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name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the author of the ''Iliad'' and the ''Odyssey''

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KBBL Radio - Simpsons Podcast
S14E10 - Ein kleines Gebet

KBBL Radio - Simpsons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 36:55


Eine weitere Religionsfolge! Nachdem Lisa zum Buddhismus gefunden hat, findet Homer auf Rat von Flanders nun zum Christentum und betet alle seine Sorgen weg. Eins führt zum anderen und die Simpsons wohnen plötzlich in der Kirche! Wie ist das denn jetzt passiert? Erfahrt es in dieser Folge von KBBL-Radio! Viel Spaß und Vielen Dank an Fabian für den Folgenwunsch!

How To Love Lit Podcast
Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 3 - Odysseus And The Cyclops Don't See Eye To Eye!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 41:39


Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 3 - Odysseus And The Cyclops Don't See Eye To Eye!   I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.      And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This is our third episode covering Homer's Odyssey, and Christy, are we finally getting to Odysseus this week?     Yes- We finally meet our title character- it was an odyssey. Pun pun-     Oh my- here we go….    I know, and we get to see wordplay this week as well- although word play through translation is not exactly the same but the Greeks did a lot of it, and not just in the Odyssey, so it's nice to get just a little taste.    How interesting.    I know, it really is.  Homer, even though writing in verse that has meter, does not rhyme, but he does use word play- which may or may not be called a pun- but it does play around with the meaning and sounds of different words.      In episode 1 we discussed a lot of the historical context both of the period in which the story is set, but also of the mysterious writer, the supposed blind bard, we have always called Homer.   I did notice we do finally get to mee the blind bard of the Odyssey, the one the ancients think might be based on our poet, but I'm not sure I would have even paid much attention to that character if we hadn't talked about Demodocus being the model for Homer, previously.      No, I agree.  I wouldn't have either.  It's kind of an interesting literary concept, at one point there is a bard telling a story about a bard telling a story and then there's the story- so a story within a story within a story- talk about complicated.      Yeah- let's just move on.  In episode 2, we discussed Telemachus and his coming of age story that we call the Telemachy- or books 1-4.  In that portion of the story, we learned that swarms of suitors have overrun the family home back in Ithaca while Odysseus is away.  Telemachus' mother, Odysseus's wife, Penelope is being pressured to pick one of these suitors to be her husband, an act which would give the selected suitor a claim to be king or chieftain of Ithaca, perhaps even a contested heir to her fortune, leaving Telemachus' life in extreme danger.  We saw that Penelope tricked the suitors by claiming she would marry one of them after she weaved a funeral shroud for her father-in-law, Laertes.  During the day she would weave, but at night she would unravel her work.  For three years this worked until one of her ladies' maids gave her up.  It is at this point that we enter the story of Telemachus.  Athena visits him, first in the shape of an old friend of Odyssseus', Mentes,  but then into another man named Mentor.  She encourages Telemachus to take charge of his own future- to go out in the world and try to find out what has happened to his father by visiting his father's old war buddies.  Telemachus listens to Athena and visits two places: Pylos and Sparta.  Here he learns very little, honestly, about what happened to his father, but what we do see is Telemachus coming into his own.  We see his confidence and sense of self develop to the point that he seems quite a different person as he journeys back home ready to confront the very dangerous challenge of taking control over his own home or really retaking a kingdom that has been taken away from him.    Yes- and today we will see where Odysseus has been this whole time.  The goal today is to get through book 9, maybe start book ten, which is kind of a chronological boomerang really.  We start book 5 twenty years after Odysseus has left home.  Calypso is forced to release him which she does.   Poseidon is outraged and reacts.  Garry let's read Poseidon's response.    “I'll give that man his swamping fill of trouble!” With that he rammed the clouds together- both hands clutching his trident- churned the waves into chaos, whipping all the gales from every quarter, shrouding over in thunderheads the earth and sea at once- and night swept down from the sky- East and South Winds clashed and the raging West and North, spring from the heavens, roiled heaving breakers up- and Odysseus' knees quaked, his spirit too; numb with fear he spoke to his own great heart: “Wretched man- what becomes of me now, at last?     And of course the answer is- you're not to die yet.  The gods will see to it.   He is shipwrecked and then found naked on the beach by Nausicaa, the daughter of King Alcinous ruler of the incredibly gracious and skilled Phaeacian's.    And of course, it is through these people, we see an incredible example of what the Greeks call Xenia and basically how Homer defines what it means in this world to be a good person. In the Homeric world, or perhaps the ancient Greek world, if we can generalize, what makes a person good or bad is not the same as we think of today. So, Garry, just to get us started, as a concept, what is Xenia.    Well, it's a concept of hospitality that is an extremely complex and developed social  institution in the ancient Greek world.  If we break the word down- the word xenos- that word means both guest-friend or guest-stranger.  If you think of the word xenophobia- it means you have fear or hatred of strangers.  So xenia is how you receive or treat strangers in your community, your oikos, your household.   Well executed xenia solidified relationships between peoples; it created alliances, and could often be the difference between life and death.  It was also religious- one of Zeus' names is Zeus Xenios because he was the god that embodied a moral obligation to be hospitable to foreigners or strangers.       And it's that moral element that is so central to so much of what we should understand about why things happen the way they do in the Homeric world.  In Homer's world, hospitality drives morality.  It is in the hosting, receiving, gift-giving and relationship building that is pushing forward the movement in the world.  It's what gets you in favor or in trouble with the gods.  If you are a good host and/or good guest, you are a good person.  If you are a bad host/ bad guest, you are a bad person.  To me it really seems to be that simple.  The moral code that determines your place is life is not based on the ten commandments or something like that- it is not based on lying, or stealing or even murdering- things that we use to define morality. If you think about it, all three of those things Odysseus does all the time and is even admired for how well he does them.  The gods are proud that he is cunning.  He brags about sacking villages.  The climax of the book involves broadscale murder (there's a slight spoiler, if you are 3000 years behind the times and don't know the ending).  There is definitely no morality around sex at all.  The definition of who you are as a person is very dependent on something else and that something else is what the ancient's called xenia- this concept of being a good host and being a good guest.  Garry, from our standpoint today, that seems weird.  We don't value hospitality in this way at all, and on the other side, we look poorly on people who are pirates, liars, thieves, or adulterers.     True- and it is a very interesting way of thinking about things- and something we should think about.  Of course, obviously and I know you weren't being exclusionary, but there are other values emphasized in Homer's epics- respect for the gods, being a wise and moderate person, not to mention, you are supposed to avenge the death of family members, that is also part of the moral code, but your point cannot be overstated more- the importance of hospitality is essential to success in life, and there are very good and obviously practical reasons for this.      Just to clarify what we're talking about- even before we get to book five, we've seen examples of this in every chapter of the epic already.  Telemachus was a good host to Mentes. Nestor and Menelaus were amazing hosts to Telemachus ,and now Alcinious is even more gracious then the other two and in fact brings Odysseus home, even though it will cost him dearly, as we'll see at the end.      True, but the concept of Xenia is not just inherent in Greek culture.  It was important in other cultures in other parts of the ancient world as well.  If you want an example that you might be familiar with from this time period and if you familiar with Biblical text we see similar things in the book of Genesis in the Bible. Abraham is very concerned about being a good host as well as a good guest and we see various interactions of him being a guest when he wanders around Canaan.  And just as the gods in the Odyssey punish and murder those who do not respect the rules of hospitality, there is a perspective to suggest that the Hebrew God of the Bible also punishes those who do not respect the rules of hospitality- just look at Sodom and Gomorrah and how the destruction of that town is set up by the abuse of guests in the community.  How you receive strangers very much defines your humanity in many cultures and has for a long time.  This idea of morality being connected to hospitality is very ancient and deeply embedded in various ancient cultures.      Well, in the Odyssey there are at least 12 hospitality scenes of all kinds. We see examples of bad hospitality as well as examples of good hospitality- In book five, we see both juxtaposed against each other almost back to back.  In Polyphemus the Cyclopes- we see almost a perfect example of a bad host.   But he isn't the first character in the book to violate the rules of Xenia- for that we don't need to look further than book one and the suitors.  Those guys are clearly terrible guests, terrible humans and we don't feel a bit sorry for them when they get what's coming in the end.  But before we get t here, let's start with the concept of xenia itself.  What is this idea of being a host which is so central to the story?  How should we understand it in terms of culture so we can then extrapolate cross-culturally?  Why is hospitality important to the degree that it is a motif in almost every book of this epic.  In fact, it's a type scene.     A type-scene.  That's a new term.  Christy, what's a type scene?    A type scene is a scene that you see over and over again.  It's kind of like a pattern.  But you become familiar with it to the point that you can recognize differences in how different people practice the same pattern or the same type, so to speak. For example, in the Iliad, how a person puts on his armour is a type scene- it happens over and over and you can see the pattern with the differences.  Holding sacrifices is another type-scene- it happens all the time.  There are many kinds of type-scenes at the disposal of the bard, he uses them to set up the story. We don't have time to feature all of them, obviously, but I want to talk about hospitality because it's so relevant to what the Odyssey is all about, in my view.   Like I said before, in the Odyssey there are at least 12 hospitality scenes.  So, that's a lot of emphasis- it sets off the plot in chapter 1, it creates complications throughout, and in some ways how we can watch Odysseus evolve as a character.  We watch him develop as we watch him reveal who his is in these various interactions with his different hosts.  So back to this idea of gift-giving and hospitality.  What are your thoughts- just in general?    Well, first of all, let's recognize that we are in an ancient world consisting of mostly isolated islands.  There are no hotels, no restaurants, and not even any money.  The Chinese are given credit in being the first to come up with money, but that wasn't until around 770 BCE.  So, just in that regard, you can see how important relationships would be just on a survival level.  Bartering, obviously did exist. But, in general, if a person is going to travel, he will have to rely on mercy from other people to survive, and of course that's how ancient societies worked.  Again, a parallel example of ancient text would be the stories of the Old Testament in the Bible, if you recall.  People went into the lands of others and threw themselves at the mercies of those rulers.  So in some sense, the idea of emphasizing hospitality on a macro-scale makes sense- I'll host you if you'll host me.  But that doesn't answer the second question, why all these gifts?  You would think that the one giving the gift would be the one being hosted.  He/or she after all is the one being fed, being clothed.  You would also think that if you were a rat of a human, and so many of us are rats, you could just go around and exploit person after person.  And notice, and you can see this through the many scenes of hospitality, you are supposed to feed and bathe a guest BEFORE you even ask their name or their business.  THAT was the ethics of the tradition.  So, the question, is why give gifts?      Well, of course, I don't know, but the obvious first pass guess, again, maybe is the idea of reciprocity.  I am going to host you today knowing that one day that balance of power may shift and I may need your hospitality.  I'll give you a good gift, so that one day you will give me a good gift- that sort of thing.  Except, as I say that out loud, it does fail the say out loud test.  After going through the Christmas season, if you are a person who practices gift-giving, you know there are always those people that shaft you.  How many of us have been in situations where we drew names, and you're supposed to buy a gift for the person that you get their name and spend a certain dollar amount.  Well, we all know that person or persons who will shaft whoever they draw.  They will justify it by saying to themselves, “Well, the original price was the money limit, I just got it on sale and they'll never know.”- which of course is bogus because we always know.   But sometimes people don't bother even doing that.  They may just shaft you because there is nothing anyone is going to do about it at a holiday party.  That sort of thing.  I can't imagine the Greeks not having those schumcks- well, we know they have those schmucks- they've moved into Penelope's house in book one.  So, I guess I'll ask you- why give gifts?  I can see how it would make a society a better and kinder place, but I can't see how and why it works.  It seems to go against human nature.    True- Of course the first reason is it makes you a good person and it pleases the gods- and we want to be good people and we all want to please the gods.  We just do.  Even those of us who unfortunately find ourselves incarcerated for terrible things we've done to other people, will likely NOT EVER want to give up the idea that we are good people.  We want others to see that in us, and we want the gods to see that in us.  And of course, we see that idea here- the gods will reward generosity and hospitality.      Which brings us to Alcinous' daughter- she truly is depicted at being a wonderful human being.  She's brave and she's generous.  Let's read where Odysseus approaches her and begs for mercy.    Page 174    But of course, as we can clearly see here.  Naussicaa, the princess, is an exceptional person.  Not very many of us are as wonderful as this girl, so I don't think reciprocity fully explains the concept of gift giving.  Of course, I don't know for sure, but one perspective  to consider here is in watching the balance of power.  Remember, primitive societies didn't have InterPol, or the United Nations, or anything like that, but that doesn't mean they didn't still have complex systems of interacting. When you show up on someone's shore, the smart thing for the person on the shore to do is to kill you at the get go- and in fact, that's what happened a lot.   Man, after all is a warring being, and societies historically war. And that is where I see the value of gifts.  The currency of today and the currency of the ancient world in one sense is the same- fame, reputation, power, glory, status- isn't that what people buy with their money- a higher place on the hierarchy?   Today, we literally BUY it with money.  We can and do buy VIP seating, VIP lounges, private planes, exclusive clubs, name brands and for what?  These things showcase that we are more important than other people- our social rank- no matter how egalitarian we claim to be.  In the ancient world just as today, greatness is defined by reputation, fame, glory- and how that happens is by giving and getting.  It's builds reputation.  If we look at what actually happens in this particular story what I notice is that for one- These tokens matter economically.  And this particular family, which is described as being a cunning family, are good at amassing wealthy by being recipients of great gifts.  We certainly see it in Odysseus.  But we also see it in Telemachus who actually negotiates his gifts, but and even Penelope is very smart in collecting gifts and building her own wealth.   But let's look at it from the other side of things.  What the giver gets in exchange is also of great value.  The giver of each gift is sending with the recipient a signal to everyone who sees the gift a message of his great reputation.  Everyone is reminded that King Menelaus is great every time he sees an artifact that came from his kingdom.  Everyone is reminded not to mess with a man as grand as can afford to give away something as great as this gifr or that gift.  But the giver is also building personal indebtedness that can extend multi-generationally.  We saw that when Telemachus visited his fathers' friends.  This networking extends reputation and gift exchange is also a tool with  which hierarchy is established.      Well, in the case of King Alcinous, he had a tremendous reputation for greatness and was, and I quote, “obeyed like a god”.   We could talk quite a bit about this banquet  King Alcinous and Queen Arete threw in honor of their guest:  the recognition scene, the games, etc.  but I want to jump ahead to the cyclopes- which is just fun to read.  And of course, it brings up one of the reasons why this book is so popular.  It's readable at every level.  We can read it for some psychological or anthropological understanding of humanity, but it's also just as fun and worthy to read the gory description of a dude poking out another dude's only eye.  So, jumping straight to book 9, the bard, in book eight, has been telling Odysseus' story but now Alcinous is making Odysseus tell his own story and finally Odysseus confesses his identity.      I am Odysseus, son of Laertes, known to the world for every kind of craft- my fame has reached the skies.  Sunny Ithaca is my home.  Atop her stands our seamark, Mount Neriton's leafy ridges shimmering in the wind.      And on he goes describing his homeland.  The first story he tells is about him sacking and plundering Cicones- sacking the city, killing the men.  By our standards, its sheer pirating, but it's not a shameful story in this context.  The shame came at the end when his stupid men got drunk and allowed the Cicones to get them back.  He says “out of each ship, six men-at-arms were killed.”  So, there's the example of how a lot of these interactions between peoples go- people warring against invaders.  But after the Cicones, he gets to the Lotus eaters.    The Lotus eaters' story is famous too, and I love how the Percy Jackson movie portrayed the Lotus eaters as being a casino in Las Vegas, and the men just kind of losing track of time as so many have in those corridors that connect the Pallazzo to the Venetian or Bally's to Paris.      I agree- Las Vegas is perfect.  The passage about the lotus eaters is a short passage especially for how well known it is, let's remember those famous Lotus Eaters.    Page 214    You know, I've heard this passage described as people high on drugs, but we may be too quick to go the route of mental incapacity.  When the men go back to their boat, they are aware that they are being forced to leave, and they even cry about it.  It's not their perceptions that are impaired; it's their will that's impaired.  The bedazzling experience of the present has totally obliterated any sense of time as well as any concern about other experiences in the future.  It's a metaphor for a lot of things beyond drugs that have this effect- although drugs definitely unfortunately do this in the extreme.      Ha!  I would say so- can we say tik tok!!  You know, our good friend, Cristiana, the other day got on tiktok, and let me say she's my age, so we're not talking about a child.  Anyway, her complaint about it was that she spent an hour drifting through video after video.  She was entertained for sure, but after an hour she looked up and realized could not tell you one thing that she had seen.  The videos were too short to even stick in her short term memory.  She was annoyed because she couldn't account for the time- she remarked that she literally had nothing to show for it- it went the way of the lotus eaters.    Ha!  So true- I guess Instagram and Facebook aren't much better,  but let me ask you this- is that an example of good xenia or bad xenia?     HA!  Well, I think of it as just a little sidebar until we get to the big xenia story-  the story of the Cyclopes-     A couple of things to notice as we compare the story of Polyphemus as host to the story about King Alcinous and Queen Arete and their reception of Odysseus.  With the Phaeacians, we see a positive example of what it means to be a good person.  We see a great and confident leader who has built a good community.  Homer is going to juxtapose that with this community that does not work well.  We are going to see what it means to be bad- a bad person, a bad leader and live in a bad society.  Remember when I said that a type-scene is a scene where you recognize a pattern.  Well, the pattern to receive a guest has been established a bunch of times already starting in book one now through book 8.  And Polyphemus does everything absolutely wrong.  He's the very opposite of a good person, and the Cyclopes society is the opposite of a good society.  Besides the hospitality type-scene- we also have an assembly which is another type-scene.  We've had a bunch of assemblies already as well- remember when Telemachus called an assembly, they met and passed around the scepter and all that, well Polyphemus is going to try to call an assembly, but it doesn't go well either because nothing these barbaric people do is worth anything.  They are awful in all ways.    So, in a traditional hospitality scene- you're supposed approach the visitor, welcome the visitor, seat and feed the visitor, offer the visitor a drink, then ask the visitor's name, exchange information, entertain the visitor, allow the visitor to bath, then sleep, try to detain the visitor give the visitor a gift, make a sacrifice  to the gods and finally escort him to the next destination.  That's exactly what we've already seen over and over again up to this point.  With that in mind, let's look at how Polyphemus treats civilized life.  First of all, Polyphemus isn't there at first, but when he gets there, before anything else, he asks them who they are.      Let's read it.     Page 219    Stop after other men then read his response    And of course they answer him, not by stating who they are but by saying who've they've been with and asking for a guest-guest.      Which  didn't go well.    No- let's read how it goes.     P 220      Instead of feeding the guests, he eats them.  It can't get worse than that, but there are more oppositions, instead of the host offering the guests wine, Odysseus offers Polyphemus wine.  And instead of Odysseus revealing his identity, he conceals it- He tells Polyphemus his name is Nobody or No man depending how your book translate it- And of course Polyphemus  likes the wine so much he decides to give Odysseus or Nobody a guest gift, but the gift is terrible.    Page 222    The scholars tell us that this scene actually has four examples of word play in the Greek, but the translation only comes across as one.  It's kind of fun that it works.  But it is this word play that has interested so many and sets the primary complication for the ten years of Odysseus' life.    Odysseus manages to get Polyphemus drunk and he and his crew stab him in the eye, very infeasibly with a piece of wood they made out of embers (don't try to explain that scientifically).  Let's read it.    Page 223    And of course, Odysseus gets away by being smart, patient, more cunning- the things that the gods reward.  Polyphemus is left to cry out to his father Poseidon- which of course in some ways is the correct idea, you are supposed to pray to the gods before your guests leave, but not like this.  And of course, finally Odyssey leaves not being escorted but by fleeing with his life as Polyphemus throws boulders at him.  Ironically, however,  Odysseus would have gotten away, and we wouldn't have had a story except for the lines that Odysseus blurts out once he's safely far enough away where he thinks he's escaped.    Page 227  .  He just can't be a nobody.  He had to tell him who he was.  He wanted him to know.  And isn't that what takes all of us on so many personal Odysseys.  We just can't be a nobody.  We would lose something in our humanity like that.  It's about identity.  That's what we're looking for in some sense.  It's what the whole of life experience is about in many ways.  Who are we?  We are NOT a nobody- at least we hope we're not- we hope to be a somebody to somebody.  How well Homer knows us.     Indeed.  It's an idea that we see Homer taking with us for the rest of the books.  Odysseus will reclaim his name.  He will define it. It's what defines your home- the place where you are somebody.  But another point to make, and I don't want to leave this discussion of uncivilized people without making mention of one other thing.  There is something very interesting to notice in Poseidon's prayer.  You know, if I had been blinded, and I had a magical father with powers, I might pray for my eyesight back.  That would be the most helpful thing moving forward, at least you'd think.  But that's not what Polyphemus does.  Let's read it.    Page 228    He'd rather have revenge than his own eyesight.      Indeed- it's fascinating to me- that when Homer wants to finish his description of what a pitiful example of a living breathing low-life is, what a totally uncivilized society looks like- he starts by saying it's a group of people who do no work, produce nothing, have no assemblies, do not live well in community, but he ends it with a prayer to seek vengeance in a final breath.      Ha!  I guess so. The worst of in us all played out- a bad person would rather hurt another person that move forward.   Well, off Odysseus goes.  He thinks he's caught a break at the beginning of book 10.  He reaches the home of the god Aeolus- a giant floating island.  And this god receives him well- another hospitality scene.  They go through all the things, and he gets a great parting gift.  He gives him a sack of wind.  Aeolus binds the winds from all the corners of the earth except the West Wind that blows Odysseus all the way to Ithaca.  For Nine days he sails non stop.  He can see men tending fires on the beaches of his hometown.  He's made it.  He can rest, but his men are greedy.  Right before they get there, while Odysseus is asleep, the shipmates open the bag wanting to sneak out treasure while Odysseus isn't watching.  When they open the bag all the winds come out at once, and they get blown all the way back to King Aeolus.  Oops.  Odysseus asks him to put the winds back in the bag.  This time, Aeolus says, sorry but no.  Instead this is what he said- let's read King Aeolus lines.    , “Away from my island- fast- most cursed man alive! It's a crime to host a man or speed him on his when the blessed deathless gods despise him so.  Crawling back like this-it proves the immortals hate you! Out- get out!'    And so off he goes- and I guess it's time for us to head out as well.  Next episode we'll pick up with Circe, and go through the rest of Odysseus' wanderings.  I also want to talk a little bit about the role of women in the books, as we'll meet a couple more.      Sounds good.  So, we'll call it a wrap for today.  Thanks for listening.  WE hope you're enjoying our discussions as we work our way through this influential classic.  As always, we hope you will honor us by sharing an episode with a friend either by text email or word of mouth.  Please leave us a five star rating on your podcast app and of course visit us at howtolovelitpodcast.com, where we have plenty of instructional materials if you are a teacher or student.  Also, follow us on any or all of our social media: Instagram, facebook, linked in, and if you'd like to receive our monthly newsletter, please email Christy at christy@howtolovelitpodcast.com.                       

Scalzo & Brust
4PM: The X-Factor, and Unsung Hero

Scalzo & Brust

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 51:42


Where would you put your money on the Packers vs 49'ers? Homer joins the show to talk Packers. 1 or 0. Who is the x-factor for the Packers first playoff game?

Morning Coffee with Rick Alexander
Reimagining Homer's Odyssey as a spiritual path to liberation

Morning Coffee with Rick Alexander

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 64:01


Today I use Homer's Odyssey to talk about the spiritual path to liberation by comparing the story with a lecture given by psychotherapist Polly Young-Eisendrath called The Spiritual Adventure of Being Human.  To sign up to be notified when my Transformation Lecture Series drops, please click here. To apply to work with my one on one, click here. Sources: The Odyssey  Lecture by Polly Young-Eisendrath   

Four Finger Discount (Simpsons Podcast)
Brake My Wife, Please (S14E20)

Four Finger Discount (Simpsons Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 83:03


Homer takes up walking as a hobby after losing his driver's licence, until Marge "accidentally" runs him over. Enjoy the show? Show some support by joining the FFD Family today to get access to hours of EXCLUSIVE podcasts at patreon.com/fourfingerdiscount

The 138th Simpsons Podcast
155. S22 E05 - Lisa Simpson, This Isn't Your Life

The 138th Simpsons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 96:30


When Lisa discovers that Marge's good grades slipped away when she met Homer, Lisa wants to avoid turning out like Marge. To do so, she is enrolled at Cloisters Academy and soon learns the truth why Marge became a dropout. Meanwhile, a series of coincidences in which Bart gets the better of Nelson leads everyone to consider Bart as the new school bully. Download and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. https://anchor.fm/138simpsons Email us at 138simpsons@gmail.com Check out our store at teepublic.com/user/annoyedgruntboys Or just click our link in our bio! ***Next Episode: S26 E02 - The Wreck of the Relationship*** #thesimpsons #simpsons #138simpsonspodcast #annoyedgruntboys #podcast #homersimpson #margesimpson #bartsimpson #lisasimpson #maggiesimpson #foxtv #simpsonspodcast #tvpodcast #tv #disney #disneyplus #season33 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/138simpsons/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/138simpsons/support

Talking Simpsons Official Free Feed
Talking Simpsons - The War of the Simpsons With Kole Ross

Talking Simpsons Official Free Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 129:31


This week we're joined by first-time guest Kole Ross, cohost of the many great Duckfeed.tv podcasts, all to discuss the season 2 ep about when Homer goes too far. After a drunken night embarrasses Marge, the couple heads to a marriage retreat that's interrupted by a giant catfish. All that, plus the first "haw haw," the first appearance of Jailbird/Snake, the source of the Lisa drinking coffee meme, and tons more in this week's podcast! Support this podcast and get dozens of bonus episodes by visiting Patreon.com/TalkingSimpsons and becoming a patron! And please follow the official Twitter, @TalkSimpsonsPod!

Die Sendung mit den gelben Leuten
Folge 24 - Einmal als Schneekönig (S04F09)

Die Sendung mit den gelben Leuten

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 92:03


S04E09 – Einmal als Schneekönig Es ist kalt in Deutschland und deshalb bringen euch Max und Luggi einen herzerwärmenden Plausch für den Januar. Homer schrottet beide Familienfahrzeuge in einem Unfall und braucht deshalb ein neues Auto. Was könnte da besser passen als ein Schneepflug?! Neben der wunderbaren Simpsons-episode erwartet euch wieder ein intensiver Vortalk zu Book of Boba und was uns sonst in unserer Weihnachtspause so bewegt hat. /// AG1 / ATHLETIC GREENS /// Klick auf athleticgreens.com/gelb und sichere dir bei deiner AG1 Bestellung einen kostenlosen Jahresvorrat an Vitamin D zur Unterstützung des Immunsystems & 5 Travel Packs! AG1 ist ein All-in-One Supplement, bestehend aus 75 Vitaminen, Mineralstoffen und weiteren essentiellen Inhaltsstoffen, welche die täglichen Nährstoffbedürfnisse deines Körpers decken. Das hoch absorbierbares Pulver zahlt in die wichtigsten Gesundheitsbereiche ein: Immunsystem, Darmgesundheit, Energiehaushalt, Regeneration und gesundes Altern. /// SUPPORTEN AUF PATREON /// Wenn ihr uns und diesen Podcast unterstützen wollt, könnt ihr das ab sofort auf Patreon tun: https://www.patreon.com/diegelbenleute Wir freuen uns über jeden Support

KBBL Radio - Simpsons Podcast
S04E18 - Nur ein Aprilscherz

KBBL Radio - Simpsons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 35:58


Nur bei diesem Podcast bekommt ihr ein April-Special im Januar! Bart will Homer den ultimativen April-Scherz spielen, übertreibt es aber ein wenig und sorgt dafür, dass Homer im Krankenhaus landet und nie wieder laufen kann... jedenfalls für ein paar Stunden. Was dann folgt, kann nur als Clipshow bezeichnet werden. Viel Spaß und Vielen Dank an John Dooe für den Folgenwunsch!

Pure Dog Talk
512 – No Best in Show? Looking Back with Bo Bengtson

Pure Dog Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 33:50


No Best in Show? Looking Back with Bo Bengtson Author, historian, editor and Sighthound specialist Bo Bengtson joins host Laura Reeves again for a fascinating look back at dog shows *before* Best in Show. “You gotta go several thousand years back basically,” Bengtson said of people appreciating the beauty of dogs. “Even in the Odyssey, which is Homer 2,000 years ago, there is a reference that cited the people who own dogs because they're handsome, because they look good. “That's kind of really interesting to me that even in those days people cared about what dogs look like. Going through the Middle Ages and forward, you find several references to not just hunting dogs or war dogs or something, but also to luxury dogs or pets. Greyhounds of all types are very, very frequently portrayed. “And then we get up to the 1800s and middle of 1800s and the industrial revolution in England. Suddenly, there was a whole new class created by the industrial revolution. People who had money and had time on their hands and what could they better focus on than dogs. That was very interesting to them and that's where the beginning of the modern dog sport really stands. “The dog shows of the past were not at all like modern dog shows. There was often a best in show award but even defeated dogs could actually compete for it. There were no groups and there were not even necessarily breeds. "In 1924, the American Kennel Club introduced new regulations and since then it's basically been (the same). The number of groups has increased slightly and the number of breeds increased drastically, but their regulations for competing have remained unchanged. “Even in my early days, in the 1980s in this country, there was not even necessarily Best in Show. I remember very, very vividly that I had a group winner who was not allowed to compete for Best in Show because there wasn't a Best in Show at that show. In the beginning, only half the number of shows had the best in show award … eventually that grew up to present day. “There have always been people who are nuts about competing for best in show and campaigning dogs. I mean you don't think of people in the ‘30s or ‘40s or something that is campaigning dogs. But they were. There was that Pointer in 1860 or something from Wales, that was shown at least 60 times. How do they even get to the show? And he was shown overseas too. How do you even know where the shows were? It's amazing. "In the 1950s, there were certainly not flights available as today and there were far fewer shows and dogs still managed to win 20 or 30 best in shows per year. People were competitive even then. “I think it's a pretty rarified sport in many ways. I mean they make it fun sometimes and I think it's fascinating. I think there's nothing like sitting with a catalog and watching a bunch of dogs of the same breed being judged by an expert. That's totally fascinating. But most people don't think so. I think you need a special type of interest or mind or something like that. Maybe you have to just be a little weird.” Be sure to listen in to catch Bo's incredible Best in Show lineup representing dogs of yesteryear through present times. Support this podcast

Flop of the Heap
Home Sweet Homer- Was He Guarding or Barding?

Flop of the Heap

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 64:18


Home Sweet Homer- 1976- The Palace TheatreThis one's a real Odyssey.Music- Mitch LeighLyrics- Charles Burr and Foreman BrownBook- Roland Kibbee and Albert Marre

EconTalk
Tyler Cowen and Russ Roberts on Nation, Immigration, and Israel

EconTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 76:35


Can Israeli society survive the loss of universal military service? Will the deregulation of Israel's kosher supervision spell the end of its Jewish character? And, speaking of Israel, what is it that makes its television dramas so good? Tyler Cowen discusses these and other subjects with EconTalk host Russ Roberts, new immigrant to Israel and unabashed fan of the Prisoners of War miniseries and Homer's Odyssey.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 2 - Telemachus Begins The Journey To Manhood And Finding Odysseus!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 45:19


Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 2 - Telemachus Begins The Journey To Manhood And Finding Odysseus!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're her to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to love lit podcast.  Today is our second episode covering the first and perhaps foremost author in what is often described as the Western Canon- Homer and his famous epic, The Odyssey.  Last week, we discussed a little of the historical context surrounding the mysterious origins of the story- the Bronze age, the Myceneans and the Trojan war.    But besides the origins of the stories, we also discussed the origins of Homer himself, if there was such a man.  It is thought that Homer lived 400 years after the timeframe of the settings of the stories he tells in his epics.  His version of The Odyssey was solidified in or around 750 BCE.  Tradition claims he was a blind bard who began this famous tale invoking the muse who had shared it with him, and within his stories the religion and cultural heritage of the Greeks has not only been preserved and passed down, but the tales have influenced the writing, thinking and worldviews of innumerable cultures around the world. Like most first book episodes, however, in episode 1 we didn't get far into the story itself, we stayed in the opening of book 1.  At the beginning of book 1, we meet Homer himself invoking the Muse to tell us Odysseus' story.  But then, the skies are opened before us and we are swiftly taken upward to the mighty Mt Olympus where we are privileged with a glimpse  inside a discussion between the gods where Zeus brings up Agamemnon's son, Orestes, avenging his father's murder by killing his own mother and her lover after they plotted and killed him on his return from Troy.  We are reminded by Zeus himself that men tend to blame the gods for everything that happens to them, but that there are many things that happen to us that are indeed our own fault.   Zeus talks about the case of Agamemnon's son avenging his death as an example.  Following this, Athena brings up the case of Odysseus, the mortal she likes.  She requests Zeus' permission and help to help bring Odysseus home, even though he has foolishly angered Zeus' brother, Poseidon, god of the sea, by blinding one of his sons, the cyclops, Polyphemus.      The Odyssey really has quite a complicated set up in some ways, and this week's episode which will cover the Telemachy is really more set up before we even meet the namesake main character, Odysseus in book 5.      There is a lot going on, there are a lot of Greek characters, a lot of backstory to explain why things are the way they are. Certainly a lot of intrigue and treachery has already taken place before we meet Odysseus on Ogygia's island, and we learn a lot of this context in the Telemachy.        True- the Telemachy or the first four books in the epic centers around Telemachus- and that is the name of Odysseus' son.  Odysseus' wife is named Penelope, and they had a son right before he had to leave against his will for the Trojan War.   The Odyssey opens with the story of Odysseus' son, but here in the Telemachy we also meet Penelope.  We meet Eurycleia.  She's a slave who has been a nurse for both Odysseus.  We meet Mentor.  It starts about a month before Odysseus arrives back in his homeland after his absences of 20 years.  In these first four books, we learn that Ithaca is in total chaos.  There is no leadership, no code of morality, no enforcer of the rules.   There has not been a assembly of the community in twenty years.  After the first four books of the Telemachy , the story switches over to Odysseus' captivity in book 5, where Hermes arrives at Ogygia and tells Calypso she must let Odysseus get home explaining to the reluctant nympyh that it is not his fate to stay with her forever.  The story of Odysseus' difficult journey from Calypso's island is from books 5-9- the stories about his journey over the last 10 years are told in the context of a flashback.  In chapter 15, we resume the Telemachy, with Telemachus arriving back home, and then in Book 16 Telemachus and Odysseus reunite and from there the story takes a totally different direction as these two seek to restore order and justice to Ithaca.  So, yes, it's slightly complicated.  But what do we expect from an epic!!!       I think it's likely that if you were Greek listening to this story being sung by Homer, himself, you already knew the stories at least in part, so the complicated plot line and characters weren't confusing like they can be for us today. But even today, so many of us are familiar with many of these story lines from different places.  For example, just the name mentor- I've heard that word used all my life, but I didn't know Mentor was the name of a man in the Odyssey who mentored Telemachus.  There's a lot of references in pop culture to a lot that we're reading- from the various gods that show up in movies, or monsters that have found their way in video games, or even just portions of the stories that have been told in things like cartoons.   Things like cyclops and sirens are a part of the culture of the world, and it seems I've always known what they were not necessarily knowing they came from The Odyssey.  For me, the best way to read this book, is not to try to keep track of all the names and characters.  It's easy to get  lost in the details of the different digressions. I found that just reading through is the best plan- and if I forget who Mentes is or Eurymachus, I can still understand what's happening in the story.  It doesn't hurt the overall understanding if we don't understand every detail of every story Menelaus, Nestor or Helen want to share with Telemachus.      No, I agree, the main ideas are easy to follow.  For one reason and this was also one thing we talked about last week is how Homer pares down the complicated Greek pantheon of gods to a number small enough for us to manage, so the pantheon of gods isn't what is going to confuse us.  Once you know who Athena, Zeus, Poseidon and Hermes are, you are pretty much good to go, and these we will learn in context. But another reason is because the focus isn't on the gods it's on the family- and even that is pared down.  We are concerned about Odysseus' family.  The value and the place of the family is very important to Homer and to Greek culture.  Odysseus, as well as the other characters, but let's focus on Odysseus, always identifies himself in relation to his family- his father, Laertes, his son, Telemachus,  and/ or his wife, Penelope.  Understanding what these basic family relationships mean is of great interest to Homer.  What does it mean to be a father, a son, a wife?  What do we do with these roles?  How do they form our identity?     So,the Telemachy which is the first four books of the Odyssey focuses on Telemachus as the starting point of the story, which is a little unusual.  Telemachus is not the protagonist of the Odyssey.  He's also not very heroic, at least not as we think of Greek heroes.  In fact, a lot of literary critics absolutely reject Telemachus as anything but drain on Odysseus.  I am not going to see him like that.  I see Telemachus' role as unique, for sure.  And, he definitely is not a returning hero like his future, but he is still the future- but it is a different future.  He is the future for Odysseus, the future for Ithaca and will have to be defined differently.  Whatever Odysseus is to be in this world after he returns from Troy, he will be it in the context of his family relationships- and when we see Odysseus on the island with Calypso, we see him understanding himself just in that way.  Calypso has offered him immortality, but it's not what he wants.  As great as he is, as a hero, as a warrior, as a pirate, he is nothing alone, and so before we meet Odysseus in chapter five crying and groaning for home, we start by looking at Telemachus- the personification of Odysseus' home.  One thing to notice about Telemachus as a character, and this is something I didn't know until I researched him for this podcast, is that Telemachus is the ONLY character in Greek literature that is not a static character.      Just as a refresher, let me remind everyone that Static characters are characters that don't change in stories. The character traits that define them at the end of the story are the same as the ones in the beginning and usually the one that creates the tragedy.  We saw this in both Oedipus and Antigone.  No one in those stories is willing to change- hence the problem.  Dynamic characters are characters that are changed by the experiences of the story- either for the better or for the worse, so you're saying that NO other characters besides Telemachus experience change over time or grow up?    I'm not saying it.  Greek scholars CMH Millar and JWS Carmichael made that claim in the journal Greece and Rome, but yes- that's it exactly.  Greeks are famous for their tragedies, but how the stories are set up with those chorus' and all, it's not designed for characters to develop inside the story- maybe between stories- Oedipus certainly changes between stories, but not within a story.  Telemachus is the only character where, the point of him is to see him change over time. So, whatever this change is, is obviously something very important to Homer.  And for Homer, the change is explicitly stated- it is not implied- it is absolutely stated through the various characters who will talk to Telemachus.  Homer is interested in showing us how a boy becomes a man.  Now, let me make the one obvious disclaimer, I am going to use gendered language because this is the way the ancient Greeks thought of this idea today we call coming of age- but please understand that this journey of self-discovery is not exclusively male – it's not even exclusively a path from childhood to adulthood, although that's always the language we employ and a good way of understanding this.    No- I think psychologically speaking, we could say that many adults never arrive to this sense of  manhood if you want to use the gendered language of the Greeks.  What Homer is clearly talking about is that place in a life's journey where any individual takes up the burden of personal responsibility- the transition from passive agent in one's life to active agent.  This is something that we think of as being nurtured by parenting because role models are how we learn in this world.  But parenting is a luxury not everyone experiences.  What do you do if you have no healthy role models in your world for whatever reason?   And what if you do- is a privileged birth a guarantee of future success? What we can see clearly in the life of Telemachus, especially if you compare him with the suitors and other sons in the Telemachy is that nothing is guaranteed- regardless of your advantages or disadvantages.  This acceptance of personal responsibility that the Greeks are representing through this language of becoming a man is something that no one can do for anyone else-  either a person takes on the burden of responsibility for his or herself and the others who are in their orbit or a person doesn't.  The suitors certainly think there is a shortcut to success, and so did the man who killed Agamemnon.       But, the gods don't allow these kinds of people to succeed ultimately- in the cases you just mentioned  both of these groups experience  the same fate- death.  Homer's gods absolutely make sure everyone gets hit with something- not even King Menelaus himself, married to the most beautiful woman in the world escapes the twists and turns of fate thrown at them by the gods.  But as we are told in the first lines of the story- what we do with the circumstances we are given are in large part what will seal the outcome of our existences.      And so the challenge of facing one individual's particular fate is broken down by looking at the particular circumstances facing Telemachus at this particular age.  Most scholars suggest he is probably 20, but that's not explicitly stated anywhere.  I think it's also interesting to note that the things he has to deal with are tremendously difficult problems and they are also not his fault.  Telemachus knows this and does what most people at least want to do when we are faced with tremendously large and difficult problems that are not our fault.  We meet Telemachus in the beginning  casting blame and sulking.  He's angry, but honestly it's easy life.  He gets pushed around by people who have literally injected themselves into his world, and he just sits in a corner.      I find it interesting that at one point Telemachus even claims that he's not even sure who his father is- even though- no one else seems to question this at all.  It's that kind of ‘who am I' that seems to be casting blame.  None of what we see in Telemachus here is very admirable or helpful.   Homer clearly illustrates the cost of doing nothing- regardless of the reason- and there are lots of good reasons to do nothing-  Telemachus has reasons to be intimidated.   He's young, he's outnumbered by men who are better trained, larger and older than he is.   He doesn't have any personal strength of mind, but maybe not of body either. At least at this point in the story, we can't be sure of how strong or smart he is.  He hasn't done anything to show us one way or the other.      Yes- and I'm glad you brought up strength of mind-  you have brought us exactly back to Athena- the goddess of wisdom.  That's who Telemachus needs and that who comes to intervene on his behalf.  The best of us are the ones who are good at listening to Athena, and thinking of wisdom as a Greek goddess speaking in our ear- is a very lovely way to conceptualize this.  In this case, he will hear a little voice speaking to him from outside of himself.  It will be on him to decide whether or not to listen to the voice.  Let us jump into the story and see how Athena meets Telemachus in book 1.  One magical element of the story is that Athena is a shape-shifter.  She can appear to people as anything or anyone she wants and that is what she does.  She is going to approach Telemachus as an old family friend, a neighboring king, a man by the name of Mentes.  As Mentes, she enters his house.      Page 81    Telemachus receives her/him well.  He gives him a seat of honor and tries to take care of the stranger.  It doesn't appear that he knows him.      No, and Athena, as Mentes, prophecies that his father will come home.  But Telemachus is despondent.  He's bitter at what has happened.  He's angry people have moved in and are taking over his home, siphoning off his wealth, and that his mother can't seem to do anything about it.  But it never occurs to him that HE can do anything himself.  He dreams of the day when his father will come back, he also longs to be famous in his own right. He dreams, but he cannot conceive of taking initiative himself.  Athena, the voice of wisdom must awaken him.  Let's read what she says in the person of Mentes    Page 86-87    First of all, he must remember who he is.  He is a son- a member of a family, he has responsibility to himself, but also to his father dead or alive as well as his mother.  Athena charges him to take up that banner of responsibility, but then she gives him a very practical plan.  Do this 1) get a boat, 2) find some associates 3) go get some advice from older successful men.  Find out the status of your family.  After you have information as to your actual status, come back and take hold of your own life.      It's also interesting that she compares him to this other prince we've heard about from Zeus, Prince Orestes who killed Aegisthus, a different lord who had made a play on his birthright and had taken him down.  There is this idea that gods will help you, but it's on you to take down your rivals.  Over the next three books, Telemachus kind of wakes up to this idea that nobody is coming- although in his case, someone IS coming, but Athena doesn't let him know that.      He wakes up to his own independence- his separateness from his mother, his nurse, his mentor, even this father- he is going to become comfortable with his own personhood.  Leaving home was Athena's strategy to enable this to happen in him.  He wakes up to a sense of responsibility- that it's on him to make something happen but lastly, he also wakes up to the difficulties of his mother's position.  He doesn't come across as empathetic at first, but this changes as he himself matures and we see this in book 15- he moves to viewing his mother as a woman with complicated choices and respects what she's managed to do and I, as a mom, appreciated this change in attitude, for sure. When Telemachus talks to his mom in book 1, and I know this is my own cultural understanding of a text of a different culture, but I was offended at how rude he appeared to me- more offended than Penelope was.  He bosses her around.  I want to read this, “So mother, go back to your quarters.  Tend to your own tasks, the distaff and the loom, and keep the women working hard as well.  As for giving orders, men will see to that, but I most of all: I hold the reins of power in this house.”  I would have wanted to say, young man, don't talk to your mother like that.  But, her reaction is not one of offense, but the word the Fagles uses is “astonished”.  And she obeys him almost happy.  It says she took to heart “the clear good sense in what her son had said.”              Well, I think she was astonished.  Here is this young man who has never taken agency in his life, and now he's going to try to stand up to her and to the suitors.  She seems to be glad he's at least owning the fact that he has responsibility in this household.  This is new.  In some ways, especially if you compare him to Orestes who is likely the same age as he is- that Telemachus might even be an embarrassment to her.  The suitors certainly have no respect for him.  In the very next paragraph it says they and I quote, “broke into uproar through the shadowed halls, all of them lifting prayers to lie beside her, share her bed.”  Penelope has been and IS  in real danger with no protection at all.  Now Telemachus tells the suitors to leave; they are amazed that he is willing to talk to them like that, even if they don't show any signs of actually moving or conceding space.  Antinous says this, “I pray that Zeus will never make YOU king of Ithaca, though your father's crown is no doubt yours by birth.”  In other words, I know this is your birth right but if you cannot claim it, you cannot have it.  The idea being, even if something is yours by birthright, it's not really yours until you can claim it.    Leadership as we all know, is more than a position, there must be an element of person charisma that creates respect.  When someone is supposed to be charge who does have personal charisma and who cannot garner respect, someone else who does will snatch it regardless of who holds the official position.      And that's where we are in the story here in Book 1.  Telemachus should be a king, but he is trapped in a place where he can't get anyone to respect him even if he wanted them to.     According to Aristotle, albeit years later, one essential part of being a king or leader is the ability to dispense justice.  That is what kings do in the ancient world, and really that's what good leadership is supposed to do to this day.  Telemachus has not done that up to this point; he has not been able to do that in any way for various reasons- and the reasons are understandable.  But that doesn't matter.  He has not administered his properties; he is not administering justice in his realm of influence, and so Telemachus has no authority and his world has no harmony.  Until he can figure that piece out, he is not in charge, he is not a king.  And so the question the text brings up, is how can he do this?  And of course the first step is that he must realize it's on him to do it.  Telemachus is going to have to construct his own authority in the eyes of those suitors.    Well, that's true, and honestly, he has to construct authority in the eyes of the reader of the text as well.  WE have to decide he's worthy, especially after we see everything that Odysseus is and has been.  If Homer can convince us that Telemachus is worthy, then we can accept and even feel glee when we see what happens to the suitors at the end of the story.  It will feel like a king dispensing justice and not just vengeance.  That's an important distinction.  Justice is for everyone; vengeance is personal.  And of course, at no time either in book 1 or in book 2 are we convinced that Telemachus is capable of of being a king.  In book 2, he calls an assembly together of all the Acheans.  This is a big deal.  No assembly has been called since Odysseus left twenty years before.   Everyone crowds around, the elders come in, Telemachus takes his father's seat.  Nine speeches are given by various people, but on first pass nothing good comes out of any of this.  Telemachus is filled with anger, he complains about what they have done but ultimately he dashes the speaker's scepter and bursts into tears.  None of that is great, but it IS a start.  The text says that everyone felt pity, but what does that do.  They just sat there in silence.  One of the suitors, Antinous, speaks up and basically says, well, it's really your mother's fault.  She won't pick a new husband, but instead has tricked us.  She told us she would marry someone when she finished making this shroud for her father-in-law Laertes, but every day she weaved it and every night she unraveled her work, so that the shroud was never done.  This went on for three years. Antinous calls Penelope “matchless queen of cunning” which is quite the backhanded compliment, but ultimately, he is taking the focus away from Telemachus.  Telemachus appears to be a nothing here.  On the other hand, and let me ask this question, from a historical perspective,  I never really have understood why Penelope had to get married.  Why couldn't she just be the queen?      Well, I'm not totally sure, remember this culture is mysterious.  One idea might be that warring and pirating is such a key component of the culture, so as not have a warrior as the head would leave a kingdom vulnerable to invaders- that may be one idea.  But, I will say, just in general, that it's important to understand that every single character in this story is an aristocrat.  These are not common people.  They are rulers, and in the world of aristocrats, and this is not just in Greek culture, but all cultures to this day, if we're honest, people put a lot of effort in planning and selecting marriages.  Social interchange between families creates links of union and interdependence that are the hallmark of the history of humanity as a whole.  So, in that sense, marriage is a political and economic game that can be won or lost.  Men compete- and this is no more obvious than with this actual game we will see being played by these suitors.  I think it's important to note that all of these suitors come from good aristocratic families.  These are not beggars or miscreants that are moving in on her.  They are Greece's finest, so to speak, men who feel like they can compete and deserve to be a king.  What is a little difficult to understand here is who is supposed to be responsible for the choice of Penelope's next husband, and we see different answers depending on who's talking here. Athena tells Telemachus to send his mother back to her father and to let her father make this choice.   Antinous says something similar, but if Antinous sends Penelope back, the he's the one in charge, not Telemachus.  If she goes back because Antinous told her to, basically the suitors have already seized authority over Penelope in making this decision for her and taking it away from Telemachus.  What we can say for sure, is there is a power vacuum in Ithaca- Telemachus may have the position of leadership because of his birthright, but he doesn't possess the charisma or the moral authority at this point to exercise any leadership and be listened to.  He is ignored and irrelevant.      That is the point of his own Odyssey.  And I think that's the whole idea that people have intuitively understood.  The first step in manhood and I'll use the gendered language of the Greeks, the first step to growing up is understanding that you have to do something and if you don't- others will swoop in and make those decisions for you, but the decisions others make likely will not be in your best interest.   Even if you start out disadvantaged, just as Telemachus is starting here, there are things you can do to help yourself.  For Telemachus, that's what he gets from listening to the goddess Athena and discerning her words of wisdom.  He gets up, calls an assembly, announces his plan.  He heard Mentes and figured out that those were words he should be listening to- they were the words of the goddess Athena.  But after listening, he still has to make a choice, he has to actually pick up and do what Athena told him to.  And he does.  He goes to the storehouse, collects goods for the trip, he talks to his nanny and tells her to not tell his mom for at least 10 maybe 12 days,  and he even faces down the suitors, clearly establishing to their faces that he views them as enemies.  He calls out the game.  And let me further note, as soon as he starts moving, Athena also engaged the world and pushed others to help him.  She also drugs the suitors so he can get out without being challenged.      Page 105        And off he goes first in book 3 and then in book 4 to older wiser men- King Nestor at Pylos and then King Menelaus at Sparta.  One interesting little side-bar is that scholars really do not agree  as to what he gets out of this trip if anything.  For sure, he doesn't get what he sets out to get.  He doesn't find his father.  They also don't agree on how long he was gone.  Homer in a couple of places implies he's only there a couple of days, but in other places, and if you match up Telemachus leaving Ithaca with Odysseus leasing Ogygia, he would need to have been gone about a month.      I think the month idea makes more sense especially if you think about the changes that occur in Telemachus while he's gone.    Well, I agree.  Also there's that detail that the nurse was told not to tell her for 10-12 days, so that's another hint, that Homer understands and expects his audience to understand Telemachus is gone longer than a couple of days.  Anyway, I'm not sure it matters a whole lot- the transformation is the transformation and the reunion on the other side will be the reunion on the other side.  In Pylos, he meets Nestor's son, Peisistratus, who has had a much more normal upbringing than Telemachus had. Pylos is kind of the example of family that has gone right.  Nestor, even in the Iliad is kind of portrayed as a wise counselor who gives speeches and advice.  Although it has been pointed out that at no time does Telemachus ask their opinion on what he should do.  He seems to be interested just in learning about the past, who his father way, how things have worked.    And he learns a lot about that.   Nestor talks  a lot about what happened at Troy- things I didn't know.  He talks about Achilles and Patroclus, about Ajax, King Priam and the role Odysseus played in the war.  He also tells Telemachus about his own journey home, and we revisit again this story about Agamemnon being murdered by his friend and Orestes murdering his father's murderer as well as his own mother.      To which I notice Telemachus said, “If only the gods would arm me in such power I'd take revenge on the lawless, brazen suitors.”  Basically, saying, I wish I were like that guy.   It's very obvious that Telemachus doesn't know how to act in this world and that is exactly why Athena sent him out.  Ithaca is not the world of Pylos or Sparta.  In fact, it's very different, but there are things to learn.  He learns by listening to how other men act and how he they interact with each other.  He learns how to conduct himself religiously, too.  How do I stay out of trouble with the gods.  The day after the big banquet Nestor throws, Nestor sends his youngest daughter Polyoaste to give Telemachus a bath.  There are those who suggest this detail of the bath is designed to express some sort of a baptism, if you want to see it that way.  Telemachus emerges and I quote, “looking like a god”.  I don't know if that's a stretch- sometimes literary people can stretch stuff.      Maybe a bath is just a bath,    yes or maybe it IS a baptism.  Who knows.  What we do know for sure is that Nestor sees something great in Telemachus, something the suitors haven't seen.  Nestor sees leadership, something, we as readers haven't seen either and Telemachus responds to this.  Nestor gives him horses, a chariot and sends him off with his own son to Sparta.  In Sparta, we are going to assume he stays for about a month, he will see and experience the life of the most successful man in Greece, Menelaus, husband to Queen Helen, the woman who started the Trojan war.  Telemachus is overwhelmed by the amazing opulence of this environment.  He's never seen anything like this before.  In terms of wealth, this is the ultimate.      The main takeaway from my perspective for Telemachus is comparing how Menelaus conducts affairs successfully and we can compare this to how things are going in Ithaca.  If we think about the last conversation Telemachus had about his mother not getting married, how interesting that we see Menelaus conducting not one but two marriages- and not even his child through his wife.  Menelaus is creating that most political of arrangements- marriages- two of them.  WE can already see that Telemachus is less awkward meeting Menelaus than he was meeting Nestor, even though this stage is even bigger.  He's speaking is more controlled and more confident to the point that when Menelaus offers him three horses, and he actually declines because horses are impractical in Ithaca.  In other words, this version of Telemachus can engage a great man like Menelaus as an equal.      Or man to man- to use a gendered expression- and this really impresses Menelaus.  WE don't know what all happens in Sparta really.  We do get to hear Helen's side of the Trojan war story, which I found really interesting, but we don't really have time to get into that- suffice it to say, it's not her fault.  The main takeaway is that by the time Telemachus leaves Menelaus which isn't until book 15, he's ready to go home.  The Telamachy won't pick up again until book 15 when Athena sends him home.  But by book 15, Telemachus is aware of his responsibilities, and we see this new Telemachus- Telemachus 2.0 as a man of action.  I know it's getting a head in the story if we look by chapters, but by book 15, Telemachus is going to offer political asylum to a wanted murderer in Ithaca.  This is stepping out in the realm of administering justice.  The man's name is Theoclymenus.   Theoclymenus is a prophet and interprets for Telemachus and omen of a hawk who is appearing on the right with a dove in its talons.  He correctly predicts that “no family in Ithaca is kinglier than yours; you will have power forever.”  That's always a nice thing to say.      And so, there we go, now Telemachus is set up for the confrontation, now we just need to get Odysseus home.      Yes- and that is what books 5-8 are about as well.  Odysseus also must find his way to those sandy shores- but before he does, he's going to tell the King who will take him how he ever got himself in the mess he did.  And next episode, we'll listen in and find out why you should never expect a Christmas party invite from a cyclops.  There's the tip for the day.      Ha!  Well, I'll keep my hopes down on that score.  Thank you for listening.  If you are enjoying this series on Homer and the Odyssey, please remember to give us a rating on your podcast ap.  And of course, share an episode with a friend.  Also, don't hesitate to connect with us via email, our website www.howtolovelitpodcast.com, Instagram, Facebook, linked in or any other social media ap you use.   And if you are listening to this in real time, we hope you are getting off to a great start in this year 2022.             

How Do We Fix It?
I Changed My Mind About Nuclear Power: Zion Lights

How Do We Fix It?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 26:04


Earth's global average temperature in 2021 was the sixth warmest on record, according to two new reports issued this week by U.S. Government agencies. Scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies report that collectively the past eight years were the warmest since modern record keeping began in 1880. The research adds to overwhelming evidence of climate change.This episode looks at the role played by carbon-free nuclear power in providing one solution to the growing climate crisis. Our guest, British environmental activist and science communicator, Zion Lights, tells us whyt she changed her mind about nuclear safety and reliability. After playing a leading role with Extinction Rebellion UK, Zion left the group and founded Emergency Reactor, which calls on fellow activists to "stop spreading misinformation and fear. Follow the science about nuclear energy." "People are already worried and scared about climate change. Let's look at solutions," she tells us.This show is the latest in a series of "How Do We Fix It?" episodes about the need to come up with pragmatic, workable solutions that limit the damage to our warming planet. Recommendation: Richard has spent part of the past year reading literary classics, including the three books of Dante's "Divine Comedy", Virgil's "The Aeneid", and The Iliad and Odyssey by Homer. "My recommendation is to challenge yourself. This may lead you to change your mind about something that's important to how you see the world," says Richard.Note: Zion Lights is an amateur astronomer. Her Tedx talk, "Don't Forget to Look Up" is full of curiosity and wonder about stargazing and the universe. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ancient Warfare Podcast
AW182 - Warfare in the Age of Homer

Ancient Warfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 62:52


'To the Greeks and Romans, the Trojan War was the beginning of all warfare and set the standards for the expected behaviour of all men. How does the epic fit actual history?'   The Ancient Warfare podcast team discuss the latest issue of the magazine X.3 Warfare in the Age of Homer.   Patreon: patreon.com/ancientwarfarepodcast

Wilde & Tausch
9AM: Get Jiggy With It

Wilde & Tausch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 48:08


What household chores do the guys think Aaron Rodgers is doing during the Packers bye week in the playoffs? Colin Cowherd has a conspiracy theory about Aaron Rodgers leaking info the media. Homer spontaneously joins for his weekly appearance. And is I, Robot one of Will Smith's best movies?

The 138th Simpsons Podcast
154. S16 E18 - A Star Is Torn

The 138th Simpsons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 87:47


Lisa attends a singing competition for children, and Homer becomes her manager because of his skill to write songs that the crowd loves. Download and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. https://anchor.fm/138simpsons Email us at 138simpsons@gmail.com Check out our store at teepublic.com/user/annoyedgruntboys Or just click our link in our bio! ***Next Episode: S22 E05 - Lisa Simpson, This Isn't Your Life*** #thesimpsons #simpsons #138simpsonspodcast #annoyedgruntboys #podcast #homersimpson #margesimpson #bartsimpson #lisasimpson #maggiesimpson #foxtv #simpsonspodcast #tvpodcast #tv #disney #disneyplus #season33 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/138simpsons/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/138simpsons/support

Scalzo & Brust
4PM: How Many Starts for J Love

Scalzo & Brust

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 45:58


The show starts off with Homer asking how many starts Jordan Love will have in his career. Greg and Joshy talk Ben into another bet with Homer. Tausch joins the show, after some confusion. 1 or 0, and an appearance from Borat.

DreamPath Podcast
Michael Price on Writing/Producing for The Simpsons, and Creating F Is For Family with Bill Burr

DreamPath Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 52:17


Michael Price has been writing and producing for the beloved and iconic television show The Simpsons for the past 20 years. In 2014 he co-created F is For Family, a serialized, animated series for Netflix, with comedian Bill Burr. Starring Bill Burr, Laura Dern, Justin Long, and Sam Rockwell, the series just concluded its fifth and final season. Michael has written for numerous other shows, including Teacher's Pet, Aaahh!!! Real Monsters, the Hercules tv series, and many Lego Star Wars projects.  What you will learn: What it's like working again on The Simpsons full time after the series finale of F is For Family. How Michael was able to bounce between the two shows throughout the creation and production of F is For Family for five seasons. [0:00-5:56] Michael reveals how he broke into Hollywood as a writer, with no backup plan, starting as a theater major, doing improv in New York, and then auditioning for acting roles before discovering that his true calling was writing. [5:56-15:10] Michael reflects on what what has changed (and what remains the same) in Hollywood for writers over the last 30 years. The pros and cons of the seemingly limitless television content available due to streaming, and the logistics of making a show for Netflix. [15:10-24:25] The nostalgia that F is For Family evokes for fans and how Michael was mindful of maintaining that tone, while also calling attention to problematic social issues of that era (the 70s). How F is For Family attracted such an amazing cast of voice actors. [24:25-34:43] Michael goes into detail about what staffing for The Simpsons is like and what “breaking story” means in the writer's room. [34:43-41:34] What it was like getting hired as a writer at the Simpsons in 2002 and how he ended up working on such a popular, beloved show. His personal dos and don'ts in writer's rooms. [41:34-52:16] Resources: Michael's: IMDb, Twitter

Scalzo & Brust
4PM: Advice For The Head Coach

Scalzo & Brust

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 45:11


Ben Brust got a haircut and Homer doesn't like it. What advice would you give Matt LaFleur before the Packers start the post season. Are You Smarter Than Ben Brust. We get it, Greg said something wrong. Get over it.

Brattlecast: A Firsthand Look at Secondhand Books
Brattlecast #120 - The Limited Editions Club

Brattlecast: A Firsthand Look at Secondhand Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 16:18


Today we're talking about some of our favorite titles from the Limited Editions Club. Founded in 1929 by George Macy, the L.E.C. brought together leading artists, illustrators, book designers, and typographers to produce beautiful editions of classic works of literature, which were then distributed to club members on a subscription basis. Only about 1,500 copies of each title was published, and they were usually signed by their author, illustrator, or both. While many of their titles have fallen out of fashion today, some are still highly collectible; James Joyce's Ulysses, with art by Henri Matisse (who hadn't read a word of the book and instead illustrated six scenes from Homer's Odyssey), and Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland signed by Alice Hargreaves, the “original” Alice for whom the book was written. Speaking of subscription-based media, we would encourage you to subscribe to the Brattlecast if you haven't already, and to share so that your friends can join the club!

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts
Hangin' with the Boys: Homer Bully

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 45:05


Nate is not having any of your negativity today. But will the Cowboys be able to match the 49ers' physicality? Plus, the window is open right now for this team, but for how long? Could it close as soon as next year? And how will practices ramp up this week? It's time to talk playoffs!

Hangin' With The 'Boys
Hangin' with the Boys: Homer Bully

Hangin' With The 'Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 45:05


Nate is not having any of your negativity today. But will the Cowboys be able to match the 49ers' physicality? Plus, the window is open right now for this team, but for how long? Could it close as soon as next year? And how will practices ramp up this week? It's time to talk playoffs!

The Art of Manliness
The Code of the Warrior

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 59:23


Editor's Note: This is a rebroadcast. It originally aired July 2020.War is a violent and bloody business, but it's rarely a no-holds barred free-for-all. Instead, codes of conduct that determine what is and isn't honorable behavior on the battlefield have existed since ancient times.My guest today explored these various codes in a book she wrote during the decade she spent teaching at the United States Naval Academy. Her name is Shannon French, she's a professor of ethics and philosophy, and her book is The Code of the Warrior: Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present. Shannon and I begin our conversation with the pointed questions she used to pose to the cadets she taught as to how being a warrior was different than being a killer or murderer, and when killing is and isn't ethical. She then explains how the warrior codes which developed all around the world arose organically from warriors themselves for their own protection, and how these codes are more about identity than rules. Shannon and I then take a tour of warrior codes across time and culture, starting with the code in Homer's Iliad, and then moving into the strengths and weaknesses of the Stoic philosophy which undergirded the code of the Romans. From there we unpack the code of the medieval knights of Arthurian legend, what American Indians can teach soldiers about the need to make clear transitions between the homefront and the warfront, and how the Bushido code of the samurais sought to balance the influence of four different religions. We end our conversation with the role warrior codes play today in an age of increasingly technologized combat. If reading this in an email, click the title of the post to listen to the show.Resources Related to the PodcastWhy You Need a Philosophical Survival KitThe Warrior's ManifestoThe Way of the Monastic WarriorThe Way of the Stoic WarriorThe Warrior EthosThe Warrior ArchetypeAoM series of Sioux guidesAristotle's Wisdom on Living the Good LifeHector and Achilles: Two Paths to ManlinessWhat Homer's Odyssey Can Teach Us TodayHow Soldiers Die in BattleWhat Plato's Republic Has to Say About Being a ManHow to Think Like a Roman EmperorThe Fall of the Roman RepublicLessons From the Roman Art of WarThoughts of a Philosophical Fighter PilotLe Morte DarthurAchilles in VietnamThe Bushido CodeEverything You Know About Ninjas is WrongConnect With Shannon Shannon on Twitter 

How To Love Lit Podcast
Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 1 - Greek Gods, Greek Heroes And One of The Oldest Epic Poems Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 55:30


Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 1 - Greek Gods, Greek Heroes And One of The Oldest Epic Poems Of All Time!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This week we embark on a seafaring adventure across the seas and through time to the ancient world of the Greeks to meet  someone who some have said is the greatest poet to have ever lived- Homer- and his second epic- The Odyssey.      To be honest, I think I agree with that assessment.      That's high praise. How does one get to that level?    I know.  It really is.  I guess, one way of looking at it may be attrition- how many poets do we still read from 3000 years ago.  That's not a large club.   We certainly don't have anyone in the English language canon that is competitive, but it's more than Homer basically invented the coming of age novel with the Telemachaie; he invented the flawed hero, as I choose to understand Odysseus.  In many ways, his epics, although they are poems, are pre-runners to modern day novels.   They are pre-cursors to fantasy.  Heck, even the success of the Marvel movies to me suggest a thinly veiled nod to Homer.  What is Superman or Wonder Woman if not demi-gods?    Well, if I may weigh in, although I don't feel even remotely qualified to suggest someone is the greatest poet to have ever lived, but what impresses me the most is the level of psychological and archetypal insights into the nature of man that crosses through culture.  Of course, I've heard of a lot of the characters and several of the stories, but I was impressed by how relatable Odysseus is.  And although so many of his adventures at sea are fantastical- they feel like hyperbolic expressions of what I go through- For example, what is Scylla and Charybdis if not being caught between a rock and a hard place?  Another thing that fascinates me is the order he wrote them in- at least the order as we think them- the first one, The Iliad, and then some years later, as an older man, The Odyssey.  That's also psychologically interesting- The Iliad has its version of a hero- Achilles is idealistic, proud in large and obvious way, self-righteous, vindictive even.         It's young man's idea of heroism versus The Odyssey and its version of heroism- a much more nuanced.  He also gets revenge, but it's slow and not very reactionary- he plots, he lies, he bides his time- things we learn by life beating the hound out of us.      I think that is well said.  Studying Homer for me is also very intimidating historically.  There is so much history and culture- beyond just the language differences just between my world and Homer's- 2600 years- give or take.  The language is different.  The culture is different. The geography and the religion are literally worlds and worlds away, and I'm not very confident I can understand the context.  And if that weren't scary enough, when you realize that Homer may have been describing events that may have preceded him by perhaps another 400- 1000 years or so, depending on who you believe- I just get lost in the math.  I might as well be saying, “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…”.   It's foreign and mysterious.  Lizzy asked me today as I was sitting on my computer reading some research on the Mycenaens what book I was working on and I said, “Research for ‘Homer's The Odyssey'” – to which she replied, “Sounds boring.”  And Lizzy listens to our podcasts!!  But on the screen of my computer were broken pieces of pottery and archeological data, not super-man and wonderwoman.    Ha!  Well, if you can't guilt-trip your family members into listening to you, even if you are boring, what hope do you have?  But, I totally understand where she's coming from, over the years, I've taught a lot of history from US to Europe to World, and the Ancient World, and I love it.  I will admit, though, even though a lot can be fascinating with the ancients, there's no doubt the farther back in time you go, it can be very difficult to conceptualize.  It is also a lot more guesswork.  Ancient Greece feels far away because it IS far away, and often we don't know what we're looking at when we see it. I hate to keep coming back to the arrogance of the present, but we really have to guard against looking at ancient peoples as primitive thinkers just because their technologies were not advanced.  I mean, honestly, which of us could survive one week on an island?  I think Survivor has proven that that's not happening.    Ha!  Those people always lose so much weight! Survivor also proves that the most cunning and deceptive you are- Odysseus style, the more likely you are to survive, but getting back to the historical side of it.  Did the Trojan war really happen?  And if it did, what was it?      That's a great question.  For years and years, even centuries- the greatest minds said no.  If Troy existed, we would know it.  And just for context, in case you are unfamiliar with the story, the story goes that there was a woman, today we call her Helen of Troy, but she wasn't Trojan, she was Greek, and she ran away with a young lover- named Paris- to a city called Troy across the ocean.  Her sister's husband, King Agamemnon, launched 1000 ships and all the Greek kings and heroes to get her back for her husband Menelaus.   The war to get Helen back took ten years before the Greeks were finally able to penetrate the wall, theoretically using a gigantic horse and a gimmick devised by Odysseus.  The story goes that Odysseus and a few others hid inside this gigantic horse.  Everyone else hid and pretended to return to Greece.  They left the horse there claiming that it was a gift to the god, Poseidon.  The Trojans brought the horse inside the gate, Odesseus came out, unlocked the gate and the Greeks sacked the city.    For forever, no one thought this place even existed with any real certainty.  We couldn't find it.   Until an outrageous and bombastic but exceedingly wealthy amateur self-proclaimed archeologist by the name of Heinrich Schliemann set out to find it in the 1860s and actually did.      Outrageous and bombastic sounds kind of like code for a schmuck?    Well, he did have a few personal issues as well as professional ones.  For one thing, he wasn't trained in archeology, so he just went around blasting everything he saw – to the point that- Historian Kenneth Harl has said that Schliemann's excavations did to Troy what the Greeks couldn't do, destroy and level the city walls to the ground.    Oh no, that's terrible.       Well, it really is and he destroyed a lot of history.  He wanted so badly to get to the jewels belonging to Helen of Troy that he actually blasted through the actual walls of the city.  But, that being said, there is something to the fact, that he actually found the walls of the city and was something no one had done before him.  He found tons of gold and all kinds of very important things- he claimed his loot belonged to people like King Priam and Agamemnon including a very important solid gold.  One of the most famous is still called The Mask of Agamennon.  This, of course, has mostly been debunked by actual archeologists who know how to properly date archeological finds, but that being said, he found stuff that is real and validated many of the events referenced by Homer, albeit in myth form.   And if you ever  have the opportunity to visit Athens, you can see the mask of Agamennon in the National Archeological Museum.  Anyway, The best historical sources we have suggest that the Trojan war actually happened and took place around 1183 BC.  Not everyone is willing to say it lasted ten years or that was fought on the scale the Homer describes with thousands of ships, but we now believe it did happen.    Well, we are less likely to believe it was sparked by petty gods and goddesses and fought by demi-gods fathered by goddesses who dip their children in magical rivers that make them mostly immortal.  But I will say, I wish they would find a mask of Helen.  I would love to see what the uncontested most beautiful woman in human history, daughter of Zeus.      True, Christy, there is so much I don't know about all the myths of the gods and goddesses, and before I started researching for this podcast seris, honestly, I thought the story of the Illiad was the story of the Greeks sacking Troy.  I have to admit I got my information from the movie Brad Pitt made called Troy.  There are so many gods and goddesses and furies and nymphs and creatures and shapeshifters.  It's overwhelming.      True, the Illiad ends with the death and funeral of the Trojan hero, Hector,  and his father very sadly begging for his body and returning it home- not the sack of Troy.  In other words, the Greeks haven't won.  That's a story you get from other places.  The Odyssey references the Trojan horse when Telemachus goes to visit his father's old war buddies, but there is not a Homeric version of the Brad Pitt movie.  I was disappointed to find that out myself.     Speaking of things that have proven disappointing about Homer, One of those things is that we don't know him or even if there IS a him.    I know this is controversial and not universally accepted, but I will say from the get-go, that I am of the persuasion that Homer was an actual person who actually composed both pieces.  Although I'm sure there was a collection of traditional myths, like we saw with the Iroquois confederacy that were passed down orally from generation to generation, I believe that there was a man named Homer who drew from the myths kind of like Shakespeare did in our English tradition from popular stories he knew people recognized, and he composed his own pieces- one being the Iliad- where he doesn't retell the entire story of the war, but focuses on one hero and one aspect of it- and the other being the Odyssey- where he again focuses on one person.  Obviously I'm not an archeologist or a university professor with a degree in classical studies and I'm not prepared or qualified to argue with anyone who is.  But, I've read enough from those who are to convince me of that.    Do we know anything about Homer at all, assuming as you do, that he existed?    Not really- to be honest.  Most traditions claim that he was blind, although I can't find any real compelling reason for that belief except there's a blind poet named Demodacus in the Odyssey that sings at the court of the Phaeacian king- which I wouldn't think means anything at all, except that the ancients themselves took it for something- so if they believed it, maybe it was so.  Oh, This is interesting, there is one tradition that believes Homer was a woman- based in large part to the prominence Homer gives women in the text- that's my favorite theory, but a minority view for sure.  No ancient scholars were making that claim.  Tradition, and by tradition, we're talking about a couple thousand of years- so that's a long time for a tradition to develop- but traditional views consider him to have been  a male bard, or what today we call a professional singer/songwriter.  No one really knows where he's from.  Although, at least seven different places claim him; the most convincing arguments, at least for me, suggest he came from islands that are actually closer to Turkey then mainland Greece- more specifically the island Chios which is in the Aegean sea but close to Smyrna, modern day Izmir.  But maybe he came from Ios or Cyme.        If you are not all that well acquainted with the geography of the Mediterranean Sea or the Aegean ocean, I'll try to create a mini-map in your mind's eye.  Think of the big Mediterranean sea being a like a giant lake, and mainland Greece jets kind of halfway between Turkey and Italy with all of these scattered islands everywhere that go with it.  So, the part of the water that is between Greece and Turkey we call the Aegean Sea.  I don't want to oversimplify to people who know their maps, but, I've learned over the last couple of years, it's harder for those of us who use GPS  all the time to see the world in terms of maps, the way we old-schoolers used to have to do all the time- no disrespect. I definitely love my GPS over a paper map- but there's the trade-off.   I guess a good linked-in question might be, do we need maps anymore?      Anyway, Ancient Troy or modern day Hissarlik is on the north side of this inlet.  If you go down about 120 towards the Mediterranean you run into Chios and Smyrna.  Both of these places are about 158 miles across the ocean from Athens.  So, today, by modern standards they don't take long to get from one to the other, but obviously if you make the gods make, like Odysseus did, it can take up to 10 years.  But, Garry, beyond the geography of Greece being so different from other parts of the world because it's so based around a culture of the sea, I have trouble understanding the different periods- the Bronze Age, the Iron Age, all that stuff.  Can you give us a two minute crash course?    Sure, well we usually call what you're talking about this age of the early Greek glory years where they built the big palaces with the gigantic walls with the gods and heroes that were larger than life- the Mycenaean civilization- and the dates for that, generally speaking, are between 1650-1200 BC.  We really don't think of the Myceans as having a writing system like we think of today-  they likely had some ways of using script perhaps to mark things for business, but the culture and stories were passed down by an oral tradition.  The most important city-states, at least this is what we think today, were some of the ones we see in the Odyssey for example Mycenae was home to the legendary King Agamemnon and Pylos was the home of King Nestor.  All of these city states worshiped the same gods and spoke the same language, but politically, they had different kings.  Kings had to be strong.  Piracy was a way of life and not even considered immoral.  We think today that these people were highly aggressive and warlike amongst themselves as well as against outsiders.  They also made their armor out of Bronze- hence the Bronze Age.  So, back to the Iliad, Helen, the most beautiful woman in the world, was the queen of Sparta.  If we referring back to your little mental map- Sparta, Mycenae and Pylos are on the other side of mainland Greece- the side closer to Italy.  The ruins from those cities show big walls and lots of wealth. Sparta is about 300 or so miles across the sea, pass the mainland and into the Aegean Ocean.  This would have been the warpath to Troy but honestly, we really don't know what happened and that is not even just about this particular war.  We don't know for sure what happened to any of these towns.  What we do know is something devastasted all of these beautiful city states.  They were burned to the ground and whatever happened caused this area to fall into a period called the Dark Age- because we know nothing about it.  Almost the only thing we really know is that during the Dark Age, there was a transition from Bronze weapons to the much stronger Iron ones.    The big changes and the big cultural movement that shaped the world- at least the Western world- like we think of today comes out of the next period- the one following the Dark Age. We call this one the Archaic period which we consider to be from 800-500BC.  This era as well as the next are where we get things we're familiar with like the Olympics, the new sophisticated writing system- the Greek alphabet- democracy- like we associate with Athens.  And to make things even more confusing, the big Greek guys that we think of- like Plato and Aristotle and the “Golden Age” do not coincide with Homer- they come much later.  So, it's a lot of history- for us on the American continent who are mostly immigrants from other parts of the world- be it Europe, Africa or Asia, it's more than we can really even conceptualize- our entire nation as we understand it as a nation is less than 250 years old.  If we add what we know of the Indigenous people like the Iroquois confederacy into our timeline -we still fall short by thousands of years- Dekcadeakoah wasn't born til 1200 AD, at least that's our best guess.  So- there's your historical context in the two minute nutshell.  Does that work?    Well of course, so- to summarize even more Homer, a man who comes this Archaic period 8th century BC,  was writing about people who claimed lived during the Mycenaean civilization a full 400 before his life time- so if we want to give Odysseus, the man, an age- he's like 3000 plus years old-  Like I said before- for me it is basically “A long time ago in an galaxy far far away”...and yet…it's not… I want to start out by reading the first page of Fagle's translation- and then let's jump into the story itself- because for me-and I mean to disrespect to history- you know I love history- but I think you will agree with me- that it's not the history of this story that has kept it around for 3000 years.  It's not the religion; it's not the culture.  Homer writes the story of our lives- all of our lives- and we keep coming back to it generation after generation for that reason.      Read page 77    Okay- Christy- I think there's one more thing I think we need to clarify- there are so many translations.  Does it matter?    Well, I think the answer to that is the same if you ask that question about translations of the Bible- whichever you like personally-- which I may add- if you want to compare when Odysseus lived with Biblical characters, Moses arguably lived about 200 years before Odysseus-my best guess from my looking at the most respected timelines for each of these guys – but I stand to be corrected -if you have an article that parallels the two histories, I'd love to see it- email it over.  The more important point- and in some sense this is true for any text- but it is especially true for ancient texts- it's not the nuance of the language that matters really at all.  It's the essence of the ideas of the stories- the universal truths.  Most of the millions who read these stories every year can't read the original Greek. And although those that can really talk about the beauty of  all that- that part is lost on us.   It's not the translation that is going to make or break the story.  The Rouse translation, which, by the way, is the one we used when I taught this text to freshmen in Wynne Arkansas, was the first one I knew and the only one I knew for a really long time.  I really like it because I know it.  But, the knock on it is that it's prose and the Odyssey was not written in prose.  It's by far one of the lesser respected ones today. A lot of people today prefer Robert Fagle's translation because his book is really easy to read but he tries to make it sound like poetry.     Well, for the record, I am using Rouse's translation. I picked up Fagles, but I ended up preferring Rouse's because I wanted to read the story in prose instead of verse, for me that's easier.  But just so I know, Christy, assuming we were Greek and could understand this as it was originally composed what would it be like.    Good question- not that anyone knows for sure- but the general understanding is that it was written in meter- dactylic hexameter to be exact.  DAH -duh-duh- One accented syllable with two unaccented syllables in a row and then each line would have six of these.  Now, this is just me, but I really compare these ancient bards to modern day rap artists.  The Bards that would go around singing these stories- would improvise- but would use the beat to kind of keep them on course- obviously it didn't sound like rap, but it's the same skill that we see rap artists do when they improvise and you wonder- how can they think of all those rhymes?  Well, the trick is to already have little phrases in your mind that you know will make your lines work.  In the case of the Greek bards, they would have these epithets, or phrases they would use to describe the names of different gods- these lines that keep repeating throughout- would help them keep up with the demands of the meter.  So what does that mean- that means when you hear them say, as we will “Bright-eyed Athena”- he's adding syllables to make the meter work.  If that makes sense.      So, the descriptions don't necessarily mean that her eyes are the most important thing about her- it's just to make the music work?     That's it exactly.  The thinking is we aren't supposed to read too much into those kinds of things.  Also, the bards themselves used a very specialized vocabulary which was a mixture of different Greek dialects in order to make it all work.   This is a tangent, but it's kind of interesting, there was a classical linguist named Milman Parry who really wanted to figure out how in the world Homer could memorize so many lines.  You know the Odyssey has over 12,000 lines.  Well, Parry, by studying modern day illiterate singer/songwriters in Bosnia.  He came to believe that Homer didn't memorize anything- he had these patterns, these phrases and names of the gods that he knew rhymed well and fit the pattern and he would just tell the story and improvise the language for every different audience- he'd end the lines with the phrases and patterns that rhymed.  Maybe like professional comedians who do comedy improv in “Who's line is it anyway?”  So, in my mind, a Greek bard is something between a cross between a rap artist and modern day improv comedian.     HA!  Well, there's some creative analogies, but I get it.  Honestly, the idea of improvising makes it cooler than if Homer just wrote a piece of writing and then just read/chanted/sang the same thing over and over again.  As a musician, it reminds me of what Jazz musicians do or even bands in general.  You know, and this is really going to sound nerdy, but every once in a while, I have some buddies that I've known from years ago- we all went to the same church at one time- but many have moved out of Memphis- but we get together about once a year and do something like this. We'll go to a friend's house with our instruments, bring up some good ole' rock and roll music that we like and just improvise.  We all know the songs, but the specific variations, solos- that sort of thing- will be just be stuff that we make up.    Parry thought a Homer show was exactly that- every time he performed The Odyssey it was totally new.  But again, this is all total speculation- no one knows.  It's just too long ago.  So- having said that, back to the question you asked, for most of our purposes none of this stuff really matters- the translation doesn't matter, that Homer may or may not even have been a person, or a male or a person with vision who wrote with letters at all- or that the text itself may not even have been a fixed text or a story with improvised performances- all of those things- all though interesting- are really not the reason we love these stories and teach them in the ninth grade- at least around here.  It's this Homeric universe- this fantastical story- this hyperbolic creation  that has magnified the human experience.  Homer gave us a  new way to conceptualize our world- and a way to feel about the events- both controllable and uncontrollable that plague our lives.  Every once in a while, someone shows up in the world that can produce such a space.  In some ways we could say that Tolkien did this with Middle Earth, that JK Rowling did it, that CS Lewis did it, even George Lucas did it- each of those artists conceptualize entirely new and different universes- and when we spend time in their work- whatever medium we use- can inhabit that universe.  We can understand our world better through their world- it's fantasy.  So, Homer was the first that we know of to do this at the scale in which he did.  This is not to say that there are not legends and stories that predate him- there most certainly are- but they don't exist, that I know of, in this full length single unit form- not like what we have with Homer.  But yet, there is more to it than even that, although that is quite a feat.    Homer defined reality for a large number of people for centuries- maybe even still- and I'm not sure those other writers that I just listed out can say that.  The Greeks for hundreds of years, were able to ground their reality on the backs of the principles, morals, the world view that was laid out in his work- The Illiad and The Odyssey.  It helped people answer basic questions like- how do I conduct myself in the world.        Let's look at those first lines again and go through them-    “Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns driven time and again off course, once he had plundered the hallowed heights of Troy.”    Christy, is Homer telling us his entire story in the first lines.    Yes- of course he is- first of all, I do want to point out that Homer does not take credit for his story.  He is going to say it was given to him from a Muse.  That's interesting and really Jungian- so, I'll let you speak to that since that's your cup of tea-    Ha!  Well, he's basically saying, it's not that he made up the story- but he found the story or the story found him-the Muse is the originator- the idea being that the story existed before him in some larger context- that there is something here greater than he is.    And of course, all religious traditions speak to this reality, but since you referenced Jung, so does psychology.  There is something greater… and that is his starting point.    Exactly, and then he brings up why we love Odysseus- he was a man of twist and turns.  You know James Joyce who wrote that incredibly complicated masterpiece Ulysses was asked why he wrote his masterpiece about Odysseus- Ulysses is the Roman way to say Odysseus- and he famously responded that he was the only complete man in literature.  Odysseus, as we are going to see is a different kind of hero.  In the Iliad which is the book that came first, the Achilles is a demi-god. He's perfect.  He is totally beautiful, totally powerful, totally honest- that is something he took pride in. He never had to lie, he never had to back down- he was bigger and stronger and could overpower anyone.  That's not Odysseus- he was amazing- for sure.  But he wasn't the absolute biggest- he had to rely on lies- he sacked cities but he also got sacked himself- he had twist and turns- and for two reasons- on the one hand, the gods had agendas that had nothing to do with him that affected his world, but also he, himself,  made choices that steered him way off course.      Odysseus is a hero- for sure-   he definitely gets all the women- haha- if you want to look at it that way- but he's the kind of hero- we as mere mortals might aspire to be.  His life didn't turn out the way he wanted it, but he still wins at life- and actually he gets to make choices that allow him to live the kind of life he ultimately figures out he wants for himself.    Exactly- and Homer shows us how to make that happen.  In this Homeric universe that is safely far away- full of monsters and goddesses and magic- we can test drive some of the things we'd like to do if we could.  In this magical place we see consequences for things like running your mouth when maybe you shouldn't. But we can get some good ideas at how to get back when we're being exploited- ways that are smarter than just running our mouth.   Maybe by watching Odysseus we can get ideas about how to correct the course of our personal odyssey, we can figure out success that looks like for ourselves in our mundane realities. At least, that's the idea.    And yet, Christy, it is magical and otherworldly with characters we don't know.  I'll just be honest, as a person who doesn't know a lot about mythology, am I going to get confused the farther into this I read?  So far, so good, but I'll admit I haven't finished the whole thing yet.    Again, back to Homer's brilliance- the answer is NO.  Homer is going to build a pantheon of gods that is manageable and knowable.  And this is brilliant.  Just like other polytheistic faiths there are hundreds of gods in the Greek pantheon- but how do you wrap your brain around 600 or so? Homer is going to reduce it to a few- the Olympians.  He's going to create a hierarchy we can understand and he's going to personalize the gods so that we can know them.  As we read the story, we meet them little by little.  We learn who they are, what they value, how they operate- and of course- how we appease them and stay out of trouble. First and foremost- we meet Zeus- he's the chief, the god of the sky- protector and father of all the other gods and humans.      We're also going to learn an important principle, that will explain a lot about life- both to us and the ancients- there are things that are in the hands of the gods, but there are also things that are in our control.  We can control what we can control but then there are times we can strive hard and still meet disaster.  Sometimes, we have offended the gods; sometimes they just like us- sometimes we are just victims of happenstance.      Yes- exactly- and how do we account for that?  Let's keep reading…    Page 78    So, we met Zeus- he's the god of the sky- now we get to meet Poseidon- he's the god of the sea- he's Zeus' brother, but he is way more unpredictable and volatile- hence the behavior of the sea.  The big three are Zeus, Poseidon and Hades- God of the Sky, God of the Sea and God of the underworld.  We meet all three in the Odyssey- and in some sense, this brings order to a universe.      There are powers out there- things we can't see but that determine our fate- but are also arbiters of justice.  There is also a spiritual battlefield- spirits- invisible forces, however you want to understand the world- energy forces larger than our own humanity can see through our natural senses- there is a story that is larger than our story, but we play a part.   Sometimes we are just a speck in humanity, but other times we are not invisible, even to these larger forces.    Of course, as we think through this, although, not many of us adopt Greek mythology as our spiritual worldview, there is a lot there, that most of the world still accepts as truth- even if you're a monotheist.    Exactly- those are the major big boys- but there are a few others that we're going to meet.  We meet Hermes pretty quickly and we quickly understand his role in the role- he is a messenger.  He's Zeus' son, but not with his wife, Hera.  Zeus is always getting in trouble with his wife because he has fidelity issues.  But Hermes, as we will quickly learn is in charge of messages.        After we meet the men, we will slowly meet some of the important women of Olympus.  The first one here is probably my favorite goddess- Athena, she might be everyone's favorite goddess. She's a virgin, not controlled by a man, ha- but a goddess of both wisdom and war.  She's awesome.    I don't know that she's everybodies- Aphrodite has fans.      Yeah- you're right- but she's a trouble-maker.  Aphrodite makes you like fall madly in love with someone you know is no good for you- or be sexually compelled to do behave improperly.    Some would say that's low impulse control.      Yes- but those would not be the ancient Greeks.  They would say it's Aphrodite's fault- you are listening to her- that was Helen of Troy's problem.  But back to Athena    Athena seems she likes Odysseus.      She DOES!!  And that's how Odysseus wins.  Someone is watching over him and he is sensitive to her leading.  Athena is the goddess of wisdom, and Odysseus is attuned to this sense of wisdom in the universe.  She speaks to him, guides him, and most importantly, Athena enables Odysseus to always keep his cool. Odysseus, we will see, with a few exceptions, is led by wisdom- not by lust,  not by uncontrollable rage- by god-given wisdom.  Seeing people as being visited by outside forces that inspire them one way or the other is not a bad way of understanding why people are the way they are- even if you don't believe in gods and goddesses- which for the record, I don't personally, but this is my understanding of the ancient Greek worldview.  In the Homeric Universe, men and women are led by one god or goddess for the most part- not by a variety of different ones.  We mentioned that Helen of Troy is attune to Aphrodite, the goddess of sexual love- that's who's giving her direction.  But Odysseus is attuned and sensitive to Athena.  Athena takes credit not for Odysseus' strength, although he is strong, not for his ability with a bow and arrow, which we'll see he's pretty good at that too, but she takes credit for his wisdom.  The Odyssey is a story of this collaboration- there are things that we can't control, but there are things we can, and if we control the things we can, the universe, a goddess or someone outside of ourselves can and will intervene on our behalf with grace and kindness.  It's a way to organize our thinking about how the universe works- a very old way of thinking about how the universe works.     Let's quote Zeus here- again from the Fagles translation- as he explains the responsibility of humans- at this point in the story- Poseidon is out of town, so to speak- he's off in Ethiopia receiving offerings by the hundreds.  And with him away, Athena will make her play to save Odysseus' life, but we also see this philosophy of the Greeks explained here in the beginning of how and why things work out the way they do.    Page 78      But now let me read what Athena says back to her father= here she demonstrates the role the gods play in the destinies of man    page 79-       And so we have our narrative hook.  The gods will intervene in the destinies of men.  Calypso has been holding Odysseus hostage.  Hermes is being sent with a message from the gods forcing Calypso to release Odysseus.  At the same time this is happening,  Athena will visit Telemachus' Odysseus' son back in their hometown, Ithaca.  Telemachus was a newborn when Odysseus' left.  He is now 20 years old.  For ten years Odysseus fought in Troy.  Then after angering Poseidon, he spent the next ten years wandering lost at sea.  Telemachus has been left to be raised by his mother and a man named Mentor (guess where got that word).  Anyway, there is trouble in Ithaca which we'll find out about next episode, but more importantly than that, it is time for Telemachus to take his own journey and go out into the world on his own.        The Odyssey can easily be divided into three parts- the first four books are about Telemachus' journey to visit all of his father's war buddies.  The second part is Odysseus wandering around the magical seas, and the third is what he finds when he gets back to Ithaca, how he finds his beautiful and faithful wife and what he sees in his palace estate.  The first part, which we'll tackle. Next episode is about the coming of age from a boy to a man. After that we'll look at what all these seas trials are all about and then finally, we'll discuss some ideas about the famous finale in our finale.    Well, it sounds like we have a plan.  You know, the Iliad is a pretty straight forward narrative- a linear timeline and a kind of tragic ending.  The Odyssey is written in circles.  It's winding with endless setbacks but it has a happy ending.      I think that's exactly the right way to look at it.  They are both charming and enduring books but for different reasons, my book club recently just finished reading the latest take on the Iliad.  Madeline Miller wrote a novel called The Song of Achilles from the perspective of Patroclus that we read and really liked, but it was sad too.   If we ever analyze the Iliad, we'll get into the appeal of that book- it certainly is there- but if we just look at what's appealing the Odyssey – I think the ending is definitely a factor- many of us know what it's like to offend the gods, experience the wrath of Poseidon, maybe even the lures of Aphrodite or Circe – we've also likely been jilted by suitors or friend-enemies- as we call them nowadays- we can live vicariously through this steady under pressure goddess led hero- and maybe be inspired to face down our monsters- maybe we can even do a little listening for Athena and learn to bide our time and wreck havoc on our foes if we need to.  But mostly, we all want that heart-warming reunion after a long absence with our loved-ones and own home- we want to rest in the prophecy that old Greek prophet Tiresias gave Odysseus during his visit to the underworld- that when our time comes death will steal upon us a gentle painless death, far from the seas it comes to take you down, borne down with the years in ripe old age with all your people there in blessed peace around you.”                                      

Wilde & Tausch
10AM: Check The Tag

Wilde & Tausch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 47:14


Davante Adams was asked during his media availability about the report that he may be franchise tagged next season...and he didn't seem too pleased, to say the least. If the Packers do franchise tag their star wide receiver, what could the ramifications be? Also, Homer joins for his weekly appearance.

Four Finger Discount (Simpsons Podcast)
Homer The Heretic (Revisited)

Four Finger Discount (Simpsons Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 64:14


Happy New Year! We've taken a week off, so we thought we'd fill in the time by treating you all to a Patreon-Exclusive review of "Homer the Heretic". This truly is one of the greatest episodes of The Simpsons and it was an absolute blast to go back and revisit it. Don't forget we do these classic revisited episodes every month exclusively on our Patreon channel, so if you're a fan of everything we do, show some support by joining the FFD family and getting some sweet podcasts in return. Available now at patreon.com/fourfingerdiscount

Homer & Tony
3PM: War Of Words

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 41:35


In Hour 2 Homer & Tony give their hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3, Packers reporter Jason Wilde joins the guys with his thoughts on Aaron Rodgers vs. Hub Arkush, a new season of Rainman begins and Homer is trying something different at McDonald's.

Zoomer Radio's Theatre of the Mind
Dream of Death & Homer Accidently Gets Engaged

Zoomer Radio's Theatre of the Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 57:19


The Shadow followed by The Aldrich Family

Pack Attack
Make It or Win It

Pack Attack

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:04


Homer tries to explain his position to Tony that he will be more sad if the Packers don't make the Super Bowl as opposed to making it and not winning it.

Pack Attack
Historically Horrific

Pack Attack

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 4:53


Homer feels the Packers need to make the Super Bowl because if they don't it will be historically horrific and they will be destroyed in the media after three straight successful seasons with not reaching the big game.

Homer & Tony
3PM: The Packers Gotta Make The Super Bowl

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 39:55


In Hour 2 Homer & Tony give their hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3, was the Bucks loss to the Pistons the worst regular season loss in franchise history, Homer confuses Tony with his theory that he would be more disappointed if the Packers didn't make the Super Bowl as opposed to not winning it, Bally Sports Wisconsin Bucks reporter Zora Stephenson stops by to talk all things "Fear The Deer," and Homer tries to defend his position that it would be historically horrific if the Packers didn't make the Super Bowl.

Jason Wilde
Jason Wilde

Jason Wilde

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 15:39


Packers reporter Jason Wilde joins Homer & Tony with the latest from titletown, did he learn anything about Aaron Rodgers during his time on the Manning Cast on Monday Night Football, is the pressure continuing to mount for the Packers as the playoffs loom, do the Packers need to win the Super Bowl to justify the success the team as accomplished the last 3 year and does he agree with Homer that it will he historically horrific if the Packers don't make the Super Bowl.

Homer & Tony
2PM: Worst Loss in Bucks History

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 48:59


In Hour 1 Tony gives an update on his hangover from Monday, Homer feels the Bucks loss to the Pistons was the worst regular season loss in franchise history, the guys discuss the continued strong play of the Badgers Johnny Davis, Packers reporter Jason Wilde joins the show with the latest news from titletown, Homer feels it will be historically horrific if the Packers don't make the Super Bowl and Are You Smarter Than "Pet Insurance Edition."

The Chronicles of Salty
"Homer Sexual"

The Chronicles of Salty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 7:56


Jan 02, 2022

Arnemancy
2022 Forecast with T. Susan Chang and Andrew B. Watt (Part 2)

Arnemancy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 66:19


On the very eve of the New Year, I am joined by my two amazing friends, astrologer Andrew B. Watt and cartomancer T. Susan Chang, for part two of our 2022 Forecast! Join us as we put our divinatory skills to the test. As Andrew interprets astrological charts for each month, Susie draws Tarot cards, and I am there to moderate! Part two of the 2022 Forecast covers the months of July through December. Two special notes for this episode: All of us are offering 20% off divination services through January 5th. To take advantage of this, use code BIGASTRO22 on our respective websites, which you can find in the list of links below. There is a PDF that goes along with this episode! You can get a copy by signing up for the Arnemancy Newsletter! Oh yeah, and Happy New Year!!!! Links Get a Tarot reading from Reverend Erik! Book an astrological consultation with Andrew B. Watt! Get a Tarot reading from T. Susan Chang! T. Susan Chang T. Susan Chang bought her first tarot deck at a Barnes & Noble in New York, where she moonlighted as a reader while working in academic publishing. After leaving the city, she took her practice underground for many years, re-surfacing in 2015 and taking up the systematic study of esoteric correspondences in tarot. Along with deck creator Mel Meleen, Susie hosts the Fortune's Wheelhouse esoteric tarot podcast, which explores imagery and symbolism in the Rider-Waite-Smith and Thoth decks. She is the creator of the Arcana Case® for tarot decks, which can be found on her Etsy page, along with her line of esoteric perfumes. She reads tarot in person at the Inspirit Crystal shop in Northampton, Massachusetts Her online Tarot course, "The Living Tarot," course can be found on her website. She is the author of A Spoonful of Promises (2011), Tarot Correspondences: Ancient Secrets for Everyday Readers (2018), 36 Secrets: A Decanic Journey through the Minor Arcana of the Tarot (2021), and co-author of Tarot Deciphered: Decoding Esoteric Symbolism in Modern Tarot (2021). She collaborates with Jack Grayle on the online course Godsong: 365 Days of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Her interest in tarot is wide-ranging and passionate, and has included: Setting up 78 Spotify playlists for those interested in card-appropriate music memorizing astrological correspondences for the minor arcana while swimming laps writing tarot haiku and spells maintaining a sprawling Card-of-the-Day-tracking database (complete with elemental, astrological, and kabbalistical frequency and percentage pie charts). When not engaged in tarot-adjacent activity, she teaches writing at Smith College, and writes occasionally about food and cookbooks. She lives in western New England with her husband, two children, and a variable number of chickens. Andrew B. Watt Andrew Watt is an astrologer, poet and artist living in western Massachusetts. He works in textiles, wood and words to produce objects for practical magic and mysterious practicality, and seeks the honest wisdom found in the life of an artisan. Main website Patreon account Amazon author page Etsy website Twitter handle Tumblr handle Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/arnemancy Listen on Podcrypt

Wilde & Tausch
11AM: Rorschach Rehash

Wilde & Tausch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 41:00


Jason brings the show back to Aaron Rodgers' comments about his future during this week's appearance on the Pat McAfee Show. Homer is bored by the conversation. Headlines for the Packers game. Woah Ashy. And we finish things up with a tribute to Jeff Dickerson.

Wilde & Tausch
10AM: It's A Friday On A Wednesday!

Wilde & Tausch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 43:17


Jason and Homer talk about the Packers defense during DeWitt Law Firm Q&A Day. They discuss the Packers-Vikings game during their Green & Gold Game Preview and get back on track by following the rules during Sleepers of the Week. We finish off the short week of Wilde & Tausch Trivia.

Wilde & Tausch
9AM: Rorschach Test

Wilde & Tausch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 46:51


Homer's in as today's Cousins Sub! He and Jason react to the passing of John Madden, discussing his impact on the game. Tuesday brought another round of Aaron Rodgers on with Pat McAfee, and he had some interesting comments about his future. Jason explains his intrigue with one particular set of comments and solicits fan reaction.

Arnemancy
2022 Forecast with Andrew B. Watt and T. Susan Chang (Part 1)

Arnemancy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 70:26


The new year is nigh! Once again, I am joined by my two amazing friends, astrologer Andrew B. Watt and cartomancer T. Susan Chang, to attempt to forecast the future. Together, we put our divinatory skills to the test. As Andrew interprets astrological charts for each month, Susie draws Tarot cards, and I am there to moderate! Part one of the 2022 Forecast covers the months of January through June. Two special notes for this episode: All of us are offering 20% off divination services through January 5th. To take advantage of this, use code BIGASTRO22 on our respective websites, which you can find in the list of links below. There is a PDF that goes along with this episode! You can get a copy by signing up for the Arnemancy Newsletter! Links Get a Tarot reading from Reverend Erik! Book an astrological consultation with Andrew B. Watt! Get a Tarot reading from T. Susan Chang! Andrew B. Watt Andrew Watt is an astrologer, poet and artist living in western Massachusetts. He works in textiles, wood and words to produce objects for practical magic and mysterious practicality, and seeks the honest wisdom found in the life of an artisan. Main website Patreon account Amazon author page Etsy website Twitter handle Tumblr handle T. Susan Chang T. Susan Chang bought her first tarot deck at a Barnes & Noble in New York, where she moonlighted as a reader while working in academic publishing. After leaving the city, she took her practice underground for many years, re-surfacing in 2015 and taking up the systematic study of esoteric correspondences in tarot. Along with deck creator Mel Meleen, Susie hosts the Fortune's Wheelhouse esoteric tarot podcast, which explores imagery and symbolism in the Rider-Waite-Smith and Thoth decks. She is the creator of the Arcana Case® for tarot decks, which can be found on her Etsy page, along with her line of esoteric perfumes. She reads tarot in person at the Inspirit Crystal shop in Northampton, Massachusetts Her online Tarot course, "The Living Tarot," course can be found on her website. She is the author of A Spoonful of Promises (2011), Tarot Correspondences: Ancient Secrets for Everyday Readers (2018), 36 Secrets: A Decanic Journey through the Minor Arcana of the Tarot (2021), and co-author of Tarot Deciphered: Decoding Esoteric Symbolism in Modern Tarot (2021). She collaborates with Jack Grayle on the online course Godsong: 365 Days of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Her interest in tarot is wide-ranging and passionate, and has included: Setting up 78 Spotify playlists for those interested in card-appropriate music memorizing astrological correspondences for the minor arcana while swimming laps writing tarot haiku and spells maintaining a sprawling Card-of-the-Day-tracking database (complete with elemental, astrological, and kabbalistical frequency and percentage pie charts). When not engaged in tarot-adjacent activity, she teaches writing at Smith College, and writes occasionally about food and cookbooks. She lives in western New England with her husband, two children, and a variable number of chickens. Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/arnemancy Listen on Podcrypt

Alles Geschichte - History von radioWissen
SCHLIEMANNS VERMÄCHTNIS - Homer

Alles Geschichte - History von radioWissen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 23:28


Wer war Homer? Das ist heute umstrittener denn je. Traditionell gilt er als der Verfasser der ersten literarischen Werke des Abendlands, der Ilias und der Odyssee. Bei genauerem Hinsehen stößt man auf Rätsel. Eines ist aber klar: Homer ist der Urvater beinahe aller nervenaufreibenden Geschichten. Der Archäologe Heinrich Schliemann hatte versucht, diesen Geschichten in der Wirklichkeit einen Ort zu geben. Im Januar 2022 wäre er 200 Jahre alt geworden. (BR 2010)

Alles Geschichte - History von radioWissen
SCHLIEMANNS VERMÄCHTNIS - Rätsel Troja

Alles Geschichte - History von radioWissen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 23:36


Troja - kaum ein anderer Ausgrabungsort weckt so viele Phantasien. Troja ist der Ort des Krieges, den Homer besang, an dem Helden wie Achill und Hektor starben, der Göttinnen und Götter entzweite und der in einem Inferno unterging. Troja ist aber auch der reale Ort, den Heinrich Schliemann ausgrub. Hat der Mythos eine reale Grundlage? Im Januar 2022 wäre Heinrich Schliemann 200 Jahre alt geworden. (BR 2022)

History Extra podcast
History's greatest mysteries: was the Trojan War fact or fiction?

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 28:16


Thanks largely to Homer's Iliad, the Trojan War is one of the most famous events in Greek mythology. But how much – if any – of the legend is actually true? In the latest in our series on history's biggest conundrums, the author and classicist Daisy Dunn revisits the literary and archaeological sources to seek out evidence for the clash between the Greeks and the city of Troy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Talking Simpsons Official Free Feed
Talking Simpsons - Lisa's Substitute With Emily VanDerWerff

Talking Simpsons Official Free Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 127:18


As we cover perhaps Lisa's most celebrated episode, we're joined by the great author/host of the Arden podcast, Emily VanDerWerff! The Simpsons get a new substitute teacher voiced by a pseudonymous Dustin Hoffman, and it exposes the deep pains in Lisa's relationship with Homer. All that plus Bart demands more asbestos in school in this very heartfelt classic episode of TV! Support this podcast and get dozens of bonus episodes by visiting Patreon.com/TalkingSimpsons and becoming a patron! And please follow the official Twitter, @TalkSimpsonsPod!

History of the 90s
Top Ten Favorite Simpson Episodes | 9

History of the 90s

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 22:17


On this episode of History of the 90s host Kathy Kenzora is looking back at some of the best Simpsons episodes from the 1990s. From Who Shot Mr. Burns to Homer at Bat we revisit 10 Simpsons episodes that stand the test of time with help from listeners of the podcast. Contact: Twitter: @1990shistory Facebook: @1990shistory Instagram: @that90spodcast Email: 90s@curiouscast.ca Newsletter: http://historyofthe90s.substack.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Classical Wisdom Speaks
Homer's Thebes... or lack thereof?

Classical Wisdom Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 43:47


Why doesn't Homer mention Thebes? It was a powerful city-state, at one point the most powerful in the Mediterranean... and yet it's conspicuously not prevalent in the great epics. Perhaps its absence speaks volumes... This Classical Wisdom Speaks episode is with Elton Barker and Joel Christensen, joint authors of both Homer's Thebes: Epic Rivalries and the Appropriation of Mythical Pasts as well as Homer: A Beginner's Guide. Elton Barker is Professor of Greek Literature and Culture at the School of Arts & Cultures at the Open University, in Milton Keynes, United Kingdom. He is also the General Secretary at Pelagios Network and Author of “Entering the Agon: Dissent and Authority in Homer, Historiography, and Tragedy”. Joel Christensen is Professor and Chair at the Department of Classical Studies in Brandeis University. In addition to his and Elton's joint books, he is Author of The Many-Minded Man: The "Odyssey," Psychology, and the Therapy of Epic (Myth and Poetics II)We'll discuss women in Archaic Greece, the possibility of a Theban Epic and whether or not Homer stole... or sampled from other traditions. You can purchase Elton and Joel's, book, Homer's Thebes: Epic Rivalries and the Appropriation of Mythical Pasts here: https://chs.harvard.edu/book/barker-elton-and-joel-christensen-homers-thebes/ You can learn more about Classical Wisdom and Classical Wisdom Speaks here: https://classicalwisdom.com/Get your FREE Guide: How to Be Happy: An Ethical Guide to ancient Philosophy here: https://classicalwisdom.com/how-to-be-happy/

Laugh Tracks Legends of Comedy with Randy and Steve

Henry "Homer" Haynes and Kenneth "Jethro" Burns ruled the country comedy world for decades with parody versions of hit songs (paging "Weird Al") and a stage act that showcased their superb musicianship as well as their comedy chops. An early takedown of Johnny Horton's "Battle of New Orleans" called "The Battle of Kookamonga" topped the Billboard charts, won a Grammy award, and remains a favorite on the Dr. Demento radio show. From there, Homer & Jethro went on to variety shows and the nightclub circuit, eventually being inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. As always, find additional cuts in the comments at laughtracksradio.com and thanks for sharing our shows.

The Gametime Guru
Episode 227: Kyle Homer - Men's Volleyball at Idaho Strike

The Gametime Guru

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 39:49


The sport of Men's Volleyball isn't too popular here in the state of Idaho. Granted, worldwide, it's massive! And it's starting to slowly grow in popularity but definitely deserves much more exposure here.  That's why I'm bringing on Kyle Homer, who plays currently for Idaho Strike and he's going to be sharing his story of his Volleyball career with us!  What are the practices like? What are the matches like? What's the atmosphere like? Do you think Volleyball players are soft? Kyle is going to tell you exactly why that's NOT the case!  Kyle will share his story of how Volleyball helped him at a time in his life when he needed it the most. He'll share some of the life lessons he's been able to take from the sport and put into his daily life as well!  This is an interview you absolutely do NOT want to miss! Tap in today and make sure you leave us a review on Apple Podcasts to get this out to more people! Facebook: The Gametime Guru Twitter: @thegametimeguru Instagram: @gametimeguru TikTok: @thegametimeguru   

Four Finger Discount (Simpsons Podcast)
Dude, Where‘s My Ranch? (S14E18)

Four Finger Discount (Simpsons Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 60:51


The Simpsons take a trip to a Dude Ranch to escape the hype of Homer's new "hate song" about Flanders. Starring David Byrne and Jonathan Taylor Thomas. SUPPORT THE SHOW FOR EXCLUSIVE CONTENT at patreon.com/fourfingerdiscount

Talking Simpsons Official Free Feed
Talking Simpsons - Brush With Greatness With Alex Navarro

Talking Simpsons Official Free Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 145:46


Once more we've got Alex Navarro from Nextlander returning, and he's here to give us insight as a person who plays drums AND worked on The Beatles: Rock Band! As Marge rediscovers her artistic talent, Homer wants to lose weight, and somehow Ringo Starr solves all of their problems. So join us for discussions on water parks, weight loss, artistic talents, drumming ability, the word "genitalia" and so much more! Support this podcast and get dozens of bonus episodes by visiting Patreon.com/TalkingSimpsons and becoming a patron! And please follow the official Twitter, @TalkSimpsonsPod!