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19Stories
19Stories:Episode 33 Cheryl Holling SPL! Recap

19Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 8:19


From Santa Rosa, CA, this is 19 Stories, I'm Cheryl Holling For those of you who may be joining me for the first time, 19Stories is about women and men from all walks of life doing the extraordinary in their everyday. Their will to live, press-on & press-through their personal fears and move into a future filled with hope. So Hello and welcome to a brief recap of the She Podcasts Live! Conference that I attended last week in Scottsdale AZ For those of you who do not podcast you may be wondering why I would do a recap on an industry event that may not apply to your lives or business.  Well for one, it was the first time in almost two years that I had engaged with really anyone outside of a very small circle and certainly on the scale that I did last week. Given the pandemic you may have been living a similar existence and with more people getting vaxed and life beginning to open up once again, god-willing for real this time, you may be looking to enlarge your circle and engage with more people as well. I have to say that getting on a plane, being in closed quarters and that close to a couple of hundred people just to get to my destination, raised some fear and anxiety for me and I actually had a bit of a panic attack.  So much so that when my cousin picked me up at the airport in Phoenix, I all but walked right past him directly into his car without barely saying hello...thankfully he understood and saw that I was operating out of my normal comfort zone than what I've been used to for the past 20 months and graciously forgave me for what otherwise could be construed as a bit rude. I got to the conference a couple of days early as I had the pleasure of working with She Podcasts for the better part of the past 5 months in putting together their SWAG bags for the event and I was to be working with a team of people, some known and others that became new friends, to coordinate the bags, check-in and registration materials and get settled before the conference began.  I had never been to Scottsdale and to say that the desert during the Fall is magical is an understatement!  To add to the majesty, the property where the conference was held was absolutely gorgeous with pools, walking trails, close to Camelback Mountain and my favorite coffee shop that no longer exists in Sonoma County within an almost 2 mile walking distance allowing me to get out and walk my almost 4 miles each morning and take in the beauty of the desert at sunrise.  Just Spectacular! Another apprehension about gathering with so many others after only getting to know a fraction of the 400+ women via Zoom, is that it is always different meeting people in person than getting to know them online.  Also, and I'll speak for myself, how do I behave after not really having live, in-person conversations for so long, will we be supportive of one-another, allow that not all of us will be comfortable being fully present right out of the gate? Well, the organizers of She Podcasts LIVE! Handled that with great aplomb by not only having badges that designated if you were an extrovert, introvert, etc...but giving color-coded lanyards that also let others know if you were comfortable with close physical contact such as hugs or did you need your space or something in between.  Systems that prior to the pandemic would seem silly but ones that made perfect sense as we came together after being apart for so long. The beauty of the women I worked with on the event was that we were all sympatico in our personalities, humor, and our mutual desire to serve and to also get the most out of the time we were there.   Given I am still relatively new to podcasting, I went with an open heart and mind to learn all that I could in making my podcast better, how to expand my audience and learn what I could about monetizing it so that I can continue producing content on a weekly basis.  Podcasting, although very rewarding can be really hard and I wanted to meet with like-minded women who've been doing it a lot longer than I have and have learned to be really successful and some very profitable form it. Although I launched my podcast as a passion project,  there are hard-costs associated with podcasts and rather than come out of pocket for those expenses I'd like to be able to cover them. I share that with you so that if you do have an idea or dream of producing your own podcast that you're aware of some of what's involved with doing so. Speaking of which, after almost 4 days of back to back panels, speakers and podcasts representing every genre, age and racial diversity, networking at the parties or a small while out on a walk or sitting by an intimate fire in the courtyard, my major takeaways is: Everyone has a unique voice and story that if you have the desire, drive and passion to tell it then podcasting is a perfect medium to do so. You need partnerships; other people, in this case women, to walk this journey with you, help you in your challenges, hold you accountable and to celebrate your victories. Your brand, if you will, is your own unique personality and voice and thus your podcast, business, fill in the blank is not going to be the same as someone else so for gosh sakes learn from others but stop comparing your progress or success to someone else Find what is and what is not working for you, change what you can and then change your mindset about what you can't Just because you can do it all doesn't mean you should!  This is a big one for me as for now I am a one-person show when it comes to both producing my podcast and pursuing my voiceover work.  Thus one of the reasons that I would like my podcast to be self-sustaining and make a bit of money so that I may actually begin farming out some of the work. And finally, with the following pearl of wisdom courtesy of the Satellite Sisters, “what women do, think and say should not be dismissed by the news of the day”?  Meaning we are more than news bites and what is deemed important on the local news.  OUR VOICE MATTERS And I believe that by being willing to be vulnerable, share our stories, our fears, our bravery and tools to overcome those fears, can we live into the hope of a healthier future. One of the mixed blessings of attending a conference in a beautifully relaxing and inspiring environment, with equally empowering and beautiful people, is coming down the other side of the “contact high” so to speak. My heart and mind are full and grateful and yet sad to not be around the energy and acceptance found in a brief moment of time, camaraderie and connection. It is my desire that by continuing to share people's stories on 19 Stories: from Fear to Hope is that I'm able to present a common thread of hope that will help you for a moment of time as well. I want to share that the very next day upon returning from my immersion into the world of podcasting, that I received notification that my little podcast that could was nominated for a SOVAS Award (aka The Society of Voice Arts and Sciences) for Best Podcast.  To say that I'm honored would be an understatement and I'm so very grateful to all of my guests who have trusted me enough to share their stories.  I look forward to being able to do so for as long as you, my listener, want to hear them. Until the next episode, stay Healthy and Hopeful. If you liked this, or any of the other episodes, make sure you like, review and share.  You can also leave a recorded review via my website at: https://www.soundsatchelstudios.com/19stories-podcast Thank you ; - )

COMPLEXITY
Lauren Klein on Data Feminism (Part 1): Surfacing Invisible Labor

COMPLEXITY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 46:10


When British scientist and novelist C.P. Snow described the sciences and humanities as “two cultures” in 1959, it wasn't a statement of what could or should be, but a lament over the sorry state of western society's fractured intellectual life. Over sixty years later the costs of this fragmentation are even more pronounced and dangerous. But advances in computing now make it possible for historians and engineers to speak in one another's languages, catalyzing novel insights in each other's home domains. And doing so, the academics working at these intersections have illuminated hidden veins in history: the unsung influence and cultural significance of those who didn't write the victors' stories. Their lives and work come into focus when we view them with the aid of analytic tools, which change our understanding of the stories we've inherited and the shape of power in our institutions. One strain of the digital humanities called data feminism helps bring much-needed rigor to textual study at the same time it reintroduces something crucial to a deeper reconciliation of the disciplines: a human “who” and “how” to complement the “what” we have inherited as fact.Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I'm your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we'll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.This week we talk to Emory University researcher Lauren Klein, co-author (with Catherine D'Ignazio) of the MIT Press volume Data Feminism. In Part 1 of a two-part conversation, we discuss how her work leverages the new toolkit of quantitative literary studies and transforms our understanding of historical dynamics — not just in the past, but those in action as we speak…For Part 2 in two weeks, subscribe to Complexity wherever you listen to podcasts — and if you if you value our research and communication efforts, please rate and review us at Apple Podcasts and/or consider making a donation at santafe.edu/give.You can find numerous other ways to engage with us — including job openings and open online courses — at santafe.edu/engage.Thank you for listening!Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano.Follow us on social media:Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedIn Related Reading & Listening:Data Feminism by Catherine D'Ignazio & Lauren Klein“Dimensions of Scale: Invisible Labor, Editorial Work, and the Future of Quantitative Literary Studies” by Lauren KleinOur Twitter thread on Lauren's SFI Seminar (with video link)Cognition all the way down by Michael Levin & Daniel DennettComplexity 34 - Better Scientific Modeling for Ecological & Social JusticeComplexity 42 - Carl Bergstrom and Jevin West on Calling Bullshit: The Art of Skepticism in a Data-Driven WorldComplexity 45 - David Wolpert on the No Free Lunch Theorems and Why They Undermine The Scientific MethodComplexity 64 - Reconstructing Ancient Superhighways with Stefani Crabtree & Devin White Mentions Include:Ruha Benjamin, Joy Buolamwini, Julia Lefkowitz, Ted Underwood, Derrick Spires, David Wolpert, Farita Tasnim, Stefani Crabtree, Devin White, Donna Haraway, Carl Bergstrom, Joe Bak-Coleman, Michael Levin, Dan Dennett

Glass In Session ™ Winecast
S8E4: Let's Absinthe!

Glass In Session ™ Winecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 22:53


Just in time for spooky season we explore a treat of a fine spirit with a tricky past. Absinthe: what it is, how it behaves in the glass, the deal on wormwood, a brief history, and some thujone theory. Please absinthe responsibly, and apologies for the historical nugget on dog flatulence. Resources from this episode: Books: Absinthe: History in a Bottle, Conrad, B. (1988) The Drunken Botanist: The plants that create the world's great drinks. Stewart, A. (2013) The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris, McCullough, D. (2012) Society of Wine Educators: Certified Specialist of Spirits (CSS) Study Guide, Nickles, J. (2020) Academic Journals/Papers: Chemistry Central Journal (5:44): Determination of the biologically active flavour substances thujone and camphor in foods and medicines containing sage (Salvia officinalis L.), Walch, S. Kuballa T., Stühlinger, W., Lachenmeier, D., (21 July 2011) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3155476/ Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (97(8)): α-Thujone (the active component of absinthe): γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptor modulation and metabolic detoxification, Höld, K., Sirisoma, N., Ikeda, T., Narahashi, T., Casida, J., (11 April 2000), pp. 3826 - 3831, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC18101/ Websites: Cocktail Safe: Wormwood and thujone safety information for cocktails https://www.cocktailsafe.org/wormwood-and-thujone.html The Spirits Business: The 10 most famous absinthe drinkers, Hopkins, A. (2014) https://www.thespiritsbusiness.com/2014/08/the-10-most-famous-absinthe-drinkers/ The Nachtkabarett: Mansinthe, Kushner, N. http://www.nachtkabarett.com/mansinthe Wormwood Society: Absinthe Original D- Don't believe the hype, Robinson, B., (24 November 2009) https://wormwoodsociety.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=665&catid=16&Itemid=233 Podcasts: Glass in Session® Winecast: S1E2: Aperitif Wines (2019) https://glassinsession.libsyn.com/s1e2-aperitif-wines Wine Two Five: Anise Spirits and a Nice (Wine!) Surprise (2018) https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/anise-spirits-and-a-nice-wine-surprise/id986650051?i=1000415280141 Wine Two Five: Boos & Booze: Spooky Wine & Spirits Stories (2015) https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/boos-booze-spooky-wine-spirits-stories/id986650051?i=1000355843969 Glass in Session® is a registered trademark of Vino With Val, LLC. Music: “Write Your Story” by Joystock (Jamendo.com cc_Standard License, Jamendo S.A.)

The Story Collider
Hazards: Stories about encountering danger in the field

The Story Collider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 28:25


Part 1: In his early twenties, Jonathan Feakins goes above and beyond for his job as a West Nile virus mosquito technician Part 2: While working as a coral reef biologist in Panama in 1989, Nancy Knowlton and her young daughter are taken into the custody of the Panamanian military when the U.S. invades. Jonathan Feakins is just some nerd who has tried to spend his life wandering strange places, reading obscure books, doing weird science, petting adorable animals, fighting the good fight, and having wonderful friends. He somehow has a species of earthworm named after him, and once got kicked out of an all-you-can-eat restaurant (for eating all he could eat). He first learned the power of a good story from his grandmother, as she regaled him with tales about her childhood pet crocodile (whose name was Baby), or about the time she (accidentally) cleared out a biker bar with a Swazi bible student named Enoch. You can learn more about his questionable life choices at bookwormcity.com. Nancy Knowlton has been a scientist with the Smithsonian since 1984 and is now a scientist emerita, first in Panama and most recently at the National Museum of Natural History in DC. She's also been a professor at Yale and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where she founded the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation. Her work on coral reefs has taken her literally around the world, and she has spent so much time underwater that she long ago lost count of the hours. She has been a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the author of Citizens of the Sea, and was the Editor-in-Chief of the Ocean Portal website. Despite the glut of bad news these days, you can find her @seacitizens talking about #OceanOptimism and #EarthOptimism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Kentucky Author Forum
Ethan Kross and Maria Konnikova

Kentucky Author Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 44:10


Writer and Professor Ethan Kross discusses his book “Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters and How to Harness It'', with journalist and author Maria Konnikova. Ethan Kross is a best-selling author and award-winning professor in the University of Michigan's Psychology Department and its Ross School of Business. He studies how the conversations people have with themselves impact their health, performance, decisions and relationships. Kross' research has been published in Science, The New England Journal of Medicine, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, among other peer-reviewed journals. He has participated in policy discussion at the White House and has been interviewed on CBS Evening News, Good Morning America, Anderson Cooper Full Circle, and NPR's Morning Edition. Kross' pioneering research has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, Harvard Business Review, USA Today, The Economist, The Atlantic, Forbes, and Time Magazine. Maria Konnikova is the author, most recently of “The Biggest Bluff'', a New York Times bestseller, one of the Times' 100 Notable Books of 2020, and a finalist for The Telegraph Best Sports Writing Award for 2021. She is a regularly contributing writer for The New Yorker and has won numerous awards, including the 2019 Excellence in Science Journalism Award. Konnikova's writing has been featured in The Best American Science and Nature Writing and translated into over twenty languages. She also hosts the podcast “The Grift”. Konnikova's podcasting work earned her a National Magazine Award nomination in 2019.

Shame Piñata
S2E8 Continuing to Make Sense of COVID Time

Shame Piñata

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 16:06


Even with all of the progress we have made through COVID, somehow, time is still a spiral. Join us for a look back at the 1-year anniversary of the lockdown where we explore the concept of time and how it helps us make sense of life.    Links: What Happens When We Lose Our Social Rituals? The Liminal Space – Embracing the Mystery and Power of Transition from What Has Been to What Will Be Music by Terry Hughes Full Transcript   I was listening through the library of Shame Piñata shows recently, and was struck by how little has changed since our discussion of COVID time was released back in March of this year. That was the one year anniversary of when the pandemic really took hold in the US, when the lockdowns started.    Since March, things have opened up a bit more. Kids are back at school. Grocery stores are busier. And at the same time, that sense of liminality, that sense of waiting for the other shoe to drop still feels like it's here with us. So I invite you to join me in reflecting on that one-year out episode. I invite you to dive back in with me, into the spiral of time, into an exploration of what time give us, how it serves us, and what it means to us... all with the goal of finding our own center in the midst of continuing liminality.    Torres: First, I have to say, like, I don't... I know you were putting like the toilet paper tubes in a little area in the bathroom but I wasn't sure why and now you have them out on the table and I'm noticing they have like a... it's like a journal... it's really cool.    This is my husband Rodrigo sitting with me and 47 empty toilet paper rolls.    Torres: ...look, I have a collection of paper rolls with stuff written on them and I'm like...   I used them as a way to mark our progression through the pandemic.    Thomas: Here's the very first one.    Torres: Oh, wow. Yeah, and we're, we're about there. It's almost a year now.   Thomas: Yeah. It was March 18 I think when we went on lockdown.    Torres: Wow.    Thomas: So this is March 30 '20. And then there's a March from '21 there at that end.    Torres: 3/2/21. That was two days ago.   Thomas: So I dated them and I have them arranged them arranged by month so we can see how many we used each month.     Torres: Ok.   After a while of just dating them, I started also writing little journal entries on them.    Thomas: What do you got there?   Torres: Ah, let's see... let me grab one of these. 8/1/20: My podcast is...   Thomas: ...now...   Torres: ...now available on Alexa. And it's written around the tube so it's like, you have to turn the tube around to read it.   Thomas: Right. It's an interactive journal experience.   Torres: Yes. It's a spiral with time.   Time is a spiral - right now and always. And COVID time is a ride all its own. Whatever your experience of time has been in the past year, join me for a look at what time gives us and the benefits of letting go. We'll also explore our own personal connection to space and time so we're not so thrown by the world around us.    This is Shame Piñata. I'm Colleen Thomas. Welcome to Shame Piñata, where we talk about creating rites of passage for real-life transitions.    So how are you doing with time right now? Do you have enough of it? Too much of it? Do you feel lost or are you right on track? Do you know what day of the week it is? How sure are you about that? I've been having a hard time telling which way is up for about a year now, and it's disconcerting and I know I'm not the only one. I've heard several people say in the past year that it's difficult to focus, it's difficult to keep track of what month it is, difficult to gauge the passage of time during the day. Was that 15 minutes? Was that only two weeks ago? COVID has really been messing with our ability to keep track of time, mostly because it's a completely liminal space that's asked us to give up the framework we've used our whole lives.   I found an article on liminality recently from Alan Seale, the Founder & Director of the Center for Transformational Presence. The piece was written in 2016. Seale, who could probably never have imagined how impactful his article would be in the early 2020's tells us that, "The word 'liminal' comes from the Latin root, limen, which means 'threshold.' The liminal space is the 'crossing over' space – a space where you have left something behind, yet you are not yet fully in something else. It's a transition space."    Time is a super interesting thing. We feel secure when we build routines and expectations based on its constant presence. We mark time with concepts like generations, lifetimes, stages of life, annual patterns, weekly schedules, daily routines. Let's take a moment to consider what COVID has done with these concepts. It's become difficult to connect across generations which has kind of separated us from that intergenerational space that's so rich an important. The National Academy of Sciences recently published a study showing that life expectancy in the US went down in 2020 due to the pandemic, so there's a hit to our concept of what constitutes a lifetime. Along with that, the life expectancy reduction for the Black and Latino communities is 3 to 4 times that for the white community. That very statistic threatens to erase any gains we've made in equity on its own. Stages of life and the ways we mark them have also been affected. Graduations, weddings and other gatherings designed to mark the stages of life largely abandoned for almost a year. We're missing those rituals, really missing them. And lastly, as you know, our annual, weekly and daily patterns have completely changed.    This is no small thing. I know you know this, and I just really want to say that whatever you're feeling right now, and whatever happened the last time you maybe suddenly just lost it over something small, you're not imagining things. This is weird. We didn't build our lives to make sense of this. An extended period of liminality with no warning and no psychological preparation is pretty brutal. COVID time to me feels like living inside a jar of sand and water that's being constantly shaken. Kinda like a snow globe, but without the pretty winter scene creating a calming sense of place.    What does time do for us? Or to be clear, what does an organized sense of time do for us? I think it gives us stability and maybe even sanity. At the very least, it provides a lay of the land, a framework, something to base our expectations on. But maybe we need to even be more fine-tuned in discussing this. It's not that time isn't flowing normally right now, right? Two weeks is still two weeks during COVID, but the thing that's weird is it doesn't feel like two weeks. I thought that I would get used to the flow of time in COVID and eventually it wouldn't be so disorienting, but that actually hasn't happened. I think that's because we're still in the liminal, threshold space, and the big question "When will this be over?" still can't be answered. So there has to be some benefit from this weird time we're in, some way we can grow from it. We'll be right back.    [MUSIC]   Thank you for spending a few minutes of your day with us! If you enjoy listening to Shame Piñata, you can support the show by sharing with a friend or co-worker. We're into our 2nd season now (yay!) so all of our first season episodes are available on your favorite player and there might be one there that would really call to someone you know. And thanks!   One thing we can definitely do is practice disconnecting from our attachments and embracing the feel of flow. We might realize we're already doing this multiple times a day once we start paying attention. We can also use this time to reframe our view of the world and how we show up in it. We can fight for making a better world, a more equitable world. I have a quote on my desk that I look at every morning from writer Roxane Gay, something she said a year ago when the pandemic started, "The rest of the world yearns to get back to normal. For Black people, normal is the very thing from which we yearn to be free." And this is a chance for all of us to change the way we live, who we connect with, what kind of media we consume, and whose words we surround ourselves with. We are being offered the chance to see things from a different angle.    And as Alan Seale says, "Herein lies the power and the gift of the liminal space. The liminal space shakes us out of our habitual lives. It draws us out of what we have known, yet does not allow us to know what is coming next, or when. It's the chrysalis stage for the caterpillar."   So how do we keep track of time within liminality? Here are a few ideas. First, routine events can help: A daily walk, a weekly lunch, a monthly treat. These are things our subconscious mind can begin to rely on for comfort and stability. And they can even weave in some connection if we want that. There's number two, regular social connections. I've been lucky enough to be part of a family that's held weekly Zoom calls for almost a year now. Before COVID, visits were few and far between, but we just celebrated our 50th call last week. (I know because my uncle keeps track and he held up a big 5-0 sign as we began the call).    If you don't have regular social connections in your life right now, consider looking online at the activities and groups you find interesting. So many things have moved online right now. It's possible to attend workshops and ceremonies on the other side of the world. And if you can't handle any more screen time, consider events that might allow you to call in rather than connect online and maybe take a walk while you listen.    Third, nature is still happening! The Earth still turns every 24 hours, bringing the steady rhythm of sunrises and sunsets which can be very potent times to observe the majesty of life on our planet. And the moon still pulls on the waters in our bodies just as much as she pulls on the waters of the Earth. You can mark the month by her changing light and if you choose to honor the new moon or the full moon, know that there is a very rich history in that tradition. And of course there are the many sabbats around the wheel of the year as celebrated by the earth-based religions throughout time. Here in the northern hemisphere we're coming up to Spring Equinox later this month which will of course be the Autumnal Equinox in the southern hemisphere. And that brings us to the mid point between emptiness and fullness, a moment of balance. And balance brings us to ritual.    [MUSIC]   We can create rituals to mark the significant moment in our lives. As social psychologist Shira Gabriel says, "Rituals mark the passage of time as sacred." We can also use ceremony to center ourselves when things are topsy-turvy. Here's a simple ritual sketch we might use to find ourselves even within the flow of COVID time.   So first we might create an intentional space by finding a still corner of the house or maybe taking a walk to find a quiet space in nature. Then we might take a few deep breaths and really feel into the body. What does it feel like to be sitting on this thing? What is the feeling of the air on my skin? How many sounds can I hear?   Next we might get in touch with any spiritual guides, Goddesses, Gods or entities we work with or connect to the numinous however we experience it with gratitude and humility. Connected to this greater force, we might notice that our breathing has softened a bit and that we feel just a little bit calmer.    We might then bring our focus to the wide field of time, seeing ourselves in the very center of it, complete and whole, grounded and calm. Noticing how it moves in spirals, how it dances around us and holds great complexity. And yet at the center of it, we are focused and deeply connected with our own self, our own presence. Sound healer Aleya Dao talks about the golden river of light that flows at our core. We might connect to that pure essence of self as we watch time go by like a movie.    We might begin to sense the many ways that our core essence transcends time, transcends the grids our mind creates to make sense of it. We might come up on a younger version of ourselves and feel moved to share something we've learned with them. We might seek out an older version of ourselves and ask for some wisdom to make this COVID time easier.    Mostly, we can rest in the deep knowing that all time is now and all space is here. This ceremonial experience of time transcends the limits we've known before, and allows us to heal in new ways. When we're ready, we can return to the space we're in, take a few deep breaths and maybe move our body around a little to come back to waking consciousness. And we might want to write down a thing or two of what we experienced in the open field of time.    So how are you keeping track of time right now? What's working for you? Drop us a note on the shamepinata.com website and we will share your tips in an upcoming show.    Our music is by Terry Hughes. You can follow us on IG and Twitter at shamepinata. You can support the show by subscribing on Radio Public, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.   I'm Colleen Thomas. Thanks for listening.

The Classic Tales Podcast
Ep. 755, The Knight of the Necropolis, Part 3 of 8, by Sax Rohmer

The Classic Tales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:23


Why do ghouls and other creatures of the night haunt the remnants of the house of Dhoon?  Sax Rohmer, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn't do this without you, and we really appreciate your support. We've set it up so that for a five-dollar monthly donation, you get a monthly code for $8 off any audiobook order. Give more, and you get more! It actually takes quite a bit to make this show every week, and I really appreciate all the help I can get. The content curation, the direction, editing, marketing, artwork, and of course, the narrating, that's all me. I also have to hire out some of the work, as well, so every little bit helps. Go to http://classictalesaudiobooks.com today, and become a financial supporter. You'll be glad you did. Thank you so much. And if you can't support us financially right now, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts, so more folks can find us. Go now to http://classictalesaudiobooks.com and become a financial supporter today. 813, the fourth novel in the Arsène Lupin series is also now available! Head on over to classictalesaudiobooks.com and pick up this fantastic adventure! And if you'd like to save 2 dollars when you get 813, simply enter the coupon code: podcast. No subscription, no additional purchase necessary, just enter the word podcast, and save 2 bucks. This is the last week for this promotion.  The Society of Voice Arts and Sciences has nominated Scaramouche as a finalist for a SOVAS award! We are going up against a few icons in the narration industry whom I've actually paid for training! It's about as prestigious as they come. I'm shocked and honored to be a nominee for this very special award. And now, The Knight of the Necropolis, Part 3 of 8, by Sax Rohmer. Tap here to purchase 813, Arsène Lupin Vol. 4, by Maurice Leblanc!   Tap here to go to www.classictalesaudiobooks.com and become a financial supporter!   Tap here to go to our merchandise store!   Tap here to visit our YouTube Channel:  

The Mind Over Finger Podcast
110 Kim Kashkashian: Expressive Artistry

The Mind Over Finger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 44:58


I have admired today's guest for a very long time! Kim Kashkashian is an internationally recognized and decorated violist who has worked tirelessly to broaden the range of technique, advocacy, and repertoire for the viola. Our conversation is absolutely filled with information and inspiration, including: Her musical journey and how her artistic path has unfolded, focusing heavily on conquering her fears and belief in chance (3:24) Why pursuing an objective view is essential to your growth (9:48) How Kim defines mindful practice... (11:26)  ...and how focusing on the entire production of your sound (including resonance, energy, and what you send out) maximizes your practice (12:51) Kim's suggestions to exercise expressive playing, including knowing exactly what a piece means to you by personifying the music (and letting how you transmit that message to an audience come second) (15:36) How the difference between intention and desire relates to the tension in performance (22:56) The distinction between being judgmental and making good differentiation, and the impact of each (29:55) Kim's advice to current music students on broadening your perspective, learning the language of music (separate from the craft of playing your instrument), and knowing the historical context of pieces (33:36) The doubt and resistance Kim has faced on her own journey (36:38) The importance of listening to yourself with love, knowing yourself and what you want to say, and knowing how to say it (37:50)   MORE ON KIM KASHKASHIAN: YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=kim+kashkashian+viola Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100063660876526   Kim Kashkashian, internationally recognized as a unique voice on the viola, was born of Armenian parents in Michigan. She studied the viola with Karen Tuttle and legendary violist Walter Trampler at the Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore. Since fall 2000 she has taught viola and chamber music at New England Conservatory. Following Grammy Award nominations for several previous recordings, Kashkashian received a 2012 Grammy Award in the "Best Classical Instrumental Solo" category for Kurtág and Ligeti: Music for Viola, on the ECM Records label. Kashkashian's recording, with Robert Levin, of the Brahms Sonatas won the Edison Prize in 1999. Her June 2000 recording of concertos by Bartók, Eötvös and Kurtág won the 2001 Cannes Classical Award for a premiere recording by soloist with orchestra. In 2016, Kashkashian was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Kashkashian has worked tirelessly to broaden the range of technique, advocacy, and repertoire for the viola. A staunch proponent of contemporary music, she has developed creative relationships with György Kurtág, Krzysztof Penderecki, Alfred Schnittke, Giya Kancheli, and Arvo Pärt, and commissioned works from Peter Eötvös, Ken Ueno, Thomas Larcher, Lera Auerbach, and Tigran Mansurian. Marlboro and the Viennese school represented by her mentor, Felix Galimir, were major influences in developing her love of chamber music. Kim Kashkashian is a regular participant at the Verbier, Salzburg, Lockenhaus, Marlboro, and Ravinia festivals. She has long-standing duo partnerships with pianist Robert Levin and percussionist Robyn Schulkowsky, and played in a unique string quartet with Gidon Kremer, Daniel Phillips, and Yo-Yo Ma. As a soloist, she has appeared with the great orchestras of Berlin, London, Vienna, Milan, New York, and Cleveland, and in recital at the Metropolitan Museum of New York, Kaufmann Hall, New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall, as well as in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Frankfurt, Berlin, Paris, Athens, and Tokyo. Kashkashian's musicianship has been well represented on recordings through her association with the prestigious ECM label in a fruitful collaboration that has been continuous since 1985. Kim Kashkashian has taught in Bloomington, Indiana, and in Freiburg and Berlin, Germany, and now resides with her daughter in Boston. Kim is a founding member of Music for Food, an initiative by musicians to fight hunger in their home communities. B.M., Peabody Conservatory of Music; M.M., New School of Music Philadelphia. Viola with Walter Trampler and Karen Tuttle. Former faculty of University of Indiana and conservatories in Freiburg and Berlin, Germany.   LINKS: "Performing and Music Communication" Barbara Hannigan live in Berlin on Sarah´s Horn Hangouts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lFs1C_ewiE     PRACTICING FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: I'm excited to tell you that Practicing for Peak Performance is now available for download! Go to MindOverFinger.com for access to all the tools that will help you transform your practice, gain confidence in your process, and start performing at your best.    With the purchase of PPP, you gain: Access to all recorded content - over 7 hours of instruction Guidance in effective high-performance systems Detailed handouts For a limited time only, a free 30-minute consultation with me. PPP alumnus Karmen Palusoo has this to say about it: “For a long time I have had this belief that learning an instrument is difficult and hard work or that it has to be, and there is no other way. Only a few weeks after PPP, I am starting to feel that change! My everyday practice sessions are now filled with freedom and ease!”   THANK YOU: A HUGE thank you to my fantastic producer, Bella Kelly, who works really hard to make this podcast as pleasant to listen to as possible for you. Most sincere thank you to composer Jim Stephenson who graciously provided the show's musical theme.  Concerto #1 for Trumpet and Chamber Orchestra – Movement 2: Allegro con Brio, performed by Jeffrey Work, trumpet, and the Lake Forest Symphony, conducted by Jim Stephenson. Thank you to pianist-singer-song-writer Louise Kelly for the introduction!  You can find out more about Kelly and her creative work by visiting louisekelly.com.    MIND OVER FINGER: As we head into this new season, I encourage you to visit MindOverFinger.com for a plethora of resources on mindful practice and information on how to work with me. Sign up for my newsletter and receive your free guide to a highly productive mindful practice using a metronome! mindoverfinger.com https://www.facebook.com/mindoverfinger/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/mindoverfinger https://www.instagram.com/mindoverfinger/

Business Matters
WeWork shares jump more than 13 per cent in public markets debut

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 52:20


Shares of the office-leasing company WeWork closed up more than 13.49 per cent on Thursday, after the company went public through a special purpose acquisition. We hear from Peter Eavis of The New York Times, who has been following the ups and downs of the company. A dispute between Brussels and Warsaw threatens to overshadow a summit for EU leaders. A Polish court recently found parts of EU law were incompatible with the country's constitution, and there have been calls from some quarters to withhold EU funds from Poland in response. Anna Wojcik is a researcher at the Polish Academy of Sciences and editor of the Rule of Law publication, and discusses the background to the dispute. The company behind a new cryptocurrency called Worldcoin wants to give away its tokens for free. But in exchange, users have to agree to have their eyes' iris scanned. This is, the website says, to "prove that they are indeed human... and that they have not received their free share of Worldcoin already". But there are already privacy concerns, as we hear from Sam Biddle of The Intercept. Shares in the Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande fell by 11.5% when they resumed trading in Hong Kong today. Sherry Fei Ju is a freelance journalist in Beijing, and brings us the latest developments. The Austrian city of Vienna is known for its collection of art galleries and museums. But some of the exhibits, it seems, are a little too racy for some social media networks. So the tourism board is posting images on the website OnlyFans, the only social network that permits depictions of nudity. We hear from Norbert Kettner of the Vienna Tourist Board. Plus, it's the beginning of India's festival season, and our workplace commentator Sandip Roy considers the challenges of trying to work through the mega festival Durga Puja, when millions are on the streets partying til dawn. All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Paddy Hirsch, a contributing editor at US National Public Radio, in Los Angeles. And writer Rachel Cartland, in Hong Kong. (Picture: A WeWork office building. Credit: Getty Images.)

Sci on the Fly
Beyond Carbon Neutral: Samuel Goodman, Part 2

Sci on the Fly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:31


Dr. Samuel M. Goodman is the author of Beyond Carbon Neutral: How We Fix the Climate Crisis Now, a book about how to reverse climate change. He is a chemical engineer by training who earned a doctorate from the University of Colorado Boulder after undergraduate studies at the University of Wisconsin Madison. Following graduate school, Dr. Goodman completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Academy of Sciences and was an AAAS S&T Policy Fellow at the US Department of Defense. He is currently an international trade analyst with the US International Trade Commission.  Dr. Goodman has always been interested in addressing climate change. And with his recent book Beyond Carbon Neutral, he hopes that he will help to move the climate change conversation forward with a blueprint for action through workable, and necessary, solutions. In the second part of this two-part episode, he talks about the history of the toxic element lead as a public health issue, and the similarities with the problem of climate change. He also discusses how fossil fuel jobs could transition as we become carbon neutral, as well as what individuals can do to help combat climate change.

The Slavic Connexion
Mountains without Borders: Discovering the Carpathians with Patrice Dabrowski

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:10


In this episode, Patrice Dabrowski takes us on a historical journey through the highly understudied Carpathian Mountains of Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine. Her brand new book details the many forces at play in the mountainous region over the years from 1860 to 1980 and shows how this area gradually went from terra incongita to tourist attraction. We hope you enjoy! ABOUT THE BOOK https://cornellpress-us.imgix.net/covers/9781501759673.jpg?auto=format&w=298&q=20&dpr=2 In The Carpathians, Patrice M. Dabrowski narrates how three highland ranges of the mountain system found in present-day Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine were discovered for a broader regional public. This is a story of how the Tatras, Eastern Carpathians, and Bieszczady Mountains went from being terra incognita to becoming the popular tourist destinations they are today. It is a story of the encounter of Polish and Ukrainian lowlanders with the wild, sublime highlands and with the indigenous highlanders--Górale, Hutsuls, Boikos, and Lemkos--and how these peoples were incorporated into a national narrative as the territories were transformed into a native/national landscape. The set of microhistories in this book occur from about 1860 to 1980, a time in which nations and states concerned themselves with the "frontier at the edge." Discoverers not only became enthralled with what were perceived as their own highlands but also availed themselves of the mountains as places to work out answers to the burning questions of the day. Each discovery led to a surge in mountain tourism and interest in the mountains and their indigenous highlanders. Although these mountains, essentially a continuation of the Alps, are Central and Eastern Europe's most prominent physical feature, politically they are peripheral. The Carpathians is the first book to deal with the northern slopes in such a way, showing how these discoveries had a direct impact on the various nation-building, state-building, and modernization projects. Dabrowski's history incorporates a unique blend of environmental history, borderlands studies, and the history of tourism and leisure. (Publisher) ABOUT THE GUEST https://www.umass.edu/archivenewsoffice/sites/default/files/styles/article_small/public/Patrice%20Dabrowski%20copy.jpg Patrice M. Dabrowski has taught and worked at Harvard, Brown, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and the University of Vienna. She is currently an associate of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, a member of the Board of Directors of the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America (PIASA), and editor of H-Poland. Dabrowski is the author of three books: Poland: The First Thousand Years (2014), Commemorations and the Shaping of Modern Poland (2004), and The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (2021). In 2014 she was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland. PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on August 27th, 2021 via Zoom. To reach us via email, send a message to slavxradio@utexas.edu if you have questions, suggestions, or would like to be a guest on the show! CREDITS Co-Producer/Host: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Co-Producer/Host: Cullan Bendig (@cullanwithana) Associate Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy Associate Producer/Administrator: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 Instagram: @charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Charlie Harper, Ketsa, Scott Holmes, Kevin MacLeod, Quantum Jazz, Kai Engel, Anthem of Rain ) Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Patrice M. Dabrowski.

Sci on the Fly
Beyond carbon neutral: Samuel Goodman, Part 1

Sci on the Fly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:02


Dr. Samuel M. Goodman is the author of Beyond Carbon Neutral: How We Fix the Climate Crisis Now, a book about how to reverse climate change. He is a chemical engineer by training who earned a doctorate from the University of Colorado Boulder after undergraduate studies at the University of Wisconsin Madison. Following graduate school, Dr. Goodman completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Academy of Sciences and was an AAAS S&T Policy Fellow at the US Department of Defense. He is currently an international trade analyst with the US International Trade Commission. Dr. Goodman has always been interested in addressing climate change. And with his recent book Beyond Carbon Neutral, he hopes that he will help to move the climate change conversation forward with a blueprint for action through workable, and necessary, solutions. In the first part of this two-part episode, Dr Goodman talks about energy sector solutions to solving the climate crisis and why better policy rather than new technology is the approach we need to take to reduce carbon emissions. This podcast does not necessarily reflect the views of AAAS, its Council, Board of Directors, officers, or members. AAAS is not responsible for the accuracy of this material. AAAS has made this material available as a public service, but this does not constitute endorsement by the association.

World Business Report
Poland row overshadows EU summit

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:40


A dispute between Brussels and Warsaw threatens to overshadow a summit for EU leaders. A Polish court recently found parts of EU law were incompatible with the country's constitution, and there have been calls from some quarters to withhold EU funds from Poland in response. Anna Wojcik is a researcher at the Polish Academy of Sciences and editor of the Rule of Law publication, and discusses the background to the dispute. Also in the programme, shares in the Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande fell by 11.5% when they resumed trading in Hong Kong today. Sherry Fei Ju is a freelance journalist in Beijing, and brings us the latest developments. The BBC's Theo Leggett tells us about research at the University of Mannheim in Germany that indicates governments worldwide may have lost around $175bn in revenue, because of tax schemes relating to the payments companies make to their shareholders. It's the beginning of India's festival season, and our workplace commentator Sandip Roy considers the challenges of trying to work through the mega festival Durga Puja, when millions are on the streets partying til dawn. Plus, ahead of next month's World Cheese Awards in Oviedo northern Spain, judge Morgan McGlynn, who is also a British cheesemaker, explains what makes a winning cheese. Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Clare Williamson. (Picture: Poland's prime minister arrives at the European Council meeting. Picture credit: Reuters.)

Appels sur l'actualité
Appels sur l'actualité - Vos questions d'actualité

Appels sur l'actualité

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:30


Tous les jours, les journalistes et correspondants de RFI ainsi que des spécialistes répondent à vos questions sur l'actualité.  Mali : pourquoi est-ce le Haut Conseil Islamique qui négocie avec les jihadistes ? Par David Baché,  journaliste au service Afrique de RFI Afghanistan : pour quelles raisons l'État islamique cible-t-il les Chiites ? Par Vincent Souriau, journaliste au service international de RFI  Chine : quelles sont ses ambitions spatiales ? Par Simon Rozé, journaliste au service Sciences de RFI États-Unis : pourquoi la justice avait-elle tenté d'étouffer le meurtre du joggeur noir Ahmaud Arbery ? Par Cécile Coquet-Mokoko, professeure de Civilisation américaine à l'Université de Versailles-Saint Quentin et spécialiste d'études africaines-américaines.    * Par téléphone : de France : 09 693 693 70 de l'étranger : 33 9 693 693 70 * Par WhatsApp : +33 6 89 28 53 64 N'OUBLIEZ PAS DE NOUS COMMUNIQUER VOTRE NUMÉRO DE TÉLÉPHONE (avec l'indicatif pays). Pour nous suivre : * Facebook : Rfi appels sur l'actualité * Twitter : @AppelsActu

Priorité santé
Priorité santé - La sécurité des données de santé

Priorité santé

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 48:30


Nos données de santé sont aujourd'hui stockées partout : dans notre carte vitale, quand nous allons chez le médecin ou à la pharmacie, lors d'une vaccination ou de la prise d'un rendez-vous sur une plateforme numérique. Si cet essor de l'e-santé constitue une avancée majeure pour la médecine, il est aussi associé aux risques liés aux vols des données, comme l'actualité récente l'a encore démontré.  Le 2 septembre dernier, les Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) ont annoncé s'être fait voler les données personnelles d'1,4 million de patients. Ces usagers avaient réalisé courant 2020 un test de dépistage du Covid-19 et avaient fourni leur identité, coordonnées complètes et numéro de Sécurité sociale pour le « contact tracing ». Qui est derrière ces cyberattaques ? Quel usage est fait des données de santé dérobées ? Comment protéger ces données de santé ? Avec : Coralie Lemke, journaliste scientifique pour Sciences et Avenir. Auteure de Ma santé, mes données aux éditions Premier Parallèle Bruno Toussaint,directeur éditorial de la revue Prescrire Dr Jérôme Marty, médecin généraliste et président de l'Union Française pour une médecine libre Erik Boucher de Crèvecoeur, ingénieur référent santé au service de l'expertise technologique de la CNIL, commission nationale de l'informatique et des libertés Eric Pieuchot, directeur des opérations d'ENOVACOM, filiale d'Orange spécialisée dans les données de santé   En fin d'émission, nous retrouverons la chronique Sexualité du Dr Solano sur le thème "cancer du sein et sexualité", à l'occasion du mois d'Octobre Rose.

Ortho Science BYTES Podcast
Key learnings from COVID-19 for the Labs with Dr. Arturo Casadevall

Ortho Science BYTES Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 13:44


The COVID-19 pandemic has been already in our lives since late 2019 and the variants surge is rapidly increasing. Is there anything we can learn from the experience? Fast forward to the fall of 2021, what are the recommendations for Hospitals and Laboratories around the world for the current pandemic and future spread of diseases? In this podcast episode, we will have a conversation with Dr. Arturo Casadevall an infectious disease specialist and Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins University about learnings from this pandemic, vaccines, variants, and how antibody testing can play a key role. About our Speaker: Dr. Arturo Casadevall is a professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He holds a joint appointment in molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research focuses on how microbes cause disease and how the immune system defends itself. Dr. Casadevall serves as chair of the W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He received his M.S., Ph.D., and M.D. from New York University. His team is currently engaged in understanding how hosts defend against the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. Dr. Casadevall's work has been recognized with numerous awards, including the American Society for Microbiology Founders Distinguished Service Award, the National Institutes of Health Merit Award, and the Rhoda Benham Award from the Medical Mycology Society of America.  He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Consider This from NPR
Havana Syndrome: Over 200 Cases Documented Yet Cause Remains A Mystery

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:33


Since 2016, a number of U.S. diplomats and federal employees have reported symptoms of a mysterious illness, the so-called Havana Syndrome.The list of symptoms include hearing loud sounds, nausea fatigue, and dizzying migraines, among others. The cause of this mystery illness is a source of curiosity, but it remains unknown.Last year the State Department commissioned a study by the National Academies of Sciences for researchers to investigate Havana Syndrome.NPR's Sarah McCammon spoke to Dr. David Relman, a Stanford professor who headed the investigation.One possible cause their group came to was a form of microwave radiation that occurs in a pulsed or intermittent form. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The New Yorker: Poetry
Forrest Gander Reads Ada Limón

The New Yorker: Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:22


Forrest Gander joins Kevin Young to read “Privacy,” by Ada Limón, and his own poem “Post-Fire Forest.” Gander is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the winner of a Pulitzer Prize for his collection “Be With.”

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Dr. Gary Kaye, DDS, Chairman, Founder and Chief Dental Officer at Biodental Sciences

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 8:45


In this episode, we are joined by Dr. Gary Kaye, DDS, Chairman, Founder and Chief Dental Officer at BioDental Sciences, to discuss BioDental's technology driven solutions for dentists and what the future holds for BioDental and its platform.This episode is sponsored by BioDental Sciences.

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad
My Chat with Political Scientist Dr. Charles Murray (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_306)

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 84:45


Topics covered include the deontological defence of truth, Thomas Sowell, the honey badger mindset, nature versus nurture issue, racial differences in cognitive abilities and criminality, sex differences, forbidden knowledge, academia, interdisciplinarity, academic specialization, consilience, the social sciences versus the natural sciences, falsifiability (epistemology), postmodernism, critical race theory, the SAT, evolutionary psychology, proximate vs. ultimate explanations, just-so stories, nomological networks of cumulative evidence, parenting, regret, and the secrets to a good life. _______________________________________ Charles Murray is the F. A. Hayek Chair Emeritus Scholar in Cultural Studies at the American Enterprise Institute. His books include Losing Ground: American Social Policy 1950-1980 (1984); In Pursuit: Of Happiness and Good Government (1989); The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life (with Richard Herrnstein) (1994); What It Means to Be a Libertarian (1997); Human Accomplishment: The Pursuit of Excellence in the Arts and Sciences, 800 BC to 1950 (2003); Real Education: Four Simple Truths for Bringing America's Schools Back to Reality (2008); Coming Apart: The State of White America 1960-2010 (2012); American Exceptionalism: An Experiment in History (2013); Human Diversity: The Biology of Gender, Race, and Class (2020); and his latest book published this year Facing Reality: Two Truths about Race in America (2021). If you appreciate my work and would like to support it: https://subscribestar.com/the-saad-truth https://patreon.com/GadSaad https://paypal.me/GadSaad _______________________________________ This chat was posted earlier today (October 20, 2021) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1322: https://youtu.be/YiQ01fQtv1U _______________________________________ The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense (paperback edition) was released on October 5, 2021. Order your copy now. https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X _______________________________________ Please visit my website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar. _______________________________________ Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. _______________________________________

FriendsLikeUs
Trauma Free Stories Of Color Matter

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 119:00


Felischa Marye, Jeanne Sparrow, and Subhah Agarwal visit friends and discuss representation without trauma, Chicago radio and more with host Marina Franklin. Felischa Marye is an American television writer and producer from Chicago. She is best known for her work as a writer and story-editor for the Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, and as the creator and showrunner of Bigger on BET. She is a graduate of the UCLA MFA screenwriting program, during which she won various film fellowships, and writing competitions including; the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and Streisand/Sony Fellowship, Film Independent's Project Involve Award, and the Entertainment Weekly Award. Jeanne Sparrow is renowned speaker, top consultant and 7-time Emmy-winning television and radio personality. She hosts a weekly radio show on #1 rated V-103, WVAZ Chicago, an iHeart Radio Station, and is also a graduate faculty instructor at Northwestern University. Jeanne helps people and organizations find more success and deliver their unique, authentic value through visionary leadership, effective sales and inspiring speaking. Subhah Agarwal has brought an honesty to her comedy that is refreshing, and at times a bit disturbing... but in a good way. Trust me. Subhah has written for the "Plan B" movie on Hulu, and “The Jim Jefferies Show"on Comedy Central, amongst others. You can also catch her jokes live at stand up comedy clubs across the country. If you don't want to leave your couch, you can see her late night debut on NBC's "A Little Late With Lilly Singh." She's also appeared on season three of HBO's "Westworld", on TruTv's sketch comedy "Friends of the People", and as herself on MTV2, Comedy Central, and Gotham Comedy Live. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

Becker's Dental + DSO Review Podcast
Dr. Gary Kaye, DDS, Chairman, Founder and Chief Dental Officer at Biodental Sciences

Becker's Dental + DSO Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 8:45


In this episode, we are joined by Dr. Gary Kaye, DDS, Chairman, Founder and Chief Dental Officer at BioDental Sciences, to discuss BioDental's technology driven solutions for dentists and what the future holds for BioDental and its platform.This episode is sponsored by BioDental Sciences.

Foreword
Dr. Justin Barrett: On Thriving with Stone Age Minds

Foreword

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:50


This week, the Foreword Podcast returns with an interview of cognitive psychologist of religion Dr. Justin Barrett, president and co-founder of Blueprint 1543, an organization working at the intersection of Christian theology and the sciences. Justin is also Honorary Professor of Theology and the Sciences at the University of St. Andrews, and has served at Calvin University, the University of Michigan and the University of Oxford. He is interviewed by Drs. James Arcadi and Fellipe do Vale.Justin begins by describing the path that brought him to doing what he does now, a path that winds through multiple states and countries and involves writing a book as a stay-at-home Dad and serving with YoungLife. On this path, Justin developed a passion for integrating his scientific work with his Christian faith, which eventually led to his work in the cognitive psychology of religion, a discipline he had a significant hand in shaping. Justin reflects on how to integrate science and theology well, which occupies so much of his work today. He also discusses his recent book, Thriving with Stone Age Minds, where he explores what it means to thrive as human beings living in an ever shifting environment always placing new demands on our natures.Along the way, listeners will discover…Why it is not a good idea to wear a necktie with batteriesWhy cities just might be bad for usWhy donuts are so amazing (from a scientific point of view)To learn more about Dr. Justin Barrett, you can explore the rich resources he and his team provide at Blueprint 1543 including videos, free courses curated for theologians and ministers (through the TheoPsych program), as well as articles on the integration of science and theology. Consider also his most recent book and the series of interviews he did with Closer to Truth.

CarbonNationTV Podcast
The Messiah Explains The 5 Sciences | Proof That We Are God | The Most High Chief Natureboy

CarbonNationTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 108:34


Digital Library of The Christ Consciousness. Support The Kingdom of God: www.patreon.com/CarbonNation CashApp: $ChiefMessiah Connect with The Messiah: Babaji's Instagram: www.instagram.com/avatar.natureboy Babaji's Facebook: www.facebook.com/eligio.bishop.92 Connect with The Christ: NatureboyTV: www.instagram.com/natureboytv/ Diet Page: www.instagram.com/the.eat.clean.cuisine/ Music: @carbonnationproductions Art: www.instagram.com/carbonnationart Business Inquiries: CarbonNationProductions@gmail.com

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
627: Sorting Out the Science of Fruit Fly Flight and Behavior - Dr. Michael Dickinson

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 44:45


Dr. Michael Dickinson is the Esther M. and Abe M. Zarem Professor of Bioengineering  at the California Institute of Technology. His work focuses on the biomechanics and the biophysics of life with a particular focus on how animals fly. He looks at these questions through a neuroscientific lens, trying to understand behavior and flight control. In addition to being an excellent scientist, Michael is quite the enthusiastic musician. He played guitar for many years, and has been strumming on the ukulele for about 10 years as well. Much of his free time is spent gardening native plants and enjoying the company of his family. He received his PhD in Zoology from the University of Washington and afterwards worked briefly at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany. Michael has received numerous awards and honors during his career, including the Larry Sandler Award from the Genetics Society of America, the Bartholemew Award for Comparative Physiology from the American Society of Zoologists, a Packard Foundation Fellowship in Science and Engineering, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, and the Quantrell award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching from the University of Chicago. He is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Michael shares more about his journey through life and science in this interview.

Beyond Boundaries Podcast
42: Angela Hobson & Scott Krummenacher (Environmental Racism & the Health of Everyone course)

Beyond Boundaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:08


On this new Beyond Boundaries Podcast episode, Rob interviews the two dynamic Washington University in St. Louis faculty behind the NEW Beyond Boundaries course offered this Spring called Environmental Racism & the Health of Everyone in Dr. Angela Hobson, Assistant Dean for Public Health at the Brown School and Professor Scott Krummenacher in Environmental Studies in the College of Arts & Sciences. They discuss this new course that focuses on environmental inequalities in St. Louis that threaten the health and well-being of low-income communities and communities of color who are increasingly on the frontlines in the fight against climate change, air and water pollution, food security, and many other urgent environmental problems. We also discuss their individual journeys from undergraduate school and beyond that led them to intersect in this new course open to ALL 1st Year students at WashU. Don't miss hearing this unique discussion about this important class.

Hormonally Speaking
Season 3, Episode 1: Environmental Toxins Can Wreck Your Hormones & What You Can Do About It w/Lara Adler

Hormonally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 79:41


What's the one thing that so many women are overlooking when trying to fix their hormones? Environmental toxins. Sadly, we have a plethora of chemicals in our environment, beauty products, and food that negatively impact both our hormones and overall health in a deep and profound way. And because many of these chemicals have been deemed "safe," we miss the compound effect they are having inside of our bodies. In the kick-off episode for our third season of Hormonally Speaking, I speak with environmental toxins expert and self-professed nerd Lara Adler, who breaks down a ton of scientific info for us, including: -How the industry studies chemical toxicity, and how this isn't the best approach to determining the actual effects on our health -Specifically how these chemicals impact our hormone receptors, as well as how they mimic our own hormones -Where to look for the biggest offenders, and how to start clearing these chemicals out of your environment This is a power-packed episode of information that will surprise you, and just might be the key to your hormonal dysregulation. Lara Adler is a Certified Holistic Health Coach and self-educated Environmental Toxins Expert. She's been a featured speaker on over a dozen Summits, dozens of podcasts, and appeared in a 9-Part Documentary Film Series viewed by millions around the world. She is a member of the Naturopathic Association of Environmental Medicine and the American Holistic Health Association. She's attended lectures and symposiums presented by highly respected institutions like the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Mount Sinai Children's Environmental Health Center and by many of the top names in Epigenetics, Hormone Disruption, and Environmental Health, on topics ranging from prenatal chemical exposures to environmental chemicals impact on the developing brain. She reads books on plastics, flame retardants, and water fluoridation for fun, and feels honored to share what I know with others, so they can make smarter, healthier choices. Find out more at her website. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/christine-garvin/support

The Hidden Gateway
THG Episode 44: The Devil is in the Details: A Disturbing Look into the Minds of Narcissists

The Hidden Gateway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:34


Join us for episode 43 where we have a chat with W. Keith Campbell, Ph.D. W. Keith Campbell, Ph.D. is a nationally recognized expert on narcissism, personality, and cultural change. His interests are far-reaching, from broad cultural processes to basic personality assessment, and from money to mystical experience, but they share a focus on the individual self. He is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Georgia's Franklin College of Arts and Sciences. We'll be chatting about how to disarm the narcissists in your life and the interaction between mental health and psychedelics. You don't want to miss this one! YouTube Channel: "The Hidden Gateway Podcast." Website: www.thehiddengateway.com*** You don't want to miss this one!

Leadership Junkies Podcast
153. Shannon Prince | Be A World Crafter: Strategies and Mindsets for Crafting Cultures of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Leadership Junkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 72:19


Do you want to better understand ways to create diverse, equitable, inclusive and anti-racist cultures and organizations? Are you looking for practical tools to achieve this objective? Are you ready to take on the challenges of diversity, equity and inclusion in your organization?   Our special guest Dr. Shannon Prince answers these and other questions about leadership, diversity, equity and inclusion, world crafting, and creating anti-racist cultures and organizations.   Shannon Prince is an attorney, legal commentator, and speaker. She earned her doctorate in African and African American Studies and her master's degree in English from Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, her law degree from Yale Law School, and her bachelor's degree magna cum laude from Dartmouth College.    She drafted best practice language on policing policies for the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, represented plaintiffs in CCJEF v. Rell, a high-profile landmark education adequacy lawsuit, and is currently representing the Cherokee Nation in their lawsuit against pharmaceutical distributors and pharmacies for their role in the opioid crisis that the tribe is suffering. She is a member of her firm's Firm Diversity Council and is a Legal Council on Legal Diversity Pathfinder. Her writing has been published in The Hill, Transition Magazine, Science, and Jezebel among other venues, and she's the author of Tactics for Racial Justice due out in January 2022.   The Leadership Junkies Podcast is brought to you by Cardivera.com. Show Notes Episode highlights… Moving beyond words and getting into diversity, equity and inclusion action Differently understanding systemic racism (getting beyond the idea that racism is about bad people) Understanding the realities of racism in business today Using metrics to track disparities in impact Making changes in diversity, equity and inclusion requires a focus on practices more than intentions Understanding intersectionality in biases Fundamentals of DEI training Training doesn't work in the absence of other diversity initiatives Navigating the “we hire the best people” concept in light of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives (understanding the role of unconscious biases) The reality that more diverse companies outperform less diverse companies Different practices you can use to increase your diversity, equity and inclusion The importance of hiring for diversity, equity and inclusion mindsets The of recruitment changes to build a more diverse, equitable and inclusive organization Understanding the role of bias interrupting in creating more diverse and inclusive organizations The importance of being more aware of your biases and assumptions (cultural metacognition) Exploring ways that bias has an unintended impact on the lack of diversity Ways that anti-racism initiatives are needed beyond diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives Ways to amplify your communication and conversations about diversity, equity and inclusion issues What you can do to create a safe place for your team to have open conversations about diversity, equity and inclusion The role of vulnerability in diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives and conversations Practicing world crafting by thinking like an ancestor … what future will you help create Resources: Shannon Prince Boies Schiller Flexner Law Firm Website Tactics for Racial Justice: Building and Anti-Racist Organizations and Community book by Dr. Shannon Prince (due out in January 2022) (LEADERSHIP JUNKIES DISCOUNT CODE: FLY21) The Leadership Junkies Podcast Cardivera Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kourting Happiness
55. How to Create a Career With No Limits with Dr. Sonya McCoy Wilson

Kourting Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 73:16


Have you often thought about creating a career with no limits?  We have a podcast guest that will empower you to transform your life and focus on what she likes to call soul work. Dr. Sonya McCoy-Wilson joins the Kourting Happiness studio with our host, Dr. Kortni Alston.  She is a Dean of Arts and Sciences, Executive Coach, and Consultant.  Learn more about creating change in your life, strategies for getting a doctorate, and designing a career with unlimited possibilities. 

FUTUREPROOF.
From Material Sciences to Talent Recruitment: How the Pandemic Changed Everything

FUTUREPROOF.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:08


COVID has changed the world to such an extent over the past year and a half, and of course it's not something that anyone would ever wish on society, but there have been some interesting developments - a lot of them positive. One of those innovations comes from SiO2, a little-known material science company from Alabama that received a $143 million investment from the US government to tackle the vaccine vial shortage. To date, they have provided the government with vials for over 100 million covid vaccine doses. I spoke to the company's president, Lawrence Ganti [at the 1:01 mark], about why the future of drugs will be biological — and the long-term positive effects that COVID could bring to pharma and life sciences. My conversation with Lawrence got me thinking about the new kinds of jobs that might have been created on account of the pandemic, which then had me thinking about how companies are finding the talent they need in a post-COVID world. To help clue us in on that front, I turned to Evan Sohn [at the 11:11 mark]. He's the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Recruiter.com, an on-demand recruiting platform that combines AI and video job-matching technology with the world's largest network of small and independent recruiters. We talked about how the pandemic changed how companies recruit, what the post-COVID world of work looks for job candidates, and much more. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play - and make sure to follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn!

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S25E29 - Using Metrics to Support Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, with Dr. Shannon Prince

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:16


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Dr. Shannon Prince about using metrics to support diversity, equity, and inclusion. See the video here: https://youtu.be/IAgPZKFEqKc. Dr. Shannon Prince (linkedin.com/in/shannon-prince-04573a211) is an attorney and legal commentator. She earned her doctorate in African and African American Studies and her master's degree in English from Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, her law degree from Yale Law School, and her bachelor's degree from Dartmouth College. She drafted best practice language on policing policies for the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, represented plaintiffs in CCJEF v. Rell, a high-profile landmark education adequacy lawsuit, and is currently representing the Cherokee Nation in their lawsuit against pharmaceutical distributors and pharmacies for their role in the opioid crisis that the tribe is suffering. She is a member of her firm's Firm Diversity Council and is a Legal Council on Legal Diversity Pathfinder. Her writing has been published in The Hill, Transition Magazine, Science, and Jezebel among other venues, and she has a book on antiracism forthcoming from Routledge called Tactics for Racial Justice. Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/ Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/ Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/ Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/ Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/ Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Amina Abubakar, PharmD | PGX for Pharmacists

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 35:50


Amina Abubakar, PharmD, AAHIVP CEO of Avant Pharmacy & Wellness Center President of Avant Institute Amina Abubakar graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy University of the Sciences in 2005. She is the owner and manager of Avant Pharmacy & Wellness Center formerly known as Rx Clinic Pharmacy in Charlotte, NC, and the founder of the Avant Institute. She is an internationally recognized award-winning clinical pharmacist, Certified HIV Specialty Pharmacist, a preceptor to UNC Chapel Hill residents and students from several schools of pharmacy. Recently, Amina was bestowed the honor by the National Community Pharmacists Association as 2020's Independent Pharmacist of the Year and also received the 2020 Bowl of Hygeia from the North Carolina Association of Pharmacists for outstanding service to the community. She has fostered an environment that showcases the impact of community pharmacists on patient care by collaborating with medical providers and expanding pharmacist-led clinical services in her community. Her desire to help others advance the pharmacy profession inspired her to found the Avant Institute to offer training to pharmacies across the country on the practical application of clinical pharmacy services through developing sustainable physician collaborations. Pharmacogenomics in a community pharmacy: ACT now Pharmacists practicing in community pharmacy are accustomed to optimizing drug therapy through various medication therapy management programs. They use patient-specific information obtained from the patient and their prescribers to cater patient-specific drug regimens. Pharmacogenomics is rapidly evolving, and this field can help optimize medication therapy using an individual's genetic code to identify opportunities for increased or decreased adverse effects or changes in efficacy. Pharmacogenomic testing technology has made conducting pharmacogenomic testing in community pharmacies possible. Pharmacists must arm themselves with the knowledge and skills specific to pharmacogenomics in order to fully integrate this expanding area into patient care and turn this into a great opportunity. [Advocacy] Currently, she shares her passion for pharmacy advancements with pharmacists, patients and policy makers all over the country through Pharmacogenomics. She was invited to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and to the FDA to discuss the role of pharmacists in pharmacogenomics. This episode is sponsored by the Ultiguard Safe Pack. UltiGuard Safe Pack is the only pen needle product that comes with an all-in-one sharps container. Learn more about why UltiGuard Safe Pack is the best choice for your patients and your pharmacy.,  Learn more about the UltiGuard Safe Pack:  https://www.ulticare.com/ultiguard-safe-pack/podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Cold-Case Christianity Podcast
Why Jesus Was a Catalyst for the Sciences

The Cold-Case Christianity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:01


Is there a reason so many famous scientists from history were Jesus-followers? Is there something about the Christian worldview that encourages an exploration of the natural world? Why have Christians dominated the sciences and what did these Christians say about Jesus? J. Warner answers these questions in this episode of the NRBtv Cold-Case Christianity Broadcast.

This Academic Life
Ep.19 – What did we do this summer?

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:31


Do professors get their summers off? You'll learn about how the three of us spent our summer. Research continues, administrative tasks pile up, and the summer is simply too short! Reference list: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) An interesting read: https://www.higheredjobs.com/Articles/articleDisplay.cfm?ID=1711 Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

MinuteEarth
Hyena Butter: Weird & Informative (Just Like Us!)

MinuteEarth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 1:59


Get your butt-, er, book here: https://www.minuteearth.com/books/ Hyenas communicate via an information-dense physical medium (hyena butter) - and now MinuteEarth does too (book). SUPPORT MINUTEEARTH ************************** If you like what we do, you can help us!: - Become our patron: https://patreon.com/MinuteEarth - Share this video with your friends and family - Leave us a comment (we read them!) CREDITS ********* Kate Yoshida | Script Writer and Narrator David Goldenberg | Director Arcadi Garcia i Rius | Illustration, Video Editing and Animation Nathaniel Schroeder | Music MinuteEarth is produced by Neptune Studios LLC https://neptunestudios.info OUR STAFF ************ Sarah Berman • Arcadi Garcia i Rius David Goldenberg • Julián Gustavo Gómez Melissa Hayes • Alex Reich • Henry Reich • Peter Reich Ever Salazar • Leonardo Souza • Kate Yoshida OTHER CREDITS ***************** Hyena audio clips by Dr. Kenna Lehmann OUR LINKS ************ Youtube | https://youtube.com/MinuteEarth TikTok | https://tiktok.com/@minuteearth Twitter | https://twitter.com/MinuteEarth Instagram | https://instagram.com/minute_earth Facebook | https://facebook.com/Minuteearth Website | https://minuteearth.com Apple Podcasts| https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/minuteearth/id649211176 REFERENCES ************** Hofer, H., M. L. East, I. Sammang, and & M. Dehnhard. 2001. Analysis of volatile compounds in scent-marks of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and their possible function in olfactory communication. Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 9:141–148. Retrieved from: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4615-0671-3_18 Theis, K.R., Venkataraman, A., Dycus, J. A., Koonter, K.D.S., Schmitt-Matzen, E.N., Wagner. A.P., Holekamp, K.E., & Schmidt, T.M (2013) Symbiotic bacteria appear to mediate hyena social odors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110: 19832–19837. Retrieved from: https://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1306477110 Theis, K. R., Schmidt, T. M. & Holekamp, K. E. (2012) Evidence for a bacterial mechanism for group-specific social odors among hyenas. Scientific Reports 2, 615. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3431069/ MinuteEarth (2021). MinuteEarth Explains: How Did Whales Get So Big? & Other Curious Questions about Animals, Nature, Geology and Planet Earth. Retrieved from: https://www.MinuteEarth.com/books

Crush the Rush
159 - How to Push Past your Comfort Zone to Create an Extraordinary Life with Dave Hollis

Crush the Rush

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:57


In this episode, learn from Dave Hollis on ways to honoring your uniqueness and having the courage to discover and live out your purpose.What we chat about in this episode:- Dave's experience transitioning from corporate to entrepreneurship- Aligning to your own vision and what that looks like- Creating space from the noise so you can connect with your purposeAbout Dave:Dave Hollis, New York Times bestselling author of Get Out of Your Own Way, host of the Rise Together podcast, health & fitness enthusiast and online coach works to inspire others to take control of their lives and create a future of fulfillment and purpose. Dave's history includes CEO of a media start-up, former president of sales & distribution for the film studio at The Walt Disney Company, a talent manager across film, tv & music and work in the publicity, research, and technology fields across the entertainment sector. In those roles, Dave has seen both the negative consequences of limiting beliefs and the positive power of imagination, dreams, and believing in oneself.Dave has sat on the board of the membership committee for the Academy of Motion Pictures, Arts and Sciences of which he is a member, and on the boards of Fandango Labs, Will Rogers Motion Picture Pioneers, National Angels and his alma mater Pepperdine's Institute for Entertainment Media and Culture. Dave's philanthropy exists via the Dave Hollis Giving Fund where acting as an ally to the needs of children in foster care, teen homelessness and food insecurity have been a recent focus for grants. A father of four and former foster parent to four more, Dave and his family live in Austin, Texas, where he drives a 1969 Ford Bronco named Incredible Hulk and has a mini schnauzer named Jeffrey. His latest book, Built Through Courage, is available nationwide October 26, 2021. Connect with Dave:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mrdavehollis Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mrdavehollis/Twitter: https://twitter.com/MrDaveHollis TEXT HOLLY: https://bit.ly/TextHollyGrab the Planner and New Power Pack Bundle - https://www.hollymariehaynes.com/plannerJoin the Crush the Rush Community -www.facebook.com/groups/crushtherushI hope these tips help! Keep in touch! Leave me a message at hollymariehaynes.com or instagram.com/holly_marie_haynes

Decouple
How to Feed a Warming Planet feat. Dr. Channa Prakash

Decouple

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 72:48


In a change of pace for Decouple, I am joined by Dr. Channa Prakash for a wide-ranging discussion on crop science and agriculture. We discuss biotechnology, its history, and the great positive changes it has brought to global food production. We also assess the strongest criticisms. Among those are concerns that we have become dependent on chemical inputs for farming, namely pesticides and fertilizers, and that this has often lead to the over-application of these chemicals resulting in environmental hazards. Additionally, many are concerned that a reliance on these chemical inputs, or on genetically modified crop varieties, has led to the “corporatization” of farming. Dr. Prakash brings numerous real-world examples policy blunders regarding food, often with destructive consequences. In particular, we focus in on Sri Lanka, where the recent banning of fertilizer and pesticide imports in a move to become an all-organic food exporter has set off a farming and economic crisis. The soft face of these harsh policies is the organic food movement, which has gained popularity in recent years. While some consumers may decide to purchase organic foods for a higher price, believing them to be more sustainably grown, organic certification opposes some of the very principles that have allowed us to feed growing populations. And it opposes the crop science that may enable us to use fewer pesticides and fertilizers, meet the nutritional of the hungry, and adapt to the challenges to food security posed by a changing climate. Finally, we take a step back to reflect on our relationship with food, why we have such strong opinions about how it's grown and where it comes from, and patterns in the social acceptance of different technologies. Dr. Channa S. Prakash is a Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Tuskegee University (USA) where he has served as faculty since 1989 and is a professor of crop genetics, biotechnology, and genomics. Everybody should follow his fantastic Twitter profile: @AgBioWorld

The John Batchelor Show
1756: The Nobelist Dmitry Muratov is a protege of Mikhail Gorbachev and the late Professor Stephen F. Cohen. Katrina Vanden Heuvel @TheNation

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 11:15


Photo:  The Academy's Documents.   The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, officially the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, is an economics award administered by the Nobel Foundation. Laureates are selected by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. .. The Nobelist Dmitry Muratov is a protege of Mikhail Gorbachev and the late Professor Stephen F. Cohen.  Katrina Vanden Heuvel @TheNation https://www.thenation.com/article/world/muratov-nobel-prize/ https://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Nobel-panel-to-announce-2021-peace-prize-16518290.php

Nature's Archive
#32: Cricket Raspet on Dockfouling - finding amazing sea creatures the easy way

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 51:58


My guest today is Cricket Raspet (@chilipossum on Instagram). Cricket is a Curatorial Assistant at the California Academy of Sciences, specializing in marine mammals.  She's a passionate community scientist, a raptor bander with the GGRO and a rescue and animal care volunteer at the Marine Mammal Center.  An interest (obsession?) with the colorful sea slugs of the pacific coast led her from the tidepools to the strange community of creatures that make floating docks their home. With a handful of like-minded explorers, she founded the Dockfoulers Union to educate people about this unique ecosystem and document its inhabitants through photography and iNaturalist observations.  To explain, dockfouling is a captivating hobby where one observes the amazing diversity that forms in ecosystems around floating docks. Think of it like tidepooling, but with some distinct advantages that we discuss today. Unique and colorful creatures can be readily seen, and these areas are ripe for personal and scientific discovery. Simply put, dockfouling can be both a crash course and a masters course in marine ecology.In this episode we discuss what dockfouling is, and the related concept of biofouling.We discuss Cricket's amazing finds in these floating dock biomes, the emergence of a dock fouling community, and how you can easily observe these magnificent creatures next time you are near a floating dock. It turns out it is easy to get started - no equipment necessary! But if you want to start taking photos, Cricket offers suggestions as well.Cricket also provides great resources to learn more, including books, videos, and iNaturalist projects. And it turns out it's "Doctober" - a special month-long BioBlitz intending to document these communities on iNaturalist.Find Cricket on Instagram at chilipossum, docfoulersunion, glamourslugs. And iNaturalist as chilipossum.Full Show NotesLinks to People and ResourcesDock Fouling in California - iNaturalist projectDock Fouling in Washington State - iNaturalist projectDoctober - Dockfauling bioblitz for October 2021Nature Lookings - website with resources on Dock Fouling and DoctoberOlympus TG-6 Waterproof Camera- recommended for underwater and terrestrial macro, with built-in focus stacking, recommended by Cricket. And a tutorial to use the TG-6 for Tidepool PhotographyThe Light and Smith Manual: Intertidal Invertebrates from Central California to Oregon, by James T. CarltonSeashore Life of the Northern Pacific, by Eugene Kozloff - illustrated marine biology book that will help with your identification and udnerstandingPeople and Organizations DiscussedCalifornia Academy of SciencesDamon Tighe - presentations on YouTube at Lake MerrittDockfoulers Union (instagram)Luan Roberts (instagram)

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
626: Digging into the Fossil Record to Understand our Planet's Past and Aid Present Conservation Efforts - Dr. Michael Archer

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:01


Dr. Michael Archer is a Professor of Paleobiology in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of New South Wales in Australia. Mike is a paleontologist who is fascinated with understanding the continuity of life over billions of years. He spends his free time watching Sci-Fi movies, including classics like Jurassic Park (one of his all-time favorites). Mike received his undergraduate education from Princeton University in Geology and Biology. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study in Australia and remained there to earn his PhD in Zoology from the University of Western Australia. Mike has since worked at the Western Australian, Queensland, and Australian Museums, and he joined the faculty at the University of New South Wales in 1978. Mike has received many awards and honors, including being named one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Sydney in 2008, receipt of the Riversleigh Society Medal, the TH Huxley Award from the Australian Museum, and the Australian Centennial Medal from the Federal Government of Australia. He is a Member of the Australia Institute of Biology, as well as a Fellow of the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, the World Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Australian College of Educators, The Australian Academy of Science, the Royal Society of New South Wales, and Australia 21. In this interview, Mike tells us more about his journey through life and science.

Coaching for Leaders
549: How to Actually Get Traction From Leadership Books, with Nicol Verheem

Coaching for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 35:31


Nicol Verheem: Teradek Nicol Verheem is a globally recognized leader and innovator, senior business executive, serial entrepreneur, and prolific angel investor. He has been recognized for his impact in the film industry with a lifetime achievement award from the Society of Camera Operators and an Academy Award for Sciences and Engineering, also known as a Technical Oscar. He was also recently recognized with the Innovator of the Year Award from the leading business journal in Orange County, California. Nicol currently serves on the Executive Management Board of The Vitec Group, as the Divisional CEO of Creative Solutions, and as the CEO of Teradek. As a technology leader, his is responsible for the strategy, roadmap, and execution of Teradek's highly recognized high tech video products driving more than $100M annual revenue -- with dominant market share across the globe. He is also a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this conversation, Nicol and I discuss how to take the ideas you hear in books, presentations, and podcasts — and make them your own. Nicol shares many examples of how he has done this in his organization in order grow a team that was ultimately recognized with an Academy Award. Plus, we discuss some of his mindsets that have helped drive the success of Teradek over the years. Key Points Leadership models aren't always molded to your organization or situation. Adapt the idea to make it a better fit for you. Well intended language by an expert might not match the culture of your organization. Don't hesitate to change a word or phrase to make sense to your team. Build relationships today with the people who will grow with you throughout your career. That's “networking for commoners.” When interviewing, ask people about their hobbies or interests in order to discover if you can lead them to live out their passions. Resources Mentioned We'd Like to Thank the Academy by Teradek Related Episodes How to Know What You Don't Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
Tensions on the rise: China, Taiwan aim to avoid conflict

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 26:42


Tension between China and Taiwan is nothing new, but with their relationship increasingly at odds, their complicated dynamic is once again in the headlines. Could conflict be imminent? Dr. James Carter, Interim Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences and Professor of History at Saint Joseph's University, puts the China-Taiwan relationship into historical context on this episode of KYW Newsradio's 'In Depth,' and forecasts the delicate balance China and Taiwan walk - both together and apart. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Connections with Evan Dawson
Connections: Is Instagram a unique threat to teenage girls?

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:34


Is Instagram a unique threat to teenage girls? Internal Facebook documents indicate that the company realizes how much damage the platform can do. Some leading psychologists have argued that we are reaching a public health crisis that threatens girls specifically. Others have pushed back, arguing that body image issues have always existed for teenage girls. Our guests explore the issues: Olivia Cross, senior at Our Lady of Mercy High School Jodi Aman , family therapist and author of “Anxiety... I'm So Done with You” Harry Reis , professor of psychology and Dean's Professor in Arts, Sciences, and Engineering at the University of Rochester

Keen On Democracy
Randall Kennedy on the Realities and Imaginaries of Race in America

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 43:45


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode of Keen On, Andrew is joined by Randall Kennedy, the author of Say It Loud!: On Race, Law, History, and Culture, to discuss the key social justice issues of our time—from George Floyd to antiracism to inequality and the Supreme Court. Find more Keen On episodes and additional videos on Lit Hub's YouTube Channel! ________________________ Randall Kennedy is Michael R. Klein Professor at Harvard Law School where he teaches courses on contracts, criminal law, and the regulation of race relations. He was born in Columbia, South Carolina. For his education he attended St. Albans School, Princeton University, Oxford University, and Yale Law School. He served as a law clerk for Judge J. Skelly Wright of the United States Court of Appeals and for Justice Thurgood Marshall of the United States Supreme Court. He is a member of the bar of the District of Columbia and the Supreme Court of the United States. A member of the American Law Institute, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Association, Mr. Kennedy is also a Trustee emeritus of Princeton University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Unleashed - How to Thrive as an Independent Professional

Tony is the co-founder and managing director at InsurTechNY, an organization that helps startups, carriers/brokers, investors, and enablers in the New York region and beyond through hosting InsurTechNY community events, startup competitions, and accelerator. He is a BCG Alum, and his background includes product leadership at Alibaba, Gartner & NBC, an MBA from NYU Stern MBA, and a Bachelor of Sciences from Carnegie Mellon. In this episode, Tony talks about his business model. Learn more about the organization at www.insurtechny.com. Key points include: 00:53: What InsurTechNY is and who it serves 13:57: Embedded insurance plays 17:14: Blockchain in InsurTechNY 26:04: Setting up the first InsurTechNY event Unleashed is produced by Umbrex, which has a mission of connecting independent management consultants with one another, creating opportunities for members to meet, build relationships, and share lessons learned. Learn more at www.umbrex.com.

Public Health Review Morning Edition

In a special edition of the newscast, ASTHO President Dr. Nirav Shah, ASTHO President Elect Dr. Anne Zink, ASTHO CEO Mike Fraser, and Scott Becker, CEO of the Association of Public Health Laboratories, discuss the FDA's Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) process during a workshop hosted Tuesday by The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The National Academies Webpage: FDA EUA Workshop

LatinEQUIS
Special Episode: Introducing "Alma's Way" with Sonia Manzano

LatinEQUIS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 25:26


Today I have the honor of speaking to Sonia Manzano known by many as Maria on Sesame Street, who she's played for 44 years. Sonia introduces Alma's Way, a new show on PBS Kids about a young 6-year-old proud, confident, Puerto Rican girl living a fast paced life in the Bronx alongside her family, friends, and neighbors. Sonia, a Puerto Rican just like Alma, has been nominated for an Emmy twice for Best Performer in a Childhood Series and has won 15 Emmys for her television writing. In 2016, Sonia was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Emmy Award by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, recognizing her as a pioneer in representation of Latinos on television and for portraying Maria. You can watch Alma's Way now on PBS Kids.

The Thomistic Institute
From Zero to Sixty (-one): My Life as a Scientist and a Catholic Convert | Prof. Jonathan Lunine

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 45:41


This lecture was delivered on June 18, 2021 as part of the third annual Thomistic Philosophy and Natural Science Symposium: Chance and Indeterminacy in the Natural World. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Jonathan I. Lunine is The David C. Duncan Professor in the Physical Sciences at Cornell University and Director of the Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, His research focuses on astrophysics, planetary science and astrobiology. In addition to his responsibilities in the classroom, he serves as Interdisciplinary Scientist on the James Webb Space Telescope project and is a coinvestigator on the Juno mission currently in orbit around Jupiter. Lunine is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the 2014 recipient of the Jean Dominique Cassini Medal of the European Geosciences Union. He is the author of Astrobiology: A Multidisciplinary Approach and Earth: Evolution of a Habitable World. Lunine obtained a B.S. in physics and astronomy from the University of Rochester (1980), an M.S. (1983) and a Ph.D. (1985) in planetary science from the California Institute of Technology. He lives in Ithaca New York, where he is a member of St. Catherine of Siena parish. In 2016 Lunine helped to found the Society of Catholic Scientists and currently serves as its vice president.

The Candid Frame: Conversations on Photography

Michael Sherwin is an artist currently based in the Appalachian mountains of northern West Virginia. From an early age, he found inspiration in the phenomena of the physical world and has spent most of this life exploring and seeking wild places, including nine years in the American West. Using the mediums of photography, video, and installation, his work reflects on the experience of observing nature through the lenses of science and popular culture.  He has won numerous grants and awards for his work and has exhibited widely, including recent shows at the Clay Center for Arts and Sciences in Charleston, WV, Huntington Museum of Art in Huntington, WV, Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, GA, CEPA Gallery in Buffalo, NY and the Atlanta Contemporary Arts Center in Atlanta, GA. Reviews and features of his work have been publicized in The Washington Post, BuzzFeed News, Art Papers Magazine, Oxford American Magazine, Prism Magazine, Medium's Vantage, and National Public Radio.  He has lectured extensively about his work at numerous universities and conferences across the nation. Sherwin earned an MFA from the University of Oregon in 2004, and a BFA from The Ohio State University in 1999. Currently, he is an Associate Professor of Art in the School of Art and Design at West Virginia University.  He is also an active and participating member of the Society for Photographic Education and the lead instructor for WVU's Jackson Hole Photography Workshop.   Websites   Sponsors Charcoal Book Club Lensrentals.com Curious Society   Education Resources: Momenta Photographic Workshops Candid Frame Resources Download the free Candid Frame app for your favorite smart device. Click here to download for . Click here to download Support the work we do at The Candid Frame by contributing to our Patreon effort.  You can do this by visiting or visiting the website and clicking on the Patreon button. You can also provide a one-time donation via . You can follow Ibarionex on and .