Podcasts about nietzsche

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German philosopher

  • 1,637PODCASTS
  • 3,543EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
nietzsche

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Best podcasts about nietzsche

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Latest podcast episodes about nietzsche

Newsworthy with Norsworthy
477. Brian Zahnd: When Everything‘s on Fire

Newsworthy with Norsworthy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 66:37


Brian Zahnd returns to the show to discuss deconstructing deconstruction, snark, Nietzsche, and his new book When Everything's on Fire. 

CURSO DE FILOSOFÍA
Extra: Jaime Balmes, un neoescolástico ecléctico.

CURSO DE FILOSOFÍA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 33:55


Un saludo amigos. Hoy hacemos un especial de Balmes, un sacerdote muy bien formado intelectualmente y que desde su formación clásica escolástica (que entonces se impartía en los seminarios) buceó en otras filosofías de las que trató de incorporar elementos que consideró verdaderos. PREGUNTA DE LA SEMANA: Qué respuesta es verdadera: a) Balmes admiró a Nietzsche en su juventud. b) Escribió el Criterio en tan solo un mes y medio. c) Fue alumno de Cousin en París. Saludos cordiales y muchas gracias por sus escuchas. ***** Música de Liszt. ***** Pulsen un Me Gusta y colaboren a partir de 2,99 €/mes si se lo pueden permitir para asegurar la permanencia del programa e incluso poder abrir otros en paralelo (recientemente ya lo he hecho con un Curso de Historia de la Iglesia católica). ¡Muchas gracias a todos!

Il podcast di Alessandro Barbero: Lezioni e Conferenze di Storia
#6 Kantorowicz – La responsabilità dello storico – Barbero Riserva (Festival della Mente, 2015)

Il podcast di Alessandro Barbero: Lezioni e Conferenze di Storia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 64:04


Ernst Kantorowicz (1895-1963) è uno dei maggiori studiosi del potere nel Medioevo. Influenzato da Nietzsche, nella sua biografia dell'imperatore Federico II celebra il superuomo che trascende la sua epoca e cambia la storia del mondo. Nazionalista tedesco, volontario nella Prima guerra mondiale, nel dopoguerra si arruola nei Freikorps che soffocano nel sangue la rivoluzione bolscevica in Germania. Ma Kantorowicz è ebreo, e coll'avvento del nazismo emigra in America, dove gli viene offerta una cattedra a Berkeley. Nel 1949, ai tempi del maccartismo, l'università obbliga tutti i docenti a prestare un giuramento anticomunista: Kantorowicz è uno dei pochi a rifiutare. Il suo gesto gli costa il licenziamento e scatena una polemica che avrà vasta risonanza, aprendo la strada al ripensamento che di lì a poco metterà fine agli eccessi della caccia alle streghe.Festival della Mente: https://festivaldellamente.itCommunity: https://barberopodcast.it/communityTwitter: https://twitter.com/barberopodcastFacebook: https://facebook.com/barberopodcastInstagram: https://instagram.com/barberopodcastGeorge Street Shuffle by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3800-george-street-shuffleLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The Nietzsche Podcast
20: Schopenhauer as Educator

The Nietzsche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 84:22


We begin to answer the question as to what Nietzsche saw in Schopenhauer, mostly in Nietzsche's own words. But the answer is not so simple as Nietzsche simply listing off a few ideas or character traits that he liked. Rather, Schopenhauer is held up alongside Rousseau and Goethe as an "image of man" to reveal to mankind how we might be elevated beyond the merely animal. All three are among those who have channeled genius, the "rarest specimens" of mankind who make up the extraordinary examples of artists, saints and philosophers who have existed throughout the ages. Nietzsche finds, in Schopenhauer, the timeless symbol of the solitary thinker. Schopenhauer was independent and uncompromising in both his philosophical convictions and in his personality. Like Heraclitus, he looks deep within himself and rejects all that is superficial and external with a skepticism like an all-devouring fire. Unlike the "savants" - the scholars and intellectuals to whom knowledge is a series of techniques or a discipline, which is studied to advance oneself in a career - the solitary genius does not know what dispassionate knowledge is, and is compelled to live out his philosophy through action. How a philosopher's example might inform our life and actions - in other words, how it might be educative - is of key importance to Nietzsche. A true cultural and philosophical education is something he thinks is totally lacking in his own age (this holds true today as well). The educative example of Schopenhauer was a personal inspiration to Nietzsche, in helping to motivate him to eventually pursue a life of solitude. But, more importantly, the genius who is the end and the advancement of culture solved a lingering problem in Nietzsche's philosophy: how to make mankind transcendentally valuable if mankind is no different from the rest of the animals. He writes that nature made its single leap in the great people who become artists, saints and philosophers. As to how Schopenhauer contrasts with Goethe and Rousseau... you'll just have to listen and find out! Episode art: Viktor Vatnetsov, Knight at the Crossroads (detail)

Dinner With a Movie
Ep. 58: A Fish Called Wanda- Fish and Chips and Pears

Dinner With a Movie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 94:27


This week we brush up on our Nietzsche and find a method in the madness of A Fish Called Wanda. We have a splendid dinner of fish and chips with a pear and discuss the sounds of Jamie Lee Curtis and John Cleese's open mouth film kissing, Michael Palin assassinating dogs, and the uncontrolled passion of Kevin Kline.

Existential Stoic Podcast
"Thus Spoke Zarathustra" by Friedrich Nietzsche

Existential Stoic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 43:23


In the second installment of ESP's Books You Should Read series, Danny and Randy discuss Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Listen to find out why Nietzsche considered Zarathustra one of his most important works.  Discover why you should read Thus Spoke Zarathustra by Friedrich Nietzsche.Subscribe to ESP's YouTube Channel!Please say hi to Danny on Twitter to get ESP updates and more. Check out Danny's webpage for ESP info and additional tools to help you live better. Thanks for listening! 

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast
PEL Presents PMP#109: Dueling in Film

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 56:48


In light of the release of The Last Duel, we talk about the trope of the honor-resolving duel in movies and TV. Mark and guest co-host Dylan Casey from PEL are joined by Clif Mark, host of the Good in Theory podcast. We touch on The Duelists, A Knight's Tale, The Duelist and The Duel (two 2016 films), Dune, Hamilton, and philosophers like Hegel and Nietzsche. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop or by subscribing via Apple Podcasts to the Mark Lintertainment Channel. Sponsors: Get 20% off your first box from Bespoke Post at boxofawesome.com. (code pretty). Get 15% off your next gift at uncommongoods.com/PMP. Use the code "Pretty" at Nebia.com/pretty to get 10% off a superior shower experience.

The Schrift - Ancient Teachings for Modern Times
Life Tip #8 - Have at least One Good Enemy - Obadiah

The Schrift - Ancient Teachings for Modern Times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:46


If you have at least one good enemy in your life, take pride in that. It means you are a robust, vivacious, and noble individual. Learn from the prophet Obadiah, learn from Jay-Z and Nas, and learn from Nietzsche, to go out there and make yourself a good, trustworthy, respectful enemy!

New Books in Intellectual History
James Garrison, "Reconsidering the Life of Power: Ritual, Body, and Art in Critical Theory and Chinese Philosophy" (SUNY Press, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:20


Reconsidering the Life of Power: Ritual, Body, and Art in Critical Theory and Chinese Philosophy by James Garrison (SUNY Press 2021), argues that the tradition of Confucian philosophy can provide resources for theorists like Judith Butler and Michel Foucault in understanding what it is to be a subject in the social world. Garrison's interlocutors are intercultural, from Confucius to Kant, Arendt to Butler, Hegel to Nietzsche. His book argues that Confucianism offers a relational, discursive, bodily, and ritualistic conception of the self. Through philosophers like Mencius, Xún Zǐ, and Lǐ Zéhòu, Confucianism's emphasis on embodied aesthetic experiences presents new ways of thinking about how human beings can resist passivity in the face of society and instead learn how to consciously and bodily gain purposeful self-awareness. Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit philosophy of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras (and stuff). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in East Asian Studies
James Garrison, "Reconsidering the Life of Power: Ritual, Body, and Art in Critical Theory and Chinese Philosophy" (SUNY Press, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:20


Reconsidering the Life of Power: Ritual, Body, and Art in Critical Theory and Chinese Philosophy by James Garrison (SUNY Press 2021), argues that the tradition of Confucian philosophy can provide resources for theorists like Judith Butler and Michel Foucault in understanding what it is to be a subject in the social world. Garrison's interlocutors are intercultural, from Confucius to Kant, Arendt to Butler, Hegel to Nietzsche. His book argues that Confucianism offers a relational, discursive, bodily, and ritualistic conception of the self. Through philosophers like Mencius, Xún Zǐ, and Lǐ Zéhòu, Confucianism's emphasis on embodied aesthetic experiences presents new ways of thinking about how human beings can resist passivity in the face of society and instead learn how to consciously and bodily gain purposeful self-awareness. Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit philosophy of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras (and stuff). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Philosophy
James Garrison, "Reconsidering the Life of Power: Ritual, Body, and Art in Critical Theory and Chinese Philosophy" (SUNY Press, 2021)

New Books in Philosophy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:20


Reconsidering the Life of Power: Ritual, Body, and Art in Critical Theory and Chinese Philosophy by James Garrison (SUNY Press 2021), argues that the tradition of Confucian philosophy can provide resources for theorists like Judith Butler and Michel Foucault in understanding what it is to be a subject in the social world. Garrison's interlocutors are intercultural, from Confucius to Kant, Arendt to Butler, Hegel to Nietzsche. His book argues that Confucianism offers a relational, discursive, bodily, and ritualistic conception of the self. Through philosophers like Mencius, Xún Zǐ, and Lǐ Zéhòu, Confucianism's emphasis on embodied aesthetic experiences presents new ways of thinking about how human beings can resist passivity in the face of society and instead learn how to consciously and bodily gain purposeful self-awareness. Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit philosophy of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras (and stuff). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

New Books Network
James Garrison, "Reconsidering the Life of Power: Ritual, Body, and Art in Critical Theory and Chinese Philosophy" (SUNY Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:20


Reconsidering the Life of Power: Ritual, Body, and Art in Critical Theory and Chinese Philosophy by James Garrison (SUNY Press 2021), argues that the tradition of Confucian philosophy can provide resources for theorists like Judith Butler and Michel Foucault in understanding what it is to be a subject in the social world. Garrison's interlocutors are intercultural, from Confucius to Kant, Arendt to Butler, Hegel to Nietzsche. His book argues that Confucianism offers a relational, discursive, bodily, and ritualistic conception of the self. Through philosophers like Mencius, Xún Zǐ, and Lǐ Zéhòu, Confucianism's emphasis on embodied aesthetic experiences presents new ways of thinking about how human beings can resist passivity in the face of society and instead learn how to consciously and bodily gain purposeful self-awareness. Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit philosophy of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras (and stuff). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Audio Mises Wire
Is College Worthwhile? A Two-Time Dropout's Take

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021


Pursuing one's dreams without a degree requires more self-discipline than serving four years on campus. One of Nietzsche's best lines offers a warning: “He who cannot obey himself will be commanded.” Original Article: "Is College Worthwhile? A Two-Time Dropout's Take" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

Mises Media
Is College Worthwhile? A Two-Time Dropout's Take

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021


Pursuing one's dreams without a degree requires more self-discipline than serving four years on campus. One of Nietzsche's best lines offers a warning: “He who cannot obey himself will be commanded.” Original Article: "Is College Worthwhile? A Two-Time Dropout's Take" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

Let's THINK about it
Step 50: The Hero Trendency

Let's THINK about it

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:11


The Hero Story Perhaps there has always been an effort towards optimization, and it generally looks like technology. When speaking of self optimization, or overcoming , we are speaking of the hero's journey popularized by Joseph Campbell. Campbell spoke a lot of the parallels of the external journey and the internal journey… the external circumstances gave the individual the opportunity to react and grow.In the 50's-70's there was a wave of belief in unlocking human potential through psycho-science-type things like intensive practice hypnosis and subliminal training… or just LSD. Some of these practices were previously used in religious awakening, but we wrapped them up under the guise of science, and then they were abused by programs like MK Ultra.During this time, people thought of the human as a blank slate that could be written, molded or shaped. (optimized?) An example of this is Laszlo Polgar, born in Hungary, and with an idea about raising children, ended up getting married and having his first child in 1969. He and his wife Clara, raised children around the idea that they could create a genius through specific narrow focus. They had three children, the Polgar sisters, who all excelled at chess, reaching amazing heights, and were declared National Treasures. In fiction, chess is too boring, so the blank slates are in the genre of assassin Killers: examples are Kill Bill, Atomic Blonde, or Leon the Professional where they are trained, usually for revenge or duty. On the darker side you have children raised by handlers or governments as weapons, like in John Wick, Black Widow, Hannah, or Kate. So what if instead of being a badass with Kalashnikovs and stilettos you're a phenom with golf clubs? This is the Tiger Woods story, a history of brutal authoritarian parenting generating mental resiliency and overcoming. A lot of success, but a lot of trauma.Physically, many of us are not capable of such heroic heights: we cannot optimize enough to overcome our genetics, despite how much protein we consume. Enter science to the rescue as the mythical augmented man: Perhaps the Six Million Dollar Man or the darker side of Robocop, more of an automaton cyborg. Talk about efficiency: just turn the man into a machine. We are culturally conditioned to accept this is the way of the future as far back as cartoons like Inspector Gadget: the bumbling doofus with all sorts of extensions and rockets and wheels that both saved the day and naturally lead to slapstick pratfalls.Backtrack: This takes us back to an earlier podcast, step 28, in which I mentioned Henri Bergson, and his summary of what makes something funny, which is “the mechanical encrusted upon the living.”Of course, the real warning: when we lean too heavily into external power, technology, optimization (or even habits and productivity), we cease to be human in a certain way. We trade in the hard path of “overcoming” for the easy path of instant power, and in that substitution, we lose something. Yet, an alternate form optimization technology exists: Arcane Magics. I'm going to suggest, this path of learning the secrets of Arcane magics of habit stacking and personal productivity is the most alluring current path to be super, to achieve your potential. From Fiction to Fact While I have been talking about science through fictional stories, in many ways it has stepped into reality.You want to see something insane: look up clips from the 1920's Olympics compared to todays Olympics: Over 100 years the science of optimization and dedicated practice works… physically at least… until they turn into that unhinged balance beam killer super model from “The Spy who dumped me.” In America, we seem to live in a society that links success and progress and achievement with wealth and appearance. This is the manifest destiny of self-actualization woven into the Protestant work ethic, capitalist, American Mythos… and technology is often the vehicle and the key.But dedication to science and technology is problematically deterministic and class eugenics can spring up from it, as played out in the movie Gattaca. The secret to tricking an unjust technocracy? Keep secrets, and work harder than everyone else.But in this age of the internet we need to know exactly how: what was his diet? What drugs was he on? Boxers or briefs?And this is the trap we are in today: there are so many paths laid out before us by the millionaires and self-hacking crowds that we have a myriad of paths to successful optimization. Yet when someone, like in Gattaca, has an overpowering, all-consuming goal to be more… or in Kill Bill to kill more… we find their dedication and focus grants results. This can be called “dedicated practice” and myths of a 10,000 hour rule to mastery circulate around it. The beauty of it is that maybe we don't need neural implants and bionic arms. Maybe the new magics are habit stacks, routines, the mystical arcana of time-blocking and flow state. The only thing left is to find an all-consuming, overpowering desire that we can shape our life around… and that is not so much hero stuff, as a very old question of all of mankind: what is my purpose? What is my mission?  The Superman, the Ubermensch, Nietzsche How can we do an episode on superheroes, and overcoming without at least bringing up Friedrich Nietzsche. He popularized the concept of Übermensch or Overman or Beyondman… now most commonly seen as Superman.(By the way, this concept is affiliated with the Nazi party due to Nietzsche's sister misusing his texts.)The Overman is really a man of overcoming… and to confuse it with physical power as the Superman warrior is quite superficial. In our society many people appear superhero, overcoming physicality, but staying in vanity. The hero's journey is ultimately a journey towards self-integration, towards wholeness, and as Jung said “individuation” through the unification of opposites.In Nietzsche's book thus spoke zarathustra the prophet Zarathustra, who comes down from his mountaintop to share his knowledge with masses is spurned by the people. He attempts to tell them of the Ubermensch, but they reject this hard life of overcoming. All spiteful and disappointed, Zarathustra decides to prophesy the disgusting concept of Last man: a lazy decadent person, born of a civilization incapable of standing up to challenge or hardship, only interested in comfort. The last man takes no risks, preferring security. This is the soft and secure rationalist who has forgotten how to dream and everything the Ubermensch would do appears as illness, or madness.Intentional hardship? Are you crazy? So, how do we push back against the zombie conformity of security that seems so rational? It seems – indeed – to be illogical to try. Isn't it in our best interest to protect ourselves and stay comfortably in the middle of the herd? Yes, for survival maybe, but what about thriving? What about self-actualization?One way is to find something external to ourselves that is more important, someway we can help: A hero uses the challenge, the tension and hardship, to manifest creativity, to innovate. Are scientists and technologists our superheroes, the innovators or our time? How about the optimizers, the overcomers?  The guys and gals hitting flow state, or testing intermittent fasting: testing, and testing, and suffering, and sharing all this data with us. Are they climbing the mountain and coming back down with the mountain-top insights? Perhaps. But what if their motivation is internet rewards, or just a whole bucket full of hacks? That would be a less than noble goal.Experimentation can happen culturally, too. Can we not appreciate the heroism of the alternate lifestyle?The real challenge, the wisdom handed down to us through some religion, philosophy, and myths is to blend all opposites: overcome and move beyond dualities of good and evil, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and earthly… this is how you become an individual.Most of us are what is called a “dividual”, not undivided, as an “individual.” We are the divided self. Fragmented. We have not overcome or transcended, or as Hegel would say “subsumed.” Sure, we might be fit, we may look like the image of the superhero, but is maintaining appearances more like the act of the lastman? I am not saying they cannot coincide, but the motivation is a vital distinction to understanding conformity and overcoming.What I do know, is we -in our society- are really good at superficial appearances… placing the signifier before the signified.  The point, I think, is that to become a real human, a whole and integrated self, is a harder and a more heroic a journey than scientific shortcutting or following formulas that guarantee results. Sure, science/tech is great and helpful, but it shouldn't do the overcoming for you: you have to do that. Also, the hero is often portrayed alone, the monk ascending the mountain to find enlightenment or Superman in his Fortress of Solitude after keeping secrets, but you do not have to do this alone. Sure, you will have to work and push back against mindless conformity, but take the journey with others and avoid the solipsistic individuality of the shallow villain. 

The Nietzsche Podcast
19: Arthur Schopenhauer, part 2: The Great Pessimist

The Nietzsche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 76:53


In this episode, we're exploring how Arthur Schopenhauer's philosophy culminates in the idea that we must deny the will-to-live. This second part will take us through Schopenhauer's view of art, his idea of genius, and how the Platonic forms relate to aesthetics. Finally, we'll discuss the final end of Schopenhauer's philosophy: nothingness. Unlike other noted pessimists, who fixated on mortality, and the finitude of a human life, Schopenhauer insists that being itself is always indestructible. Death isn't even a way out of the horror of existence. Thus, it becomes imperative that the knowing subject discover through reason how to negate the will and to become free of the blind, ceaseless striving that creates his suffering. For the episode image, I decided to go with young Schopenhauer. Since he wrote World as Will and Representation at 28 years old and never changed his mind about the contents of the book, young Schopenhauer and old Schopenhauer represent exactly the same Platonic Idea. And since time is simply an illusion of the phenomenal world, why not go from old to young? Next week, we'll discuss Nietzsche's essay, Schopenhauer as Educator.

Open College Podcast
EP#55 | Jordan Peterson's Religion

Open College Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 65:56


Where do we find the meaning of life? In answering that question, we look to Professor Jordan Peterson a man with a foot in two worlds. He is a man of science, proficient in the biological bases of psychology and the developments of psychology as an applied science. Website:  http://www.opencollegepodcast.com http://www.StepheHicks.org 
Support Open College with BitCoin & Crypto https://cointr.ee/opencollegepodcast Stephen Hicks Books: Liberalism: Pro & Con https://www.amazon.ca/Liberalism-Stephen-R-C-Hicks/dp/1925826821/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=stephen+hicks&qid=1606248873&sr=8-4 Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault https://www.amazon.ca/Explaining-Postmodernism-Skepticism-Socialism-Rousseau-ebook/dp/B005D53DG0/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=stephen+hicks&qid=1606248873&sr=8-1 Nietzsche and the Nazis https://www.amazon.ca/Nietzsche-Nazis-Stephen-R-C-Hicks-ebook/dp/B003XVYHRU/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=stephen+hicks&qid=1606248873&sr=8-2 Pocket Guide to Postmodernism https://www.amazon.ca/Pocket-Guide-Postmodernism-Andrew-Colgan-ebook/dp/B08DQ3MYHQ/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=stephen+hicks&qid=1606248873&sr=8-3 Open College Audio Platforms Apple Podcasts https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/open-college-podcast/id1438324613?mt=2 SoundCloud http://www.soundcloud.com/opencollegepodcast Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/possibly-correct/open-college-podcast-with-dr-stephen-rc-hicks Google Play https://play.google.com/music/m/Iuramibvl3n32ojiutoxhlba4gu?t=Open_College_Podcast Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/2qgnmMDAEevJ28UNdXvboZ?si=LuTt_Zc5Th-kOpNd5thgBw Video Platforms YouTube https://www.youtube.com/c/opencollegepodcast Bitchute http://www.bitchute.com/opencollegepodcast Odysee https://odysee.com/@StephenHicksOpenCollege:4 Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/c-657777 Join our email list - http://eepurl.com/dEEsTj Contact Dr. Hicks, on twitter @SRChicks or visit http://www.StephenHicks.org Minds: www.minds.com/opencollege Bitchute: www.bitchute.com/opencollegepodcast Facebook: www.facebook.com/OpenCollegePodcast Locals: https://opencollege.locals.com MeWe: mewe.com/i/possiblycorrectmedia

Philosophize This!
Episode #159 ... The Creation of Meaning - Nietzsche - Amor Fati

Philosophize This!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 29:18


Today we continue our discussion on the creation of meaning.

The Nietzsche Podcast
18: Arthur Schopenhauer, part I: Will & Representation

The Nietzsche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 99:01


Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) is known today as the ultimate pessimist among philosophers. Among Nietzsche's influences, perhaps none can be said to be more significant than Schopenhauer. Given that Nietzsche promoted a life philosophy that was ultimately "yes-saying" and full of determination to embrace this world and all its suffering, it may be surprising to some who are not familiar with Schopenhauer to learn that Nietzsche was so enamored with him. As Charlie Huenemann says, the young Nietzsche was "lit afire" by the famous pessimist upon first discovering his work at Schulpforta. We can even perhaps credit Schopenhauer's writing with enticing Nietzsche to consider an academic path other than philology, and to eventually throw in his own contribution and critique of the German idealists and their movement. The core ideas of Schopenhauer's that we'll cover in part one will be Schopenhauer's metaphysics, which is contained in books I and II of the first volume of the World as Will and Representation. Thus, the first episode will unravel the puzzle of what exactly the title means: what is it to say that the world is representation, or that the world is will? Or, as Schopenhauer claims - that it is both entirely, and that both perspectives on the world each elucidate some different aspect of it? This episode will provide a bridge from the byzantine, tortured Kantian metaphysics that had dominated German philosophy into the rebellious, anti-metaphysica stance of Nietzsche. Next week, we'll discuss the second aspects of will and representation, which involves a discussion of ethics and aesthetics. Please support us on Patreon, anything helps, Zarathustra bless: https://www.patreon.com/untimelyreflections

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki
Next Time You Feel Lonely...

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 9:06


Today's Quotes: "Don't surrender your loneliness so quickly, let it cut more deep.  Let it ferment and season you as few human or even divine ingredients can.  Something missing in my heart tonight has made my eyes so soft my voice so tender my need of God absolutely clear.” - Hafiz “Man ordinarily lives in loneliness. To avoid loneliness, he creates all kinds of relationships, friendships, organizations, political parties, religions and what not. But the basic thing is that he is very much afraid of being lonely. Loneliness is a black hole, a darkness, a frightening negative state almost like death … as if you are being swallowed by death itself. To avoid it, you run out and fall into anybody, just to hold somebody's hand, to feel that you are not lonely… Nothing hurts more than loneliness.But the trouble is, any relationship that arises out of the fear of being lonely is not going to be a blissful experience, because the other is also joining you out of fear. You both call it love. You are both deceiving yourself and the other. It is simply fear, and fear can never be the source of love. Only those who love are absolutely fearless; only those who love are able to be alone, joyously, whose need for the other has disappeared, who are sufficient unto themselves…The day you decide that all these efforts are failures, that your loneliness has remained untouched by all your efforts, that is a great moment of understanding. Then only one thing remains: to see whether loneliness is such a thing that you should be afraid of, or if it is just your nature. Then rather than running out and away, you close your eyes and go in. Suddenly the night is over, and a new dawn … The loneliness transforms into aloneness.Aloneness is your nature. You were born alone, you will die alone. And you are living alone without understanding it, without being fully aware of it. You misunderstand aloneness as loneliness; it is simply a misunderstanding. You are sufficient unto yourself.”― Osho"Fear can be an indication that we are letting go of false comforts to find the true comfort in the silence.  Fear can be a sign that we are becoming aware of our unnecessary busyness, the loneliness we feel, the needs we usually ignore, including our need for peace, and quiet.  Fear emerge as our substitutes for the Love in the silence no longer work, and only silence is present."- Dr. Bruce Davis"The lonely one offers his hand too quickly to whomever he encounters." - Nietzsche"O wondrous creatures, by what strange miracle do you so often Not smile?" - Hafiz Today's Practice: Don't reach for creature comforts today (idle chatter, unnecessary busyness, etc to fill the Silence) reach for the Comforter in the Silence.  Sit in the big Quiet and feel for the Love inside.  Touching this place inside is the end of loneliness.  It's the end of fear.  It's the end of your perceived separation from God, from your Self.   Reach for the Comforter, and smile, and then go about your business.  I Love you, Nik nikki@curlynikki.com 

Urbi et Orbi
44. El idioma analítico de John Wilkins

Urbi et Orbi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 55:20


Octavio y David discuten el breve ensayo de Borges sobre John Wilkins y su idioma analítico. En la misma línea de Nietzsche, pero con otro tono, los urbinautas reflexionan sobre los límites del lenguaje, y la posibilidad (o imposibilidad) de nombrar las cosas.

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #44 Robert Drysdale Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu World Champion discusses the power of community, competition, and humility.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 43:45


Robert Drysdale, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu IBJJF and ADCC World Champion, MMA Fighter, TEDx Speaker, and owner of Zenith Jiu-Jitsu talks the power of community, competition, and humility.Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: 0:00:05.9 Mischa Z: Welcome back, everybody, to the Tools For A Good Life Summit. And right now I would like to introduce to you Robert Drysdale, world champion, a BJJ Brazilian jiu-jitsu master. Is "master" an appropriate word or...0:00:25.6 Robert Drysdale: I go by coach or just Rob. I'm very simple.0:00:29.9 Mischa Z: Okay, fantastic.0:00:31.3 Robert Drysdale: No need for a lot of titles, it's all good.0:00:33.4 Mischa Z: I love it. Fantastic. That's one thing that drew me to you for this summit. Real quick, I'm gonna read your bio. Okay?0:00:41.7 Robert Drysdale: Sure.0:00:42.4 Mischa Z: Fantastic. Born in the USA, from a Brazilian mother and American father, and having spent his life between these two countries, Robert Drysdale remains the only American born to have ever won both the IBJJF and ADCC world championships, the two most prestigious tournaments in all of jiu-jitsu. Furthermore, he has also cultivated a career in MMA, both as a fighter and as a coach. The author also holds a bachelor's degree in History, as well as a long-held passion for this discipline. He lives in Las Vegas, Nevada, where he teaches Brazilian jiu-jitsu and MMA. And you are the co-founder of the international team, Zenith Jiu-Jitsu, and you are the father of two girls. So I've got two friends... I'm 53, I have two friends late 40s, and as I was putting together this summit, and really, I think there's so many great modalities out there to help us as we get a little bit older in age, perhaps an existential crisis, whatever it is. But there's all these great modalities, and I think Brazil...0:02:04.5 Mischa Z: Train going by, if you heard that. Brazilian jiu-jitsu and the martial arts, judo, are so powerful. So I've got these two buddies, both who are pushing 50, both who have started Brazilian jiu-jitsu or BJJ, for anyone who's listening and is unfamiliar with that term BJJ, and it's transformed their lives. One's been doing it for about a year and a half, and one's been doing it for about three years, so I was like, "I definitely need to get somebody on the summit who can speak to it, and why not somebody who's been in it his whole life?" And that's how I came to you. I have a couple of questions to start with. First off, can you speak to that just a little bit?0:03:06.5 Robert Drysdale: I think there's a variety of reasons why Brazilian jiu-jitsu is appealing to a whole plethora of people at different walks of life, everything from children, to mothers, to competitive athletes, to dads, to people who've never practiced any sports or they never really felt a calling to martial arts in general, maybe people that think that fighting was despicable, all of a sudden they're madly in love with Brazilian jiu-jitsu. I think there's a variety of things that come into play here, and it helps explain why Brazilian jiu-jitsu is such a worldwide phenom. I think, firstly, it has to do with we like challenges, we like things that are difficult enough for us to be able to overcome them, and I think Brazilian jiu-jitsu is like you're overcoming yourself one day at a time. Think of a video game that you play that you can beat the first time you play it, it's not very challenging, you're probably not gonna play it again. But if it's something that is constantly challenging you, if it's something that's constantly, there's new layer after layer after layer, and you can't defeat it, now you become more challenged by it, and that's what competition is. We are obsessed with competition, we enjoy competition. And competition is good, and there's a healthy way to be competitive, and I think jiu-jitsu is one of the many arenas where you can exercise that healthy competition.0:04:25.3 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:04:26.1 Robert Drysdale: I also think that people have become highly addicted to the endorphins from training, physical endorphins, and they get, some people call it a "runner's high" or whatever high you experience while you're working out, you experience that in jiu-jitsu as well. Granted, and I am biased here, I'm the first one who admit it, jiu-jitsu is chess with your body, it's highly, highly intellectual. It drives me crazy. It's a bit of a peeve of mine when people think of fighters as these brutes that don't know how to think, and that's why they fight. I cannot think of anything more intellectual than fighting, I really can't. It is one of the most extreme displays of human intelligence.0:05:04.7 Mischa Z: Yes, yes.0:05:05.9 Robert Drysdale: It's just that it's not seen that way for a variety of reasons. It's not sold that way, because if you pitch fighting that way, it might be less interesting to show business, but I've known these guys and some of these guys have never read a book in their lives, but they are some of the most intelligent people you've ever met in your life.0:05:21.3 Mischa Z: Yeah, can I say something to that real quick?0:05:23.9 Robert Drysdale: Sure.0:05:24.6 Mischa Z: Sure. So my one buddy, Kevin, he said that, he started a couple of years ago, but he said, initially, it's the physicality of it, but then you realize really quickly, it's the mental game, it's the mental process, it's the strategy, that chess, and the more... If you play chess, for example, the more you know, the more you realize you don't know and you need to know, kind of a thing. Is that a good analogy or...0:05:52.7 Robert Drysdale: It is infinite, it's infinite. We often compare it to chess. And I remember I had a friend of mine in college, back in Brazil, where he was a chess master, highly ranked, and we would argue, we'd always debate which one was more complex, chess or jiu-jitsu, and I'd win every time, 'cause you can't... Because chess is two-dimensional, and it's only got a few pieces, and the pieces only do so many moves. Human movement is three-dimensional, it has infinite movements, infinite movements. You add the emotional stress of fighting, that does... It's very few things in life can replicate that. I imagine war would be something even more stressful. I imagine a real life-threatening situation will be very stressful like that. But fighting is extremely stressful, and you gotta manage it, and it's not... It's the reason why most people are terrified of it, 'cause just the thought of it freaks them out. [chuckle]0:06:44.5 Robert Drysdale: Knowing that it's 7:00 PM on a Saturday, you're gonna have to step into a cage and fight against someone who's been trained their whole life to knock your head off. It's a terrifying thought, and it really is. And I have no issues admitting this, I was terrified every single time I stepped in there. You can't show it.0:07:01.3 Mischa Z: Really?0:07:02.1 Robert Drysdale: Oh, absolutely, absolutely, on the verge of crying, I was so scared. On the verge of crying. Actually, I would hope to get injured like the week of the fight, so I didn't have to fight, 'cause there's a part of me that was hoping I would get injured, so I didn't have to fight. That's how scary... And that's intelligence, that is intelligence. People don't see it, but it's to manage that, it's not for everyone. So, I think that... And then you add the physical element to it, it's extremely physical. They say that wrestling is one of the hardest things you'll do in life, and it's true, like trying to take someone down and then trying to stand back up, and you're holding them down. I think CrossFit is easy, and I'm not trying to discredit anyone, but, physical terms, and you can't compare... And then there's a technical layers to it. It's just layer after layer after layer.0:07:50.7 Mischa Z: Layer after layer.0:07:51.9 Robert Drysdale: 23 years of doing this, and I'm not even scraping the surface.0:07:55.4 Mischa Z: That's incredible.0:07:55.6 Robert Drysdale: And it really is infinite. I really feel like fighting, in general, is not appreciated as something that requires an enormous amount of intelligence and intellect in general. It's just that our definition of intelligence is so narrow, it's so limiting that we don't see it that way, we see two meatheads trying to knock each other out. But there's beauty in that, too, there's value. You're trying to defeat your opponent. It's like looking in through a mirror, you're trying to look through that mirror, trying to move faster than the mirror moves, and I think it's beautiful in many, many different levels. But it's something I think a lot of people miss, they only see a bar fight. I don't see a bar fight, I see a ceremony.0:08:37.2 Mischa Z: Yeah. I wanna speak to two things in that regard, and one is, my buddy, Kevin, I'm gonna drop their names 'cause they're gonna be so excited that they're collaterally involved in this. [laughter] But, Kevin said it's the most rigorous exercise for him, and that it beats the hell out of him, and he loves it. At 50 years old, he's like, "Yeah, it just kicks my ass, and it feels so good," and so there's that physical outlet, which is so powerful, especially as we get older, I think, to keep that movement, and just for longevity. It's so powerful. But my other buddy, Fernando, it transformed his relationships with people, and specifically with his girlfriend that he's been with for a while, and it was... He was talking about how in the judo, the Brazilian jiu-jitsu, how it's very meditative on one hand 'cause your mind has to focus, which is awesome, and then also the patience that it teaches you and the new perspective that it teaches him, and how he was able to bring that out and find patience with a new perspective with his relationships. Can you speak to that a little bit or is that your experience as well or...0:10:03.4 Robert Drysdale: It does help on a personal level, too. There's so many lessons. I often say that every lesson you're gonna learn in life, you're gonna learn it on the mats first. It's just that you may or may not see them, but they're all there. But there's something about... I think especially when it comes to men and women relationships, 'cause we're living in an age where we're taught that everything is exactly the same, and I don't believe that. I think that women expect a certain behavior from a man and vice versa, and I think that's the way nature is. I'm not suggesting there are fixed gender roles, but I think women do like a strong masculine figure. You just talk to them, and they'll tell you, like, "Who are you attracted to?" And they're gonna define what they're attracted to, and it fits a certain profile. There are exceptions; there might be women out there who love men who cry all the time, for example, or who show weakness or can't fix a door or can't open the door for them or can't carry groceries. These things might exist, but I think for the most part, women like a man being a man. And one thing that jiu-jitsu will do for you, or fighting in general, well, I think I'm biased towards jiu-jitsu, and obviously that's my background, but I think any kind of combat will do, is it does give you a certain level of confidence about being... You learn... Because you're gonna lose, you're gonna lose, you're gonna win.0:11:23.8 Robert Drysdale: I think that martial arts combat, the strife, the struggle, is something that, it puts you exactly where you need to be confidence-wise. I'll give you an example. Children that walk into my gym, they have the insecure child, right, the child that can't make eye contact, he's bullied, he's made fun of, he never wins at any sport, so he doesn't try. Parents bring them into jiu-jitsu as a last hope, last resort, "This my child is doomed." And what happens is that child, initially they lose and they lose, but every now then they win, and then they go, "Oh, wow, I didn't know I could do that, I just went around." And then they lose and lose again, and then they win another one. So what it does is as they win, as they lose, it brings their confidence level up to where it should be because they walked in they were very insecure. They're not over-confident because they still lose, but the wins, they teach them that they are more capable than they thought they were.0:12:17.4 Robert Drysdale: And then you get the child who is the bully, you get the child who is the over-confident child, perhaps because he's bigger or he's more confident, and he just walks in and he acts like he's gonna own the room, and then he walks into jiu-jitsu and he gets tapped by the nerdy kid with glasses. He loses a round after round after round to the kid, and now he's shocked, he's shocked that he just lost, like, "I didn't think that was possible." So, two things happen to the bully, he either leaves or he changes. He adapts and he goes, "Wait a second, I'm not as good as I thought I was." So it brings him down from that state of over-confidence, exactly where he's supposed to be, and then the bullied and the bully end up more or less in the same place, exactly as it's supposed to be. And when you find that happy place, you'll see the flaws in yourself, you'll see the weaknesses, but you'll see the strength too, and then you walk away with that, with a certain degree of confidence that I think it is just... Confidence is one of those things, you can't talk it, you can't. You just have to feel it, you have to be it. And jiu-jitsu changes you, it changes you from the inside in a very meaningful way.0:13:20.4 Robert Drysdale: So I think for people that start relating, not just romantically, but business-wise, they see something different. I was a very insecure teenager, very, very terrified of fighting, terrified of talking with a girl, I get very socially awkward, didn't have a whole bunch of friends, but jiu-jitsu changed me to the point where after I stepped into a cage, I'm going, "What's gonna intimidate me now?" I'll be in college, and there'll be an exam and everyone's terrified of it, everyone's worried, I'm like, "This is a piece of paper, people." [laughter] "There's no way that this is gonna scare me." And if you get used to that, having that battle, the win, the lose, and the struggling, that creates, in you, a certain medal that you don't get by talking about it, by reading a self-help book. You don't get it any other way, you have to experience it and that raises your... I think it improves on all your relationships, it makes you better at everything.0:14:19.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, I like it. I was just thinking too, I'm imagining as, at any age, it can be a haven to work out emotions, to work out thoughts, to go to the map, or... Is that a realistic assessment as well? Yeah. Okay.0:14:43.5 Robert Drysdale: Absolutely.0:14:44.1 Mischa Z: What's that?0:14:45.3 Robert Drysdale: No, absolutely, I said.0:14:46.7 Mischa Z: Yeah. Great. I have a question, I'm gonna lay out a scenario for you, and then I'm gonna ask you a question, and I'm looking forward to your answer. Okay?0:14:58.5 Robert Drysdale: Absolutely.0:15:00.5 Mischa Z: Fantastic. Think of life as a three-legged stool of relationships, finances and health, now think of someone who is or was successful and has two of those legs fall out from under them, this could be a combination of divorce, career, upheaval, financial stress, kids acting out or not going the direction that they want, there could be physical health challenges for themselves or for a loved one, maybe a death in the family and continued failed relationships, and to top it off there, pull yourself up from your bootstraps, there're fix it, there're push your way through it methods that served them so well are no longer working, they need new tools. And so for me, and as I was hitting my 40s, there was divorce, career upheaval, and success, and I'm sure you've...0:16:00.4 Mischa Z: Actually I watched your TED Talk, which was amazing, so you can relate. But there's that, there's success as a solution, there's money as a solution, and then, excuse my language, the shit hits the fan, for me it was divorce, career upheaval, failed relationships, both parents died in rapid succession, so it shook my foundations, and I was like, "I need some new tools, I need something more than just... I'm gonna go work more or make more money or... " You know what I mean? So this is my question to you, thinking of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, what are the exact next steps you would offer this person, so they know they are headed in the new right direction, that they will have positive momentum towards getting their life back on track?0:16:56.9 Robert Drysdale: Yeah, you go through cycles in life, I'm not the same me I was 10 years ago, and it's a painful transformation because you change your mind, you change your world view, you change your relationships, your world collapses on you at some point and nothing's working anymore. I've been through that as well. The one thing, and I recommend this. When people ask me, "Is jiu-jitsu healthy?" And I go, "For the body or for the mind?" Very different. [chuckle] It's not healthy on the body I don't, I don't care what people say, yeah, you'll have a good heart rate, your heart will be fine, but there's more to health than just your heart and lungs. But, mentally, it's very healthy. Mentally, it's kept me in a very good place. I've seen it do it to people with PTSD, autism, social anxiety, panic syndrome, double personality disorder, schizophrenia, you name it, people that are suicidal, drug addicts and alcoholics, and it just puts them... Because there's something missing in modern life. If you listen to my TED Talk, I've loved Nietzsche since I was a teenager, and he says that technology, comfort and science were gonna make life easier, but it's also gonna make them unhappier 'cause they're gonna be so comfortable they have nothing to fight for. And once you have nothing to fight for, how can you find happiness? How can you find satisfaction when everything is given to you?0:18:23.5 Robert Drysdale: If I give you a black belt, if I send you a black belt in the mail, how does that make you feel? It doesn't make you feel any better, it doesn't make you feel better about yourself, right? If you earn it, if you put 10 years of your life into something, struggle to achieve it, now it means something that is meaningful in a deeper way. And I think these are the things that martial arts do for you, they make you word hard for everything, and there's value in that, there's a satisfaction to that that you don't find in many other things in life. When you're in there, the lights are off, the sound is off, the world is off, there's no thinking, there's no stress, there's no time for anxiety, to think about your sex life, your romantic life, your financial life, there's someone trying to beat you, there's someone trying to choke you. [laughter] And you have to deal with all that, and it's... It's those two hours you're on the mats, it's peaceful, it's like ultimate form of therapy, these things are missing in human life, this is how we've lived our entire existence, 99% of our existence, we struggled every second of every day. And then you have technology, it comes in and makes life so easy, we're no longer struggling, poor people are obese. It's the first time in history it's ever happened, struggles are no longer the same struggles we had 500 years ago, 1000 years ago, 20,000 years ago.0:19:49.9 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:19:51.6 Robert Drysdale: And I think we're missing that, and I think martial arts is a space where we get to exercise that aspect of human nature that's been set aside. We don't have to work haRobert Drysdale to hunt an animal anymore, we go to Walmart, we buy meat. If you wanna see a beautiful view, you pull up a picture, you don't have to climb a mountain anymore. [chuckle]0:20:11.1 Robert Drysdale: We don't have to climb a mountain. You can buy a photo and frame a beautiful picture in your living room, is that right? Right? [chuckle]0:20:17.6 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:20:18.5 Robert Drysdale: So because of all these things, I think that it's... The lack of struggling is making people less happy. And I think this is one explanation for depression and suicide going through the roof. I'm not saying I have all the answer, I'm not proposing that, but I think that martial arts is an expression of something that is very primal, very human and necessary, like this is how we have lived, this is who we are. And it's a place to exercise all that in a healthy way. So...0:20:46.5 Mischa Z: Okay... Yeah, go on, sorry.0:20:48.9 Robert Drysdale: No. I'm just gonna wrap it up. And to your point, I think that that's... That's why people feel so good in there, that's why your friend feels so good losing, getting... He just got his ass kicked and he loved it. Because he's been taught his whole life that losing is bad, and losing is part of the process. You're gonna lose. The only people who don't lose are the people who don't throw themselves out there. If you don't throw yourselves out there, you're never gonna have a sense of achievement, because you're never gonna achieve anything, right?0:21:17.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:21:17.7 Robert Drysdale: Right. So, you just gotta take the good and the bad and you learn how to love both, you learn how to love your losses, too. I'm happy for my losses. Now looking back, every time I lost... At the time I was depressed, I'm like, "Oh, my life is over, I just lost, I've have dedicated a whole year to this com... " But now I look back and I'm so thankful for them. I'm like those made who I am, and I'm happy with who I am. So, it's a very healthy environment.0:21:40.8 Mischa Z: I love it. Let me ask you as well. So, let's say you got a 40, 50-year-old guy or girl, maybe late 30s, somewhere in that range who might feel intimidated or feel like, "I don't know if I could stand and ass kicking day one," or... How would you encourage somebody to get through the door for day one?0:22:07.5 Robert Drysdale: Yeah. I learnt that lesson the hard way as a business owner. It's easy to forget what it was like your first day, because your first day only lasts one day. And then by week three, you're very... It's your second home. But for someone who's just getting started, that first day is the hard one of the hardest days of their life for a lot of people. To just walk in through the door, it terrifies them.0:22:26.8 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:22:27.9 Robert Drysdale: In my gym, we created what we call a 15-day lesson program. There's no actual contact, it's just theory. So, it can be boring for someone who knows how to fight, but for someone who doesn't, it's still a lot of interesting information, where we teach you the basics of the basics. Basically, teaching you how to crawl before you're gonna walk. And new beginners love it, because they're not allowed to train their first 15 days, all they gotta do is... It's just like music theory before I hand the guitar. So, you're not gonna hold on to a guitar before you're done with day 15.0:22:55.6 Mischa Z: Yeah. Yeah.0:22:55.6 Robert Drysdale: You're just gonna be learning the theory of it. But if you don't know anything about music, maybe it's a little boring, you just wanna pick up a guitar, which some people do by day five, they're ready to rock and roll, but we give them the option. And so basically, everyone's gonna evolve at their own pace. It's not a race. It's you are racing against yourself, if there's any race going on. So, you're evolving at your own pace. So we have moms in there who have never done any... That haven't practiced sports since they were children, and they're overweight, and they're un athletic, and they're very insecure, and they're in their 50s, perhaps. And they jump in my class, and I have professional fighters on the mat. So, you'll imagine how they feel about that and... But the way we do it... And I can't speak for every gym, this is how I run my gym.0:23:38.3 Mischa Z: I love it.0:23:39.5 Robert Drysdale: We give them time. This is your pace, you wanna rest, you're rest. You wanna go to the bathroom, go to the bathroom. You wanna sit out, sit out. You wanna watch, you watch. And because you're in an environment... We follow our peers, like what people around us are doing, that's what we wanna do. So, if you see everyone around you and you created a culture where everyone around is competing in a healthy way, and they're trying to win and defeat each other in a healthy way, then you're watching that... And I'm telling you, I don't care if you're a mom, I don't care if you're 60 or 70, I don't care if your knees hurt, you're gonna watch, then you're gonna go, "I wanna be part of that. It looks like those people are having a blast" and they are. And then once you immerse yourself in that culture, and it's okay to lose and no one's gonna make fun of you, because that person just lost the previous round, and it's just part of what we do, that competition, it becomes highly addictive. There's a reason why... I've never seen anyone quit jiu-jitsu, because they didn't like it. I've seen people quit for work reasons, family reasons, health reasons. I've never seen anyone say, "You know what, I rolled around and someone beat me and I hated it." Granted, your first week, you should not get your ass kicked, because it's not for everyone.0:24:46.2 Mischa Z: Right.0:24:47.0 Robert Drysdale: It might be too intimidating. I am advocate of easing people in and let them be comfortable enough with the mats before you start pushing them. And then they're gonna ask to be pushed, even moms do, they want to be pushed.0:25:00.6 Mischa Z: I love that. So we've got day one through 15, learn about it, get comfortable with the environment, super soft entry, and you just see the... How good it is and how vital... I don't know if vital is a good woRobert Drysdale, but I'm sensing that. And so what happens next? Do you have a day 16 to 30 or...0:25:23.0 Robert Drysdale: Well, and then we throw you in the beginners class. So now, you're in a class with the other... So, we have a class before you went to the beginner class, a preparation class, so to speak. Beginner class, you're gonna be there for anywhere between a year to two years, depending on your attendance level. And obviously, how quickly you progress, and people progress at different rates. Like a 22-year-old is gonna progress faster than an eight-year-old or a 65-year-old, for example. Athletic ability does count. So there is some differences. So anywhere between a year and two years, and then we move you to my advanced class. Sorry about that, it's the dog.0:25:58.8 Mischa Z: That's okay. Dog saying hi. [chuckle]0:26:01.8 Robert Drysdale: But then you move into the advanced class where the instruction is gonna be a little more sophisticated, and the class is a little bit long or becomes physically a little bit harder. It's just a more... It's just a little... You just raise the bar for them, and then they're in that class for the rest of their lives.0:26:20.7 Mischa Z: So, beginner, one to two years and then are... So I get the sense, and tell me if this is true, and I'm sure you've seen it, but again, let's say we've got somebody 30, 40, 50 or a mom who's like, "Yeah, I wanna do this." Or a dad or what have you, and... Or you mentioned somebody who's got PTSD. The transformation or the mental freedom starts right away, right? It's not like... Is that an accurate sense that I have like, "Hey, the baby steps just are beautiful." Is that a... Is that...0:27:03.2 Robert Drysdale: You'll get something out of it day one, but it's one of those things the more you do it... Like compare it to music. Your first day with a guitar may not be the most rewarding day, because you can't really play anything.0:27:13.4 Robert Drysdale: Yeah.0:27:13.9 Mischa Z: Alright, but the more... The first time you can hear that sound, or the first chord that you can hear nice and clear, you're gonna go, "Oh, wow, I can do this." Okay. Now, I know what people are doing, I just gotta get better at it." And this practice will... Next thing you know, you can play a whole song.0:27:28.8 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:27:29.4 Robert Drysdale: And it's very similar, but it doesn't end. At the same time, there's no I know or I don't know. It's not binary. It's a spectrum, and it's infinite. 23 years in, my body is destroyed, and I only wish my health were better, so I can keep training and keep improving.0:27:44.1 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:27:45.0 Robert Drysdale: But there's... And it's not an age thing, it's more of a miles thing. It's like a car. It could be 2020 and have 150,000 miles on it.0:27:53.8 Mischa Z: Yes.0:27:54.6 Robert Drysdale: So it's kinda how I'm... At 39, it's kind of how I feel. I got arthritis all over my body, but I mean, it was worth it. I wouldn't go back and change anything.0:28:02.3 Mischa Z: Of course.0:28:03.3 Robert Drysdale: But it's baby steps. You get more out of it the more you do it. It is really is a marathon and it's... Your life will end before the marathon ends.0:28:14.5 Mischa Z: Fantastic. Tell me, off the top of your head, of somebody who's, again, our age, and I'll... I'm a little older than you, so I apologize for saying our age, but sort of a transformation that you've seen from somebody perhaps on the door of suicide, not guaranteeing that someone's gonna have this transformation, but have you seen, literally, people on... Mentally at the bottom and then come through that? Can you walk me through that?0:28:48.1 Robert Drysdale: Yes. We had one veteran, she was an Iraq veteran and... I don't even know what she went through. I was too scared to ask, but she was very traumatized. Her social anxiety was through the roof, she had a dog with her 24/7. I think to make matters worse, she had no family or very little family. She was very distant from her family. She basically had like... She'd be at home all day living off whatever she was getting from her... As a veteran. She was wounded, too, so she had problems moving. She would use a wheelchair, and she didn't get off the wheelchair. But it was a bad scenario, man, it was just awful. And it kind of broke my heart, because you could see she was a very lonely person, and she was really struggling mentally, but she would come to the gym every day.0:29:39.3 Robert Drysdale: She would come to the gym every single day, and I... And she couldn't do much. She was so injured that there was not much she could do, but she was there every day, and you can see her improving, just being on the mats with us, everyone was really nice and patient and understanding. It sort of gave her like a... It gave her a second family, a place... Or a first family perhaps, a place to belong, a place to be, a place to be happy and people would joke around with her. And that's the other thing, marshal arts environment is an environment where people are treated equally, truly, not pretentiously, like truly. If we like you, we make fun of you just like everyone else. It's a brotherhood or a sisterhood, if you will. There's no such thing as, "I have to keep the appearances," and you gotta talk to people." You remove the social mask, like, "Hey, man, I've seen you almost cry from losing. It's okay." It's a very naked kind of relationship.0:30:35.8 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:30:36.2 Robert Drysdale: So it's very honest. It's very honest, and I think people appreciate that. We treated her like she was one of us. She got treated exactly like everyone else. It wasn't like, "Oh, my God, she's a veteran, and she's injured. Let's give her special treatment." It was none of that. There was no special treatment. It was like, "Now you're one of us." Okay, you're on a mat like everyone else. No one went easy on her in the sense where... We respected her disability, but no one is treating her like someone who's handicapped. She got treated like a normal human being, and that's how I think... If someone has a handicap, that's how you treat them, like it's... I've heaRobert Drysdale that the worst thing you can ask a cancer patient is, "How are you doing? How you feeling?" Like a dying cancer patient.0:31:16.6 Robert Drysdale: It's the worst thing you can do, is ask them how they're feeling. Like, why would you do that? Do you think that's gonna make them feel better if it is asked repeated for the 10th time and they feel like shit? They have cancer, they're gonna die, and they know that, how do you think you're helping? If you wanna make... Do something for that person, make them laugh, tease them about the old times or remember something that will happen in... 10 years. "Oh, remember that one time you did... That was retarded." Make fun of them and then make them laugh, and they can make fun of you, and you just treat them equal, treat them like you would treat your best friend. I think that's what people are looking for, and martial... At least, in my environment, I try to cultivate that. I try to be blunt with people and just treat them the way I would wanna be treated. And that involves just more than just being nice to them. It's being truly like a friend, you treat them like a friend. And that means, you normally make fun, you don't feel too sorry for them. Pick your self up. Come on, one more rep, one more rep. Let's go. Now don't be lazy. Get up. Do it again."0:32:20.4 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:32:20.9 Robert Drysdale: You know, and I think that people, they... It's uncomfortable, but people crave that. People need that. You need the push, you... You know what's funny about being a coach that acts that way, is that first they're shocked, like, "How could you talk to me like that?" Or, "How could you make me... " And then eventually, you gain their respect because deep down, that's what they wanted.0:32:42.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, they just wanna be treated... They want that humanness, right? That...0:32:49.1 Robert Drysdale: That involves everything. Humanness involves everything, and that's... It's not just being nice to people, not just being polite or political about it. Humanness involves everything, the pretty and the ugly. It involves, "Hey, argue with me, disagree with me."0:33:02.5 Mischa Z: Yeah. I like that.0:33:03.5 Robert Drysdale: Right, right. It's okay. You can disagree with me.0:33:05.2 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:33:05.5 Robert Drysdale: "Oh, my gosh, someone disagreed with me. I can no longer be your friend." "No, it's okay. We'll grab lunch afterwards, but you're still wrong." You'll call him an idiot, and we'll go grab lunch, grab a beer afterwards, and it's all good.0:33:14.7 Mischa Z: Right.0:33:14.9 Robert Drysdale: But we're so sensitive and...0:33:17.2 Mischa Z: God, we're sensitive. It's insane, man.0:33:19.4 Robert Drysdale: And it's gotten to the point of just ridiculous. This isn't... Where historians will make fun of us in the future, 'cause... Remember those people in the 21st century, right, where you couldn't make fun of each other, because people will get offended. I went to a comedy show the other day, and I can't remember the comedians name, I wish I could, because I would like to give him credit. And he goes, "Comedy is the last bastion of free speech."0:33:41.0 Mischa Z: Oh, really? Yeah.0:33:43.8 Robert Drysdale: I'm like, "Amen." That's the only place that you can actually speak your minds. It's like Dave Chappelle and Bill Burr, they have that privilege to just fire from...0:33:50.6 Mischa Z: Just let it rep. Right?0:33:53.1 Robert Drysdale: Rep and it's comedy, so they can get... If I said it, I'd go to prison. I think martial arts is appealing, because it's kind of like comedy in a way where it's very blunt, very naked, and very real, very human.0:34:06.1 Mischa Z: So did you see this vet, this woman who... And obviously, you got to see a progression and a profound effect, she came out of her shell and... Or tell me more. You got to see some cool results?0:34:20.6 Robert Drysdale: Oh, yeah, absolutely. Next thing you know she's smiling. Next thing you know, she's... It became a ever happy place. I shouldn't have moved, so we don't have her any more, but she... There was a progression there in terms of helping her, happiness, and she couldn't do much jiu-jitsu because of her disability. There really wasn't much she could do, but she just loved being with us and doing her best to do the moves, and we would push her and... We worked around her engines. We have another lady, she's close to 60 now, and she can barely... She's all beat up, but she's on the mat almost every day, and everyone's patient with her, but we push her still.0:34:54.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:34:54.7 Robert Drysdale: Whenever she goes on her knees, I'm like, "No no no, off your knees, off your knees, push ups. On your toes." And people are like, "Oh, you're making me uncomfortable." But then they're like, "You know, I'm glad coach did that, because that's what I really wanted." We've had alcoholism, and people that struggle with that. And they come to the gym every day. It's like their therapy. I don't think they go to AA anymore. As long as they're on the mats every day, it kind of gives them the strength to fight that addiction.0:35:21.0 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:35:22.2 Robert Drysdale: And we don't talk about it... Yeah.0:35:23.7 Mischa Z: Honestly, I think atheist or agnostic or not, or whatever, but I mean, it clearly it's, if you want to believe this or take it that far, it's gotta be providing a connection to a source or God or call it whatever you want. Like, it's gotta be tapping into something that... Into that, yeah?0:35:43.2 Robert Drysdale: There are corners of human nature that we don't always tap into. You don't tap into that unless you have a very strong sense of community, right? And for some people, that's God; for some people, that's just spiritual; for some people, that's just... I mean, call it what you will, but it's... There are feelings that we need to experience as humans that are very rich. We don't call them rich, because they're free. But just because they're free doesn't mean everyone has them.0:36:08.4 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:36:08.6 Robert Drysdale: But I think we need that. Some of my best moments in life, looking back, were not me on the podium with the gold medal around my neck. They were me on the mats making... With my friends after the practice, we're all covered in sweat, and we just tried to kill... We were trying to kill each other five minutes ago, but now we're laughing in front of each other and exchanging information and teaching each other the moves or... There's a sense of community that you get from that brotherhood that is very unique. I've heard this from soldiers, veterans, they come back from wars, and they go, "Rob, I don't believe in the war, but I feel like I have to go back because my brothers are there." So they go back more for that brotherhood than they do because of the cause. They don't believe in it anymore, but if my friends are there, I have to be there for them.0:36:54.6 Mischa Z: That's supporting them.0:36:55.0 Robert Drysdale: They probably miss that bond that they've created being in that... Struggling, the situation of struggle for as long as they have. You're risking your life every day, and there's someone there that is willing to take a bullet for you.0:37:07.3 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:37:07.8 Robert Drysdale: That's a very unique bond. And I've never been to war, but the mats are that on a smaller scale, but I know how that feels. I have friends that I know they would take a bullet for me, and I'll take a bullet for them.0:37:19.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:37:20.4 Robert Drysdale: And that's... These are the kind of people... It's a kind of friendship you don't dissolve very easily. And it's funny, because if you saw us training, you would think that we hated each other.0:37:27.2 Mischa Z: Yeah. Yeah, I love that aspect of it, that community, that friendship, that connection, that's so powerful. And I think as we get more into the tech as a world, as a society, those... That community is splintering, and it's become illusory or there's that... The connection through the phone or through that swipe or whatever is not perhaps enough, and I love... Go ahead.0:37:56.9 Robert Drysdale: No, I just want to capitalize on it, 'cause I think social media is a huge problem. I think it's... It is the reason why suicide and anxiety are going through the roof. There's no real connection anymore, and we think it is. And it is addictive. I spend six hours a day on my phone. I'm not saying I'm not part of... I'm telling you, I'm the part of the problem, but I see what it does to you. You become highly addicted. And the worst part is that, not only are you not creating those bonds, but you become dependent on it for an approval to feel good about yourself, right?0:38:26.3 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:38:27.1 Robert Drysdale: It's what the world... The world sets my value. No longer, I don't set my own value, the world sets my value. And that's a... And there's no way that wouldn't lead to a sad life.0:38:37.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. I tell you what, I think this is a good place to end. I have a list of amazing questions that I would just want to say that we didn't touch on this much, because I really wanted to offer everybody some, some... The hope or, that tool of what you offer, that Brazilian jiu-jitsu, that strength of mind, resolve, the mental, the community is just so powerful, and it's out there. And obviously, it's growing like mad, so... But I think... You've traveled the world, anybody can watch your TED talk, and they'll get a... They'll get an inkling of sort of your emotional experience with Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which I believe for you is, on one hand was this blessing, but on the other hand is the curse, right?0:39:31.2 Mischa Z: There's that duality, and it almost kills you, but at the same time, it's your your source. So in the bonus round, we're gonna get into that. I've got some awesome, amazing questions. Perhaps we can get into some of your exploits. I'm excited to talk family with you in round two and some other super fun stuff. So anybody listening, if you've enjoyed Robert and his insights, there's going to be a lot more in our bonus session, so click on the VIP access. And Robert also does, does... Obviously, you have studios, you do retreats, but Robert is gonna offer up some amazing bonuses where perhaps you can join Robert in the fray, literally. So we have that to look forward to. And then where... You can always find Robert at robertdrysdale.net, and a Google search, you can see his TED Talk. And then I'm just going to your site, zenithbjj.com. You can find Robert and all your fun stuff there. You've got a YouTube channel. Any final thoughts to share that we did not get a chance to cover in this first round, Robert?0:40:54.9 Robert Drysdale: No, man. That was just... That's about it. I think the mats are for everyone. There's no such thing as... And if it's not the mats, it's some other competitive endeavor. You have to find that. You need that place to manifest that other side of you. If you don't have that, you need to find it, your life will be more complete.0:41:13.6 Mischa Z: Yeah. Fantastic. Thank you so much. This has been amazing and... Yeah, I love your insights. So stay tuned for round two. Click on the VIP, all access pass.

Near Dark Radio
59 - We Made the List w/Ray Fox

Near Dark Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 91:08


Ray Fox is back to explore the nature of reality, culture and social justice. We question the official narrative of Jan. 6, discuss Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals, and pick apart some of the big players in the racial justice movement. Support the podcast at https://www.patreon.com/neardarkradio for exclusive access to bonus episodes. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jon-gower/support

The Jim Rutt Show
EP146 John Vervaeke Part 4: Awakening from the Meaning Crisis

The Jim Rutt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 100:37


John Vervaeke joins Jim for the fourth of a five-part series examining the ideas put forward in Vervaeke's popular YouTube series, Awakening from the Meaning Crisis. They discuss Nietzsche as a prophet of the meaning crisis, the politicization of the quest for meaning, recreating religion, the deep functionality of Christianity, meaning cultivation, Newell & Simon's error, the essentialism heuristic, … Continue reading EP146 John Vervaeke Part 4: Awakening from the Meaning Crisis → The post EP146 John Vervaeke Part 4: Awakening from the Meaning Crisis appeared first on The Jim Rutt Show.

The Nietzsche Podcast
17: All Hallow's Special!

The Nietzsche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 53:10


In America, we celebrate Halloween with costumes and trick or treating. In Germany, Allerheiligen is a holiday of paying respects to the dead, and showing reverence for all the saints of the Catholic Church. In Mexico, Dia de los Muertos involves the building of shrines and offering of food to the deceased. Among the ancient Celts, there was Samhain, a time in which the veil between worlds became thinner. Where do all these death holidays come from, and why do so many cultures, with different religious traditions, set aside a day for the ritualized celebration of the dead? And, most importantly for the subject of this podcast... what can Nietzsche tell us that can help understand this anthropological puzzle? Today, we're talking all things Halloween, from a Nietzschean lens. We discuss the effect of darkness and night upon the psyche, the overactive imagination and collective dream state of early man, how we never stop believing in fairytales, and why rituals help spiritualize the wicked thoughts and feelings of mankind. Join us for a special, creepy episode of The Nietzsche Podcast. Muahahahahaha! Episode art: Hans Baldung — Die Hexen (“The Witches”, 1510), courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Gap Filosófico
(Re)Aprender a ler, com intensidade /// Nietzsche, Spinoza, Fuganti/// Gap filosofico

Gap Filosófico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 3:27


Pix Gapfilosofico@gmail.com

História em Meia Hora

Deus está morto mesmo ou é papinho do bigodudo? Separe trinta minutos do seu dia e aprenda com o professor Vítor Soares (@profvitorsoares) sobre a vida e a obra de Friedrich Nietzsche. Se você quiser ter acesso a episódios exclusivos e quiser ajudar o História em Meia Hora a continuar de pé, clique no link: www.apoia.se/historiaemmeiahora --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historiaemmeiahora/support

Douglas Jacoby Podcast
SOTM—Introduction—It Still Haunts Us

Douglas Jacoby Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 3:33


For additional notes and resources check out Douglas' website.The Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7) is the section of the New Testament widely agreed to contain the very heart of Jesus' kingdom message. The teachings were and still are remarkable and revolutionary. For just as by the Law God had been building an alternative community through the people of Israel, so Jesus Christ is creating an alternative communityin the world.“After [two thousand] years the Sermon on the Mount still haunts men. They may praise it, as Mahatma Gandhi did; or like Nietzsche, they may curse it. They cannot ignore it. Its words are winged words, quick and powerful to rebuke, to challenge, to inspire. And though some turn from it in despair, it continues, like some mighty magnetic mountain, to attract to itself the greatest spirits of our [age]—many [of them] not Christians—so that if some world-wide vote were taken, there is little doubt that men would account [the Sermon on the Mount] ‘the most searching and powerful utterance we possess on what concerns the moral life.'” — A. M. Hunter, Design for Life: the Sermon on the Mount, 1953 (slightly adapted)So, if you want to internalize Jesus's key teachings, and if you're looking for somewhere to focus in your daily study and meditation, focus here!The PlanDaily podcasts for 40 days. The first 10 are accessible to everyone; the remainder require login (website members). To become a member, click here.We will be taking our time as we study the 111 verses of the Sermon on the Mount.Most podcasts are 10-15 minutes in length.Focus: character, inner sanctity, obedience, and building our lives on the Word.Supplement: Receive daily tweets from the Sermon on the Mount, beginning 1/1/2020. Click here.Sermon on the Mount podcasts 1-40 are going live in 1 January-9 February 2020, a day at a time.0 Dec—Haunting (intro)1 Jan—Mountain (Matt 5:1-2)2 Jan—Poor (Matt 5:3)3 Jan—Mourning (Matt 5:4)4 Jan—Meek (Matt 5:5)5 Jan—Hungry (Matt 5:6)6 Jan—Merciful (Matt 5:7)7 Jan—Pure (Matt 5:8)8 Jan—Peacemaking (Matt 5:9)9 Jan—Persecuted (Matt 5:10-12)10 Jan—Salt (Matt 5:13)11 Jan—Light (Matt 5:14-16)12 Jan—Fulfillment (Matt 5:17-19)13 Jan—Pharisees (Matt 5:20)14 Jan—Anger (Matt 5:21-26)15 Jan—Lust (Matt 5:27-30)16 Jan—Divorce (Matt 5:31-32)17 Jan—Oaths (Matt 5:33-37)18 Jan—Retaliation (Matt 5:38-42)19 Jan—Enemies (Matt 5:43-47)20 Jan—Perfection (Matt 5:48)21 Jan—Show-off! (Matt 6:1)22 Jan—Alms (Matt 6:2-4)23 Jan—Prayer (Matt 6:5-8)24 Jan—The Prayer (Matt 6:9-13)25 Jan—Forgive (Matt 6:14-15)26 Jan—Fast (Matt 6:16-18)27 Jan—Treasure (Matt 6:19-21)28 Jan—Darkness (Matt 6:22-23)29 Jan—Mammon (Matt 6:24)30 Jan—Anxious (Matt 6:25-32)31 Jan—Kingdom (Matt 6:33-34)1 Feb—Judge (Matt 7:1-5)2 Feb—Swine (Matt 7:6)3 Feb—Ask (Matt 7:7-11)4 Feb—Gold (Matt 7:12)5 Feb—Narrow (Matt 7:13-14)6 Feb—Prophets? (Matt 7:15-20)7 Feb—Lord, Lord (Matt 7:21-23)8 Feb—Sand (Matt 7:24-27)9 Feb—Wow! (Matt 7:28-29)

My Ghost In The Machine
10. On the Philosohpy of NieR Automata (5/5) — Meaning in a Godless World

My Ghost In The Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


The Hebrew God of Genesis is dead. The Hebrew God of Genesis remains dead, and we have killed him" –declared Nietzsche over 120 years ago. Okay. But, what now? What is a culture supposed to do after it has dismantled its central existential meaning script? Well, the masterpiece game NieR: Automata (dubbed the most philosophical game ever made) has a number of interesting ways of approaching this question.

Fördomspodden
#149 Upplever Kristoffer Appelquist att hans tarmar presterar bättre på handikapptoaletter?

Fördomspodden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 51:58


Har komikern och programledaren Kristoffer Appelquist rättat en annan människas uttal av ”Nietzsche” den senaste månaden? Är han ätstörd? Och tycker han att ”Parlamentet” som underhållningsform betraktad borde skickats till gaskammaren för flera decennier sedan men också att man som komiker i Sverige ändå MÅSTE använda den exponeringsytan och därmed fortsätta bli deepthroatad av tips från denna satans coach till man kvävs och dör?

The Nietzsche Podcast
16: The Congenital Defect of All Philosophers

The Nietzsche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 72:58


Philosophers have a birth defect. They are cursed, destined to philosophize without a historical sense. Even without realizing it, we take for granted the moral prejudices of our own times. For better or worse, language and the cultural software we inherit both play a role in shaping our thought. For all these reasons, philosophers of all ages have fallen victim to habitual errors: of beginning from the conclusion, of inverting the effect and cause, in assuming that if something gladdens the heart, it must be true. In this episode, we're doing a deep dive into the Nietzschean method for understanding habitual errors in philosophical thinking. With the toolkit Nietzsche provides, we can dissect the propositions of philosophers, religions and cultures. Our main targets in this episode will be Kant and Schopenhauer, Nietzsche's influences and treasures of German philosophy — but after all, one repays a teacher badly if he remains a student only!

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

In this episode, Dinesh reveals how our side is finally solving the problem of censorship—and makes a big announcement.  Dinesh invokes the case of two bomb-throwing leftist lawyers to show how terrorism is a feature of the Left, not the Right. Dinesh compares the slogans of the Biden State Department to the slogans of apparatchiks in the old Soviet Union.  Comedian Terrence Williams joins Dinesh to talk about what he's cooking up now. Dinesh reflects on Nietzsche, Darwin and the Christian view of human nature.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Les chemins de la philosophie
Nietzsche, toute action exige l'oubli

Les chemins de la philosophie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 59:16


durée : 00:59:16 - Les Chemins de la philosophie - par : Géraldine Mosna-Savoye, Adèle Van Reeth - Il y a dans la pensée de Nietzsche une valorisation de l'oubli renvoyant à une réflexion sur le vivant et son fonctionnement qui participe chez lui d'une analyse de la vie : l'oubli est une condition du bon fonctionnement du vivant. Pourquoi faudrait-il se réjouir d'avoir la mémoire qui flanche ? - invités : Patrick Wotling ancien élève de l'École normale supérieure, professeur de philosophie, directeur du département de philosophie de l'Université de Reims et fondateur du Groupe International de Recherches sur Nietzsche

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Julian Reid / Musical Spiritual Hotel: Rest, Hospitality, and Sacred Music

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 46:02


Julian Reid explores the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, the jazz pianist, producer, writer, and performer explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy. Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions. Interview by Matt Croasmun.Show NotesClick here to learn more about Julian Reid's "Notes of Rest"Introduction: Evan Rosa"God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble… The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart… Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful." (Friedrich Nietzsche at 14 years old; see Friedrich Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography by Julian Young; h/t Brain Pickings)Bringing together music and scriptureEngendering wonder and trust as a seedbed for a life of faithCreating space, the architecture that music createsWeekly liturgical practicesThe ends and uses of music in sacred spacesLiving in a tent, motel—a musical spiritual hotelScripture is like a cathedral or museum.Performance: "Thank You, Lord"Gratitude—the way we enter into hospitality, "what it means to be hosted by God"Hotel art—the artwork invites and calms rather than jarring and provokingCuriosity vs calmnessInvoking a different kind of responseSanitizing the PsalmsPerformance: "Give Me Jesus"Speaking to different registersAimed at an encounter with the living GodGraceProclamation: music and preachingTaking risks over the pulpitKarl Barth: "God tempts the church through God's absence."Kerygma: "proclamation"Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer" (Taize)Word and WaterThe metaphor of water utilized in "Notes of Rest"Black musical idiomsFinding the use of Contemporary Christian Music (CCM)Balm in GileadThe Hymns of Isaac Watts, colonizing, historical contextCombining musical genealogiesBraxton Shelly's Healing for the SoulImaginative fuel from the mysticsCistercian monastics: worshipping in silence and solitude; "a long-standing faith"Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer / Give Me Jesus" (Medley)Introduction (Evan Rosa)One of the most gripping and influential philosophers of the last 200 years once wrote:"God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble… The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart… Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful."That Friedrich Nietzsche, written when he was 14 years old.There is plenty of "vain ostentation" in popular music today, and certainly not excluding the music played in church.But the unitive depth and invitation into transcendence that music offers us of course pairs beautifully with scripture. And whatever else might have changed in Nietzsche's thinking, even at the end of his life in Twilight of the Idols, he suggested that "Without music life would be a mistake. The German imagines even God as a songster." And I say: Well, not just the German, but the human.In today's episode, Matt Croasmun welcomes Julian Reid, jazz pianist and producer, writer, and performer (not to mention Yale and Emory educated). You can hear his hip-hop infused jazz project The JuJu Exchange on episode 26 of For the Life of the World, when Julian joined us to talk about How Jazz Teaches us Faith and Justice. Today, Matt and Julian explore the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, Julian explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy.Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions.Thanks for listening.About Julian ReidJulian Reid is a Chicago-based jazz pianist and producer, writer, and performer (B.A. Yale University / M.Div. Emory University). The JuJu Exchange is a musical partnership also featuring Nico Segal (trumpet, Chance the Rapper; The Social Experiment) and Everett Reid—exploring creativity, justice, and the human experience through their hip-hop infused jazz. Their new 5-song project is called The Eternal Boombox. Julian's latest project is "Notes of Rest"—a spiritual mini-retreat that places meditations from the Bible on a bed of music, cultivating rest, contemplation, and creativity in all who will hear Jesus' call.Production NotesThis podcast featured musician Julian Reid and biblical scholar Matt CroasmunEdited and Produced by Evan RosaHosted by Evan RosaProduction Assistance by Martin Chan, Nathan Jowers, Natalie Lam, and Logan LedmanA Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/aboutSupport For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give

Urbi et Orbi
43. Las mentiras de Nietzche

Urbi et Orbi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 62:05


Nietzsche la emprende, con su ímpetu característico, contra la idea misma de verdad y la pretensión humana de acceder a una imagen objetiva del mundo, de las cosas como son en sí mismas.

Jouissance Vampires
Deciphering Nietzsche/anism Part II

Jouissance Vampires

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 44:44


We continue to probe Nietzsche and Nietzsche/anism, picking up on some problems and questions that were opened in our last interview with Geoff Waite. We begin with a reading of Nietzsche from two radically different positions: Georges Bataille and György Lukács. We then go on to discuss Nietzsche and Marx, consciousness, antihumanism, antiphilosophy, liberation, Nietzsche's politics and more. Does Nietzsche/anism address a real problem that Marxism can't account for? Or must we work to discard all traces of Nietzsche/anism in order to champion a more liberated world and a more egalitarian version of philosophy?

The Nietzsche Podcast
Untimely Reflections #4: At the Movies! Reviewing, “When Nietzsche Wept” (2007) Featuring, my wife.

The Nietzsche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 57:42


This is the twentieth episode of the podcast! Maybe the smallest of milestones, but we decided to celebrate. It's a bit unusual for me to do two Untimely Reflections in a row, but hopefully it'll be as fun for everyone else as it was for me. Today, I'm sitting down with my wife Amberly to talk about a movie we just watched, "When Nietzsche Wept" by director Pinchas Perry. Amberly knows very little about philosophy or Nietzsche, but knows a lot about movies, and especially what makes something a bad movie. Well, she's going to need those skills, because this film was disappointing in almost every respect. Based on a book by Irvin Yalom, the film unfortunately repeats a lot of myths about Nietzsche, some of underlay his entire portrayal in the story, and Nietzsche is mostly sidelined in lieu of Dr. Breuer, whose midlife crisis is the central narrative of the film. It really made me wish for a good film adaptation of Nietzsche's life.  We'll return to our regularly scheduled lecture series next week. Special thanks to Amberly for being willing to watch this long-winded and tortured film with me, which, in her words, "has the production value of a Wishbone historical recreation!"

The Charlie Kirk Show
How George Floyd's Death Radically Reshaped America—Exposing CRT LIVE from Baylor

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 93:41


Coming to you LIVE from Waco, Texas, Charlie delivers a barnburner of a speech for his third stop on the Exposing Critical Racism Tour. He walks through the deterioration of America at the hands of the woke mob in the aftermath of the killing of George Floyd and the oligarchs who caved to them…all before before answering audience questions on abortion, human dignity, Nietzsche, modern art, and much, much more.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Schrift - Ancient Teachings for Modern Times
Life Tip #3 - Put Your Mind on the Paleo Diet - Isaiah 41

The Schrift - Ancient Teachings for Modern Times

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 16:01


We tend to be very careful about what we put into our bodies, but let our mind consume whatever we want. Just because something is "true," doesn't mean it will "taste good" to the mind. Nietzsche realized that "truth" is overrated. And therefore it is comforting to hear Isaiah speak of the "ends of the Earth" rather than "the ends of the galaxy."

Embrace The Void
EV - 213 Warspeak with Michael Grenke

Embrace The Void

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 65:14


My guest this week is Dr. Michael Grenke, a tutor at St John's College and author of the introduction to the recently released Warspeak: Nietzsche's victory over nihilism. We discuss Nietzsche's worldview, the risks and insights in that view, and how we wrestle with nihilism and meaning in the modern world.Warspeak: https://www.amazon.com/Warspeak-Nietzsches-Victory-over-Nihilism/dp/1895131499Convocation: NietzscheEditing by Lu Lyons, check out her amazing podcast Filmed Live Musicals! http://www.filmedlivemusicals.com/podcast.htmlMusic by GW RodriguezSibling Pod Philosophers in Space: https://0gphilosophy.libsyn.com/Support us at Patreon.com/EmbraceTheVoidIf you enjoy the show, please Like and Review us on your pod app, especially iTunes. It really helps!Recent Appearances: I was on a panel discussing Chapelle's recent special and why I believe it was an objectively transphobic set, whether or not it was funny. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msCXuy7S75MNext week: Liberal Currents with Adam Gurri

The Nietzsche Podcast
Untimely Reflections #3: Karl Nord - On the Use and Abuse of Nietzsche for Randian Aesthetics

The Nietzsche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 97:30


In this episode, I'm chatting with my friend Karl Nord about Ayn Rand's Romantic Manifesto, Nietzsche's Use and Abuse of History for Life, whether H.P. Lovecraft's characters have volition, the use of deus ex machina in Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn series, the depressing spirit of Von Trier films, morality in art and as art, and the alchemical power of aligning the artistic and the political. 

Square One: Conversations with the Best in Business
111: Brad Feld, Founder and Partner of Foundry Group

Square One: Conversations with the Best in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:08


Today was a treat on the show - we had one of the most successful and thoughtful entrepreneurs in the tech ecosystem join us: Brad Feld. Brad has been an early-stage investor and founder for the last 30 years - most notably, he co-founded Techstars, was an early-stage investor in companies like Zynga, Fitbit, Harmonix, and Makerbot, and for the last 15 years has been running Foundry Group, which has raised over $1.5B to invest in the next generation of tech companies. Brad recently wrote a book on Nietzsche and lessons applicable for founders. In today's episode, we took a different turn and talked about some of the most poignant lessons from the book and how they apply to build companies today.

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
243 The Entrepreneur's Weekly Nietzsche with Dave Jilk

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 91:15


Frederick Nietzsche was one of the most important philosophers of all time. In this episode of Follow Your Different, Dave Jilk and I talk about a new book that fuses Nietzsche and modern entrepreneurship in a fascinating, provocative, and very thought-provoking way. The new book is called Entrepreneur's Weekly Nietzsche, and Dave co-authored it with Brad Feld (FYD 175). In this dialogue, we go deep on many of the dichotomies we face as company founders and builders. We examine the difference between passion and obsession, and what Nietzsche means by creativity and super abundance. We also talk about how to know you should keep driving forward with your idea or maybe change course. You can also listen to us discuss how founders should evolve their role in the company that they started over time. This is a super-smart, deep-insight bearing conversation about some ideas for company creators with a big-brain, been-there-done-that kind of guy. So fire up your cerebellum and get ready for a fun ride through thinking town! Dave Jilk on Fusing Nietzsche and Entrepreneurship The dialogue starts off with the elephant in the room: why fuse Nietzsche and the world of entrepreneurship? Dave explains that he wasn't very fond of most business books, in general. For him, most of them contain a few important things, but wrapped around in 200 pages of text. Though reading them is an unavoidable occupational hazard for him and his co-author, Brad Feld. So he and Brad got the idea of writing their own book, containing their thoughts and experiences in entrepreneurship. But they don't want it to be just another business book. That's where their attention turned to Nietzsche and his works. “I was reading him (Nietzsche) a little earlier than Brad. When I was reading it, we notice things that apply to entrepreneurship. It was striking though, and of course his languages is very interesting and colorful, right? So we started playing with, “Hey, could we write something”, and we wrote a few of the essays and grabbed a couple of Brad's blog posts and stuck them in his stories to see how that worked and, and it kind of clicked.” – Dave Jilk From there, they managed to get enough content to write an entire book. Nietzsche, Entrepreneurs, and Being a Little Bit Crazy There are some people who referred to Nietzsche as sort of a crazy person. Dave thinks the better word to use is “Wacky”, and that Nietzsche himself revels in that description. As someone studying human nature, he was open to exploring different situations and experiences, which might have gotten him this reputation. Going back to entrepreneurs, Dave thinks that one has to be a little bit crazy and explore the possibility without worrying about looking bad or weird. That is especially true for startups and early stages of most businesses. “Some people would argue that you have to be extremely rational, analytical about this. But we say, to create something truly disruptive, you have to have a vision. You have to have a vision of what the world could be like, after your disruption is successful. What is the world going to be like, with no evidence whatsoever, no particularly good reason to believe that the world will adopt that. You have to have to be, as you say, a little bit crazy.” – Dave Jilk Being Brave and Different When asked if Nietzsche had been very courageous because he was challenging the preconceived norms despite the pushbacks, Dave agreed to some degree. For him, Nietzsche was more like someone who bravely dives headfirst into something before worrying about the consequences to his reputation and the like. “Nietzsche's essential project was to transform the moral tradition of Europe. It's a moral tradition that that went back, at least, two millennia, and possibly longer. He was trying to dis to disrupt that, to change it to, and to explore what it would be like when it did change. And the that exploration is, was frightening to him.

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
243 The Entrepreneur's Weekly Nietzsche with Dave Jilk

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 91:15


Frederick Nietzsche was one of the most important philosophers of all time. In this episode of Follow Your Different, Dave Jilk and I talk about a new book that fuses Nietzsche and modern entrepreneurship in a fascinating, provocative, and very thought-provoking way. The new book is called Entrepreneur's Weekly Nietzsche, and Dave co-authored it with Brad Feld (FYD 175). In this dialogue, we go deep on many of the dichotomies we face as company founders and builders. We examine the difference between passion and obsession, and what Nietzsche means by creativity and super abundance. We also talk about how to know you should keep driving forward with your idea or maybe change course. You can also listen to us discuss how founders should evolve their role in the company that they started over time. This is a super-smart, deep-insight bearing conversation about some ideas for company creators with a big-brain, been-there-done-that kind of guy. So fire up your cerebellum and get ready for a fun ride through thinking town! Dave Jilk on Fusing Nietzsche and Entrepreneurship The dialogue starts off with the elephant in the room: why fuse Nietzsche and the world of entrepreneurship? Dave explains that he wasn't very fond of most business books, in general. For him, most of them contain a few important things, but wrapped around in 200 pages of text. Though reading them is an unavoidable occupational hazard for him and his co-author, Brad Feld. So he and Brad got the idea of writing their own book, containing their thoughts and experiences in entrepreneurship. But they don't want it to be just another business book. That's where their attention turned to Nietzsche and his works. “I was reading him (Nietzsche) a little earlier than Brad. When I was reading it, we notice things that apply to entrepreneurship. It was striking though, and of course his languages is very interesting and colorful, right? So we started playing with, “Hey, could we write something”, and we wrote a few of the essays and grabbed a couple of Brad's blog posts and stuck them in his stories to see how that worked and, and it kind of clicked.” – Dave Jilk From there, they managed to get enough content to write an entire book. Nietzsche, Entrepreneurs, and Being a Little Bit Crazy There are some people who referred to Nietzsche as sort of a crazy person. Dave thinks the better word to use is “Wacky”, and that Nietzsche himself revels in that description. As someone studying human nature, he was open to exploring different situations and experiences, which might have gotten him this reputation. Going back to entrepreneurs, Dave thinks that one has to be a little bit crazy and explore the possibility without worrying about looking bad or weird. That is especially true for startups and early stages of most businesses. “Some people would argue that you have to be extremely rational, analytical about this. But we say, to create something truly disruptive, you have to have a vision. You have to have a vision of what the world could be like, after your disruption is successful. What is the world going to be like, with no evidence whatsoever, no particularly good reason to believe that the world will adopt that. You have to have to be, as you say, a little bit crazy.” – Dave Jilk Being Brave and Different When asked if Nietzsche had been very courageous because he was challenging the preconceived norms despite the pushbacks, Dave agreed to some degree. For him, Nietzsche was more like someone who bravely dives headfirst into something before worrying about the consequences to his reputation and the like. “Nietzsche's essential project was to transform the moral tradition of Europe. It's a moral tradition that that went back, at least, two millennia, and possibly longer. He was trying to dis to disrupt that, to change it to, and to explore what it would be like when it did change. And the that exploration is, was frightening to him.

The Charlie Kirk Show
Is God Dead? Making Sense of Nietzsche with Dr. Khalil Habib

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 49:32


“God is dead.” What is there to say about such a provocative statement from one of the most provocative thinkers of the last two centuries? Turns out—a lot. Charlie sits down with Dr. Khalil Habib, a political philosophy professor from Hillsdale College, to unpack the profound, and oftentimes misunderstood legacy of the German philosopher who has the distinction of being an influence on the politics of both the right and the left—for better or worse. This conversation offers a deep and thoughtful defense of the West and the existential crisis it faces in today's day and age.   To take Hillsdale classes for free, visit CharlieForHillsdale.com   Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PlasticPills - Philosophy & Critical Theory Podcast
Nietzsche: The Aristocratic Rebel

PlasticPills - Philosophy & Critical Theory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 79:01


Jordan DeJonge joins the pod to revisit the question "just how reactionary was Nietzsche?" as asked in Domenico Losurdo's newly translated intellectual biography: Nietzsche, The Aristocratic Rebel (https://amzn.to/3mF15gS). While most left-wing intellectuals read Nietzsche selectively, this 1000 page tome opts to take seriously the implications of Nietzsche's anti-democratic thinking.

Philosophize This!
Episode #158 ... The Creation of Meaning - Nietzsche - The Ascetic Ideal

Philosophize This!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 30:53


Today we look at the creation of meaning through the work of Nietzsche. 

Outside Podcast
What the Mountains Teach Us About Patience

Outside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 31:14


It sounds like a predictable journey for a brainy young person seeking happiness: a trek in the Swiss Alps to contemplate the works of a great philosopher who found purpose and meaning in the mountains. But as John Kaag discovered, following in the footsteps of a legend, especially in an Alpine environment, can get tricky fast. Kaag dodged a near disaster on his trek, but the adventure was the start of a relationship with the Alps that would bring both exhilaration and darkness into his life as he grew to become a well-known philosopher himself. In this episode, we learn about the experiences behind Kaag's celebrated book Hiking with Nietzsche and the many challenges he's overcome along his bumpy path to embracing patience and gratitude. This episode is brought to you by Toyota, a company that wants to help you find joy by exploring America's scenic byways. No matter what kind of adventure you're after, there's a Toyota designed to get you there. Learn more at toyota.com.

TBTL- Too Beautiful to Live
#3514 Somewhere Between Archie and Nietzsche

TBTL- Too Beautiful to Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 67:46


Luke joins the show from Texas, where he endured a boat tour guide whose sense of humor was...confusing at best. Plus, Gillian Anderson is asked an awkward question after her big Emmy win last night, but she handled it with aplomb.

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
BIDEN'S HOSTAGE CRISIS

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 50:15


In this episode, Dinesh reveals how Biden, like Jimmy Carter, has a hostage crisis, but both the administration and its allies in the media refuse to label it as such.  Pondering the vacuous effeminacy of Secretary of State Anthony Blinken's public statements, Dinesh says we have met Nietzsche's "last man" and his name is Blinken.  Author Mary Grabar joins Dinesh to pinpoint the falsehoods of the 1619 Project. Dinesh reflects on how the end of the American era, like the end of the Athenian era in the 5th Century BC, might arise out of a military disaster in a faraway place. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.