distinguished in the case of e.g. cookbooks and monasteries--and then the gray areas in-between are explored. When students unconsciously ape their teachers, that is a tricky form of emulation--is it even possible to "follow but not ape"? Perhaps genres do this work: The Aeneid is not the Iliad and yet older writers are somehow internalized in the later ones. Mentioned in the Episode Karl Polanyi, 1944) The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time, on the embeddedness of markets in norms and rules. John Locke's Second Treatise on Government (1690) denounces the "arbitrary will of another," an early case of seeing will simply qua will is unacceptable. Arnold Davidson sees genre variation (like Milton learning from Homer) also happening in musical invention. Michael Tomasello works on children's rule-following and enforcement against violations, Johannes Huizinga's Homo Ludens (1938) with its notion of demarcated "sacred spaces of play" is a touchstone of rule-following Lorraine and John both adore. Recallable Books The Rule of Saint Benedict (516 onwards) Irma Rombauer, Joy of Cooking (1931 onwards) As Elizabeth says, it's from following the rules that joy emerges.... Walter Miller's Canticle for Liebowitz Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground (1864) an instance of the notion that one establishes free will by caprice or defiance against natural laws ("damnit, gentleman, sometimes 2+2=5 is a nice thing too!") Read the transcript here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in History
Lorraine Daston Rules the World (EF, JP)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 45:34


Lorraine Daston, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). Historian of science Lorraine Daston's wonderful new book, Rules: A Short History of What We Live by (Princeton UP, 2022). is just out. Daston's earlier pathbreaking works include Against Nature, Classical Probability in the Enlightenment and many co-authored books, including Objectivity (with Peter Galison) which introduced the idea of historically changeable "epistemic virtues." In this Recall this Book conversation, Daston--Raine to her friends--shows that rules are never as thin (as abstract and context-free) as they pretend to be. True, we love a rule that seems to brook no exceptions: by the Renaissance, even God is no longer allowed to make exceptions in the form of miracles. Yet throughout history, Raine shows, islands of standardized stability are less stable than they seem. What may feel like oppressively general norms and standards are actually highly protected ecotopes within which thin rules can arise. Look for instance at the history of sidewalks (Raine has)! Raine, Elizabeth and John dive into the details. Implicit and explicit rules are distinguished in the case of e.g. cookbooks and monasteries--and then the gray areas in-between are explored. When students unconsciously ape their teachers, that is a tricky form of emulation--is it even possible to "follow but not ape"? Perhaps genres do this work: The Aeneid is not the Iliad and yet older writers are somehow internalized in the later ones. Mentioned in the Episode Karl Polanyi, 1944) The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time, on the embeddedness of markets in norms and rules. John Locke's Second Treatise on Government (1690) denounces the "arbitrary will of another," an early case of seeing will simply qua will is unacceptable. Arnold Davidson sees genre variation (like Milton learning from Homer) also happening in musical invention. Michael Tomasello works on children's rule-following and enforcement against violations, Johannes Huizinga's Homo Ludens (1938) with its notion of demarcated "sacred spaces of play" is a touchstone of rule-following Lorraine and John both adore. Recallable Books The Rule of Saint Benedict (516 onwards) Irma Rombauer, Joy of Cooking (1931 onwards) As Elizabeth says, it's from following the rules that joy emerges.... Walter Miller's Canticle for Liebowitz Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground (1864) an instance of the notion that one establishes free will by caprice or defiance against natural laws ("damnit, gentleman, sometimes 2+2=5 is a nice thing too!") Read the transcript here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

What's Left of Philosophy
40 Teaser | What is Liberalism? Part I. John Locke's Second Treatise of Government

What's Left of Philosophy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 11:42


In this episode we kick off our new series called “What is Liberalism?” with private property, conquest, and a discussion about John Locke's apologia for both. We appreciate the efforts of the left to civilize liberalism in the wake of its own civilizing efforts across the globe, but we ask whether it's really possible to separate economic and political liberalism to make liberalism work for the left. Our experiences in DEI workshops suggest not, although many who are smarter than Locke have tried. The full episode is available on our patreon!patreon.com/leftofphilosophy | @leftofphil References: John Locke, Second Treatise of Government, ed. C.B. Macpherson (Indianapolis: Hackett, 1980) Music: Vintage Memories by Schematist | schematist.bandcamp.com

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 23. Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 40:44


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. The three modern "social contract" political philosophers need to be seen in their similarities and divesities. They are founders, with Machiavelli, of modern political philosophy. Each shows a logical deviation from the groundings of political things in Aristitle and Aquinas. The Leviathan, the Second Treatise in Civil Government, and theSocial Contract are the basic texts   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org

Queen of the Sciences
Thomas Jefferson, Theologian

Queen of the Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 65:42


Being great afficionados of great thinkers who are impossible contradictions, we turn our attention to American founding father Thomas Jefferson: the man who penned the stirring words of the Declaration of Independence that "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness" ... and yet, in his lifetime, owned over 600 slaves including a (for lack of a better term) concubine, Sally Hemings (who also happened to be his deceased wife's half-sister...!!), manumitted only two of those slaves and none of them his own children by Sally until after his death according to his will, and made at best lackluster gestures toward the injustice of it all, not to mention its moral corruption of slaveholders. In this episode, we try to make sense of this "American sphinx" and especially his revisionist attitude toward Christianity, producing a variation on the faith with no power to set slaves free—or Jefferson himself. Notes: 1. Ellis, American Sphinx 2. Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power 3. Jefferson, Writings (Library of America). See in particular the following: Notes on the State of Virginia, 1787 letter to Peter Carr, 1803 letter to Joseph Priestley, 1803 letter to Benjamin Rush, 1813 letter to John Adams, 1816 letter to Charles Thomson, 1819 and 1820 letters to William Short, 1822 letter to Benjamin Waterhouse, 1826 letter to James Heaton. 4. Locke, Second Treatise of Government and Letter concerning Toleration 5. Havel, “The Power of the Powerless” 6. Manseau, The Jefferson Bible Do you rejoice every other Tuesday to see a new Queen of the Sciences episode appear? Then consider supporting us on Patreon. You can start at just $2 a month; more gets you swag. Or just pay us a visit at sarahhinlickywilson.com and paulhinlicky.com!

Democracycast
Hybrid Warfare

Democracycast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 29:22


Dean Edwards reports on hybrid warfare as is happening in Ukraine. Disinformation and misinformation terms are explained.   He also recommends these resources for self governance: John Locke's writing, Second Treatise on Civil Government. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Two-Treatises-of-Government and Locke a very short introduction from Oxford University Press   For some information on nonviolent conflicts see:  https://www.aeinstein.org/    More breaking news on Ukraine is available on Walter Lehk's Twitter @walterlekh    Since Twitter Spaces are a recent development you can find information about them at:  https://www.google.com/search?q=twitter+spaces&oq=Tw&aqs=chrome.3.69i60j69i57j35i39l2j69i60j69i61j69i60l2.8062j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8    You can find links to our spaces by searching Twitter for  #democracymovementsreport and #Democracy Watch News also, without the #, search Twitter for Democracy Movements Report and Democracy Watch News. Also at: https://twitter.com/dwatchnews_eur   To donate to our developing news service go to www.democracywatchnews.org   #ukraine#Russia Listen or Direct download: https://democracycast.libsyn.com Send listener feedback to democracycast@earthlink.net  Our website:  www.democracywatchnews.org    Twitter: D Watch News International https://twitter.com/dwatchnews?lang=en   Twitter: DWatch News  North America      https://twitter.com/dwatchnews_nam/lists/engagement-n-america  Facebook:  https://facebook.com/dwatchnews Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/democracywatchnews/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/35464830  YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRhWxBiRG-01eLS9A_vlVuA   Our production team and theme music https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rnPeRDB3JTrr80N_NlLmUM7nEzrRejw8-5qFYd45W5M/edit?usp=sharing  Democracy Watch News is currently produced by volunteers. Please  donate if you can.    https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=FQZHMRJUTN5XU

Tom Mullen Talks Freedom
You Have a Right to What You Own and Nothing More

Tom Mullen Talks Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 39:30


Summary: Libertarians since Thomas Jefferson have talked about natural, inalienable rights to life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness, and more. We entertain the correct view that our rights are so numerous that they couldn't all be named in any manifesto or treatise. The only problem is that, since rights are so numerous and can't all be named in any one place, those wishing to invade our true rights start inventing false ones like rights to healthcare or education or to lock us in our homes until they feel safe from a virus they believe we might be carrying. In this episode, I suggest that we stop thinking and talking about rights as separate and distinct principles and return to the source of our philosophy and a concept that might help us more clearly understand and articulate our positions. Additional Reading: https://tommullen.net/featured/you-have-a-right-to-what-you-own-and-nothing-more/ (You Have a Right to What You Own and Nothing More) https://constitution.org/2-Authors/jl/2ndtreat.htm (The Second Treatise of Civil Government – John Locke (1690)) https://mises.org/library/new-liberty-libertarian-manifesto (For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto (1973)) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1517679419/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1517679419&linkCode=as2&tag=tomusbl-20&linkId=8ffcd00e36fcd936b55c717656027b1d (Where Do Conservatives and Liberals Come From? Part 1 – Tom Mullen (2015)) https://tommullen.net/featured/the-best-argument-against-minimum-wage-laws-you-dont-own-other-people/ (The Best Argument Against Minimum Wage Laws: You Don't Own Other People) Free Gift from Tom: Download a free copy of Tom's new e-book, An Anti-State Christmas, at http://antistatechristmas.com/ (antistatechristmas.com). It's also available in paperback. A great stocking stuffer! Get a few copies for friends and family who need deprogramming or even just a few laughs. Like the music on Tom Mullen Talks Freedom? You can hear more at https://skepticsongs.com/ (tommullensings.com)!

The Connected Sociologies Podcast
Early Modern Social Theory: Europe and its ‘Others'- Prof John Holmwood

The Connected Sociologies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:08


  This session looks at the beginnings of modern European social theory in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The English political philosophers, Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) and John Locke (1632-1704), set out a distinction between the ‘state of nature' and the ‘state of society' in order to identify rights and obligations associated with private property. Their writings are widely seen in the context of the later development of capitalism, but are much more directly concerned with the justification of colonialism with which they were each directly engaged. In the eighteenth century, writers associated with the Scottish Enlightenment –for example, David Hume (1711-1776), Adam Smith (1723-1790), William Robertson (1721-1793), John Millar (1735-1801), and Adam Ferguson (1723-1816) – developed a typology of different types of society as stages of historical development. In this session, we consider how these ideas contributed to the view that ‘freedom' was a product of European modernity and that modernity operated in terms of an internal logic from which colonialism was effaced. Reading Bhambra, Gurminder K. and John Holmwood 2021. ‘Hobbes to Hegel: Europe and its Others' in Colonialism and Modern Social Theory. Cambridge: Polity Hegel, G. W. F. 1975 [1830]. Lectures on the Philosophy of World History. Introduction: Reason in History. Translated by H. B. Nisbet. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Hobbes, Thomas 1991 [1651]. Leviathan. Edited by Richard Tuck. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Lebovics, Herman 1986. ‘The Uses of America in Locke's Second Treatise of Government,' Journal of the History of Ideas 47 (4): 567-581 Locke, John 1960 [1698]. Two Treatises of Government. Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Peter Laslett. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Meek, Ronald 1976. Social Science and the Ignoble Savage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Welchman, Jennifer 1995. ‘Locke on Slavery and Inalienable Rights,' Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (1): 67-81  

The Thomas Jefferson Hour
#1456 Written in Your Heart

The Thomas Jefferson Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 57:05


Jefferson answers listener questions about his classification systems, and Monticello's gardens and water supply. Jefferson offers advice to a young woman who is trying to be a "good student of liberty." He tells her that "liberty is written in your heart." You can order Clay's new book at Amazon, Target, Barnes and Noble, or by contacting your independent bookstore. The Language of Cottonwoods is out now through Koehler Books. Mentioned on this episode: Virgil Online Course and Lewis and Clark Tours, books by Thomas Paine, including Common Sense, The American Crisis, The Age of Reason, and The Rights of Man, The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, Jefferson and His Time by Dumas Malone, Second Treatise of Government by John Locke, The Aeneid (Robert Fagles Translation) by Virgil, The Odes of Horace, Histories by Tacitus, History of Rome by Livy, History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides, Histories by Herodotus, The Iliad by Homer, The Odyssey by Homer, Voltaire, Bolingbroke, David Hume, Find this episode, along with recommended reading, on the blog. Support the show by joining the 1776 Club or by donating to the Thomas Jefferson Hour, Inc. You can learn more about Clay's cultural tours and retreats at jeffersonhour.com/tours. Check out our new merch. You can find Clay's publications on our website, along with a list of his favorite books on Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, and other topics. Thomas Jefferson is interpreted by Clay S. Jenkinson.

Black Robe Regiment Revival
No King but Jesus!

Black Robe Regiment Revival

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 88:30


The final installment of my series of messages concerning natural law, and your God-given rights. Topics Discussed. The Declaration of Independence and the natural law principles contained within. Patriotism is dangerous and extreme to tyrants and despots. We have the means to save our Constitutional Republic at our disposal- Are we going to stand tall or forfeit our liberty? The Black Robed Regiment, and why we need a revival of the fighting spirit of these valiant men today. Can a government be secular and immoral, and still maintain the civil and religious liberties of it's people? Stop waiving that white flag of surrender, Christian soldier, and stand fast in the liberty wherewith Christ has made you free! What does it mean to have “No King but Jesus”? The two Biblical examples that correlate with the Declaration of Independence What is the fate of tyrants and bloodthirsty oppressors? The Declaration of Independence, natural and revealed law, and The Second Treatise of Government. The call for a regiment of fearless Christian soldiers, and how the future of America depends upon them. Philippians 2:9-15 Much, much more! Social Media- www.gab.com/MisanthropicMonk Video- https://ugetube.com/@misanthropic_monk Video- https://www.bitchute.com/channel/BbJnmmsNdL5Q/ Video- https://odysee.com/@MisanthropicMonk:b Please like, share, and subscribe!

Queen of the Sciences
The Empiricists Strike Back

Queen of the Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 66:31


In matters civic, we have great sympathies with empiricist and classical-liberal critics of the recent woke madness induced by Critical Social Theory. And yet... In this episode we distinguish among the many children of the Enlightenment, point out the strengths of the empiricist/liberal tradition but also its corresponding weaknesses that CST exploits, and exhort secular empiricists to reconsider the moral, spiritual, and theological roots of the intellectual tradition that they rightly see as critically endangered. So have a listen, and then share this episode with an empiricist near you! Support us on Patreon! Notes: 1. Pluckrose and Lindsay, Cynical Theories 2. Spinoza, Principles of Cartesian Philosophy 3. Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy 4. Sharp, Spinoza and the Politics of Renaturalization 5. Locke, Second Treatise of Government 6. Dennett, Darwin's Dangerous Idea 7. Rectenwald, Springtime for Snowflakes 8. Also check out our episode on Faith to the Aid of Reason More about us at sarahhinlickywilson.com and paulhinlicky.com!

Reflections on Risale-i Nur
Twenty Ninth Letter, Second Treatise - On Ramadan 04

Reflections on Risale-i Nur

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2021 66:09


“In this section which will be about the noble Ramadan, the most brilliant and magnificent one among those tokens, some of the wisdoms of the noble Ramadan will be mentioned. This second section comprises Nine Subtle Points that expound nine out of many wisdoms of the noble Ramadan.” For a rough translation of the section that is being discussed click here (scroll to Episode 04). This text is a work in progress and should not be considered a finalized translation. It is only meant to help with understanding the recorded discussion. Read and interpreted by Mustafa Tuna. For more on the Risale-i Nur, visit www.reflections-RN.org.

Reflections on Risale-i Nur
Twenty Ninth Letter, Second Treatise - On Ramadan 03

Reflections on Risale-i Nur

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2021 78:36


“In this section which will be about the noble Ramadan, the most brilliant and magnificent one among those tokens, some of the wisdoms of the noble Ramadan will be mentioned. This second section comprises Nine Subtle Points that expound nine out of many wisdoms of the noble Ramadan.” For a rough translation of the section that is being discussed click here (scroll to Episode 03). This text is a work in progress and should not be considered a finalized translation. It is only meant to help with understanding the recorded discussion. Read and interpreted by Mustafa Tuna. For more on the Risale-i Nur, visit www.reflections-RN.org.

Reflections on Risale-i Nur
Twenty Ninth Letter, Second Treatise - On Ramadan 02

Reflections on Risale-i Nur

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2021 66:36


“In this section which will be about the noble Ramadan, the most brilliant and magnificent one among those tokens, some of the wisdoms of the noble Ramadan will be mentioned. This second section comprises Nine Subtle Points that expound nine out of many wisdoms of the noble Ramadan.” For a rough translation of the section that is being discussed click here (scroll to Episode 02). This text is a work in progress and should not be considered a finalized translation. It is only meant to help with understanding the recorded discussion. Read and interpreted by Mustafa Tuna. For more on the Risale-i Nur, visit www.reflections-RN.org.

Reflections on Risale-i Nur
Twenty Ninth Letter, Second Treatise - On Ramadan 01

Reflections on Risale-i Nur

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2021 75:43


“In this section which will be about the noble Ramadan, the most brilliant and magnificent one among those tokens, some of the wisdoms of the noble Ramadan will be mentioned. This second section comprises Nine Subtle Points that expound nine out of many wisdoms of the noble Ramadan.” For a rough translation of the section that is being discussed click here (scroll to Episode 01). This text is a work in progress and should not be considered a finalized translation. It is only meant to help with understanding the recorded discussion. Read and interpreted by Mustafa Tuna. For more on the Risale-i Nur, visit www.reflections-RN.org.

The Thomas Jefferson Hour
#1436 Appointments and Disappointments

The Thomas Jefferson Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 60:39


We speak with President Thomas Jefferson this week about his cabinet, particularly about his Secretary of the Treasury, Albert Gallatin. President Jefferson, as portrayed by humanities scholar Clay S. Jenkinson, gives credit to Mr. Gallatin for retiring the national debt during his administration, for running the federal government while Jefferson and Madison were away, and for keeping government spending in check. In the What Would Jefferson Do segment, Jefferson recommends reading: Thomas Paine, Common Sense; Tacitus, The Histories; Montesquieu, Spirit of the Laws; The letters and orations of Cicero; John Locke, Second Treatise on Government; and The Federalist Papers. Read about Clay's upcoming online courses here: https://jeffersonhour.com/onlinecourse Find this episode, along with recommended reading, on the blog. Support the show by joining the 1776 Club or by donating to the Thomas Jefferson Hour, Inc. You can learn more about Clay's cultural tours and retreats at jeffersonhour.com/tours. Check out our new merch. You can find Clay's publications on our website, along with a list of his favorite books on Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, and other topics. Thomas Jefferson is interpreted by Clay S. Jenkinson.

The Classroom
Second Treatise of Government (1689) - John Locke

The Classroom

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 23:53 Transcription Available


 In this episode, Erick Nganyange and Professor Ron Cline discuss the impact of John Locke's book “second treatise of government”. John Locke was a British philosopher, Oxford academic, and medical researcher. In his book, Second Treatise of Government (1689),  Locke places sovereignty into the hands of the people.  The student and Professor are discussing Locke's ideas on the state of nature, state of war, slavery, and dissolution of Government. 

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast
REISSUE-PEL Ep 37: Locke on Political Power (w/ New Intro)

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2020 109:26


A 2011 episode on John Locke's Second Treatise on Government (1690), with a fresh introduction connecting it to the present. What makes political power legitimate? Like Hobbes, Locke thought that things are less than ideal without a society to keep people from killing us, so we implicitly sign a social contract giving power to the state. But on Locke's view, nature’s not as bad, so the state is given less power. But how much less? And what does Locke think about tea partying, kids, women, acorns, foreign travelers, and calling dibs? Featuring guest Sabrina Weiss. Hear the full, new reconsideration of this episode by Mark, Wes, and Dylan on the latest Nightcap available via partiallyexaminedlife.com/support. End song: "Lock Them Away," by Mark Lint (2003). Sponsors: Save $35 off meal delivery at SunBasket.com/PEL, code PEL. Have your donations matched up to $250 at givewell.org/PEL (select podcast and Partially Examined Life). Learn about St. John’s college at sjc.edu/PEL.  

Tony Talks Back
Political Philosophy: Capitalism, Adam Smith, and The Wealth of Nations

Tony Talks Back

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2020 19:50


Love it or hate it, we are all here today because of capitalism. There are few if any global systems more well-developed than our markets and free trade. Listen to my personal philosophy, the general philosophy of capitalism, and its modern foundations in the writings of Adam Smith in this rather more controversial podcast episode. BECOME A PATRON: https://www.patreon.com/TonyTalksBack Or, make a one-time donation here: https://paypal.me/TonyTalksBack Follow on social media for updates on new content and releases: https://www.facebook.com/TonyTalksBack/ https://twitter.com/TonyTalksBack Learn more about the topics discussed: Biography of Adam Smith: https://www.investopedia.com/updates/adam-smith-wealth-of-nations/ Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/3300/3300-h/3300-h.htm Locke's Second Treatise on Government: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/7370/7370-h/7370-h.htm Capitalism: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/capitalism.asp Global poverty statistics: https://ourworldindata.org/extreme-poverty? Music credits: Peace of Mind by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4199-peace-of-mind License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Canon In D For Two Harps by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/6959-canon-in-d-for-two-harps License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ SCP-x5x (Outer Thoughts) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/6735-scp-x5x-outer-thoughts- License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Overthink
Anti-Maskers and American Individualism

Overthink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2020 49:52 Transcription Available


On episode 3 of Overthink, Ellie and David delve into the rise of Anti-Mask protests across the country. The two discuss American individualism in our conception of freedom, the role of breath in the Judeo-Christian tradition, how much freedom we actually have when choosing lunch, and so much more!Interested in the works discussed? You can find them here:  G.W.F. Hegel, The Philosophy of RightJohn Locke, Second Treatise of GovernmentSimone de Beauvoir, America Day By Day and The Ethics of Ambiguity Nietzsche, The Genealogy of MoralsThe BibleKate Manne, Down GirlDeep Throat (adult film)Website | overthinkpodcast.comInstagram & Twitter | @overthink_podEmail |  Dearoverthink@gmail.comYouTube | Overthink podcast

How Enslavement was Justified in America During 1715-1815
“Slavery would be too difficult to abolish due to its necessity to the country and its economy

How Enslavement was Justified in America During 1715-1815

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2020 27:30


Thank you for listening to my podcast! Here is my bibliography: Jefferson, Thomas. Autobiography of Thomas Jefferson. New York and London: The Knickerbocker Press, 1914. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/loc.ark:/13960/t84j0wc2d.  Jefferson, Thomas. “The Complete Memoirs, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers of Thomas Jefferson.” Edited by David Widger. The Project Gutenberg, May 17, 2009. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/28860/28860-h/28860-h.htm To Jefferson, it was anti-democratic and contrary to the principles of the American Revolution for the federal government to enact abolition or for only a few planters to free their slaves. Locke, John. “Second Treatise of Government by John Locke.” The Project Gutenberg eBook of Second Treatise Of Government By John Locke. Accessed March 3, 2020. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/7370/7370-h/7370-h.htm. Locke, John. “Two Treatises of Government by John Locke.” The Project Gutenberg eBook of Two Treatises Of Government By John Locke. Accessed March 3, 2020. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/7370/old/trgov10h.htm 

Discourse Magazine Podcast
A Brief History of Liberalism: Ben Klutsey talks to Alan Kors

Discourse Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2020 49:39


In this conversation, Director of Academic Outreach at Mercatus, Ben Klutsey, speaks with Dr. Alan Charles Kors, Henry Charles Lea Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Kors surveys the history of Liberalism's triumphs and setbacks from the Enlightenment to modern college classrooms. The audio, as well as the transcript of this conversation between Klutsey and Kors, has been slightly edited for clarity. Love the show? Consider giving us a rating on Apple Podcasts and be sure to check out the Discourse Magazine for more. Resources mentioned: Voltaire, Letters on England John Stuart Mill, On Liberty John Locke, Second Treatise on Government F. A. Hayek, Road to Serfdom Alan Kors, Syllabus for History of Classical Liberal Thought Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State, and Utopia John Rawls, A Theory of Justice

Origins: Explorations of thought-leaders' pivotal moments
Episode 22: Elizabeth Anderson - A new equality and the philosopher for this moment in American life

Origins: Explorations of thought-leaders' pivotal moments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2020 80:58


Show Notes: Marx Philosophic and Economic manuscript of 1844 (3:30) Changed by exposure to systematic class privilege (7:10) ‘Cubilcle’-ization revolution (8:10) Normative aspects of economics and markets (11:30) The American Economic Journal (15:00) Being intellectually curious (16:00) Hugh Lacey History of Philosophy and Science - Swarthmore (16:00) Thomas Kuhn - Structure of Scientific Revolutions (18:30) How scientific ‘controversies’ arise and how they are resolved Intellectual fruitfulness of doing philosophy of X where X can be any discipline or problem (20:00) Turning point: do this from political and economic philosophy Normative inquiry has to be responsive to the actual experiences of people (22:00) Early life as a contemporary philosopher (24:00) John Dewey and privatism (25:00) Max Weber “Science as a Vocation" (26:30) Any vocation is ‘Wissenschaft’ (knowledge-making) Sustaining moments are those when the big questions arise Why it is hard to ask people what matters to them (32:00) Ethnography and human-centered design - how your ideas impact on the ground (33:20) Read broadly (34:00) "The Island Of Stone Money” - Island of Yap (36:30) Creative process (38:20) “The key is always to keep reading" How she decides what to read - have a research question in mind (39:20) What is populism? By Jan-Werner Müller (42:20) Landmark paper “What is the point of equality” (42:30) Quest for equality is a quest for justice, to get rid of oppressive social relations (46:20) MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius Grants’ (47:25) Cecilia Conrad Origins episode (48:20) Future book (50:30) Research into how different disciplines attributes ‘genius’ (51:30) Definitions of genius (52:00) How she organizes information (52:30) Thomas Piketty Capital in the Twenty-First Century (1:00:00) Morning routine (1:07:10) Locke’s Second Treatise (1:09:50) Lightning Round (1:17:00) Book: The Theory of Moral Sentiments by Adam Smith 'Five-Cut Fridays’ series Guest’s list

A Shareable World
18. Theories of private property in the age of capitalism: Hobbes and Locke

A Shareable World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2020 47:01


“…all of this is important because it's about how I, or you or anyone else has to live one's daily life. In other words, all these theories are just that there are things that intellectuals play with. But the problem is how do I live my daily life? How do I justify what I do when I get up in the morning? How do I treat my children, and my grandchildren? And so forth. That's where it has to be considered.”—big mike Listen: iTunes, Spotify, Mixcloud | Transcript In this episode: 00:00 How do utopian forms of thinking change, looking into the 16th and 17th centuries, towards justifying current power structures as opposed to opposing them? What does this have to do with competing strands of emerging socialism and capitalism? How does private property emerge as an idea and practice? How does it relate to theories of the social contract? 13:29 How are different justifications for (or attacks on) private property derived from different concepts of the ‘state of nature,' or fables about prehistory? How does Locke's theory about property anticipate the labor theory of value in Marx? 28:10 What are labor theories of value? How did they allow people to articulate utopian forms of society, based around valuing the worker? What ideas do people have around the management of wealth and the planning of society? 37:44 What are the assumptions about human beings built in to stories about private property and the social contract? How does this have to do with earlier discussed stories around the Bible etc.? What does socialism assume about human nature? 43:13 How do questions around human nature enable us to think about what education should look like in a new society? Further Reading Johann Valentin Andreae, Christianopolis Tommaso Campanella, The City of the Sun Peter Chamberlen, The Poore Man's Advocate Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan John Locke, Second Treatise on Government

Queen of the Sciences
Two Kingdoms, 20th and 21st Century Edition

Queen of the Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2020 58:34


Can a distinction between the religious and governmental realms hashed out in the sixteenth century be remotely useful for us today? Well, we give it an honest try. If in the past the danger was religion invading the realm of the state and making use of violent coercion to advance its ultimate goals, today the danger (at least in the parts of the world we've lived in) is the other way around: the state attempting to assert itself in realms of conscience, mind, and ultimate salvation. We explore totalizing ideologies and share our insights on how to keep on distinguishing the two kingdoms for the good of all people, whatever their religion or politics. Notes: 1. Dietrich Bonhoeffer writes about secularism and the French vs. American revolutions in “Inheritance and Decay” in Ethics 2. Alasdair MacIntyre observes how “we’re all liberals now” in Whose Justice? Which Rationality? 3. John Locke’s political essays mentioned in this episode are the Second Treatise on Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration 4. Dad calls Robert Benne a liberal in his essay “Luther and Liberalism” in A Report from the Front Lines: Conversations on Public Theology, A Festschrift in Honor of Robert Benne 5. John Witte Jr. discusses early Lutheran political theology in Law and Protestantism: The Legal Teachings of the Lutheran Reformation 6. Robert P. Ericksen, Theologians under Hitler 7. Martin Luther reminds us that the kingdom of God will come regardless of our efforts or obstructions in the Small Catechism 8. The excerpt of the song goes “Meet the new boss, same as the old boss,” and it’s from “Won’t Get Fooled Again” by The Who. If you didn’t already know that, you should probably drop everything and go listen to the album Who’s Next 9. Here’s a link to info about the memoir I mentioned (still forthcoming, but if you sign up for my Theology & a Recipe e-newsletter you’ll be notified about publication details… plus, of course, you’ll get Theology & a Recipe), as well as an article I wrote called “A Primer on Luther’s Politics” More about us at sarahhinlickywilson.com and paulhinlicky.com!

Classics
Episode 19 - Locke's Second Treatise of Government

Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2020 47:14


In this episode, Andrew Zwerneman sits down with Cana Academy master teacher Jeannette DeCelles-Zwerneman to discuss the subject of her most recent teaching guide, Leading a Seminar on Locke’s Second Treatise of Government. To purchase the guide, please visit our online shop here.

The Bible Geek Show
The Bible Geek Podcast 19-029

The Bible Geek Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2019


Re: the Bible’s stance on alcohol, what about Jesus' own drinking as in Matt. 11:18-19? Are you familiar with Norman Golb and his book, Who Wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls, and if so, what do you think? Does Mark’s negative depiction of Jesus’ disciples and relatives reflect enmity between Jewish and Gentile/Pauline factions? Why does the author of “The Second Treatise of the Great Seth” speak so mockingly of the heroes of the OT? .  Brandon suggests we need not worry that passages or whole epistles by Paul were censored since some pretty disturbing material still appears in the Pauline Corpus. Think so?  If I understand you correctly, we agree that Simon Magus is at the root of this belief system advanced by the “works of Paul” (stuff about the law and a judging, punishing God are out).  So Simon’s philosophy and writings would be considered source material.  Is there any uncontaminated remnant of this belief system?               What do you think of the idea that there was no historical "Nazareth" until someone pointed at a place and told the patron saint of credulity, the Empress Helena (Mother of Constantine), "Yeah, this is Nazareth."? You once said you rejected the notion in Atwill’s Caesar’s Messiah that the Romans had a part in creating the gospels and that they were engaged in a sort of esoteric satire which resulted in Christians unwittingly worshiping Titus instead of Jesus. I was wondering why you think this is such an incredible theory, isn't this precisely what happened in your case? Sure sounds like the jokes on you!

Queen of the Sciences
What Is a Person?

Queen of the Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2019 71:33


Usually, when a person asks what or who makes for a person, it's to dehumanize some person or group of persons. Our intention in this episode is to head in the opposite direction. Dad takes us on a worldwind tour of Western civilization (which, frankly, he often does) to see that what counts as personhood or humanity has been under dispute from the get-go and continues to be disputed up to this very day. Meanwhile, I explore the striking fact that, in the doctrine of the Trinity, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are called "persons"—coincidence or not? (Not.) What does trinitarian personhood imply about human personhood? And could a robust nature-person distinction actually solve all the besetting problems of the modern world?! 1. Locus classicus = classical location or point, namely the verse of Scripture that is the foundation for a doctrine. For imago dei ( = image of God), it’s Genesis 1:26–28; see also Genesis 9:6. 2. The Mesopotamian creation epic is Enuma Elish 3. Plato records Socrates’ attempt to die without the interference of hysterical women in Phaedo 4. The things I’ve written mentioned in this episode are: “Blessed Are the Barren” and Woman, Women, and the Priesthood in the Trinitarian Theology of Elisabeth Behr-Sigel 5. Dad discusses Leibniz vs. Voltaire & Spinoza in Paths Not Taken 6. John Locke, Second Treatise of Government 7. Thomas Jefferson, The Declaration of Independence 8. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan 9. For more on the Lincoln-Douglas debates, see Harry V. Jaffa, A New Birth Of Freedom: Abraham Lincoln and the Coming of the Civil War 10. In this episode we both said that US law granted that enslaved Africans could be counted as 2/3 of a human in the census, but the actual number was 3/5 of a human (which is even less than what we remembered). Let us state for the record that all persons of African descent are 100% human. 11. Vladimir Lossky, In the Image and Likeness of God 12. Plato discusses the Forms in The Republic 13. Aristotle theorizes about “natural slaves” in Politics 14. Fritz Oehlschlaeger, Procreative Ethics 15. René Descartes ruined everything with his mind/thing distinction in Meditations On First Philosophy 16. Luther, Disputation against Scholastic Theology 17. Here’s the extraordinary story of the paralyzed man 18. "Leiblichkeit ist das Ende der Werke Gottes" (Bodiliness is the goal of the work of God) —Friedrich Christoph Oetinger More about us at sarahhinlickywilson.com and paulhinlicky.com!

Everyday Samurai Life
Ep30: Incrementalism

Everyday Samurai Life

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2019 34:18


Incrementalism is the gradual path of encroachment upon individual rights that leads to tyranny. Before someone can exert their will over you they must first disarm you. This is why there can be no compromise on the fundamental principles of liberty.    Being well trained in the use of arms and actually having them in your possession at all times is an essential ingredient to securing yourself, as well as contributing to the security of a free state.    Individually and collectively, a free society cannot allow incrementalism to erode the foundations of justice and the practical means of maintaining self-government.     That a Free State offers no privileges to those that would live as parasites must engage in incrementalism and obscure their designs. All politics is based on deception.    The political class must pervert law away from its real purpose of serving justice and promoting social harmony before they can exert their will upon their constituents. They must confuse issues and pit groups against one another in order to divide and rule.    Upholding the principles of justice are easy when you understand the simplicity of common law: do all you have agreed to do and do not encroach upon other people or their property. A government orchestrated for this sole purpose, the protection of people and their property is inexpensive and noninvasive. It is entirely opposite to the present experience with governments, the most expensive and invasive humanity has ever known.   There is a better way. It begins by developing the your own dignity and self-mastery, grounded in principle and disciplined to bring forth your highest capacities.   This is why we train along the dual path of scholarly and martial arts.   Bring your best self forward with the enhanced mindfulness practice of Brain Shots: www.everydaysamurai.life/shots     References:   Aristotle: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/politics-a-treatise-on-government/id395545349?mt=11   Mark Mazower, Governing The World:   https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/governing-the-world/id520240957?mt=11   Abraham Maslow on the hierarchy of needs:   Toward a Psychology of Being https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/toward-a-psychology-of-being/id1130653193?mt=11&at=1000lNCh   John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government:   https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/second-treatise-of-government/id395546114?mt=11   Clausewitz On War:   All Volumes (Illustrated) https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/on-war-all-volumes-illustrated/id473064144?mt=11&at=1000lNCh   Sun Tzu, The Art of War: The Art of War https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-art-of-war/id1161754554?mt=11&at=1000lNCh

Everyday Samurai Life
Ep30: Incrementalism

Everyday Samurai Life

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2019 34:18


Incrementalism is the gradual path of encroachment upon individual rights that leads to tyranny. Before someone can exert their will over you they must first disarm you. This is why there can be no compromise on the fundamental principles of liberty.    Being well trained in the use of arms and actually having them in your possession at all times is an essential ingredient to securing yourself, as well as contributing to the security of a free state.    Individually and collectively, a free society cannot allow incrementalism to erode the foundations of justice and the practical means of maintaining self-government.     That a Free State offers no privileges to those that would live as parasites must engage in incrementalism and obscure their designs. All politics is based on deception.    The political class must pervert law away from its real purpose of serving justice and promoting social harmony before they can exert their will upon their constituents. They must confuse issues and pit groups against one another in order to divide and rule.    Upholding the principles of justice are easy when you understand the simplicity of common law: do all you have agreed to do and do not encroach upon other people or their property. A government orchestrated for this sole purpose, the protection of people and their property is inexpensive and noninvasive. It is entirely opposite to the present experience with governments, the most expensive and invasive humanity has ever known.   There is a better way. It begins by developing the your own dignity and self-mastery, grounded in principle and disciplined to bring forth your highest capacities.   This is why we train along the dual path of scholarly and martial arts.   Bring your best self forward with the enhanced mindfulness practice of Brain Shots: www.everydaysamurai.life/shots     References:   Aristotle: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/politics-a-treatise-on-government/id395545349?mt=11   Mark Mazower, Governing The World:   https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/governing-the-world/id520240957?mt=11   Abraham Maslow on the hierarchy of needs:   Toward a Psychology of Being https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/toward-a-psychology-of-being/id1130653193?mt=11&at=1000lNCh   John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government:   https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/second-treatise-of-government/id395546114?mt=11   Clausewitz On War:   All Volumes (Illustrated) https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/on-war-all-volumes-illustrated/id473064144?mt=11&at=1000lNCh   Sun Tzu, The Art of War: The Art of War https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-art-of-war/id1161754554?mt=11&at=1000lNCh

Conservative Minds
Episode 4: John Locke - Second Treatise of Government

Conservative Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2018 51:19


Locke posits an original human state of nature characterized by nominal freedom and equality. People leave the state of nature to form political society to protect their property and ensure their safety. In Locke's view, government has a role limited to the preservation of liberty, the security of property, and the redress of injuries.

Words & Numbers
What Is Money, Anyway?

Words & Numbers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2018 33:54


Money is one of those things that is so ubiquitous, so completely taken for granted, that we rarely stop to think about what it actually is. The colored bits of paper that we call dollars don’t have any particular worth on their own, yet we use them as though they do. John Locke, in 1689 when he wrote his Second Treatise of Government, touched on it, hinting at the three qualities money possesses. But what are those three things? What happens when one or more of those three attributes is abandoned? And how does the government fit into all of this? Join James Harrigan and Antony Davies as they examine this and more on this week’s episode of Words and Numbers. Show Notes: Payless Shoes’s social experiment Japan 1 Japan 2 Foolishness of the Week Instructions for making toast Topic of the Week: What is money? Money Join the Conversation Antony Davies on Twitter James R. Harrigan on Twitter Antony Davies on Minds.com James R. Harrigan on Minds.com Words & Numbers Backstage

Before Economics: The History of Political Economy
[03] John Locke – The Second Treatise of Civil Government

Before Economics: The History of Political Economy

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2018 8:14


Before Economics Episode 03: John Locke – The Second Treatise Of Civil Government

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast
Episode 22, John Locke's Political Philosophy (Part II)

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2017 51:41


Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Born in Somerset, England 1632 and died in Essex, at the age of 72 in 1704, John Locke was among the most famous philosophers and political theorists of the 17th century. Locke's main political work, Two Treatise of Government, was published in anonymously in 1689. The First Treatise is a sentence-by-sentence refutation of Robert Filmer's Divine Right of Kings, whilst the Second Treatise outlines Locke's ideas for civilized society based on natural rights and contract theory. Our main focus today is the second treatise of government. Locke begins by describing the state of nature, a picture much more stable than Thomas Hobbes' state of nature that recall, is "war of every man against every man,". Locke argues that all men are created equal in the state of nature by God. He proceeds by explaining the hypothetical rise of property and civilisation, in the process explaining that the only legitimate governments are those consented to by the people. Ultimately for Locke, a government that rules without the consent of the people can ultimately be overthrown. For many, the language of the second treatise of government echoes throughout the declaration of independence. In the words of Thomas Jefferson: "Bacon, Locke and Newton, I consider them as the three greatest men that have ever lived". Part I. State of Nature (19:15), Part II. Property (00:05 in Part II), Part III. Civil Society (15:50 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (31:40 in Part II).

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast
Episode 22, John Locke's Political Philosophy (Part I)

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2017 43:30


Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Born in Somerset, England 1632 and died in Essex, at the age of 72 in 1704, John Locke was among the most famous philosophers and political theorists of the 17th century. Locke's main political work, Two Treatise of Government, was published in anonymously in 1689. The First Treatise is a sentence-by-sentence refutation of Robert Filmer's Divine Right of Kings, whilst the Second Treatise outlines Locke's ideas for civilized society based on natural rights and contract theory. Our main focus today is the second treatise of government. Locke begins by describing the state of nature, a picture much more stable than Thomas Hobbes' state of nature that recall, is "war of every man against every man,". Locke argues that all men are created equal in the state of nature by God. He proceeds by explaining the hypothetical rise of property and civilisation, in the process explaining that the only legitimate governments are those consented to by the people. Ultimately for Locke, a government that rules without the consent of the people can ultimately be overthrown. For many, the language of the second treatise of government echoes throughout the declaration of independence. In the words of Thomas Jefferson: "Bacon, Locke and Newton, I consider them as the three greatest men that have ever lived". Part I. State of Nature (19:15), Part II. Property (00:05 in Part II), Part III. Civil Society (15:50 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (31:40 in Part II).

OLD MoLtv: Sophia
Classical liberalism, part 1 (Daniel Kaufman & David Ottlinger)

OLD MoLtv: Sophia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2017 60:00


Dan’s definition of classical liberalism ... Locke’s Second Treatise of Government and Mill’s On Liberty ... Mill and Locke on the individual ... The social contract and political authority ... The group and the individual in the modern world ... How much of a liberal was Mill really? ... Social censorship and the PC debate ... Is Mill’s utilitarianism at odds with his liberalism? ... Classical liberalism in America ...

MeaningofLife.tv: Sophia
Classical liberalism, part 1 (Daniel Kaufman & David Ottlinger)

MeaningofLife.tv: Sophia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2017 60:00


Dan’s definition of classical liberalism ... Locke’s Second Treatise of Government and Mill’s On Liberty ... Mill and Locke on the individual ... The social contract and political authority ... The group and the individual in the modern world ... How much of a liberal was Mill really? ... Social censorship and the PC debate ... Is Mill’s utilitarianism at odds with his liberalism? ... Classical liberalism in America ...

MeaningofLife.tv: Sophia
Classical liberalism, part 1 (Daniel Kaufman & David Ottlinger)

MeaningofLife.tv: Sophia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2017 60:00


Dan's definition of classical liberalism ... Locke's Second Treatise of Government and Mill's On Liberty ... Mill and Locke on the individual ... The social contract and political authority ... The group and the individual in the modern world ... How much of a liberal was Mill really? ... Social censorship and the PC debate ... Is Mill's utilitarianism at odds with his liberalism? ... Classical liberalism in America ...

The History of China
#110 - Tang 23: Where the Wangs Went Wrong

The History of China

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2016 41:24


We take a look at the final years of Emperor Dezong's reign, his political successes and failures, and the strange, mysterious,short-lived Wang Party that would seize control over government for about 5 minutes before being kicked out by Dezong's grandson Xianzong. Also, we have a paralyzed, mute emperor, so there's that, too! Time Period Covered: ca. 790-806 CE Major Historical Figures: Tang Dynasty: Li Kuo, Emperor Dezong of Tang [r. 780-805] Li Song, Emperor Shunzong of Tang [r. 805] Li Chun, Emperor Xianzong of Tang [r. 805-820] Dou Wenchang, Eunuch Protector of the Army Huo Xianming, Eunuch Protector of the Army Wang Shuwen, Wang Party Founder Wang Pi, Wang Party Member Tibetan Empire: Prime Minister Shang Jiecan (Shan-rgyal-btsan) Uyghur Khannate: Tun-Baga-Tar Khan Dalby, Richard. "Court Politics in Late Tang Times" in The Cambridge history of China vol. 3 Zizhi Tongjian Jiu Tangshu Wang, Yunsheng (1963). "Second Treatise on the historic Significane of that Bastard Sima's Political Innovations"...  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TeachingAmericanHistory.org Podcast
Session 2: The American Mind, Part 1

TeachingAmericanHistory.org Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2015


https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/presidential-academy/Session+2.mp3 Focus Thomas Jefferson wrote that in drafting the Declaration of Independence he meant to give expression to "the American mind." What does the Declaration tell us about the American mind as it related to the foundations, forms, and purposes of the newly sovereign United States? What is the political logic of the argument of the Declaration? What is the philosophical and historical heritage on which the Declaration draws? Reflections on the course of human events, people, the laws of nature and of nature’s God, decent respect for the opinions of mankind, self evident truths, equality, rights, liberty, the pursuit of happiness, consent, prudence, the ends of government, the right to abolish government and institute new government, facts submitted to a candid world, sacred honor, and more.   Readings Kurland and Lerner, The Founders' Constitution Chapter 14, Document 6: Bill of Rights(1689) John Locke, Second Treatise (1689), §§ 1–15, 25-51; 61-63; 123-126, 54, 95–99, 119–126, 149, 155, 163, 168, 207–10, 220–31, 240–43 Kurland and Lerner, The Founders' Constitution Chapter 2, Document 2: Thomas Gordon,Cato's Letters (1721), No. 38 The post Session 2: The American Mind, Part 1 appeared first on Teaching American History.

Free Thoughts
The Conscience of the Constitution

Free Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2014 58:20


Timothy Sandefur joins Trevor Burrus and Jason Kuznicki for a conversation about America’s founding documents: the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence.Which is the Constitution’s primary value: liberty or democracy? Is it enough to tell lawmakers to just “go back to the Constitution” when Constitutional interpretation varies so wildly? What does the Constitution have to say about slavery? Individual rights? Voting rights?Sandefur is a principal attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation and the author of the 2014 book The Conscience of the Constitution: The Declaration of Independence and the Right to Liberty. He also heads the Pacific Legal Foundation’s Economic Liberty Project, which protects entrepreneurs against intrusive government regulation.Show Notes and Further Reading:Supreme Court CasesTroxel v. GranvilleGrutter v. BollingerLawrence v. TexasBarron v. BaltimoreMuller v. OregonJohn Locke, Second Treatise of GovernmentWilliam Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of EnglandAkil Amar, America’s Unwritten ConstitutionJ. Harvey Wilkinson, Cosmic Constitutional Theory: Why Americans Are Losing Their Inalienable Right to Self-Governance See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Chapter Audio Books on PodOmatic
John Locke: Two Treatises of Civil Government

Chapter Audio Books on PodOmatic

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2010 664:22


By: John Locke (1632-1704) The Two Treatises of Civil Government is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke. The First Treatise is an extended attack on Sir Robert Filmer’s Patriarcha, which argued for a divinely-ordained, hereditary, absolute monarchy. The more influential Second Treatise outlines a theory of civil society based on natural rights and contract theory. Locke begins by describing the “state of nature,” and goes on to explain the hypothetical rise of property and civilization, asserting that the only legitimate governments are those which have the consent of the people. Locke’s ideas heavily influenced both the American and French Revolutions. His notions of people’s rights and the role of civil government provided strong support for the intellectual movements of both revolutions. (Summary adapted from Wikipedia) http://www.audioowl.com/book/two-treatises-of-civil-government-by-john-locke

Political Philosophy - Audio
16 - Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (7-12)

Political Philosophy - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2009 45:11


In the opening chapters of his Second Treatise, Locke "rewrites" the account of human beginnings that had belonged exclusively to Scripture. He tells the story of how humans, finding themselves in a condition of nature with no adjudicating authority, enjoy property acquired through their labor. The lecture goes on to discuss the idea of natural law, the issue of government by consent, and what may be considered Locke's most significant contribution to political philosophy: the Doctrine of Consent.

Political Philosophy - Audio
15 - Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (1-5)

Political Philosophy - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2009 44:40


John Locke had such a profound influence on Thomas Jefferson that he may be deemed an honorary founding father of the United States. He advocated the natural equality of human beings, their natural rights to life, liberty, and property, and defined legitimate government in terms that Jefferson would later use in the Declaration of Independence. Locke's life and works are discussed, and the lecture shows how he transformed ideas previously formulated by Machiavelli and Hobbes into a more liberal constitutional theory of the state.

Political Philosophy - Audio
17 - Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (13-19)

Political Philosophy - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2009 45:10


In this lecture, two important issues are addressed in the context of Locke's Second Treatise. First, there is discussion on the role of the executive vis-a-vis the legislative branch of government in Locke's theory of the constitutional state. Second, Locke's political theories are related to the American regime and contemporary American political philosophy. The lecture concludes with John Rawls' book, A Theory of Justice, and how his general theory relates to Locke's political ideas.

Political Philosophy - Video
15 - Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (1-5)

Political Philosophy - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2009 44:40


John Locke had such a profound influence on Thomas Jefferson that he may be deemed an honorary founding father of the United States. He advocated the natural equality of human beings, their natural rights to life, liberty, and property, and defined legitimate government in terms that Jefferson would later use in the Declaration of Independence. Locke's life and works are discussed, and the lecture shows how he transformed ideas previously formulated by Machiavelli and Hobbes into a more liberal constitutional theory of the state.

Political Philosophy - Video
16 - Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (7-12)

Political Philosophy - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2009 45:11


In the opening chapters of his Second Treatise, Locke "rewrites" the account of human beginnings that had belonged exclusively to Scripture. He tells the story of how humans, finding themselves in a condition of nature with no adjudicating authority, enjoy property acquired through their labor. The lecture goes on to discuss the idea of natural law, the issue of government by consent, and what may be considered Locke's most significant contribution to political philosophy: the Doctrine of Consent.

Political Philosophy - Video
17 - Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (13-19)

Political Philosophy - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2009 45:11


In this lecture, two important issues are addressed in the context of Locke's Second Treatise. First, there is discussion on the role of the executive vis-a-vis the legislative branch of government in Locke's theory of the constitutional state. Second, Locke's political theories are related to the American regime and contemporary American political philosophy. The lecture concludes with John Rawls' book, A Theory of Justice, and how his general theory relates to Locke's political ideas.

Reading Political Philosophy: From Machiavelli to Mill - Audio
Transcript -- Locke: Jon Pike and Jeremy Waldron

Reading Political Philosophy: From Machiavelli to Mill - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2009


Transcript -- A wide-ranging discussion of Locke using the Second Treatise as a starting point. Locke’s relationship to liberalism and modern liberal theory is analysed, as well as his relationship to the ‘state of nature’ debate.

Reading Political Philosophy: From Machiavelli to Mill - Audio

A wide-ranging discussion of Locke using the Second Treatise as a starting point. Locke’s relationship to liberalism and modern liberal theory is analysed, as well as his relationship to the ‘state of nature’ debate.

The Philosophy Podcast
Second Treatise of Government

The Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2009 15:23


Second Treatise of Government by John Locke. For more audio you can learn from, please visit www.learnoutloud.com

The Philosophy Podcast
Second Treatise of Government

The Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2009 15:23


Second Treatise of Government by John Locke. For more audio you can learn from, please visit www.learnoutloud.com

Philosophy: The Classics
Locke - 2nd Treatise

Philosophy: The Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2007 14:23


What are the legitimate powers of the State? This is the fundamental question John Locke addressed in his Second Treatise of Civil Government. Nigel Warburton sketches the main features of this work and outlines some criticisms of it in this podcast of a chapter from his book Philosophy: The Classics (3rd ed.)