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Family of computer operating systems developed by Microsoft

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    The Sams Report
    The End is Near

    The Sams Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 10:24


    On this edition of the Sams Report, Microsoft brings more gaming to the browser, Windows 8.1 has a few users, and the end is near.

    Screaming in the Cloud
    Google Cloud Run, Satisfaction, and Scalability with Steren Giannini

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:01


    Full Description / Show Notes Steren and Corey talk about how Google Cloud Run got its name (00:49) Corey talks about his experiences using Google Cloud (2:42) Corey and Steven discuss Google Cloud's cloud run custom domains (10:01) Steren talks about Cloud Run's high developer satisfaction and scalability (15:54) Corey and Steven talk about Cloud Run releases at Google I/O (23:21) Steren discusses the majority of developer and customer interest in Google's cloud product (25:33) Steren talks about his 20% projects around sustainability (29:00) About SterenSteren is a Senior Product Manager at Google Cloud. He is part of the serverless team, leading Cloud Run. He is also working on sustainability, leading the Google Cloud Carbon Footprint product.Steren is an engineer from École Centrale (France). Prior to joining Google, he was CTO of a startup building connected objects and multi device solutions.Links Referenced: Google Cloud Run: https://cloud.run sheets-url-shortener: https://github.com/ahmetb/sheets-url-shortener snark.cloud/run: https://snark.cloud/run Twitter: https://twitter.com/steren TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined today by Steren Giannini, who is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, specifically on something called Google Cloud Run. Steren, thank you for joining me today.Steren: Thanks for inviting me, Corey.Corey: So, I want to start at the very beginning of, “Oh, a cloud service. What are we going to call it?” “Well, let's put the word cloud in it.” “Okay, great. Now, it is cloud, so we have to give it a vague and unassuming name. What does it do?” “It runs things.” “Genius. Let's break and go for work.” Now, it's easy to imagine that you spent all of 30 seconds on a name, but it never works that way. How easy was it to get to Cloud Run as a name for the service?Steren: [laugh]. Such a good question because originally it was not named Cloud Run at all. The original name was Google Serverless Engine. But a few people know that because they've been helping us since the beginning, but originally it was Google Serverless Engine. Nobody liked the name internally, and I think at one point, we wondered, “Hey, can we drop the engine structure and let's just think about the name. And what does this thing do?” “It runs things.”We already have Cloud Build. Well, wouldn't it be great to have Cloud Run to pair with Cloud Build so that after you've built your containers, you can run them? And that's how we ended up with this very simple Cloud Run, which today seems so obvious, but it took us a long time to get to that name, and we actually had a lot of renaming to do because we were about to ship with Google Serverless Engine.Corey: That seems like a very interesting last-minute change because it's not just a find and replace at that point, it's—Steren: No.Corey: —“Well, okay, if we call it Cloud Run, which can also be a verb or a noun, depending, is that going to change the meaning of some sentences?” And just doing a find and replace without a proofread pass as well, well, that's how you wind up with funny things on Twitter.Steren: API endpoints needed to be changed, adding weeks of delays to the launch. That is why we—you know, [laugh] announced in 2018 and publicly launched in 2019.Corey: I've been doing a fair bit of work in cloud for a while, and I wound up going down a very interesting path. So, the first native Google Cloud service—not things like WP Engine that ride on top of GCP—but my first native Google Cloud Service was done in service of this podcast, and it is built on Google Cloud Run. I don't think I've told you part of this story yet, but it's one of the reasons I reached out to invite you onto the show. Let me set the stage here with a little bit of backstory that might explain what the hell I'm talking about.As listeners of this show are probably aware, we have sponsors whom we love and adore. In the early days of this show, they would say, “Great, we want to tell people about our product”—which is the point of a sponsorship—“And then send them to a URL.” “Great. What's the URL?” And they would give me something that was three layers deep, then with a bunch of UTM tracking parameters at the end.And it's, “You do realize that no one is going to be sitting there typing all of that into a web browser?” At best, you're going to get three words or so. So, I built myself a URL redirector, snark.cloud. I can wind up redirecting things in there anywhere it needs to go.And for a long time, I did this on top of S3 and then put CloudFront in front of it. And this was all well and good until, you know, things happened in the fullness of time. And now holy crap, I have an operations team involved in things, and maybe I shouldn't be the only person that knows how to work on all of these bits and bobs. So, it was time to come up with something that had a business user-friendly interface that had some level of security, so I don't wind up automatically building out a spam redirect service for anything that wants to, and it needs to be something that's easy to work with. So, I went on an exploration.So, at first it showed that there were—like, I have an article out that I've spoken about before that there are, “17 Ways to Run Containers on AWS,” and then I wrote the sequel, “17 More Ways to Run Containers on AWS.” And I'm keeping a list, I'm almost to the third installation of that series, which is awful. So, great. There's got to be some ways to build some URL redirect stuff with an interface that has an admin panel. And I spent three days on this trying a bunch of different things, and some were running on deprecated versions of Node that wouldn't build properly and others were just such complex nonsense things that had got really bad. I was starting to consider something like just paying for Bitly or whatnot and making it someone else's problem.And then I stumbled upon something on GitHub that really was probably one of the formative things that changed my opinion of Google Cloud for the better. And within half an hour of discovering this thing, it was up and running. I did the entire thing, start to finish, from my iPad in a web browser, and it just worked. It was written by—let me make sure I get his name correct; you know, messing up someone's name is a great way to say that we don't care about them—Ahmet Balkan used to work at Google Cloud; now he's over at Twitter. And he has something up on GitHub that is just absolutely phenomenal about this, called sheets-url-shortener.And this is going to sound wild, but stick with me. The interface is simply a Google Sheet, where you have one column that has the shorthand slug—for example, run; if you go to snark.cloud/run, it will redirect to Google Cloud Run's website. And the second column is where you want it to go. The end.And whenever that gets updated, there's of course some caching issues, which means it can take up to five seconds from finishing that before it will actually work across the entire internet. And as best I can tell, that is fundamentally magic. But what made it particularly useful and magic, from my perspective, was how easy it was to get up and running. There was none of this oh, but then you have to integrate it with Google Sheets and that's a whole ‘nother team so there's no way you're going to be able to figure that out from our Docs. Go talk to them and then come back in the day.They were the get started, click here to proceed. It just worked. And it really brought back some of the magic of cloud for me in a way that I hadn't seen in quite a while. So, all which is to say, amazing service, I continue to use it for all of these sponsored links, and I am still waiting for you folks to bill me, but it fits comfortably in the free tier because it turns out that I don't have hundreds of thousands of people typing it in every week.Steren: I'm glad it went well. And you know, we measure tasks success for Cloud Run. And we do know that most new users are able to deploy their apps very quickly. And that was the case for you. Just so you know, we've put a lot of effort to make sure it was true, and I'll be glad to tell you more about all that.But for that particular service, yes, I suppose Ahmet—who I really enjoyed working with on Cloud Run, he was really helpful designing Cloud Run with us—has open-sourced this side project. And basically, you might even have clicked on a deploy to Cloud Run button on GitHub, right, to deploy it?Corey: That is exactly what I did and it somehow just worked and—Steren: Exactly.Corey: And it knew, even logging into the Google Cloud Console because it understands who I am because I use Google Docs and things, I'm already logged in. None of this, “Oh, which one of these 85 credential sets is it going to be?” Like certain other clouds. It was, “Oh, wow. Wait, cloud can be easy and fun? When did that happen?”Steren: So, what has happened when you click that deploy to Google Cloud button, basically, the GitHub repository was built into a container with Cloud Build and then was deployed to Cloud Run. And once on Cloud Run, well, hopefully, you have forgotten about it because that's what we do, right? We—give us your code, in a container if you know containers if you don't just—we support, you know, many popular languages, and we know how to build them, so don't worry about that. And then we run it. And as you said, when there is low traffic or no traffic, it scales to zero.When there is low traffic, you're likely going to stay under the generous free tier. And if you have more traffic for, you know, Screaming in the Cloud suddenly becoming a high destination URL redirects, well, Cloud Run will scale the number of instances of this container to be able to handle the load. Cloud Run scales automatically and very well, but only—as always—charging you when you are processing some requests.Corey: I had to fork and make a couple of changes myself after I wound up doing some testing. The first was to make the entire thing case insensitive, which is—you know, makes obvious sense. And the other was to change the permanent redirect to a temporary redirect because believe it or not, in the fullness of time, sometimes sponsors want to change the landing page in different ways for different campaigns and that's fine by me. I just wanted to make sure people's browser cache didn't remember it into perpetuity. But it was easy enough to run—that was back in the early days of my exploring Go, which I've been doing this quarter—and in the couple of months this thing has been running it has been effectively flawless.It's set it; it's forget it. The only challenges I had with it are it was a little opaque getting a custom domain set up that—which is still in beta, to be clear—and I've heard some horror stories of people saying it got wedged. In my case, no, I deployed it and I started refreshing it and suddenly, it start throwing an SSL error. And it's like, “Oh, that's not good, but I'm going to break my own lifestyle here and be patient for ten minutes.” And sure enough, it cleared itself and everything started working. And that was the last time I had to think about any of this. And it just worked.Steren: So first, Cloud Run is HTTPS only. Why? Because it's 2020, right? It's 2022, but—Corey: [laugh].Steren: —it's launched in 2020. And so basically, we have made a decision that let's just not accept HTTP traffic; it's only HTTPS. As a consequence, we need to provision a cert for your custom domain. That is something that can take some time. And as you said, we keep it in beta or in preview because we are not yet satisfied with the experience or even the performance of Cloud Run custom domains, so we are actively working on fixing that with a different approach. So, expect some changes, hopefully, this year.Corey: I will say it does take a few seconds when people go to a snark.cloud URL for it to finish resolving, and it feels on some level like it's almost like a cold start problem. But subsequent visits, the same thing also feel a little on the slow and pokey side. And I don't know if that's just me being wildly impatient, if there's an optimization opportunity, or if that's just inherent to the platform that is not under current significant load.Steren: So, it depends. If the Cloud Run service has scaled down to zero, well of course, your service will need to be started. But what we do know, if it's a small Go binary, like something that you mentioned, it should really take less than, let's say, 500 milliseconds to go from zero to one of your container instance. Latency can also be due to the way the code is running. If it occurred is fetching things from Google Sheets at every startup, that is something that could add to the startup latency.So, I would need to take a look, but in general, we are not spinning up a virtual machine anytime we need to scale horizontally. Like, our infrastructure is a multi-tenant, rapidly scalable infrastructure that can materialize a container in literally 300 milliseconds. The rest of the latency comes from what does the container do at startup time?Corey: Yeah, I just ran a quick test of putting time in front of a curl command. It looks like it took 4.83 seconds. So, enough to be perceptive. But again, for just a quick redirect, it's generally not the end of the world and there's probably something I'm doing that is interesting and odd. Again, I did not invite you on the show to file a—Steren: [laugh].Corey: Bug report. Let's be very clear here.Steren: Seems on the very high end of startup latencies. I mean, I would definitely expect under the second. We should deep-dive into the code to take a look. And by the way, building stuff on top of spreadsheets. I've done that a ton in my previous lives as a CTO of a startup because well, that's the best administration interface, right? You just have a CRUD UI—Corey: [unintelligible 00:12:29] world and all business users understand it. If people in Microsoft decided they were going to change Microsoft Excel interface, even a bit, they would revert the change before noon of the same day after an army of business users grabbed pitchforks and torches and marched on their headquarters. It's one of those things that is how the world runs; it is the world's most common IDE. And it's great, but I still think of databases through the lens of thinking about it as a spreadsheet as my default approach to things. I also think of databases as DNS, but that's neither here nor there.Steren: You know, if you have maybe 100 redirects, that's totally fine. And by the way, the beauty of Cloud Run in a spreadsheet, as you mentioned is that Cloud Run services run with a certain identity. And this identity, you can grant it permissions. And in that case, what I would recommend if you haven't done so yet, is to give an identity to your Cloud Run service that has the permission to read that particular spreadsheet. And how you do that you invite the email of the service account as a reader of your spreadsheet, and that's probably what you did.Corey: The click button to the workflow on Google Cloud automatically did that—Steren: Oh, wow.Corey: —and taught me how to do it. “Here's the thing that look at. The end.” It was a flawless user-onboarding experience.Steren: Very nicely done. But indeed, you know, there is this built-in security which is the principle of minimal permission, like each of your Cloud Run service should basically only be able to read and write to the backing resources that they should. And by default, we give you a service account which has a lot of permissions, but our recommendation is to narrow those permissions to basically only look at the cloud storage buckets that the service is supposed to look at. And the same for a spreadsheet.Corey: Yes, on some level, I feel like I'm going to write an analysis of my own security approach. It would be titled, “My God, It's Full Of Stars” as I look at the IAM policies of everything that I've configured. The idea of least privilege is great. What I like about this approach is that it made it easy to do it so I don't have to worry about it. At one point, I want to go back and wind up instrumenting it a bit further, just so I can wind up getting aggregate numbers of all right, how many times if someone visited this particular link? It'll be good to know.And I don't know… if I have to change permissions to do that yet, but that's okay. It's the best kind of problem: future Corey. So, we'll deal with that when the time comes. But across the board, this has just been a phenomenal experience and it's clear that when you were building Google Cloud Run, you understood the assignment. Because I was looking for people saying negative things about it and by and large, all of its seem to come from a perspective of, “Well, this isn't going to be the most cost-effective or best way to run something that is hyperscale, globe-spanning.”It's yes, that's the thing that Kubernetes was originally built to run and for some godforsaken reason people run their blog on it instead now. Okay. For something that is small, scales to zero, and has long periods where no one is visiting it, great, this is a terrific answer and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. It's clear that you understood who you were aiming at, and the migration strategy to something that is a bit more, I want to say robust, but let's be clear what I mean when I'm saying that if you want something that's a little bit more impressive on your SRE resume as you're trying a multi-year project to get hired by Google or pretend you got hired by Google, yeah, you can migrate to something else in a relatively straightforward way. But that this is up, running, and works without having to think about it, and that is no small thing.Steren: So, there are two things to say here. The first is yes, indeed, we know we have high developer satisfaction. You know, we measure this—in Google Cloud, you might have seen those small satisfaction surveys popping up sometimes on the user interface, and you know, we are above 90% satisfaction score. We hire third parties to help us understand how usable and what satisfaction score would users get out of Cloud Run, and we are constantly getting very, very good results, in absolute but also compared to the competition.Now, the other thing that you said is that, you know, Cloud Run is for small things, and here while it is definitely something that allows you to be productive, something that strives for simplicity, but it also scales a lot. And contrary to other systems, you do not have any pre-provisioning to make. So, we have done demos where we go from zero to 10,000 container instances in ten seconds because of the infrastructure on which Cloud Run runs, which is fully managed and multi-tenant, we can offer you this scale on demand. And many of our biggest customers have actually not switched to something like Kubernetes after starting with Cloud Run because they value the low maintenance, the no infrastructure management that Cloud Run brings them.So, we have like Ikea, ecobee… for example ecobee, you know, the smart thermostats are using Cloud Run to ingest events from the thermostat. I think Ikea is using Cloud Run more and more for more of their websites. You know, those companies scale, right? This is not, like, scale to zero hobby project. This is actually production e-commerce and connected smart objects production systems that have made the choice of being on a fully-managed platform in order to reduce their operational overhead.[midroll 00:17:54]Corey: Let me be clear. When I say scale—I think we might be talking past each other on a small point here. When I say scale, I'm talking less about oh tens or hundreds of thousands of containers running concurrently. I'm talking in a more complicated way of, okay, now we have a whole bunch of different microservices talking to one another and affinity as far as location to each other for data transfer reasons. And as you start beginning to service discovery style areas of things, where we build a really complicated applications because we hired engineers and failed to properly supervise them, and that type of convoluted complex architecture.That's where it feels like Cloud Run increasingly, as you move in that direction, starts to look a little bit less like the tool of choice. Which is fine, I want to be clear on that point. The sense that I've gotten of it is a great way to get started, it's a great way to continue running a thing you don't have to think about because you have a day job that isn't infrastructure management. And it is clear to—as your needs change—to either remain with the service or pivot to a very close service without a whole lot of retooling, which is key. There's not much of a lock-in story to this, which I love.Steren: That was one of the key principles when we started to design Cloud Run was, you know, we realized the industry had agreed that the container image was the standard for the deployment artifact of software. And so, we just made the early choice of focusing on deploying containers. Of course, we are helping users build those containers, you know, we have things called build packs, we can continuously deploy from GitHub, but at the end of the day, the thing that gets auto-scaled on Cloud Run is a container. And that enables portability.As you said. You can literally run the same container, nothing proprietary in it, I want to be clear. Like, you're just listening on a port for some incoming requests. Those requests can be HTTP requests, events, you know, we have products that can push events to Cloud Run like Eventarc or Pub/Sub. And this same container, you can run it on your local machine, you can run it on Kubernetes, you can run it on another cloud. You're not locked in, in terms of API of the compute.We even went even above and beyond by having the Cloud Run API looks like a Kubernetes API. I think that was an extra effort that we made. I'm not sure people care that much, but if you look at the Cloud Run API, it is actually exactly looking like Kubernetes, Even if there is no Kubernetes at all under the hood; we just made it for portability. Because we wanted to address this concern of serverless which was lock-in. Like, when you use a Function as a Service product, you are worried that the architecture that you are going to develop around this product is going to be only working in this particular cloud provider, and you're not in control of the language, the version that this provider has decided to offer you, you're not in control of more of the complexity that can come as you want to scan this code, as you want to move this code between staging and production or test this code.So, containers are really helping with that. So, I think we made the right choice of this new artifact that to build Cloud Run around the container artifact. And you know, at the time when we launched, it was a little bit controversial because back in the day, you know, 2018, 2019, serverless really meant Functions as a Service. So, when we launched, we little bit redefined serverless. And we basically said serverless containers. Which at the time were two worlds that in the same sentence were incompatible. Like, many people, including internally, had concerns around—Corey: Oh, the serverless versus container war was a big thing for a while. Everyone was on a different side of that divide. It's… containers are effectively increasingly—and I know, I'll get email for this, and I don't even slightly care, they're a packaging format—Steren: Exactly.Corey: —where it solves the problem of how do I build this thing to deploy on Debian instances? And Ubuntu instances, and other instances, God forbid, Windows somewhere, you throw a container over the wall. The end. Its DevOps is about breaking down the walls between Dev and Ops. That's why containers are here to make them silos that don't have to talk to each other.Steren: A container image is a glorified zip file. Literally. You have a set of layers with files in them, and basically, we decided to adopt that artifact standard, but not the perceived complexity that existed at the time around containers. And so, we basically merged containers with serverless to make something as easy to use as a Function as a Service product but with the power of bringing your own container. And today, we are seeing—you mentioned, what kind of architecture would you use Cloud Run for?So, I would say now there are three big buckets. The obvious one is anything that is a website or an API, serving public internet traffic, like your URL redirect service, right? This is, you have an API, takes a request and returns a response. It can be a REST API, GraphQL API. We recently added support for WebSockets, which is pretty unique for a service offering to support natively WebSockets.So, what I mean natively is, my client can open a socket connection—a bi-directional socket connection—with a given instance, for up to one hour. This is pretty unique for something that is as fully managed as Cloud Run.Corey: Right. As we're recording this, we are just coming off of Google I/O, and there were a number of announcements around Cloud Run that were touching it because of, you know, strange marketing issues. I only found out that Google I/O was a thing and featured cloud stuff via Twitter at the time it was happening. What did you folks release around Cloud Run?Steren: Good question, actually. Part of the Google I/O Developer keynote, I pitched a story around how Cloud Run helps developers, and the I/O team liked the story, so we decided to include that story as part of the live developer keynote. So, on stage, we announced Cloud Run jobs. So now, I talked to you about Cloud Run services, which can be used to expose an API, but also to do, like, private microservice-to-microservice communication—because cloud services don't have to be public—and in that case, we support GRPC and, you know, a very strong security mechanism where only Service A can invoke Service B, for example, but Cloud Run jobs are about non-request-driven containers. So, today—I mean, before Google I/O a few days ago, the only requirement that we imposed on your container image was that it started to listen for requests, or events, or GRPC—Corey: Web requests—Steren: Exactly—Corey: It speaks [unintelligible 00:24:35] you want as long as it's HTTP. Yes.Steren: That was the only requirement we asked you to have on your container image. And now we've changed that. Now, if you have a container that basically starts and executes to completion, you can deploy it on a Cloud Run job. So, you will use Cloud Run jobs for, like, daily batch jobs. And you have the same infrastructure, so on-demand, you can go from zero to, I think for now, the maximum is a hundred tasks in parallel, for—of course, you can run many tasks in sequence, but in parallel, you can go from zero to a hundred, right away to run your daily batch job, daily admin job, data processing.But this is more in the batch mode than in streaming mode. If you would like to use a more, like, streaming data processing, than a Cloud Run service would still be the best fit because you can literally push events to it, and it will auto-scale to handle any number of events that it receives.Corey: Do you find that the majority of customers are using Cloud Run for one-off jobs that barely will get more than a single container, like my thing, or do you find that they're doing massively parallel jobs? Where's the lion's share of developer and customer interest?Steren: It's both actually. We have both individual developers, small startups—which really value the scale to zero and pay per use model of Cloud Run. Your URL redirect service probably is staying below the free tier, and there are many, many, many users in your case. But at the same time, we have big, big, big customers who value the on-demand scalability of Cloud Run. And for these customers, of course, they will probably very likely not scale to zero, but they value the fact that—you know, we have a media company who uses Cloud Run for TV streaming, and when there is a soccer game somewhere in the world, they have a big spike of usage of requests coming in to their Cloud Run service, and here they can trust the rapid scaling of Cloud Run so they don't have to pre-provision things in advance to be able to serve that sudden traffic spike.But for those customers, Cloud Run is priced in a way so that if you know that you're going to consume a lot of Cloud Run CPU and memory, you can purchase Committed Use Discounts, which will lower your bill overall because you know you are going to spend one dollar per hour on Cloud Run, well purchase a Committed Use Discount because you will only spend 83 cents instead of one dollar. And also, Cloud Run and comes with two pricing model, one which is the default, which is the request-based pricing model, which is basically you only have CPU allocated to your container instances if you are processing at least one request. But as a consequence of that, you are not paying outside of the processing of those requests. Those containers might stay up for you, one, ready to receive new requests, but you're not paying for them. And so, that is—you know, your URL redirect service is probably in that mode where yes when you haven't used it for a while, it will scale down to zero, but if you send one request to it, it will serve that request and then it will stay up for a while until it decides to scale down. But you the user only pays when you are processing these specific requests, a little bit like a Function as a Service product.Corey: Scales to zero is one of the fundamental tenets of serverless that I think that companies calling something serverless, but it always charges you per hour anyway. Yeah, that doesn't work. Storage, let's be clear, is a separate matter entirely. I'm talking about compute. Even if your workflow doesn't scale down to zero ever as a workload, that's fine, but if the workload does, you don't get to keep charging me for it.Steren: Exactly. And so, in that other mode where you decide to always have CPU allocated to your Cloud Run container instances, then you pay for the entire lifecycle of this container instances. You still benefit from the auto-scaling of Cloud Run, but you will pay for the lifecycle and in that case, the price points are lower because you pay for a longer period of time. But that's more the price model that those bigger customers will take because at their scale, they basically always receive requests, so they already to pay always, basically.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to chat with me. Before you go, one last question that we'll be using as a teaser for the next episode that we record together. It seems like this is a full-time job being the product manager on Cloud Run, but no Google, contrary to popular opinion, does in fact, still support 20% projects. What's yours?Steren: So, I've been looking to work on Cloud Run since it was a prototype, and you know, for a long time, we've been iterating privately on Cloud Run, launching it, seeing it grow, seeing it adopted, it's great. It's my full-time job. But on Fridays, I still find the time to have a 20% project, which also had quite a bit of impact. And I work on some sustainability efforts for Google Cloud. And notably, we've released two things last year.The first one is that we are sharing some carbon characteristics of Google Cloud regions. So, if you have seen those small leaves in the Cloud Console next to the regions that are emitting the less carbon, that's something that I helped bring to life. And the second one, which is something quite big, is we are helping customers report and reduce their gross carbon emissions of their Google Cloud usage by providing an out of the box reporting tool called Google Cloud Carbon Footprint. So, that's something that I was able to bootstrap with a team a little bit on the side of my Cloud Run project, but I was very glad to see it launched by our CEO at the last Cloud Next Conference. And now it is a fully-funded project, so we are very glad that we are able to help our customers better meet their sustainability goals themselves.Corey: And we will be talking about it significantly on the next episode. We're giving a teaser, not telling the whole story.Steren: [laugh].Corey: I really want to thank you for being as generous with your time as you are. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Steren: Well, if they want to learn more about Cloud Run, we talked about how simple was that name. It was obviously not simple to find this simple name, but the domain is https://cloud.run.Corey: We will also accept snark.cloud/run, I will take credit for that service, too.Steren: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: There we are.Steren: And then, people can find me on Twitter at @steren, S-T-E-R-E-N. I'll be happy—I'm always happy to help developers get started or answer questions about Cloud Run. And, yeah, thank you for having me. As I said, you successfully deployed something in just a few minutes to Cloud Run. I would encourage the audience to—Corey: In spite of myself. I know, I'm as surprised as anyone.Steren: [laugh].Corey: The only snag I really hit was the fact that I was riding shotgun when we picked up my daughter from school and went through a dead zone. It's like, why is this thing not loading in the Google Cloud Console? Yeah, fix the cell network in my area, please.Steren: I'm impressed that you did all of that from an iPad. But yeah, to the audience give Cloud Run the try. You can really get started connecting your GitHub repository or deploy your favorite container image. And we've worked very hard to ensure that usability was here, and we know we have pretty strong usability scores. Because that was a lot of work to simplicity, and product excellence and developer experience is a lot of work to get right, and we are very proud of what we've achieved with Cloud Run and proud to see that the developer community has been very supportive and likes this product.Corey: I'm a big fan of what you've built. And well, of course, it links to all of that in the show notes. I just want to thank you again for being so generous with your time. And thanks again for building something that I think in many ways showcases the best of what Google Cloud has to offer.Steren: Thanks for the invite.Corey: We'll talk again soon. Steren Giannini is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, on Cloud Run. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice. If it's on YouTube, put the thumbs up and the subscribe buttons as well, but in the event that you hated it also include an angry comment explaining why your 20% project is being a shithead on the internet.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    Windows Weekly (MP3)
    WW 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders - Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot

    Windows Weekly (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:25


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    Windows Weekly (Video HI)
    WW 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders - Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot

    Windows Weekly (Video HI)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:57


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
    Windows Weekly 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:57


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
    Windows Weekly 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:25


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    Radio Leo (Audio)
    Windows Weekly 782: A Hazy Shade of Winders

    Radio Leo (Audio)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 111:25


    Windows Defender, Microsoft Viva, GitHub Copilot Windows New Windows 11 Insider Build Brings OneDrive Information Microsoft Gets Ready to Roll Out Search Highlights on Windows 11 Xiaomi Launches its First Windows on ARM 2-in-1 PC Microsoft 365 & Cloud Microsoft launches Defender for Individuals for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers Microsoft's Viva Sales: A new companion app that works with many CRM systems (not only Microsoft's) Microsoft to curtail some of its facial recognition capabilities in the name of 'Responsible AI' From Nvidia to IKEA: Here's who's joining the Metaverse Standards Forum Dev GitHub Copilot, Microsoft's AI pair-programming service, is generally available The Directions on Microsoft Briefing | Directions on Microsoft Xbox Xbox Cloud Gaming to Get Mouse and Keyboard Support on PC Microsoft Warns About Supply Shortages for Xbox Controllers Far Cry 5 is Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass Microsoft's Xbox App on PC Adds a Performance Indicator Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 22H2 App pick of the week: Reading apps Enterprise pick 1 of the week: Microsoft's Secured Core comes to IoT devices Enterprise pick 2 of the week: Don't be fooled: Patch Tuesday isn't going away Beer pick of the week: Torch & Crown Rainbows Everywhere Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: hackerrank.com/WW newrelic.com/windows go.acronis.com/ww

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Roofing, windows, screws all needed in building supply shortage

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 3:51


    It's not just missing plasterboard halting construction on sites across New Zealand. Roofing, windows, and even screws are harder to get and come at an inflated price. And with added labour shortages it's enough to see some businesses crumble. Sam Olley reports.

    Sixteen:Nine
    Naveen Viswanatha, Google

    Sixteen:Nine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:35


    The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT The prevailing impression of Google and digital signage is that the tech giant came briefly into the sector a few years ago, made some noise, and then quietly left. But the reality is that the tech giant has continued to be active in digital signage, and there are numerous screen  networks out there running on Chrome OS devices through different CMS software vendors. Then there's Android, the Google-developed operating system used on a pile of smart displays and separate play-out boxes. But now Google is again getting visibly active in the digital signage and related kiosk ecosystem, extending an existing program called Chrome Enterprise Recommended to software vendors who use Chrome OS. It's also introduced a Chrome OS device management license,  for narrow-purpose uses like screens and kiosks, that works out to just a touch more than a couple of bucks a month. And there's Flex, an application that can extend the life of a Windows box by running Chrome, and enable screen networks using a blend of playback hardware. I think a lot of the early interest in Google, back in 2015, was with the relatively low prices of the software and hardware. These days, it likely has more to do with scale, manageability and security. I spoke with Naveen Viswanatha, Google's product lead on Chrome OS. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Naveen, thank you for joining me. What's your role at Google?  Naveen Viswanatha: Hey, thanks for having me. I am the Chrome OS Product Lead for our solution areas and our solution areas include virtualization, contact center, and very recently we've beefed up our kiosk and digital signage solution area.  Are you at the main campus out in Silicon Valley?  Naveen Viswanatha: I am, indeed. Yeah, right here in the heart of the main campus in Mountain View. How long have you been with Google? Naveen Viswanatha: I have been with Google for 16 years but I haven't been spending the whole time in Chrome OS. I've been using Chrome OS for about 7 years, I believe. So you're almost a lifer in Google terms?  Naveen Viswanatha: I guess so, it seems like that.  I'm gonna talk about Chrome OS. Can you give me a sense of the installed base globally for Chrome OS? I don't need like today's number, but just like … it's many millions, right?  Naveen Viswanatha: Yeah. We don't break out specific details, but yeah it's in the millions and that kind of spans, I would say across three broad areas. Education is one area. So students and student Chromebooks and boxes. Consumer, and then Enterprise and, within Enterprise, that's where my focus is in the solution space. So yeah, that's how we look at the overall market, but yeah it's seen a tremendous amount of growth, especially in the last several years. Yeah, the pandemic really put a push on Chrome for Education, right?  Naveen Viswanatha: It did. I would actually say that it increased an already healthy appetite for Chrome devices within the education space. I actually used to be part of the education team, and we went from devices that were primarily purchased by schools and districts to devices that were now starting to see adoption in the home and that was the kind of recent trend that we saw over the course of the pandemic is really devices being used in the home, remote for delivery of curriculum.  Would that be driven in part by just the simple fact that the kids are learning at home now, and the parents are seeing the Chromebooks and thinking, okay these are perfectly workable laptops? Naveen Viswanatha: That's entirely right, and in addition to that, some of the unique capabilities allow students to use their education profiles. So the same profile that they use on their Chromebooks at school, they can log into a personal Chromebook at home and all of their data, all of their bookmarks, their applications, everything is synced to them pretty uniquely. And so, that ability of having this kind of floating cloud profile was another reason that it became really easy to simply adopt Chrome devices at home.  Okay, so on the enterprise side, you know, this is a digital signage podcast so we talk about digital signage. I assume that relative to education and to consumer, the percentage of the installed basis for digital signs of kiosk would be still pretty small, right?  Naveen Viswanatha: It's smaller. It's growing though, and in fact, I would actually say that we saw a lot of acceleration, arguably more acceleration broadly in the Enterprise space, over the pandemic in terms of growth, relative to the other verticals I was talking about, and a lot of that had to do with unique capabilities of Chrome that aligned really well with some of the challenges that businesses had during the pandemic to really maintain business continuity, whether that was remote work or whether that was increased concerns around security, data protection due to being remote.  These are all things that Chrome OS was really designed for, and so over the course of the pandemic, we saw a huge acceleration in these trends, and as a result Chrome OS was really the platform and endpoint of choice for many organizations. When I wrote last week about the announcement that, of the the recommended track for kiosk in digital signage. I said that Google made a big splash in the digital signage space in 2015. They took a big booty in the middle of the primary trade show for the industry and had all kinds of people looking at that booth and going, “oh, interesting, these guys are involved. I wonder what that means and will they take over and so on…” and it didn't really happen, there would be suggestions that Google got into the space and then got out of the space but what I wrote was basically, maybe they stepped back a little bit visibly, but they've continued to be in the digital signage and kiosk space and have a pretty decent footprint that isn't known.  Is that a fair statement?  Naveen Viswanatha: I think that is a fair characterization and I'm glad you brought that up because, as we've seen the trend over the course of the last couple of years, some of the trends that I was talking about with regards to the pandemic, those trends around moving to cloud and web are significant. Those trends in moving to remote and hybrid work are significant, increased data protection and controls are significant, and that primarily those three things really accrue primarily to end user computing so Chrome books and Chrome boxes used by employees.  But in addition to that, I think this kind of ties back to your point, we did see a lot of interesting trends as people started moving back into physical spaces. So increased expectations from customers for self-service options, increased expectations from employees for more engaging physical environments when they do return to the office, and these kinds of latter two trends are unique to kiosk and digital signage. So that's where we started really leaning more into this business that we have had for some time, as you mentioned, but really on the backs of what our customers and our partners were doing and what we're seeing as broader trends, we really wanted to lean into this area and really help drive more growth and drive more value into the overall ecosystem znd so recently we have really beefed up our efforts around kiosks and digital signage.  You know, when you work in a very niche industry like digital signage, you have this distorted idea that it's actually a pretty big industry, but in the the overall scheme of things, it's tiny, and I wondered if Google, going back a few years, looked at digital signage and continued to look at it and thought this is interesting stuff.  Signage and kiosks, it's got some possibilities, but it's so small compared to education. How much focus have you put on it? Naveen Viswanatha: I think that's a fair question. The reality, I think is that we have always maintained that we want to be an enterprise computing platform, or commercial, basically anything that requires a business or an organization or an NGO or a government to purchase devices and be the primary buyer. So it's a very broad space, and over the last several years, we have endeavored to really beef up our capabilities around end user computing. That was somewhat timed coincidentally with the pandemic. So that was an area of focus for us starting in 2018-19, really to emphasize these focuses on these solution areas, as I was mentioning, to really go after distinct sections of the enterprise market, and then very recently, starting to invest in kiosk and digital signage because we're starting to see additional trends driving that and those trends being lined up with ChromeOS capabilities. So I wouldn't say it was due to the size of the market in particular. I think it's just in terms of when we think about our overall strategy and where we saw our customers really taking the platform, we wanted to really lean into those areas, and so that's really been the main driver is trying to meet our customers where they are, and identify areas that have a strong product market fit in the enterprise space and you see that as a reflection of the key solution areas that we're investing in, including kiosks and signage now.  So when Google as a company takes an interest in something like this, how does that manifest itself in real terms? Is there like a dedicated team or is this one market that a broader Chrome OS team pays attention to and puts some work into? Naveen Viswanatha: That's a really good question. So I keep referring to these solution areas and maybe it'll help a little bit because I think that'll help frame the answer to your question a bit more to talk about what these solution areas are.  A few years ago we started looking at where we were seeing product market fit and where we were seeing our customers adopt Chrome OS beyond education, and really noticed that to deliver a robust solution built on top of this platform, you really needed to have an end to end solution that customers and organizations knew was just gonna work and work really well, and so what that meant was there's really four components to these solution areas. So there's underlying features and capabilities of the operating system itself, so security, APIs, core functionality that the operating system provides, even for enterprises, things that are unique to the solution areas and I can list off a few new features and capabilities that we have as an example that are unique to the kiosk and signage solution area but that's another part of that.  The second component is around management. So how can these solutions areas and their administrators and the folks that manage these solutions, manage the platform easily? And then there's an ecosystem component to this too, and this is really what I think rounds out our notion of a solution area. An ecosystem includes devices so endpoints and OEMs, as well as peripherals and then ISV partners. So solution providers that actually build their products on top of Chrome OS and we ensure that they're optimized and integrated into the operating system. So that's what constitutes a solution area, and as we saw increased focus and investment in those solution areas, we started really orienting our teams to deliver against that.  On the product and engineering side and the UX side within Google, that means that we still rely on broad platform capabilities that you think of more as foundational layers, but increasingly we have teams that are focused on delivering features capabilities, management capabilities, specific to solution areas. And we'll talk a little bit about that or what we did for the kiosk, and then in addition to that, we really started focusing our partner teams on the partners, both the devices, peripherals, as well as ISV partners that we wanted to work with to really bring these solutions to life, and so there's increasing focus around these areas and we're really organizing ourselves across the stack to really deliver towards these solutions. So you have this Chrome enterprise recommended track for “kiosk and digital signage”. When I saw that, I wasn't familiar with it and I thought, okay, they've created this, but in doing a little bit of digging, it looks like you have Chrome enterprise recommended tracks in other areas already. So this is something you already do and you've added digital signs and kiosks?  Naveen Viswanatha: Yeah, that's exactly right. The solution tracks that you saw prior to the recent announcement for the kiosk track were really built around the end user computing growth that we were seeing in the last several years that I was alluding to earlier, and very recently, last week we announced the kiosk and signage Chrome enterprise recommended solution track, and so nine partners that we worked with, their solutions are validated, they're optimized, they're integrated into Chrome OS. That means that our partner engineering teams have worked with these organizations to ensure that everything that they build on our platform works. They are regression tests every release that comes out. So we're really tightly working with these organizations, and we only expect, especially in the kiosk and signage space, this category to grow over the coming quarters and years.  And this whole validation process, is that to keep your engineers sane or is it in certain respects, a marketing tool to say this is kind of Google approved and Google validated? Naveen Viswanatha: It's a bit of both actually. We actually go through and test these solutions within our own test labs, and then these providers also will be testing their solutions with every Chrome OS release, and as a result of that, we badge these providers, these ISV partners of ours, and that badge effectively denotes that level of confidence for any organization that's going to adopt an end to end solution. Some of the companies that are involved in this are pretty small in relative terms. Are they getting involved, to use a term a colleague of mine used to use, “to bask in reflected glory that we're working with Google” or have they made a business decision based on the technology that this is where things are going and we wanna get ahead of it? Naveen Viswanatha: I've spoken to many of these partners and really a lot of it boils down to their alignment either from a business or technology standpoint that they want to really align their solutions with a platform that they feel is going to help them scale their business. These are organizations that are typically developing web-based applications that are lightweight, robust and work well on Chrome as a web-based operating system. Security is a big concern for them, and I think it's a growing concern in the signage space. We've spoken to many customers having concerns about their screens taken over. If you have more and more screens in your physical spaces, your brand and your operations are potentially at risk, and so a lot of these partners kind of align to that element of Chrome, and I think the simplicity in being able to remotely manage devices, that's another area that these partners have really embraced and benefited from.  So I think it's really around looking at what technology and platform they want to align with and that's where we've started our conversations with them and as you mentioned they represent a specific segment of the market, and I think over the coming quarters and years, we're really looking to add more partners to our kiosk and signage Chrome enterprise recommended track. I got a sense back in 2015 that when the first iteration of this came out and you had a whole bunch of partners really quickly that a lot of the energy and interest around Chrome devices was, here's low cost management software and relatively low cost playback hardware versus the PCs that were out in the market then and it was just at a point when you were starting to see set top boxes and things like that being used.  I sense that's changed, that the partner marketplace is a lot more sophisticated, and as you've alluded to, they're looking more at things like security and ease of management?  Naveen Viswanatha: A hundred percent, that is absolutely right. The kiosk and signage landscape has shifted dramatically, I think, in the last, 18 to 24 months really, kind of emerging out of the pandemic as well, and I think it was shifting before and then I think what happened was that a lot of physical spaces started really being underutilized during the early part of the pandemic, but then that really set customer expectations and business expectations a lot around how they can be use technology to really digitally transform their businesses, and so as people started moving back into physical spaces, customers started moving back into physical spaces, it came with a fervor that I think has really accelerated some interesting opportunities in the signage space. Opportunities and threats too, as you mentioned, security and data protection and these things are becoming more and more of a concern. Updating, if you have more screens and more kiosks in your physical space, the kind of traditional operating systems that were being used, don't lend themselves well to that, right? They don't lend themselves well to being updated, being patched, being managed remotely. I think we've all seen blue screens in airports and different types of signs before. That's becoming more and more challenging, just the reliability and remote management.  So as these trends are starting to really put pressure on a lot of businesses, that's where Chrome OS is starting to really be considered more and more as a robust platform that can really help accelerate the next phase of digital transformation in these physical spaces. I get the argument for Windows and the bloatware and the crap on there and the updates you can't control and all those sorts of things. It's less of an issue with Linux but there's still an issue?  Naveen Viswanatha: Linux is an interesting platform. We don't see it too much ourselves but I think one of the challenges with Linux has to do with that it can do anything you really want it to, but in order to get it, to do what you want, it takes a lot of tuning, a lot of configuration, a lot of setup, and so I think you'll be spending the cost as an organization on either building up the technical capacity and knowing how to do that and really piecemealing a solution together, and at some point you're probably gonna ask yourself, is it worth it for our business to really become a Linux expert for our digital signage and kiosk strategy? Is that really core to driving the customer experience or should we rely on a platform like Chrome OS to give us a lot of that as part of its core capability?    And if you're using something like Chrome OS as a software firm, is there less demand to have in-house expertise around an operating system, if you're using something like Chrome versus Linux?  Naveen Viswanatha: Yeah, I would say that's one of the common benefits that we've seen. Recently I spoke to a retailer abroad in Asia, and they were saying that they saw an 80% reduction in staff having to focus on updates and management of the platform, and I asked the question because I wasn't sure if they said 80% or 18% because 80% sounded really startling and in fact they said no 80%, and now these individuals, they're effectively being focused on higher order capabilities with higher order needs within the organization rather than just going out and servicing screens and devices that needed to be updated, they're focusing more on higher value business objectives. And so absolutely, I think this is one of the areas where businesses need to ask themselves is this core, or is it context? It means core to obviously incorporate digital signage and service options within your business, but is it core for your organization to understand exactly how an operating system is gonna work? One of the arguments that a very successful company in the digital signage space called BrightSign makes … they are spin out of Roku and the CEO is saying that one of the reasons there's a lot of attraction to our hardware is we don't really have an operating system. It's our own proprietary operating system. So there's nothing to really hack. There's nothing you can do with it.  I understand the risk with Windows and to a lesser degree with Linux are, and I know you do harden Chrome, but what are there ways in? And if there are, please explain them to me. (Laughter) Naveen Viswanatha: That's actually one of the areas that I think we have a very strong track record around, and I will add that systems will get compromised over time, and unless you have a security team, a large robust security team, actively monitoring and ensuring that exploits and vulnerabilities are gonna be patched consistently, that turnaround time needs to be very quick, and that's exactly what we do on the Chrome OS side, and I think you can look at our track record. We have zero ransomware attacks ever reported on Chrome OS.  It's also another component that if you double click into the security piece of Chrome OS, it's really baked into the operating system. Many other operating systems out there will think about security as a bolt on afterthought. It's core to exactly how Chrome OS works. I'll give you a couple of examples.  Executables are blocked from running on the operating system, they're just blocked. And so that's a huge vector of vulnerability that is just removed entirely. Timely security updates, like I was talking about before. We have the ability to roll out updates on a four week cycle. Even if you're part of our long term stable channel so organizations that don't choose to get four week updates on the operating system, they wanna actually get six month updates instead, even if you're on that six month long term stable support channel, we will still roll out critical security updates to you. So you get the best of both worlds, right? And again, we have a whole team of people that are watching and monitoring what kind of vulnerabilities are out there on a consistent basis, and I'll mention one more thing really quickly and that is that the operating system files are kept in a complete, separate partition, so they can't be modified at all. So let's say with kiosk, your app is hacked in some way, or there's a vulnerability in the application that you're building, the operating system itself is hardened and entirely isolated from the application session itself. It's just a handful of things to think about.  I think any chief information security officer or CIO or organization that's really looking at security needs to evaluate it broadly, and we have a lot of great material that can tell you beyond what I've said here. Why Chrome OS is a very hardened and safe operation. I suspect you've also learned a lot through the years too. I know that some of the companies who were early on with Google using Chrome OS, they were frustrated by new versions that would break their software, and I think you got to a point pretty quickly where you started to pin the OS versions and a company could stay on that until they're ready to move to the next one instead of being auto-updated.  Naveen Viswanatha: Yeah, and we have learned a lot over the last several years, and you bring up a good point. One of the design principles that we really try to anchor on, when you think about what a business wants, they want predictability and control. They wanna know when things are gonna change, they wanna have the control to be able to initiate those changes.  Even if we have this release train rolling out great new updates, security updates, new features. As a business, you want to be able to throttle that, and yeah, we have a number of different controls that have allowed organizations to do that. A long term stable and support channel, which I mentioned expands the actual stable channel that the operating system is on for six months. So that was a big one that we announced earlier this year. But in addition to that, the ability to, like you said, pin different application versions and be able to know exactly when you wanna roll those out, there's a number of other controls that allow you to better understand how you're gonna update your fleet.  So tell me about Flex.  Naveen Viswanatha: Ah, we're super excited about Flex. So that was one of the three big announcements we had around CER. The first one was the Chrome enterprise recommended solution track that you alluded to earlier. The second one was a brand new SKU that's focused specifically on kiosks and digital signage, and we can get to that in a moment too, and the third one was the incorporation of Flex.  So Flex is something that we announced earlier this year and what it allows organizations to do is install Chrome OS on any device they already have. So if you have an existing investment, say in Windows devices, they're aging, you're not sure when you're gonna refresh them, maybe you wanna refresh part of them but you wanna get the benefits of Chrome OS, the security, the built in updates, everything we've been talking about thus far, remote management, you can now install Chrome OS Flex on those devices and get all of the benefits from Chrome OS. So we've seen that as a really interesting opportunity in the kiosk space as many customers are starting to use that as an. Chrome OS. So they'll maybe extend the life of their existing infrastructure for a couple of years, and then we'll see them roll onto Chrome devices in the future, but we've also seen organizations look at Chrome OS Flex as a way to really tailor what they want in terms of device capabilities for their signage solutions based on the breadth of different hardware and endpoints that exist out there today. So for example, if you wanted an existing device that is not a Chrome OS device, either based on the aesthetics of it, based on the form factor or performance, is it ruggedized, fanless, et cetera. You can look at that and say I wanna use that device. It's not a Chrome OS device, but with Flex now, I can transform that into a Chrome OS device and incorporate it into my overall device strategy. So why can you extend your life? Is that because it's a leaner application and strips out a lot of stuff? Naveen Viswanatha: It's because we're able to really look at the hardware and separate the hardware from the software, and so rather than relying on Microsoft's operating system support and when that's gonna be EOLd (end of lifed) or when the device itself be becomes EOLd, Chrome OS Flex allows us to effectively say, look, that's an end point and we're gonna separate the software and the operating system from the actual device components. As an organization there creates an abstraction layer for you to utilize Flex as a way to extend the life of that infrastructure.  I assume you could also run a blended network as well, so that you could have Chrome OS devices and re refurbed windows or reclaimed windows devices as Flex devices and run concurrently. You don't have to have a network, that's just all pure Chrome OS devices.  Naveen Viswanatha: Yeah, you hit the nail on the head and that's what we're starting to see with many of our customers who will start with Chrome OS flex, but then they'll say … a lot of organizations, especially larger organizations, they don't necessarily have one device on one operating system or one endpoint or one operating system, they have a plethora of them and these devices might be on different refresh and end of life cycle.  So when there might be one coming up, say, at the end of next year, Chrome OS Flex is a great way to evaluate Chrome OS capabilities. Most of the time customers overwhelmingly are happy with Chrome OS and start using that as an onboarding mechanism for other Chrome devices or then rolling out Flex to other parts of their fleet that might be the end of lifting and subsequent years. And so during that time, they will have, like you said, a hybrid model of Chrome OS devices, as well as Flex devices, and you can absolutely manage those through the single pane of glass, like via the partner pane of glass, one of the nine partners that we just announced, or even our own admin console. You mentioned a new SKU. What is that?  Naveen Viswanatha: Yeah we're very excited about that. The new SKU is called the kiosk and signage upgrade, and what it does is it unlocks all of the signage capabilities that an organization wants, but none of anything else that you need. And what I mean by that is that Chrome OS is an operating system that serves end user computing, as well as signage. On the end user computing side, you need capabilities to manage users, user profiles, logins, different types of login modalities. But on the signage side, you don't really need that, right? Even if there's end user interaction, there's a lot of user modes and user capabilities that are not part of that overall management… Because it's a dumb end point in a hell of a lot of cases?  Naveen Viswanatha: I wouldn't use the word dumb, but because it's a highly focused endpoint, and as a result of that, we tailored a SKU which is $25 per device per year. So that's half off, two bucks a month basically, enterprise SKU, and for that, you get this 50% off SKU and very focused functionality, still gives you all the security, all the device controls, cloud management, reporting and insights. You just don't get the user controls that you get with the Chrome enterprise upgrade SKU, and that's the full SKU.  But if you did want those user controls, for whatever reason it may be, could you use those? And could you run a blended network with both kinds of licenses?  Naveen Viswanatha: Absolutely and we have a lot of customers that that, that are doing exactly  One thing that came up a few years ago and there was some buzz around it, but I don't know where it went. There was chatter that Android, which is pretty widely used in digital signage as well, was going to converge with Chrome OS and it was going to be the same thing that didn't really happen or did I miss it?  Naveen Viswanatha: No, it didn't happen. I've been on the team for seven years, so I'm not sure if what you're referring to is before my time, but we do have Android and Chrome OS as a company, two operating systems that serve different parts of the overall market. Now you're right that there is going to be some overlap. We see Android in the signage space. We see Android focusing a little bit more on mobile kiosk type of use cases. So a customer associate in a store walking around with a tablet style device, so things along those lines, whereas Chrome OS feels like it's a bit more focused on fixed facility types of infrastructure, and that's how we see the segmentation today. And we obviously worked very closely with the Android team.  Over time I think, as things evolve somewhat organically, if there are opportunities to bring these two capabilities or two operating systems together, that's something that we will consider but today we see a pretty natural segmentation. One thing I will add is that you were talking about managing a blended environment. With the Chrome OS capabilities and Android management capabilities, many organizations are managing both Chrome OS and Android endpoints through their universal endpoint management solutions. So that is a way that these two solutions can coexist even today.  This has been great. I could have talked for at least an hour or more, but we committed to a certain time window, so I should honor it. The last question I wanted to ask is just very simply if software companies and solution providers wanna get involved, or at least look into this how do they start? Naveen Viswanatha: Yeah, so you can go to our website. We have a lot of great information on our website. For customers, we have a wayfinding guide. We have information about the different solutions that we have for kiosk in terms of both devices that they can use at as endpoints, as well as peripherals that they can also utilize.  On the partner side, on the solution provider side gets in contact with our business development team. I know we are actively looking at working with more and more partners. I mentioned earlier that we listed nine and that's just a starting point, and what we've seen is that on the solution provider and ISV side, as you scale out globally, there are a lot of kinds of localized partners that do a lot of work in different regions, and so we expect this area to really build out significantly over the coming years. So get in touch with our BD team and our business development team, and be happy to work with you, figure out ways to incorporate you into our Chrome enterprise recommended program. As you dug into this, were you surprised by how many CMS software companies are out there?   Naveen Viswanatha: Yeah, I absolutely was. Especially considering where we were just five years ago or so. It seems like this has been one of the areas where we've seen a lot of hyper specialization and hyper localization. So unlike other solution categories like contact center, as an example, you tend to have a number of global players and then a few localized players within each market.  In this particular arena, in kiosks and digital signage, it feels very different because you look at APAC. I can't even talk about APAC as a market because each country, and sometimes even within countries, different specializations with retail versus employee spaces and workspaces has created a huge ecosystem around kiosks and signage. So yes, long answer in terms of in terms of your original question, but absolutely.  That's good for me because a crowded market means there's more to write about and talk about. (Laughter) Well, thank you very much for spending some time with me! Naveen Viswanatha: Thank you, and appreciate the time and opportunity, and I look forward to talking to you again at some point. 

    mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

    Samsung tiene 50 millones de móviles sin vender / GitHub Copilot para todos / Detectores electrónicos de ajedrez / Reventa ética de entradas / Los negativos de los SMR / Corea del Sur lanza su cohete propio / Windows 10/11 bloqueado en Rusia Patrocinador: En el Assembler Institute of Technology abren matrículas ahora mismo con dos programas: Máster en Desarrollo de Software en Barcelona, remoto o presencial durante 7 meses; y un Máster en Data Science de 6 meses. — Son muy buenos. Diles que vas a de mi parte y te harán un descuento de 250 euros en la matrícula. Samsung tiene 50 millones de móviles sin vender / GitHub Copilot para todos / Detectores electrónicos de ajedrez / Reventa ética de entradas / Los negativos de los SMR / Corea del Sur lanza su cohete propio / Windows 10/11 bloqueado en Rusia ♟️ Pruebas anti-trampas a Hikaru Nakamura durante el torneo Candidatos en Madrid. El gran evento de ajedrez del año está dejándonos grandes partidas y una imagen poco vista: un jugador teniendo que pasar los detectores electrónicos (vídeo) antes de la partida. — No sé si Hikaru comentó algo en su Twitch después, donde tiene 1,4 millones de seguidores.

    Risky Business
    Risky Business #668 -- Microsoft is hiding its Azure security problems

    Risky Business

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022


    On this week's show Patrick Gray and Adam Boileau discuss the week's security news, including: Paige Thompson guilty of Capital One hack Microsoft is hiding serious Azure security issues New Australian government lobbying for Julian Assange How to ransomware documents in the cloud Microsoft stops Windows 10/11 downloads in Russia Belarusian cyber partisans obtain spy agency's audio recordings Much, much more This week's edition of the show is brought to you by Gigamon. Josh Day, Gigamon's Director of applied threat research team, will be along in this week's sponsor interview to talk about detecting badness on your network in encrypted traffic. Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that's your thing. Show notes Former Seattle tech worker convicted of wire fraud and computer intrusions | USAO-WDWA | Department of Justice MPs back quiet diplomacy in Assange case Botched and silent patches from Microsoft put customers at risk, critics say | Ars Technica Microsoft's Vulnerability Practices Put Customers At Risk | LinkedIn Security firm warns of ransomware attacks targeting Microsoft cloud 'versioning' feature - The Record by Recorded Future Separate Fujitsu cloud storage vulnerabilities could enable attackers to destroy virtual backups | The Daily Swig Large supermarket chain in southern Africa hit with ransomware - The Record by Recorded Future Telegram: Contact @tass_agency Microsoft pulls Windows 10 and 11 in Russia • The Register DDoS Attacks Delay Putin Speech at Russian Economic Forum Russia warns of a “military clash” if it's hit by US cyberattacks - The Record by Recorded Future Belarusian hacktivist group releases purported Belarusian wiretapped audio of Russian embassy U.S. defense firm L3Harris in talks with NSO Group over spyware - The Washington Post Srsly Risky Biz: Friday June 17 - by Tom Uren Suspect in hacking Russian customs detained in Moscow String of attacks on French telecom infrastructure preceded April attack on fiber optic cables Chinese APT groups targeting India, Pakistan and more with Sophos firewall vulnerability - The Record by Recorded Future Ukrainian cybersecurity officials disclose two new hacking campaigns Police Linked to Hacking Campaign to Frame Indian Activists | WIRED INTERPOL raids hundreds of scammy call centers in sweep A Twitch Streamer Is Exposing Coronavirus Scams Live | WIRED Ranking The World's Angriest Scammers - 10/10 Rage - YouTube MIT researchers find new hardware vulnerability in the Apple M1 chip - The Record by Recorded Future A new vulnerability in Intel and AMD CPUs lets hackers steal encryption keys | Ars Technica Tornado Cash Is Crypto Hackers' Favorite Way to Cash Out, But Experts Say It Can Be Traced How CISA's list of 'must-patch' vulnerabilities has expanded both in size, and who's using it The tale of a whale who took Solend's money – Amy Castor

    Broken Silicon
    158. Lovelace & Raptor Lake Launch October, AMD Little Phoenix APU, ARC A380 Pricing

    Broken Silicon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 131:19


    AMD, Nvidia, and Intel all seem to be targeting Quarter 4 for their big releases… SPON: Get 10% off Tasty Vite Ramen with Code “brokensilicon” at: https://bit.ly/3oyv4tR SPON: brokensilicon = -25% off Windows, dieshrink = -3% off Everything: https://biitt.ly/shbSk 0:00 Zebra vs Hoarse Voice, Bonus 6G Episode is LIVE 4:44 Reesie Health Update 10:33 Ionizing Radiation, First OLED TVs (Corrections) 16:34 Intel 4 Node Doubles Density or brings +20% Performance 21:50 Intel Sapphire Rapids Delayed to Q2 2023 - Next to Bergamo 31:31 Raptor Lake likely Launches October...after Zen 4 42:14 Wait for Raptor Lake or Zen 4 with Vcache? Will 170w be enough for Zen 6? 49:02 AMD Phoenix, Dragon Range, Mendocino, and Sonoma Valley Discussion 1:00:19 Little Phoenix for Steam Deck 2 Leak 1:10:09 Will Phoenix & Raptor Lake Mobile actually have good supply? 1:14:16 Nvidia Lovelace Launches Q4 due to Oversupply Issues 1:22:33 Alchemist Performance & Pricing Update 1:26:44 Late 2022 Building Advice – Used Cards, OLED Monitors, RDNA 3 1:31:16 Apple M2 Announced with 8-core CPU and 10-core GPU 1:35:54 AMD Game Bundle, Intel 3 Node, Loongson CPUs (Wrap-Up) 1:47:27 Metaverse, Bitcoin, XBOX June Showcase (Final Reader Mail) https://www.techpowerup.com/295809/intel-4-process-node-detailed-doubling-density-with-20-higher-performance https://medium.com/@mingchikuo/intels-sapphire-rapids-shipment-delay-to-2q23-is-detrimental-to-intel-and-its-server-supply-chain-a1de691bd093 https://twitter.com/mooreslawisdead/status/1538622486258008070 https://youtu.be/MYJ_9zfqWUg https://youtu.be/rIN3IbA3vCY https://twitter.com/wxnod/status/1537824618613833728 https://youtu.be/JN0ygfN0-go https://www.techpowerup.com/295926/amd-phoenix-point-zen-4-mobile-processor-powered-up https://www.techpowerup.com/295850/amd-ryzen-3-7320u-surfaces-possibly-the-mendocino-soc https://wccftech.com/nvidia-geforce-rtx-4090-october-rtx-4080-november-rtx-4070-december-rtx-4060-ces-2023-launch-rumor/ https://videocardz.com/newz/nvidia-geforce-gtx-1630-delayed-rtx-40-series-launch-slips-by-a-month https://youtu.be/ARjeBywF7uo https://twitter.com/SkyJuice60/status/1537031000970371073 https://twitter.com/3dcenter_org/status/1537435073774907394?s=21&t=oMgVBvr5ST4LeAiiAP2ztQ https://videocardz.com/newz/first-review-of-intel-alchemist-acm-g10-gpu-is-out-arc-a730m-is-outperformed-by-rtx-3060m-in-gaming https://videocardz.com/newz/intel-quietly-changes-official-arc-a380-memory-specs-its-15-5-gbps-not-16 https://www.notebookcheck.net/Apple-M2-GPU-outdoes-its-own-hype-with-up-to-45-faster-performances-than-the-M1-in-GFXBench-and-up-to-13-5-in-Cinebench-R23.629517.0.html https://videocardz.com/press-release/apple-announces-next-gen-m2-silicon-with-8-core-cpu-and-10-core-gpu?s=03 https://videocardz.com/newz/amd-raise-the-game-bundle-goes-live-after-a-month-saints-row-sniper-elite-and-forspoken-are-out-for-grabs https://www.tomshardware.com/uk/news/nvidia-arm-intel-alder-lake-expert https://www.techspot.com/review/2478-amd-ryzen-5600-upgrade/ https://www.amd.com/en/products/graphics/amd-radeon-rx-6700 https://www.techspot.com/news/94919-preview-core-i9-13900-engineering-sample-performance-looks.html https://videocardz.com/newz/intel-14th-gen-core-meteor-lake-p-die-shot-with-6-performance-and-8-efficient-cores-has-been-revealed https://twitter.com/iancutress/status/1536471424654778372?s=21&t=nKekRs5AxVEX3154QCA6SQ https://youtu.be/he6xyl_MHXY https://www.techspot.com/news/94921-chinese-chipmaker-claims-upcoming-cpus-feature-similar-ipc.html

    Digital Forensic Survival Podcast
    DFSP # 331 - New Services

    Digital Forensic Survival Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 16:04


    In the past I've talked about fast triage from a high-level, addressing the different artifacts and some interesting elements in each of those artifacts. I decided to start going a bit deeper and focus on one or a few artifacts at a time and really talk about the important details they may record for your investigation and how to interpret that information quickly. I'm going to start with the New Service Installation details recorded in Windows event logs. These have a number of advantages for your triage methodology and I will have all the details coming up.

    Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
    Ransomware Minute. Shoprite Group, Windows & Linux Systems. Scott Schober, WCYB Digital Radio.

    Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 2:12


    The Ransomware Minute is a rundown of the latest ransomware attacks & news, brought to you by CyberArk. Listen to the podcast weekly and read it daily at ransomwareminute.com • CyberArk is the global leader in Identity Security. Centered on privileged access management, CyberArk provides the most comprehensive security offering for any identity – human or machine. To learn more about our sponsor CyberArk, visit https://cyberark.com

    Digital Employee Experience: A Show for IT Change Makers
    Revolutionizing Workflow Integrations w/ Rami Husseini

    Digital Employee Experience: A Show for IT Change Makers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 17:58


    If the last two years have done anything, it's revolutionized the way that we work. Mobile working no longer means we work from an office and can go to a job site. It means we have the world at our fingertips—literally.  The ability to be anywhere didn't happen at the snap of our fingers, but thanks to the advancements in technology like Snapdragon. In today's episode, we chat with Rami Husseini, Director of Product Management at Qualcomm about how Snapdragon and its integration with Windows has made it possible for companies to change the way they work for good.  We discuss: The future of mobile handsets with 5G and WiFi connectivity  How technology impacts businesses and the way they work The balance between sustainability made devises and demand  For more amazing DEX content, including podcasts, articles and exclusive research, head over to the DEX Hub (dex.nexthink.com) To hear more interviews like this one, subscribe to the Digital Employee Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your preferred podcast platform. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Digital Employee Experience in your favorite podcast player.

    Cyber Security Headlines
    June 21, 2022

    Cyber Security Headlines

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 7:18


    Windows downloads blocked in Russia The importance of receipts Chrome extensions can be used for fingerprinting Thanks to today's episode sponsor, Optiv Modernizing your identity control plane from AD to the cloud is complex. Ralph Martino, who is leading the identity and access management (IAM) group for Optiv, discusses what challenges CISOs are facing in today's ever-changing climate: • Increasing security • Decreasing risk • Lowering cost Learn more at www.optiv.com/IAM-Microsoft.

    mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

    Apple verificará que somos humanos / Carga inalámbrica p2p / Nuevo mapa tectónico / En VTOL al trabajo / Un bug zombie en Safari / Samsung restringe Pay a sus teléfonos / Una PlayStation 5 mini artesanal Patrocinador: En el Assembler Institute of Technology abren matrículas ahora mismo con dos programas: Máster en Desarrollo de Software en Barcelona, remoto o presencial durante 7 meses; y un Máster en Data Science de 6 meses. — Son muy buenos. Diles que vas a de mi parte y te harán un descuento de 250 euros en la matrícula. Apple verificará que somos humanos / Carga inalámbrica p2p / Nuevo mapa tectónico / En VTOL al trabajo / Un bug zombie en Safari / Samsung restringe Pay a sus teléfonos / Una PlayStation 5 mini artesanal

    SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
    #SGGQA 256: LinkedIn Crypto Fraud, USA Common Charger, is the Nothing Something?

    SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022


    The FBI is worried about crypto scams on LinkedIn. Amazon is running out of workers to hire. Politicians in the USA are grumbling about a common charger on gadgets. Google is trying to lighten the mood on #TextsGoGreen. And what do we think about the Nothing? Is it something? Let’s get OUR tech week started … Continue reading "#SGGQA 256: LinkedIn Crypto Fraud, USA Common Charger, is the Nothing Something?"

    Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone
    BS 197 (Encore) Neuroscience for Dummies with Frank Amthor

    Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 65:07


    This month's episode of Brain Science features an encore playing of my interview with Dr. Frank Amthor, author of Neuroscience for Dummies and Neurobiology for Dummies. It is a great episode for newbies and will be a good review for longtime listeners. This is a FREE sample of my Premium content and the episode transcript is also FREE. Links and References: Essentials of Modern Neuroscience by Franklin Amthor, W. Anne Burton Theibert, David Standaert, and Erik Roberson Neurobiology For Dummies by Frank Amthor Neuroscience For Dummies, 2nd Ed. by Frank Amthor Please visit http://brainsciencepodcast.com for additional references and episode transcripts.   Please Visit Our Sponsors: TextExpander at textexpander.com/podcast Announcements: Want to be part of BS 200? Just email me at brainsciencepodcast@gmail.com to learn more. Get free gift "5 Things You Need to Know about YOUR Brain when you sign up for the free Brain Science Newsletter to get show notes automatically every month. You can also text brainscience to 55444 to sign up. Check out the Brain Science podcast channel on YouTube for episode excerpts and summaries. Support Brain Science by buying Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty by Virginia "Ginger" Campbell, MD. (Autographed copies are available) Check out the free Brain Science Mobile app for iOS, Android, and Windows. (It's a great way to get both new episodes and premium content.) Learn more ways to support Brain Science at http://brainsciencepodcast.com/donations Connect on Social Media: Twitter: @docartemis Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/brainsciencepodcast Contact Dr. Campbell: Email: brainsciencepodcast@gmail.com

    Radio Giga
    Das Euro-Zeichen (€) am PC & Smartphone schreiben

    Radio Giga

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022


    Wie ihr das Euro-Symbol ganz einfach in Windows, macOS, Android und iOS schreiben könnt, erfahrt ihr hier.

    Steve Heiting's Northwoods Musky Report
    June 16, 2022: Watch For Short Feeding Windows

    Steve Heiting's Northwoods Musky Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 4:13


    Cold nights are producing short feeding windows. Steve Heiting begins with a live report, and then returns to the studio to discuss what to watch for to catch muskies when those windows occur. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/steve038/support

    Windows Central Podcast
    Surface Turns 10

    Windows Central Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 86:20


    We celebrate 10 years of Surface products by sharing our favorite models from the last decade. You can officially say farewell to Internet Explorer, but it will live on (for awhile) as a compatibility mode in Microsoft Edge. Plus there's a new build of Windows 11, a $40 Surface Pen alternative, a review roundup, monitor talk, and much more. Links Windows 11 preview build 25140 rolls out to Insiders in the Dev Channel | Windows Central We're celebrating 10 years of Microsoft Surface all week at Windows Central! | Windows Central What's the point of Surface? 10 years on | Windows Central Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga (Gen 7) review: Hotter than ever, in more ways than one | Windows Central Microsoft reiterates Patch Tuesday updates are here to stay | Windows Central- Check out this new $40 Surface Pen alternative from Adonit | Windows Central Sponsors: Indeed: Choose Indeed and join 3 million companies worldwide who use Indeed to hire great people and help grow their teams faster. Get started right now with a free $75 sponsored job credit at indeed.com/wcp. Offer valid for a limited time. Terms and conditions apply.

    KNBR Podcast
    6-19 Bruce Jenkins looking thru the Windows of Baseball with Marty before the series finale vs the Pirates

    KNBR Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 11:34


    SF Chronicle's Bruce Jenkins looking thru the Windows of Baseball with Marty before the series finale vs the Pirates See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Marty Lurie Podcast
    6-19 Bruce Jenkins looking thru the Windows of Baseball with Marty before the series finale vs the Pirates

    Marty Lurie Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 11:34


    SF Chronicle's Bruce Jenkins looking thru the Windows of Baseball with Marty before the series finale vs the Pirates See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Tech Guy (Video HI)
    Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1903

    The Tech Guy (Video HI)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 159:44


    Finding good hearing aids and preparing for a hearing exam. Troubleshooting internet speeds for a T-Mobile home internet connection. Exporting and printing multiple notes from an iPhone. Repurposing an old Chromebook from Dell. Migrating an iPhotos Photo Library to macOS's Photos app. Troubleshooting auto-launching apps on an LG G6. Using a Vizio soundbar with ARC and HDMI-CEC. Using an external SSD to run macOS. Recording an audio stream on iPad. Transferring files from an iPad to a Windows PC using AirDrop. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet, Scott Wilkinson, and Dick Debartolo. Steam Deck™ Senators call for US to adopt common charger | TechCrunch Letter to Department of Commerce on e-Waste Elon Musk's plan is to run Twitter off the top of his head - The Verg ReSound hearing aids and wireless accessories | ReSound US Starkey | Find the Best Hearing Aid for You S.670 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 | Congress.gov | Library of Congress Hearing aids, information on hearing loss and tinnitus | Oticon Eargo Hearing Aid Products Widex Hearing Aids & Hearing Care Solutions Amazon.com: Windows 11 Tips and Tricks: Master Windows 11 in 3 Weeks eBook: Ganeshlal, Bhaju: Kindle Store iMazing Store Transfer iPhone, iPad or iPod touch notes to your Mac or PC computer DB Browser for SQLite Check when your Chromebook's updates will stop - Chromebook Help harper on Twitter: "I thought planes were supposed to have good air circulation https://t.co/UeTnqCmwo4" / Twitter Aranet4 - CO2 monitor Import photos from another library in Photos on Mac - Apple Support LG G6 Battery - iFixit Store How to Control Which Apps Open on Android Startup - DroidViews Vizio Sound Bar HDMI ARC Not Working: 7 Quick & Easy Fixes [2022] How to enable HDMI-CEC and ARC on your TV | Official Roku Support SuperDuper! Take a screenshot or screen recording on iPad - Apple Support ZOOM Recorders LANDrop LANDrop - Drop any files to any devices on your LAN I've Seen The Light!!! (And this isn't it.) | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Mikah Sargent, Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1903 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsors: meraki.cisco.com/twit UserWay.org/twit cachefly.com

    The Tech Guy (MP3)
    Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1903

    The Tech Guy (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 158:59


    Finding good hearing aids and preparing for a hearing exam. Troubleshooting internet speeds for a T-Mobile home internet connection. Exporting and printing multiple notes from an iPhone. Repurposing an old Chromebook from Dell. Migrating an iPhotos Photo Library to macOS's Photos app. Troubleshooting auto-launching apps on an LG G6. Using a Vizio soundbar with ARC and HDMI-CEC. Using an external SSD to run macOS. Recording an audio stream on iPad. Transferring files from an iPad to a Windows PC using AirDrop. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet, Scott Wilkinson, and Dick Debartolo. Steam Deck™ Senators call for US to adopt common charger | TechCrunch Letter to Department of Commerce on e-Waste Elon Musk's plan is to run Twitter off the top of his head - The Verg ReSound hearing aids and wireless accessories | ReSound US Starkey | Find the Best Hearing Aid for You S.670 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 | Congress.gov | Library of Congress Hearing aids, information on hearing loss and tinnitus | Oticon Eargo Hearing Aid Products Widex Hearing Aids & Hearing Care Solutions Amazon.com: Windows 11 Tips and Tricks: Master Windows 11 in 3 Weeks eBook: Ganeshlal, Bhaju: Kindle Store iMazing Store Transfer iPhone, iPad or iPod touch notes to your Mac or PC computer DB Browser for SQLite Check when your Chromebook's updates will stop - Chromebook Help harper on Twitter: "I thought planes were supposed to have good air circulation https://t.co/UeTnqCmwo4" / Twitter Aranet4 - CO2 monitor Import photos from another library in Photos on Mac - Apple Support LG G6 Battery - iFixit Store How to Control Which Apps Open on Android Startup - DroidViews Vizio Sound Bar HDMI ARC Not Working: 7 Quick & Easy Fixes [2022] How to enable HDMI-CEC and ARC on your TV | Official Roku Support SuperDuper! Take a screenshot or screen recording on iPad - Apple Support ZOOM Recorders LANDrop LANDrop - Drop any files to any devices on your LAN I've Seen The Light!!! (And this isn't it.) | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Mikah Sargent, Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1903 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsors: meraki.cisco.com/twit UserWay.org/twit cachefly.com

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
    The Tech Guy 1903

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 159:44


    Finding good hearing aids and preparing for a hearing exam. Troubleshooting internet speeds for a T-Mobile home internet connection. Exporting and printing multiple notes from an iPhone. Repurposing an old Chromebook from Dell. Migrating an iPhotos Photo Library to macOS's Photos app. Troubleshooting auto-launching apps on an LG G6. Using a Vizio soundbar with ARC and HDMI-CEC. Using an external SSD to run macOS. Recording an audio stream on iPad. Transferring files from an iPad to a Windows PC using AirDrop. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet, Scott Wilkinson, and Dick Debartolo. Steam Deck™ Senators call for US to adopt common charger | TechCrunch Letter to Department of Commerce on e-Waste Elon Musk's plan is to run Twitter off the top of his head - The Verg ReSound hearing aids and wireless accessories | ReSound US Starkey | Find the Best Hearing Aid for You S.670 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 | Congress.gov | Library of Congress Hearing aids, information on hearing loss and tinnitus | Oticon Eargo Hearing Aid Products Widex Hearing Aids & Hearing Care Solutions Amazon.com: Windows 11 Tips and Tricks: Master Windows 11 in 3 Weeks eBook: Ganeshlal, Bhaju: Kindle Store iMazing Store Transfer iPhone, iPad or iPod touch notes to your Mac or PC computer DB Browser for SQLite Check when your Chromebook's updates will stop - Chromebook Help harper on Twitter: "I thought planes were supposed to have good air circulation https://t.co/UeTnqCmwo4" / Twitter Aranet4 - CO2 monitor Import photos from another library in Photos on Mac - Apple Support LG G6 Battery - iFixit Store How to Control Which Apps Open on Android Startup - DroidViews Vizio Sound Bar HDMI ARC Not Working: 7 Quick & Easy Fixes [2022] How to enable HDMI-CEC and ARC on your TV | Official Roku Support SuperDuper! Take a screenshot or screen recording on iPad - Apple Support ZOOM Recorders LANDrop LANDrop - Drop any files to any devices on your LAN I've Seen The Light!!! (And this isn't it.) | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Mikah Sargent, Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1903 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/all-twittv-shows Sponsors: meraki.cisco.com/twit UserWay.org/twit cachefly.com

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
    The Tech Guy 1903

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 158:59


    Finding good hearing aids and preparing for a hearing exam. Troubleshooting internet speeds for a T-Mobile home internet connection. Exporting and printing multiple notes from an iPhone. Repurposing an old Chromebook from Dell. Migrating an iPhotos Photo Library to macOS's Photos app. Troubleshooting auto-launching apps on an LG G6. Using a Vizio soundbar with ARC and HDMI-CEC. Using an external SSD to run macOS. Recording an audio stream on iPad. Transferring files from an iPad to a Windows PC using AirDrop. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet, Scott Wilkinson, and Dick Debartolo. Steam Deck™ Senators call for US to adopt common charger | TechCrunch Letter to Department of Commerce on e-Waste Elon Musk's plan is to run Twitter off the top of his head - The Verg ReSound hearing aids and wireless accessories | ReSound US Starkey | Find the Best Hearing Aid for You S.670 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 | Congress.gov | Library of Congress Hearing aids, information on hearing loss and tinnitus | Oticon Eargo Hearing Aid Products Widex Hearing Aids & Hearing Care Solutions Amazon.com: Windows 11 Tips and Tricks: Master Windows 11 in 3 Weeks eBook: Ganeshlal, Bhaju: Kindle Store iMazing Store Transfer iPhone, iPad or iPod touch notes to your Mac or PC computer DB Browser for SQLite Check when your Chromebook's updates will stop - Chromebook Help harper on Twitter: "I thought planes were supposed to have good air circulation https://t.co/UeTnqCmwo4" / Twitter Aranet4 - CO2 monitor Import photos from another library in Photos on Mac - Apple Support LG G6 Battery - iFixit Store How to Control Which Apps Open on Android Startup - DroidViews Vizio Sound Bar HDMI ARC Not Working: 7 Quick & Easy Fixes [2022] How to enable HDMI-CEC and ARC on your TV | Official Roku Support SuperDuper! Take a screenshot or screen recording on iPad - Apple Support ZOOM Recorders LANDrop LANDrop - Drop any files to any devices on your LAN I've Seen The Light!!! (And this isn't it.) | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Mikah Sargent, Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1903 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/all-twittv-shows Sponsors: meraki.cisco.com/twit UserWay.org/twit cachefly.com

    Radio Leo (Audio)
    The Tech Guy 1903

    Radio Leo (Audio)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 158:59


    Finding good hearing aids and preparing for a hearing exam. Troubleshooting internet speeds for a T-Mobile home internet connection. Exporting and printing multiple notes from an iPhone. Repurposing an old Chromebook from Dell. Migrating an iPhotos Photo Library to macOS's Photos app. Troubleshooting auto-launching apps on an LG G6. Using a Vizio soundbar with ARC and HDMI-CEC. Using an external SSD to run macOS. Recording an audio stream on iPad. Transferring files from an iPad to a Windows PC using AirDrop. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet, Scott Wilkinson, and Dick Debartolo. Steam Deck™ Senators call for US to adopt common charger | TechCrunch Letter to Department of Commerce on e-Waste Elon Musk's plan is to run Twitter off the top of his head - The Verg ReSound hearing aids and wireless accessories | ReSound US Starkey | Find the Best Hearing Aid for You S.670 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 | Congress.gov | Library of Congress Hearing aids, information on hearing loss and tinnitus | Oticon Eargo Hearing Aid Products Widex Hearing Aids & Hearing Care Solutions Amazon.com: Windows 11 Tips and Tricks: Master Windows 11 in 3 Weeks eBook: Ganeshlal, Bhaju: Kindle Store iMazing Store Transfer iPhone, iPad or iPod touch notes to your Mac or PC computer DB Browser for SQLite Check when your Chromebook's updates will stop - Chromebook Help harper on Twitter: "I thought planes were supposed to have good air circulation https://t.co/UeTnqCmwo4" / Twitter Aranet4 - CO2 monitor Import photos from another library in Photos on Mac - Apple Support LG G6 Battery - iFixit Store How to Control Which Apps Open on Android Startup - DroidViews Vizio Sound Bar HDMI ARC Not Working: 7 Quick & Easy Fixes [2022] How to enable HDMI-CEC and ARC on your TV | Official Roku Support SuperDuper! Take a screenshot or screen recording on iPad - Apple Support ZOOM Recorders LANDrop LANDrop - Drop any files to any devices on your LAN I've Seen The Light!!! (And this isn't it.) | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Mikah Sargent, Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1903 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/radio-leo Sponsors: meraki.cisco.com/twit UserWay.org/twit cachefly.com