Podcasts about John Adams

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2nd president of the United States

  • 990PODCASTS
  • 1,709EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 28, 2021LATEST
John Adams

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Best podcasts about John Adams

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Latest podcast episodes about John Adams

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 22: 18022 Adams: Doctor Atomic

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 167:27


John Adams's mesmerizing score, in the powerful production of Penny Woolcock, tells the story of one of the pivotal moments in human history—the creation of the atomic bomb. This gripping opera presents the human face of the scientists, military men, and others who were involved in the project, as they wrestled with the implications of their work.Purchase the music (without talk) at:Adams: Doctor Atomic (classicalsavings.com)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @khedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com

HUB History - Our Favorite Stories from Boston History
Thanksgiving Bonus: Founding Sons Behaving Badly

HUB History - Our Favorite Stories from Boston History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 46:37


By now, you're probably done with Thanksgiving dinner. If your family is anything like mine, you've probably moved on to the drinking course. Just try to keep it under control. At least more under control than John Adams' kids, who were right in the middle of the Thanksgiving day riot at Harvard in 1787. Original show notes: http://www.hubhistory.com/episodes/harvards-thanksgiving-day-riot-episode-107/

The Volunteer State
Is Josh Heupel a better choice for SEC coach of the year than Kirby Smart or Lane Kiffin?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:14


Clemson coach Dabo Swinney on Monday suggested that South Carolina's first-year coach Shane Beamer should be considered for SEC coach of the year. If an ACC coach can nominate someone for an SEC award, then we can, too. And there's no shortage of options this year, including Josh Heupel, Tennessee's first-year coach who inherited a depleted roster and an ongoing NCAA investigation left by the previous coaching staff. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks consider Heupel's candidacy for SEC coach of the year, and they offer their picks as it stands today. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

The Brion McClanahan Show
Ep. 551: Kamala the Irrelevant

The Brion McClanahan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:11


John Adams called the vice presidency the worst job ever invented. It was supposed to be irrelevant, at least that is how it was sold to the States during ratification. Modern conceptions of the job are a distortion of originalism, but Kamala Harris might just be the right remedy. She is so bad, no one wants her to do anything. https://mcclanahanacademy.com https://brionmcclanahan.com/support http://learntruehistory.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/support

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
American Maxim: The Woke Brigade Ruins Everything

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 23:51


Amazon Prime’s new TV series The Wheel of Time is irritatingly woke, Kevin McCarthy is still a loser (unlike John Adams), and BLM stands for “Burn, Loot, Murder.” Support the American Maxim Podcast: https://subscribestar.com/americanmaxim. In John Adams, the epic biography, David McCullough unfolds the adventurous life journey of John Adams, the brilliant, fiercely independent, often […]

Inquisikids Daily
Who Was John Adams?

Inquisikids Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:49


Who Was John Adams? Join us today as we learn about the patriot and second President of the United States, John Adams. Sources: https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/john-adams/ https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/56841/25-facts-about-john-adams https://www.biography.com/us-president/john-adams Send us listener mail! Send an audio message: anchor.fm/inquisikids-daily/message Send an email: podcast@inquisikids.com

Munsons at the Movies
Ep. 49 - Laura Linney (feat. John Rigby)

Munsons at the Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 89:52


Welcome to the Munsons at the Movies Podcast. Each episode we delve into the filmography and impact of a randomly selected actor. In this episode, we explore the career of Laura Linney. Best known for her roles as Wendy Byrde in Ozark (2017-22), Sammy in You Can Count on Me (2000), and Abigail Adams in John Adams (2008), Linney has quietly put together a remarkable career in film, television, and theater. Joined once again by John Rigby, we discuss her status as the oldest Oscar nominee to have a child, her ability to play a wide range of character ages, contemplate her top 10 film roles, and decide whether Linney's middle of the road box office status affects her overall score. Where does Linney rank on the Munson Meter? Listen to find out.

New Books in Law
Dennis C. Rasmussen, "Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:34


When Americans conjure the image of the signing of the Constitution of the United States, they often think about the various paintings that depict the Founders looking to George Washington on the dais at the convention. It is this snapshot of history that embodies Americans' perceptions of the Founders and their conviction in the creation of the great nation. What Americans fail to understand about America's Founding is the overwhelming anxieties that many of the Founders experienced, especially as they lived in the new republic that they had created. Not only did they find themselves anxious about the future of the new country, but many were also explicitly pessimistic about the future that they noted in so much of their later writings and letters. Dennis C. Rasmussen, in his new book Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of American Founders, addresses this gap in research on the American Founding, and on the Founders themselves. Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison all wondered whether the system they had worked to establish, build, and defend would live beyond their own generation. In Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders (Princeton UP, 2021), Rasmussen explores the enduring arguments made by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams that convinced them of America's inevitable demise. Modern Americans conceptualize the founding of the United States as an isolated moment in time, and rarely consider the reality of how the Founders spent the remainder of their lives putting the Constitution to work. Rasmussen places the founders' fears in context of the ongoing chaos of the late 1700's where other countries were facing revolution, treason, and anarchy. Fear of a Setting Sun's purpose is not to disregard the founders' optimism in the system they created, and in fact the book heralds James Madison's lifelong optimism and belief that the American experiment would prevail—though he is at odds with the other major Founders in this regard. Fear of a Setting Sun explores the Founders' disillusionment in order to provide a fuller meaning of American constitutionalism and the value that is formed in its implementation. Rasmussen provides a perspective that changes what scholars and the general public believe and know about the founding of the republic, the historical stakes at the time of the founding, and how the Founders generally grew more pessimistic over time about the potential for the new republic to achieve its great potential. This book will be of interest to political scientists, historians, students and scholars of the founding period and the ideas and personalities that dominated the early days of the American republic. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Intellectual History
Dennis C. Rasmussen, "Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:34


When Americans conjure the image of the signing of the Constitution of the United States, they often think about the various paintings that depict the Founders looking to George Washington on the dais at the convention. It is this snapshot of history that embodies Americans' perceptions of the Founders and their conviction in the creation of the great nation. What Americans fail to understand about America's Founding is the overwhelming anxieties that many of the Founders experienced, especially as they lived in the new republic that they had created. Not only did they find themselves anxious about the future of the new country, but many were also explicitly pessimistic about the future that they noted in so much of their later writings and letters. Dennis C. Rasmussen, in his new book Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of American Founders, addresses this gap in research on the American Founding, and on the Founders themselves. Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison all wondered whether the system they had worked to establish, build, and defend would live beyond their own generation. In Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders (Princeton UP, 2021), Rasmussen explores the enduring arguments made by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams that convinced them of America's inevitable demise. Modern Americans conceptualize the founding of the United States as an isolated moment in time, and rarely consider the reality of how the Founders spent the remainder of their lives putting the Constitution to work. Rasmussen places the founders' fears in context of the ongoing chaos of the late 1700's where other countries were facing revolution, treason, and anarchy. Fear of a Setting Sun's purpose is not to disregard the founders' optimism in the system they created, and in fact the book heralds James Madison's lifelong optimism and belief that the American experiment would prevail—though he is at odds with the other major Founders in this regard. Fear of a Setting Sun explores the Founders' disillusionment in order to provide a fuller meaning of American constitutionalism and the value that is formed in its implementation. Rasmussen provides a perspective that changes what scholars and the general public believe and know about the founding of the republic, the historical stakes at the time of the founding, and how the Founders generally grew more pessimistic over time about the potential for the new republic to achieve its great potential. This book will be of interest to political scientists, historians, students and scholars of the founding period and the ideas and personalities that dominated the early days of the American republic. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in History
Dennis C. Rasmussen, "Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:34


When Americans conjure the image of the signing of the Constitution of the United States, they often think about the various paintings that depict the Founders looking to George Washington on the dais at the convention. It is this snapshot of history that embodies Americans' perceptions of the Founders and their conviction in the creation of the great nation. What Americans fail to understand about America's Founding is the overwhelming anxieties that many of the Founders experienced, especially as they lived in the new republic that they had created. Not only did they find themselves anxious about the future of the new country, but many were also explicitly pessimistic about the future that they noted in so much of their later writings and letters. Dennis C. Rasmussen, in his new book Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of American Founders, addresses this gap in research on the American Founding, and on the Founders themselves. Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison all wondered whether the system they had worked to establish, build, and defend would live beyond their own generation. In Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders (Princeton UP, 2021), Rasmussen explores the enduring arguments made by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams that convinced them of America's inevitable demise. Modern Americans conceptualize the founding of the United States as an isolated moment in time, and rarely consider the reality of how the Founders spent the remainder of their lives putting the Constitution to work. Rasmussen places the founders' fears in context of the ongoing chaos of the late 1700's where other countries were facing revolution, treason, and anarchy. Fear of a Setting Sun's purpose is not to disregard the founders' optimism in the system they created, and in fact the book heralds James Madison's lifelong optimism and belief that the American experiment would prevail—though he is at odds with the other major Founders in this regard. Fear of a Setting Sun explores the Founders' disillusionment in order to provide a fuller meaning of American constitutionalism and the value that is formed in its implementation. Rasmussen provides a perspective that changes what scholars and the general public believe and know about the founding of the republic, the historical stakes at the time of the founding, and how the Founders generally grew more pessimistic over time about the potential for the new republic to achieve its great potential. This book will be of interest to political scientists, historians, students and scholars of the founding period and the ideas and personalities that dominated the early days of the American republic. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Dennis C. Rasmussen, "Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:34


When Americans conjure the image of the signing of the Constitution of the United States, they often think about the various paintings that depict the Founders looking to George Washington on the dais at the convention. It is this snapshot of history that embodies Americans' perceptions of the Founders and their conviction in the creation of the great nation. What Americans fail to understand about America's Founding is the overwhelming anxieties that many of the Founders experienced, especially as they lived in the new republic that they had created. Not only did they find themselves anxious about the future of the new country, but many were also explicitly pessimistic about the future that they noted in so much of their later writings and letters. Dennis C. Rasmussen, in his new book Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of American Founders, addresses this gap in research on the American Founding, and on the Founders themselves. Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison all wondered whether the system they had worked to establish, build, and defend would live beyond their own generation. In Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders (Princeton UP, 2021), Rasmussen explores the enduring arguments made by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams that convinced them of America's inevitable demise. Modern Americans conceptualize the founding of the United States as an isolated moment in time, and rarely consider the reality of how the Founders spent the remainder of their lives putting the Constitution to work. Rasmussen places the founders' fears in context of the ongoing chaos of the late 1700's where other countries were facing revolution, treason, and anarchy. Fear of a Setting Sun's purpose is not to disregard the founders' optimism in the system they created, and in fact the book heralds James Madison's lifelong optimism and belief that the American experiment would prevail—though he is at odds with the other major Founders in this regard. Fear of a Setting Sun explores the Founders' disillusionment in order to provide a fuller meaning of American constitutionalism and the value that is formed in its implementation. Rasmussen provides a perspective that changes what scholars and the general public believe and know about the founding of the republic, the historical stakes at the time of the founding, and how the Founders generally grew more pessimistic over time about the potential for the new republic to achieve its great potential. This book will be of interest to political scientists, historians, students and scholars of the founding period and the ideas and personalities that dominated the early days of the American republic. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Dennis C. Rasmussen, "Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:34


When Americans conjure the image of the signing of the Constitution of the United States, they often think about the various paintings that depict the Founders looking to George Washington on the dais at the convention. It is this snapshot of history that embodies Americans' perceptions of the Founders and their conviction in the creation of the great nation. What Americans fail to understand about America's Founding is the overwhelming anxieties that many of the Founders experienced, especially as they lived in the new republic that they had created. Not only did they find themselves anxious about the future of the new country, but many were also explicitly pessimistic about the future that they noted in so much of their later writings and letters. Dennis C. Rasmussen, in his new book Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of American Founders, addresses this gap in research on the American Founding, and on the Founders themselves. Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison all wondered whether the system they had worked to establish, build, and defend would live beyond their own generation. In Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders (Princeton UP, 2021), Rasmussen explores the enduring arguments made by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams that convinced them of America's inevitable demise. Modern Americans conceptualize the founding of the United States as an isolated moment in time, and rarely consider the reality of how the Founders spent the remainder of their lives putting the Constitution to work. Rasmussen places the founders' fears in context of the ongoing chaos of the late 1700's where other countries were facing revolution, treason, and anarchy. Fear of a Setting Sun's purpose is not to disregard the founders' optimism in the system they created, and in fact the book heralds James Madison's lifelong optimism and belief that the American experiment would prevail—though he is at odds with the other major Founders in this regard. Fear of a Setting Sun explores the Founders' disillusionment in order to provide a fuller meaning of American constitutionalism and the value that is formed in its implementation. Rasmussen provides a perspective that changes what scholars and the general public believe and know about the founding of the republic, the historical stakes at the time of the founding, and how the Founders generally grew more pessimistic over time about the potential for the new republic to achieve its great potential. This book will be of interest to political scientists, historians, students and scholars of the founding period and the ideas and personalities that dominated the early days of the American republic. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Volunteer State
Tennessee football bowl projections: Music City, Duke's Mayo or Liberty for Vols?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 25:55


Bowl projections abound, and we're not going to miss out on the projection fun. Tennessee (5-5, 3-4 SEC) is positioned to play in a bowl for just the second time in a five-year stretch. The Vols will host South Alabama (5-5) on Saturday (7:30 p.m. ET, ESPNU) before concluding the regular season against Vanderbilt (2-8). They need to win at least one of those two games to secure bowl eligibility. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks forecast Tennessee's bowl prospects.  Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

The Cyberlaw Podcast
Cyber Incident Reporting Bill: Good News for K Street

The Cyberlaw Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 51:36


Two major Senate committees have reached agreement on a cyber incident reporting mandate. And it looks like the big winners are the business lobbyists who got concessions from both committees. At least that's my take. Dmitri Alperovitch says the bill may still be in trouble because of Justice Department opposition. And Tatyana Bolton not unfairly credits the Cyber Solarium Commission for incident reporting getting this close to passage.   Meanwhile, another piece of legislation, the Secure Equipment Act of 2021, has already been passed and signed by the president. It will lock a boatload of Chinese equipment out of U.S. markets. Dmitri explains why the FCC needed this additional authority.  Mark MacCarthy explicates the EU court ruling that upheld a $2.8 billion award against Google for “self-preferencing” in shopping searches. If you're surprised by the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, and the strength of the defense case, you can blame Facebook and Twitter, which astonishingly suppressed posts arguing that Rittenhouse had acted lawfully in self-defense. In a reverse John Adams moment, Twitter even suspended Rittenhouse's defense counsel for defending him. And Facebook declared him guilty of a mass shooting and blocked searches for his name. If you want more content mob-eration like that in your podcast feed, well, no worries: the NYT is on it; the gray old lady is demanding to know why woke censorship hasn't yet come to podcasts. This has turned out to be a pretty good week for catching bad guys, Dmitri reports. REvil affiliates have been, arrested, indicted, and had some of their  ill-gotten gains seized. Mark unpacks yet another bipartisan tech regulation-cum-competition bill. This one aims to reduce platforms' ability to foist "opaque algorithms" on their users. Tatyana notes that a lot of the bills trying to improve portability and competition are likely to raise cybersecurity concerns. Dmitri and I aren't impressed by the hoax email sent out in the FBI's name from a poorly designed FBI website. It's one step up from defacing the FBI's website. I argue the bureau ought to give the hacker a low four-figure bug bounty and call it a day, but Dmitri thinks the hacker will be on the FBI's most wanted list for a while. I tend to agree; there is, after all, no greater crime than embarrassing the bureau. In quick hits:  Mark gives us a quick overview of the states' recently updated antitrust complaint against Alphabet's Google. Tatyana and Dmitri talk about the implications of the Commerce Department sending information requests to the world's top chipmakers. Tatyana explains (as much as anyone can) Elon Musk's decision to sell a bunch of Tesla stock because that's what Elon Twitter wanted. We note that Elon promised to show his tweets to a lawyer in advance if they could move the market and wonder whether he actually found a lawyer who thought that tweet was a good idea. I do a quick victory lap for having suspected that Frances Haugen's incoherent retreat from criticizing Facebook's end-to-end encryption was forced on her by the Silicon Valley version of the Deep State. Thanks to Politico, we now know her European tour was run by a batch of lefty digerati who hate Facebook, but not as much as they hate the FBI.  And I mourn the fact that this week the U.S. government finally surrendered to Microsoft and joined the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace. Download the 383rd Episode (mp3)   You can subscribe to The Cyberlaw Podcast using iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, Pocket Casts, or our RSS feed. As always, The Cyberlaw Podcast is open to feedback. Be sure to engage with @stewartbaker on Twitter. Send your questions, comments, and suggestions for topics or interviewees to CyberlawPodcast@steptoe.com. Remember: If your suggested guest appears on the show, we will send you a highly coveted Cyberlaw Podcast mug! The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not reflect the opinions of their institutions, clients, friends, families, or pets.

KIND OF A BIG DEAL
Mini Deal - The One Where We Have A Big Deal Thanksgiving - Episode 71 With Terry Miller and Doug Parks

KIND OF A BIG DEAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 27:31


Kind of A Big Thanksgiving Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday in the United States, and Thanksgiving 2021 occurs on Thursday, November 25. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and the Wampanoag shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states. It wasn't until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November. In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the "New World." After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the men had an orgy on the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth. Did you know? Lobster, Seal and Swans were on the Pilgrim's Menu. Pilgrims held their second Thanksgiving celebration in 1623 to mark the end of a long drought that had threatened the year's harvest and prompted Governor Bradford to call for a religious fast. Days of fasting and thanksgiving on an annual or occasional basis became common practice in other New England settlements as well. During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress designated one or more days of thanksgiving a year, and in 1789 George Washington issued the first Thanksgiving proclamation by the national government of the United States; in it, he called upon Americans to express their gratitude for the happy conclusion to the country's war of independence and the successful ratification of the U.S. Constitution. His successors John Adams and James Madison also designated days of thanks during their presidencies. In 1817, New York became the first of several states to officially adopt an annual Thanksgiving holiday; each celebrated it on a different day, however, and the American South remained largely unfamiliar with the tradition. In 1827, the noted magazine editor and prolific writer Sarah Josepha Hale—author, among countless other things, of the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb”—launched a campaign to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday. For 36 years, she published numerous editorials and sent scores of letters to governors, senators, presidents and other politicians, earning her the nickname the “Mother of Thanksgiving.” --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kindofabigdeal/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kindofabigdeal/support

Steven Spierer Show – TalkRadioOne
Steven Spierer, 11/13/21

Steven Spierer Show – TalkRadioOne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 63:18


Polarized parties and seemingly intractable conflicts of interest and ideology threaten to destroy the United States of America.  No, not right now.  Steve talks with Professor Dennis C. Rasmussen, author of Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America’s Founders, an examination of how George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson [...]

Drinks with Great Minds in History
President John Adams & More - Luke's Second Birthday Special

Drinks with Great Minds in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:51


It's Luke's Birthday... Again!  On this episode, our "Apple Pie Patriot" joins me to discuss our Undergraduate Senior Theses, one on the Adams Administration, the other on the Treaty of Amiens (1802).   We chat about life as a History Major, John Adams' successes and shortcomings, and the "Vanity of Peace."  And, I won't lie... we got nostalgic beforehand and drank a good bit!  Key content: John Adams, Alien and Sedition Acts, XYZ Affair, Quasi War, Napoleonic Wars, Treaty of Amiens Cheers!Support the show here and get access to all sorts of bonus content:https://www.patreon.com/user?u=34398347&fan_landing=trueBe sure to follow me on Facebook at "Drinks with Great Minds in History" & Follow the show on Instagram @drinkswithgreatminds_podcastMusic:Hall of the Mountain King by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3845-hall-of-the-mountain-kingLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Artwork by @Tali Rose... Check it out!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=34398347&fan_landing=true)

The Volunteer State
Is Tennessee football or Florida a bigger long-term threat to Georgia?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 28:36


Tennessee fans celebrated two triumphs Saturday: the Vols' 45-42 victory over No. 17 Kentucky, and South Carolina's 40-17 thrashing of Florida. Florida (4-5, 2-5 SEC) has jumped the rails since beating Tennessee 38-14 on Sept. 25, while the Vols (5-4, 3-3) are on the upswing. Tennessee will face its greatest test to date against No. 1 Georgia (3:30 p.m. ET, CBS) on Saturday at Neyland Stadium. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks preview UT's clash against a defense that Vols coach Josh Heupel described as "statistically maybe as good as anybody that's ever played the game." Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

Economics & Strategy Podcast
Episode 022: John Adams III, Zekelman Industries

Economics & Strategy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 32:28


John Adams III is the Inside Sales & Customer Support Manager at Zekelman Industries, a firm that manufactures steel piping for large scale construction projects. The steel industry is a part of well developed supply chain and is highly competitive, making relationship maintenance important and price competition possible. John speaks with me about how his firm creates value without falling into the price competition trap. Surprisingly, one of those value adds is an award winning website!

VPR Classical Timeline
207 - Justinian Tamusuza

VPR Classical Timeline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 3:39


Justinian Tamusuza is one of the premiere, contemporary African composers today. His music has been compared to American minimalist composers like Steve Reich and John Adams. However, what sets Tamusuza apart is his use of rhythm that calls to mind the pulse of traditional African music.

Patriot Lessons: American History and Civics
Constitutional Convention Convened - Demi-Gods Meet in Philadelphia

Patriot Lessons: American History and Civics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 45:55


Discover how James Madison, with an assist from Alexander Hamilton and others, cleverly maneuvered to convene the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in May 1787. Explore who attended the Convention, including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and James Wilson; those who were unable to attend, such John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and Thomas Paine; and those who refused, such Patrick Henry. Jefferson called those who attended "Demi-Gods." Learn the rules that applied to the Convention, including voting and secrecy. Understand how the fate of freedom rested in the hands of the Convention. Also check out PatriotWeek.org, Judge Warren's book at www.AmericasSurvivalGuide.com, and the Save our Republic! video series on Patriot Week's YouTube Channel. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-warren9/support

Knights of Old
43 - John Adams and Dick Collins

Knights of Old

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 76:05


Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/knightsofold)

Composers Datebook
The Minneapolis Symphony and the Minnesota Orchestra

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 2:00


Synopsis At the dawn of the 20th century, Teddy Roosevelt was president and America was in an upbeat, prosperous mood. Cultural affairs were not forgotten, either. To the already established American symphony orchestras in cities like New York, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati and San Francisco, new ensembles would spring up in Philadelphia, St. Louis, Cleveland, and Seattle. On today's date in 1903, it was Minneapolis' turn. On November 5th of that year, a German-born musician named Emil Oberhoffer led the first concert of the newly formed Minneapolis Symphony. In those days it was a 50-piece ensemble, but in the course of the next 100 years, would double in size and change its name to the “Minnesota” Orchestra. As this is the Composers Datebook, we'd be remiss if we didn't mention that the Minnesota Orchestra has enjoyed a special relationship with a number of leading American composers. Aaron Copland conducted the orchestra on a memorable and televised Bicentennial Concert in 1976, and two young American composers, Stephen Paulus and Libby Larsen, served as composers-in-residence with the orchestra in the 1980s. The orchestra has also given the premiere performances of works by Charles Ives, John Adams, Ellen Taaffe Zwilich, Dominick Argento, and Aaron Jay Kernis, among many others. Music Played in Today's Program Dominick Argento (1927-2019) — A Ring of Time (Minnesota Orchestra; Eiji Oue, cond.) Reference 91

American Elections: Wicked Game
Introducing 'History Daily' From Host Lindsay Graham

American Elections: Wicked Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 16:08


'History Daily' is a new podcast from host Lindsay Graham which does history, daily. Every weekday beginning November 1st—the same day President John Adams first moved into the White House—this new podcast will bring you a slice of the history that happened that day.Whether it's to remember the tragedy of December 7th, 1941, the day “that will live in infamy,” or to celebrate that 20th day in July, 1969, when mankind reached the moon, History Daily is there to tell you the true stories of the people and events that shaped our world—one day at a time.So if you're stuck in traffic, bored at work—wherever you are, listen to History Daily to remind yourself that something incredible happened to make that day historic.History Daily premiers November 1st. Search for and subscribe to History Daily wherever you get your podcasts.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

1865
Introducing 'History Daily' From Host Lindsay Graham

1865

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 16:00


'History Daily' is a new podcast from host Lindsay Graham which does history, daily. Every weekday beginning November 1st—the same day President John Adams first moved into the White House—this new podcast will bring you a slice of the history that happened that day.Whether it's to remember the tragedy of December 7th, 1941, the day “that will live in infamy,” or to celebrate that 20th day in July, 1969, when mankind reached the moon, History Daily is there to tell you the true stories of the people and events that shaped our world—one day at a time.So if you're stuck in traffic, bored at work—wherever you are, listen to History Daily to remind yourself that something incredible happened to make that day historic.History Daily premiers November 1st. Search for and subscribe to History Daily wherever you get your podcasts. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SEC Football Unfiltered
Here are two options for how the College Football Playoff rankings should look

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 40:35


Georgia almost certainly will be ranked No. 1 when the first College Football Playoff rankings are unveiled on Tuesday night. Sorry to spoil the surprise. After that, it's going to get interesting.  On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams debate how they'd order the top seven teams in this week's rankings. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

History Daily
The First Day of the White House

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 18:20


November 1, 1800. President John Adams moves into the newly completed White House. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Saturday, October 30, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 5:00


Today is the birthday of Ezra Pound (1885). He coined the term “imagism” for poetry which sought clarity of expression through the use of precise images.

History & Factoids about today
Oct 30th-Candy Corn, John Adams, Grace Slick, Fonzie, Kevin Pollak, Bush, Ruth Gordon

History & Factoids about today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 13:39


candy corn, pop culture 1963, kevin pollak, henry winkler, john adams, nia long, gavin rossdale, jeannie kendall, t. graham brown, grace slick, patsy montana, ruth gordon, rumble in the jungle, tsar bomba, war of the world

The Roundtable
"The Centrist Solution" by Senator Joe Lieberman

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 38:09


In this era of extremism, our largest problems remain unsolved and our international leadership is compromised. Having two fiercely opposed political parties is what John Adams, the second President of the United States, dreaded “as the greatest political evil under our Constitution.” If American government is to work, it must do so in the center—where open discussion, hard negotiation, and effective compromise take place. No living politician knows this better than former Senator Joseph I. Lieberman, who served for forty years in state and national government, including twenty-four in the United States Senate and a campaign for the Vice Presidency. In this vivid account of his political life, Senator Lieberman shows how legislative progress and all-inclusive government occurs when politicians reject extremism and embrace productive compromise. In The Centrist Solution, he shines a light on ten milestones of centrist success during his time in government.

One Symphony with Devin Patrick Hughes
Tracy Silverman, electric violinist and classical music Rock-Star

One Symphony with Devin Patrick Hughes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 58:15


Tracy Silverman, electric violin virtuoso and pioneer, and conductor Devin Patrick Hughes speak about “The Agony of Modern Music,” the history of how many strings came to be on the violin, Tracy's debut with the Chicago Symphony, his stint as a musical Olympian, how to not achieve perfection, playing like Ray Charles, Jascha Heifetz, and Jimi Hendrix. He also discusses his collaborations with Terry Riley, John Adams and his Electric Violin Concerti, and his album Between the Kiss and the Chaos.   Described as “the greatest living exponent of the electric violin” by the BBC, pioneering violinist and composer Tracy Silverman believes “strings must evolve or they will perish” and his mission is to reconnect strings with our popular culture and to teach string players to groove. His groundbreaking work incorporating rock, jazz, Americana, hip-hop, and other popular genres with the 6-string electric violin has upended the contemporary classical genre, and his strum bowing method has been adopted by performers all around the world.  Terry Riley described Tracy's violin playing as being like an orchestra itself. John Adams said: “When I heard Tracy play I was reminded that in almost all cultures other than the European classical one, the real meaning of the music is in between the notes.  No one makes that instrument sing and soar like Tracy, floating on the cusp between Heifetz and Jimi Hendrix.” Tracy was first violinist in the Turtle Island String Quartet, and was named one of the 100 distinguished alumni by the Juilliard School, and as a composer has 3 Electric Violin concerts among other works, and has performed concertos written for him by John Adams, Terry Riley, Nico Muhly, and Kenji Bunch. The violin virtuoso and humanitarian was recently featured on NPR's Tiny Desk Concerts, Performance Today, CBS Sunday Morning, and A Prairie Home Companion, and is an internationally in-demand clinician and currently teaches at Belmont University in Nashville.  Thank you for joining us on One Symphony and thanks to Tracy Silverman for sharing his performances and works. You heard Between the Kiss and the Chaos, Hundred Percent Forever, the Beatles Here Comes the Sun, Axis and Orbits, Crazy Times, John Adams's the Dharma at Big Sur, all performed by Tracy Silverman.   Additional performances were by the Beatles, Fanny Clamagirand, Sinfonia Finlandia, Nikolaus Harnoncourt, the Berlin Philharmonic, the BBC Symphony, and John Adams. Thanks to the record labels Delos, Naxos, Acewonder, and Nonesuch for making this episode possible!  You can check out Tracy's music and books at  tracysilverman.com and strumbowing.com. You can always find more info at OneSymphony.org including a virtual tip jar if you'd like to lend your support. Please feel free to rate, review, or share the show! Until next time, thank you for being part of the music!

Capital Daily
Victoria's Haunted Harbour History

Capital Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 24:41


To celebrate the spooky season upon us, we welcome local historian and owner of Ghostly Walks, John Adams, to share his favourite ghost story straight from the buildings of Victoria.  Get more stories like this in your inbox every morning by subscribing to our daily newsletter at CapitalDaily.ca Check our membership opportunity at CapitalDaily.ca/MemberAnd subscribe to us on our socials! Twitter @CapitalDailyVic  Instagram @CapitalDaily  Facebook @CapitalDailyVic 

SEC Football Unfiltered
SEC coach of the year: Can Lane Kiffin or Mark Stoops beat Kirby Smart?

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 43:32


Kirby Smart is the man to beat for SEC coach of the year. But if Smart's Bulldogs (7-0, 5-0) stumble before the College Football Playoff, or if voters are just desperate for a plucky underdog story, other candidates would come into play. On this edition of “SEC Football Unfiltered,” a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams debate the top candidates who could threaten Smart for SEC coach of the year. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

The Volunteer State
How many moral victories can the Vols claim in Josh Heupel's first season?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 28:01


Can a 28-point loss be a moral victory?  Depends how you look at it. Tennessee football's 52-24 loss to No. 4 Alabama on Saturday was closer for most of the game than the final score indicated. The Vols led 14-7 after one quarter and trailed just 31-24 early in the fourth quarter. On the flip side, Tennessee suffered its 15th straight losses to Alabama, and none of the last six results in this series have been closer to 22 points. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks evaluate Tennessee's performance and debate whether it qualifies as a moral victory. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

American POTUS
Part 1 - The Indespensable Characters of Our Revolution

American POTUS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 52:35


John Adams and Thomas Jefferson worked together to build our nation, but as individuals, they were worlds apart.  Adams was a blunt Massachusetts lawyer who sparked intense arguments every time he spoke his mind.  Jefferson was a slippery and quiet Virginia planter with controversial and conflicting views on slavery and government.  2 men, 2 vastly different styles and personalities, 1 common cause – to create a government by the people, for the people.  This is Part 1 of our 2-part series on our complicated but essential revolution!

The Daily Good
Episode 396: A carbon-negative perfume, a great quote from Mark Twain, a classic old restaurant in Los Angeles, your weekly joke, the infectious music of Louis Jordan, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 17:17


Good News: An innovative company has created the world’s first “carbon negative” perfume and is bringing it to market soon! Link HERE. The Good Word: A classically sardonic quote from Mark Twain… Good To Know: A fascinating group of facts about John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and their deaths! Good News: A university researcher is creating […]

Mainely History
John Adams, Attorney at Law with Sara Georgini

Mainely History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 55:35


Sara Georgini discusses John Adams's formative years as a young attorney, including his experiences riding the circuit through Maine, and how the legal system operated in the years just before the American Revolution.

Sharon Says So
44. Massachusetts: 1,100 Strongly-Worded Letters with Kaben Kramer

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:41


In this episode, Sharon tells Kaben Kramer about the best letter-writer of all time, Abigail Adams. Born and raised in the great state of Massachusetts, Abigail wrote over 1,100 letters to her husband, President John Adams, throughout his political career. Her words packed a punch, and her letters frequently persuaded her husband to advocate for women's rights and condemn slavery on the floors of our new nation's Congress. Abigail was a trusted wife, loving mother, charitable educator, smallpox inculcator, ammunition maker, and at times, she was referred to as “Mrs. President.” Join Sharon and Kaben as they discuss the incredible life and legacy of Abigail Adams. For more information on this episode including all resources and links discussed go to https://www.sharonmcmahon.com/podcast

SEC Football Unfiltered
Who's the top LSU football coaching candidate who would say yes to the Tigers?

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 45:11


It's coaching search season for LSU football. The Tigers will have a new coach in 2022 after Sunday's announcement that coach Ed Orgeron will be dismissed at the conclusion of this season. This will mark the opening of one of college football's top jobs, and one of college athletics' most highly regarded athletics directors, Scott Woodward, is expected to swing for a big-name hire. On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams offer potential candidates who should be linked to the search. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

The After Dinner Scholar
The American Character and the Revolution with Dr. Pavlos Papadopoulos

The After Dinner Scholar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 19:46


In the preface to his History of Rome Livy wrote that he wanted to explore, “what was the life, what the mores, by what men, and by what arts—at home and at war—imperium was born and augmented.” In the course, “Exodus and the American Vision,” What was the life, what the mores, by what men, and by what arts? are questions Dr. Pavlos Papadopoulos's senior humanities students are asking about the American character with the help of authors including John Adams, Edmund Burke, Thomas Jefferson, and others.

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
BUSTING THE COURT PACKERS

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 50:49


In this episode, Dinesh examines the draft report of the Biden Commission on the Court which, somewhat unexpectedly, gave thumbs down to the idea of court packing. Dinesh reviews new evidence of Walmart's racial indoctrination program for employees.  Dinesh revels in how Marine Lt. Col. Scheller beat the system.  Debbie joins Dinesh to explore how Abigail and John Adams created a thoroughly modern marriage.  Dinesh concludes his study of how Adams sought to foster virtue in the new American republic.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
DIVIDE AND CONQUER

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:37


In this episode, Dinesh reveals how the clashes over identity politics are creating the recipe for an unworkable society.  Dinesh exposes how the Biden administration is abusing the Patriot Act to go after critics and political dissenters, a tyrannical approach that Democrats have tried before. Dinesh spells out the implications of a federal judge imposing a contempt of court citation on D.C. authorities for violating the civil rights of a January 6 defendant. Historian Victor Davis Hanson joins Dinesh to talk about his new book, "The Dying Citizen." Dinesh explains why John Adams considered virtue indispensable to the success of a republic, and how he thought it might be cultivated from generation to generation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show
Ep. 134 10.15.21 Friday Follies: Ban Lawnmowers & Sensitivity Toward “Extraterrestrials”

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 14:09


“Property must be secured or liberty cannot exist,” John Adams. Behind nearly every Leftist idea is the goal of dissolving God's decree of property rights built into creation. Calif. Gov. Newsom continues assault with newest “fight climate change” initiative: banning lawn mowers. And OTHER insanity in the news...

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
THE MULTIRACIAL GOP

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 52:32


In this episode, Dinesh shows how an emerging multiracial GOP will take on and defeat the fake race narrative of the Democratic Left.  Kamala Harris scorns the European explorers who discovered America, so Dinesh turns the tables on her by exposing the Democratic Party leaders as the real exploiters and racists. Dinesh also begins his examination of John Adams by identifying the problem of cultivating virtue in a free society. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Volunteer State
Where would Tennessee football be right now if Lane Kiffin hadn't left in January 2010?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:50


On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks reflect on Kiffin's exit, discuss his return and examine what is an important game for each program. Tennessee has had a losing record in seven of the last 11 seasons, following Kiffin's exit. Toppmeyer asks Sparks and Adams to envision a world in which Kiffin didn't depart in January 2010. What would have happened to Tennessee football and Kiffin?

American Conservative University
Prager University 5-Part Series: Making America

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:40


Prager University 5-Part Series: Making America https://youtu.be/vBtDAJc-8wc PragerU 2.92M subscribers Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton. You've heard their names. You may have even heard them referred to as the Founding Fathers. But what exactly does that mean? In this five-part series, Dinesh D'Souza examines how each of them, in their own particular way, helped to create the great enterprise that is America. FOLLOW PragerU! Facebook:

American Conservative University
Prager University 5-Part Series: Making America

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:40


Prager University 5-Part Series: Making America https://youtu.be/vBtDAJc-8wc PragerU 2.92M subscribers Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton. You've heard their names. You may have even heard them referred to as the Founding Fathers. But what exactly does that mean? In this five-part series, Dinesh D'Souza examines how each of them, in their own particular way, helped to create the great enterprise that is America. FOLLOW PragerU! Facebook:

The Paul Finebaum Show
Hour 4: John Adams

The Paul Finebaum Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:05


Paul welcomes in John Adams of the Knoxville News Sentinel, takes your calls and more.

Plodding Through The Presidents
Conspiracy Theories & The Corrupt Bargain with Mark Cheathem

Plodding Through The Presidents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 65:58


We look at the role of the Illuminati in the Election of 1800 between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson before welcoming Dr. Mark Cheathem to the show. He teaches a course on conspiracy theories in American history at Cumberland University, and he joined us to talk about his course, his personal inspiration for teaching it, and conspiratorial thinking. Then we dig into a conspiracy theory about a rigged election and the men who rode it all the way to the White House – Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren.Show notes, photos, and sources at plodpod.comConsider joining our Patreon family at https://www.patreon.com/ploddingthroughthepresidentsCheck out our merch store at https://www.teepublic.com/stores/plodding-through-the-presidents?ref_id=24294Vote for us for Best History Podcast in the Discover Pods Awards at https://survey.alchemer.com/s3/6563613/2021-Discover-Pods-Awards-Finalists

PragerU: Five-Minute Videos
John Adams and Virtue: Making America

PragerU: Five-Minute Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 6:52


Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is the shared goal of every American. We all have a pretty good idea about what life and liberty mean, but what about pursuit of happiness? John Adams, our second president, understood how crucial this concept was to the American idea. Dinesh D'Souza explains. Watch our latest short documentary, 'Restricted': Prageru.com/restricted