Podcasts about Georgetown University

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Private university in Washington, D.C., United States

  • 2,520PODCASTS
  • 4,074EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST
Georgetown University

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Georgetown University

Show all podcasts related to georgetown university

Latest podcast episodes about Georgetown University

Gov Innovator podcast
Lessons from the New Hope Project for today: An interview with Julie Kirksick, former New Hope Executive Director, and Kali Grant, Georgetown University – Episode #191

Gov Innovator podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:15


The New Hope Project was an anti-poverty program in the 1990s in Milwaukee that offered a simple but powerful pledge: If participants were willing to work full-time, they would not be poor. The program used a wage subsidy, support for child care and health insurance, and (if participants needed it) short-term subsidized employment to achieve […] The post Lessons from the New Hope Project for today: An interview with Julie Kirksick, former New Hope Executive Director, and Kali Grant, Georgetown University – Episode #191 appeared first on Gov Innovator podcast.

ProTalk with ProTec
S2, E3: Bridget Hodge

ProTalk with ProTec

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:47


Bridget Hodge with the Wethman Group of Keller Williams, grew up in a military family, traveled all over the world, and finally settled in the Northern Virginia area. Growing up, her family has always been involved in real estate: rental properties, staging, renovations and investment properties, so real estate is a family pastime. Bridget received her bachelor's degree in English Literature from Roanoke College and her master's degree in Real Estate & Finance from Georgetown University. Prior to working in residential real estate, she worked for Kaiser Permanente, L-3 Communications, and Jones Lang LaSalle. Bridget also worked as a Listing Agent for a large residential team in Fairfax. As the Listings Director, she offers valuable insight and expertise on the home sale process and provides exceptional care to every client. Bridget is licensed in Virginia, DC, and Maryland.

Business Daily
The supply chain's weak link

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 17:28


How disruption in a single port, factory or freight centre can cause global chaos. Ed Butler speaks with Stavros Karamperidis, an expert in maritime economics at the University of Plymouth, and Kent Jones, professor of economics at Babson College in the US. Meanwhile, chief economist at Enodo Economics, Diana Choyleva, explains how China's energy crisis will impact exports and the price we pay for goods, and Professor Marc Busch from Georgetown University explains why he thinks governments should leave big businesses to solve supply issues themselves. (Photo: a container ship is unloaded at a dock in the US. Credit: Reuters)

Dr. Duke Show
Ep. 573 – Students Love Socialism … Until It Impacts Them Personally

Dr. Duke Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:55


On this episode of the “Dr. Duke Show” we start at Georgetown University, where students are praising socialism and the redistribution of wealth, that is until being asked questions that impact them personally.

Politicology
Submarines, German Elections, and Biden's Speech at the U.N. — A Global Power Q&A with Molly McKew

Politicology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 53:19


To unlock exclusive content, visit: https://politicology.com/plus National security writer and Georgetown University adjunct professor Molly McKew joins Ron Steslow to break down some of the most important international news stories: (01:50) The U.S., U.K., and Australian security partnership and the submarine deal that angered the French.  (17:08) Joe Biden's speech at the United Nations General Assembly (18:16) How the German elections (and Angela Merkle's decision not to seek reelection) will impact global politics (36:02) The relationship between foreign policy and public opinion.   Are you learning from Politicology? Contribute now at https://politicology.com/donate Follow this Molly on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MollyMcKew

The Fearless and Successful Podcast by Dijana Llugolli
Julie Reisler: Intuitive Discovery

The Fearless and Successful Podcast by Dijana Llugolli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:12


Join me for this Intuitive Discovery with Julie Reisler, founder and CEO of Empowered Living, is a Master Transformational Coach, Bestselling Author, TEDx Speaker, and Podcast Host of The You-est You. Julie has been featured in Forbes, MindBodyGreen, The Chopra Center, and Thrive Global and is the author of the Get a PhD in YOU book series. She is a multi-time TEDx speaker and teacher on the popular app, Insight Timer, with over 145,000 downloads. Julie is also the founder of the Life Designer® Coaching Certification Academy and Sacredology® Community. Julie has a master's degree in health and wellness coaching and is on the faculty at Georgetown University in their coaching program. She loves guiding big-hearted spiritual entrepreneurs to be their ‘You-est You' in their careers and life. To learn more about Julie and her certification program, go to juliereisler.com/certification Connect with Julie Reisler on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/juliereisler/ Listen to the Youest You podcast: https://juliereisler.com/podcast/ Take the Intuitive Assesment: https://members.juliereisler.com/intuitionassessment/ Meditate with Julie on Insight Timer https://insig.ht/s3f0weeQikb D's call to action: - Share your biggest takeaway over at Instagram tagging Julie: https://www.instagram.com/juliereisler/ and myself www.instagram.com/dijanallugolli - Rate the podcast on Android or Apple: https://reviewthispodcast.com/insider - Check our website for ways to collaborate with D: www.dijanallugolli.com Love + Gratitude always D --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fearlessandsuccessful/message

Finding Humanity
[S04E01] The Irony of Mass Incarceration

Finding Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:38


Shon Hopwood is a serial robber who spent 11 years in federal prison. But when he walked out of prison in 2008, Shon couldn't have predicted an incredulous twist: earning the title ‘Professor' at Georgetown University while raising his young family. While the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world, there is little evidence to show that with more people in the prison system, crime rates are significantly reduced or that public safety is ensured. In this episode, we discuss the irony of the American criminal justice system. On the podcast, we explore if prisons are aimed to rehabilitate, the vicious cycle created by the prison industrial complex, and how one former inmate remarkably started his legal career within the four walls of prison. Featuring policy and advocacy insights from: Professor Shon Hopwood, Former Inmate and Associate Professor of Law, Georgetown University; Dr. Annahita Mahdavi West, Activist and Associate Professor at Long Beach City College; and Dr. Nazgol Ghandnoosh, Senior Research Analyst at The Sentencing Project. -- This special series of Finding Humanity is a production of Humanity Lab Foundation and Hueman Group Media. Subscribe, rate, and leave us a review. For more information, visit findinghumanitypodcast.com. Follow us on Twitter @find_humanity and on Facebook @findinghumanitypod.

Live From America Podcast
Episode #209: The Recruiter

Live From America Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 68:40


This Week's Guests: Retired Senior CIA Operations Officer - Douglas London Comedian - Boris Khaykin Link to the book https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/douglas-london/the-recruiter/9780306847301/ The World's Famous comedy Cellar presents "Live From America Podcast" with Noam Dworman and Hatem Gabr. The top experts and thinkers of the world and the best comics in the Nation get together weekly with our hosts to discuss different topics each week, News, Culture, Politics, comedy & and more with an equal parts of knowledge and comedy! About Douglas London: Douglas London is a retired Senior CIA Operations Officer, an Adjunct Associate Professor at Georgetown University's Center for Security Studies, and a Non-resident fellow at the Middle East Institute. He served predominantly in the Middle East, South and Central Asia, and Africa, including three assignments as a Chief of Station, the President's senior intelligence officer at post, and Chief of Base in a conflict zone. Assignments at CIA Headquarters included executive positions at CIA's Counterterrorism Center, Information Operations Center, and Near East and South Asia Division. London was decorated with the CIA's Career Intelligence Medal, the McCone Award, and multiple unit and individual citations. This revealing memoir from a 34-year veteran of the CIA who worked as a case officer and recruiter of foreign agents before and after 9/11 provides an invaluable perspective on the state of modern spy craft, how the CIA has developed, and how it must continue to evolve. If you've ever wondered what it's like to be a modern-day spy, Douglas London is here to explain. London's overseas work involved spotting and identifying targets, building relationships over weeks or months, and then pitching them to work for the CIA—all the while maintaining various identities, a day job, and a very real wife and kids at home. The Recruiter: Spying and the Lost Art of American Intelligence captures the best stories from London's life as a spy, his insights into the challenges and failures of intelligence work, and the complicated relationships he developed with agents and colleagues. In the end, London presents a highly readable insider's tale about the state of espionage, a warning about the decline of American intelligence since 9/11 and Iraq, and what can be done to recover. Follow Live From America YouTube www.youtube.com/channel/UCS2fqgw61yK1J6iKNxV0LmA Twitter twitter.com/AmericasPodcast www.LiveFromAmericaPodcast.com LiveFromAmerica@ComedyCellar.com Follow Hatem Twitter twitter.com/HatemNYC Instagram www.instagram.com/hatemnyc/ Follow Noam Twitter twitter.com/noamdworman?lang #CIA #DouglasLondon #TheRecruiter

Optimal Business Daily
377: The Calculus of Remarkability by Cal Newport on How To Pursue Greatness & Maximize Accomplishments

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:33


Cal Newport shares the calculus of remarkability Episode 377: The Calculus of Remarkability by Cal Newport on How To Pursue Greatness & Maximize Accomplishments Cal Newport is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University, who specializes in the theory of distributed algorithms. He previously earned his Ph.D. from MIT in 2009 and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2004. In addition to studying the theoretical foundations of our digital age as a professor, Newport also writes about the impact of these technologies on the world of work. His most recent book, Deep Work, argues that focus is the new I.Q. in the knowledge economy, and that individuals who cultivate their ability to concentrate without distraction will thrive. The original post is located here: http://calnewport.com/blog/2011/09/22/the-calculus-of-remarkability/ Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily

I'll Have Another with Lindsey Hein Podcast
Episode 341: Julie Culley – Career and motherhood

I'll Have Another with Lindsey Hein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 96:31


Julie Culley is currently the Sports Marketing Manager for Brooks Running. Before that position, Julie was the Director of Track and Field and Cross Country for Georgetown University. Before coaching,... The post Episode 341: Julie Culley – Career and motherhood appeared first on Lindsey Hein.

The John Batchelor Show
1749: 2/2 #RealistInternationalism: Spy vs Spy awakens NATO anxiety. Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 10:35


Photo:  NATO photo 2/2    #RealistInternationalism: Spy vs Spy awakens NATO anxiety. Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst https://responsiblestatecraft.org/2021/09/21/congress-wants-to-put-even-more-troops-in-russias-backyard/

The John Batchelor Show
1749: 1/2 #RealistInternationalism: Spy vs Spy awakens NATO anxiety. Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 13:05


Photo:  Spy as seen in a 2004 Mountain Dew television commercial. 1/2    #RealistInternationalism: Spy vs Spy awakens NATO anxiety. Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst https://responsiblestatecraft.org/2021/09/21/congress-wants-to-put-even-more-troops-in-russias-backyard/

The John Batchelor Show
1749: 2/2 #AfterAfghanistan: The Helmandi Afghans and the Battle of Mawandi, 1879. Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 9:20


Photo:  The Last Eleven at Maiwand by Frank Feller 2/2     #AfterAfghanistan: The Helmandi Afghans and the Battle of Mawandi, 1879. Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst https://responsiblestatecraft.org/2021/09/28/has-neo-orientalism-killed-our-ability-to-sense-the-limits-of-western-global-influence/

The John Batchelor Show
1748: 1/2 #AfterAfghanistan: The Helmandi Afghans and the Battle of Mawandi, 1879. Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 12:30


Photo:  The Last Stand of the British at Maiwand, Afghanistan, 27 July 1880 by John Elder Moultray 1/2    #AfterAfghanistan: The Helmandi Afghans and the Battle of Mawandi, 1879. Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst https://responsiblestatecraft.org/2021/09/28/has-neo-orientalism-killed-our-ability-to-sense-the-limits-of-western-global-influence/

Building While Flying
Building the Leaders of the Future - with Gary Sheng, Civics Unplugged

Building While Flying

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:14


For Gary Sheng, the year 2016 kicked off a deep exploration of civics, leadership, and the future of democracy—which ultimately led him to his calling.  Gary Sheng is a Co-Founder and the COO of Civics Unplugged, a platform and movement focused on empowering the next generation to build the future of democracy. Its three-month civic leadership fellowship for high school students provides a civics foundation, teaches problem solving and effective dialoguing with others, and helps them build their “civics muscles.” With partnerships with National Geographic, Georgetown University, The Smithsonian, the Ethereum Foundation and more, the future for Civics Unplugged is bright.  In this week's episode of Building While Flying, Gary shares his personal journey from Google developer to nonprofit co-founder, and discusses why civics education and leadership development for Gen Z matters. He says that learning is a lifelong process, and being a good citizen is a lifelong exercise. He also discusses the role companies and corporations can play in civics, and how they can support organizations like Civics Unplugged to help build a better future. Other in-flight topics: How Civics Unplugged was born Impacts of the 2016 election  Building community around a movement The role of corporations in civics The future of Gen Z What's next for Civics Unplugged ...and more! Relevant Links: CU website: https://www.civicsunplugged.org/  CU Fellowship: https://www.civicsunplugged.org/fellowship  CU Insta: ​​https://www.instagram.com/civicsunplugged/  Gary's website: http://www.garysheng.com/  Gary LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/garysheng/  Gary's Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@garysheng

Trend Lines
‘America Is Back' Won't Save the U.S.-Led Global Order

Trend Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 85:25


After the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, the United States and its allies enjoyed a near monopoly on economic, military and ideological power in a suddenly unipolar world. Over the decade and a half that followed, the U.S. emerged as the dominant power atop a liberal international order in large part shaped by its preferences.  But the rise of China and resurgence of Russia as great power competitors has challenged Washington's global leadership role, while offering new options to countries seeking alternatives to the U.S.-led order. That coincides with the emergence within the U.S. and other Western democracies of movements questioning the foundations of that order. Combined, these trends have significantly weakened the United States' ability to maintain its hegemonic position in a rapidly transforming international landscape. This week on a special edition of Trend Lines, Daniel Nexon joins WPR weekly columnist Howard French to discuss the rapidly changing global order and the United States' place in it. Nexon is a professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. With Alexander Cooley, he is the co-author of “Exit from Hegemony: The Unraveling of the American Global Order.” If you would like to request a full transcript of the episode, please send an email to podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com. Relevant Articles on WPR: The U.S. Still Makes for a Tough Competitor Against China   The U.S. and China Are Both Failing the Global Leadership Test   America's ‘Return' Might Not Be Enough to Revive the West The Liberal World Order Is Dying. What Comes Next? Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie. To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.

The Thomistic Institute
Why Should We Believe God Exists? | Prof. Gregory Doolan

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 72:02


This lecture was delivered at the University of Arizona on September 14, 2021. The handout can be found at https://tinyurl.com/4tj4vebb. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Gregory T. Doolan received his B.A. in political theory from Georgetown University in 1993 and his Ph.D. in philosophy from The Catholic University of America in 2003. He taught philosophy at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C. from 2004–05 and joined the faculty of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America in 2005. Dr. Doolan's research interest is in the area of Aquinas's metaphysics; in recent years, his focus has been on Aquinas's account of the Aristotelian categories of being. A native of Philadelphia, Dr. Doolan currently lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife and three children.

Free Library Podcast
Sheryll Cashin | White Space, Black Hood: Opportunity Hoarding and Segregation in the Age of Inequality

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:07


In conversation with Richard Rothstein Sheryll Cashin's NAACP Image Award–nominated books on racism and inequality include The Failures of Integration, The Agitator's Daughter, and Place, Not Race. The Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Civil Rights and Social Justice at Georgetown University, a contributing editor at Politico, and a member of the Poverty and Race Research Action Council, Cashin formerly worked as a law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and in the Clinton's White House. White Space, Black Hood, which Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. referred to as ''riveting and beautifully written'' and ''meticulously researched'', uses two decades of data to expose the ways in which the U.S. government fostered inequality through the creation of impoverished Black spaces and affluent white spaces. A distinguished fellow of the Economic Policy Institute and a senior fellow (emeritus) at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Richard Rothstein is the author of the bestselling book The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America and is a former national education columnist for The New York Times. (recorded 10/5/2021)

NLP Highlights
133 - PhD Application Series: Preparing Application Materials, with Nathan Schneider and Roma Patel

NLP Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 43:54


This episode is the first in our current series on PhD applications. How should people prepare their applications to PhD programs in NLP? In this episode, we invite Nathan Schneider (Professor of Linguistics and Computer Science at Georgetown University) and Roma Patel (PhD student in Computer Science at Brown University) to share their perspectives on preparing application materials. We start by talking about what factors should go into the decision to apply for PhD programs and how to gain relevant experience. We then talk about the most important parts of an application, focusing particularly on how to write a strong statement of purpose and choose recommendation letter writers. Blog posts mentioned in this episode: - Nathan Schneider's Advice on Statements of Purpose: https://nschneid.medium.com/inside-ph-d-admissions-what-readers-look-for-in-a-statement-of-purpose-3db4e6081f80 - Student Perspectives on Applying to NLP PhD Programs: https://blog.nelsonliu.me/2019/10/24/student-perspectives-on-applying-to-nlp-phd-programs/ Homepages: - Nathan Schneider: https://people.cs.georgetown.edu/nschneid/ - Roma Patel: http://cs.brown.edu/people/rpatel59/ The hosts for this episode are Alexis Ross and Nishant Subramani.

Reduced Shakespeare Company Podcast

Dr. Kavita Mudan Finn is an independent scholar (late of Georgetown University, George Washington University, and most recently, MIT) who is both a creator and scholar of Fan Fiction Studies, and who recently filmed an hour-long interactive conversation with Austin Tichenor on The Shakespeareance. In this excerpt, Dr. Finn discusses how "fan fiction" might be best defined; how fan fiction is a surprisingly new field of study, despite it being a centuries-old practice; some of fan fiction's earliest examples, including the identity of two OG slashers; the distinctions (such as they are) between performance studies and fan studies; what the actual opposite of fandom is; ridiculous casting uproars; and how the shows of the Reduced Shakespeare Company – including the RSC name – are forms of fan fiction themselves. (Length 21:17) The post Fan Fiction Finn appeared first on Reduced Shakespeare Company.

The Running Explained Podcast
42: Coping with Injury with Dr. Victoria Sekely, DPT (@trainsmartrunstrong)

The Running Explained Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 67:54


Dr. Victoria Sekely DPT (@trainsmartrunstrong) joins the show to talk about a very important (and difficult) topic: coping with injury. In this episode, we cover a range of injury-related topics including:⁠ ⁠

Trending In Education
Democracy, Tyranny, Shakespeare and Experimental Psychology with Dr. Fathali Moghaddam

Trending In Education

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:46


Dr. Fathali Moghaddam is a professor in the Department of Psychology at Georgetown University and a faculty fellow at the Berkley Center. His expertise includes culture and intergroup conflict, with a particular focus on the psychology of globalization, radicalization, human rights and duties, and terrorism. You can learn more about his work here. Fathali joins host Mike Palmer on this episode and begins by sharing how his work as an Iranian-born social psychologist was transformed by the revolution and hostage situation in Iran in 1979. He tells how he drove to Tehran from England and spent the ensuing years studying social psychology within the regime of Khomeini. There he learned of the contexts in which dictators can assume power and this has been a strand of his research ever since. We explore his belief that it is the role of educators to ensure we protect and nurture democracy by developing psychological citizens. In a wide-ranging conversation touching on the themes and seminal works of Dr. Moghaddam's career, we also hear what drove him to write his latest book about Shakespeare and the importance of extending beyond narrow specializations to adopt broader, more interdisciplinary mindsets. We conclude with notes on the current state of higher education and the psychology of bureaucracy. It's a profound and insightful conversation that you won't want to miss. Subscribe to Trending in Education wherever you get your podcasts. Visit us at TrendinginEd.com for more great shows like this!

The You-est You™ Podcast
Why You Must Slow Down and be Mindful with Julie Reisler

The You-est You™ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 18:45


Meet Julie Reisler Julie Reisler is a master Life Designer coach with over ten years of coaching experience and a master's degree in health & wellness coaching. Julie is the host and founder of the You-est You Podcast, with over 230+ episodes, and is the founder of the School of Sacredology, a big-hearted community for individuals looking to live from their heart and soul and go from fear to faith. Julie has been featured in Forbes magazine, MindBodyGreen, The Chopra Center, and Thrive Global. She is also a prominent teacher and guide on the popular app Insight Timer and is on the faculty at Georgetown University in their coaching program. To learn more about Julie and how she might support you on your You-est You journey, go to juliereisler.com.   Hey soul family! I am so glad you are here with me. I loved recording this episode and sharing this special story with you, and I hope you enjoy it too. It's important to note that there is a lesson we can find in even the smallest of experiences. We just have to be open to them.   The Turtle Story About 6 months before Covid invaded all of our lives, I had an experience that would change my life. I was making the half-hour trek into DC to take my kids to school, then back to head to the gym to begin my hectic day. As I'm driving down a busy four-lane highway, I see a turtle directly in my path and come to a screeching halt. Somehow, there is no one on either side of me. While I'm frantically trying to figure out what to do with this turtle before traffic comes along, a car stops on the other side of the road. A woman gets out of her vehicle, leaps over the median, grabs the turtle, and carries it to the other side.    Dumbfounded, I asked her, "How did you know what to do?" She quickly explained she was a turtle expert. What were the chances of that? She told me how to handle the situation if it happened again. Much to my surprise, it did...only a few weeks later. I was able to take her advice and help the turtle to safety. Shortly afterward, while I was at a retreat, I found the little turtle that sits on my desk. He reminds me that being slow, steady, and mindful is what I should aim for with each and every day.    Slow and Steady Getting into the mindset of the turtle, becoming mindful of living a slow and steady existence encompasses not only being kind and taking time to honor yourself but being with your emotions. It is essential to be with your physical body, as well as your mental, emotional and spiritual self. Just tuning in and being mindful of who you are at the core of your being.  I know how busy everyone is with kids, partners, careers, but you have to take time either in the beginning or at the end of your day to be present. To make time for slow and steady energy and take a pace for grace.    But for now, at this moment, stop and be mindful of how you can find your slow and steady. Your pace of grace. In what small way can you add this to your life? Being present in the midst of chaos?    Tuning In To truly be present and find that pace for grace, you need to be mindful of your authentic energy and how you can work with your natural state. If you are a high-energy person, how can you make slow and steady work for you? You also have to create healthy connections with yourself. Reaching into emotions you might not want to feel. You can't bypass "negative" emotions simply because they aren't happy or high vibe thoughts. Be present with them. Connect to your authenticity.  Final Thoughts I invite you to reflect on how you can better slow down, get into that mindful, slow, and steady turtle energy. How can you make your life more delicious by being mindful? Being present and living moment to moment and really savoring your life and enjoying life's little gems? Take a look and then implement that pace for grace today.       Sacred Connection As always, this community is a sacred, safe place built on love and acceptance. It was created to help you evolve and expand into your highest self. Please share your wisdom, comments, thoughts. I love hearing from you and learning how you are being your truest, you-est you. Please join us in our Facebook group The You-est You® Community for Soul Seekers Join host Julie Reisler, author and multi-time TEDx speaker, each week to learn how you can tap into your best self and become your You-est You® to achieve inner peace, happiness, and success at a deeper level! Tune in to hear powerful, inspirational stories and expert insights from entrepreneurs, industry thought leaders, and extraordinary human beings that will help to transform your life. Julie also shares a-ha moments that have shaped her life and career and discusses key concepts from her book Get a PhD in YOU   Here's to your being your you-est you! Enjoying the show? For iTunes listeners, get automatic downloads and share the love by subscribing, rating & reviewing here! *Share what you are struggling with or looking to transform with Julie at podcast@juliereisler.com. Julie would love to start covering topics of highest interest to YOU.   You-est You Links: Subscribe to the Podcast  Learn more at JulieReisler.com Become a Sacred Member at the Sacredology® Membership Join The You-est You® Community for Soul Seekers on Facebook Subscribe to Julie's YouTube Channel Book Julie as a speaker at your upcoming event Amazon #1 Best selling book Get a PhD in YOU Download free guided-meditations from Insight Timer Julie's Hungry For More On line Program (10 Module Interactive Course) 15 Days Of Gratitude To Change Your Life on InsightTimer

Scientific Sense ®
Prof. Garance Genicot of Georgetown University on aspirations, inequality, networks and elections

Scientific Sense ®

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 62:00


Tolerance and Compromise in Social Networks, Aspirations and inequality, Electoral Systems and Inequalities in Government Interventions, and Political Reservations as Term-Limits. Scientific Sense ® by Gill Eapen: Prof. Garance Genicot is Professor of Economics at Georgetown University. She studies key issues in development economics such as aspirations, informal credit and insurance markets, intra-household bargaining, social networks, tolerance and inequality. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scientificsense/message

USArabRadio
The Two-State Solution: Revivable or Still Alive

USArabRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 58:42


Dr. Atef Gawad discussed an important topic "The Two-State Solution: Revivable or Still Alive" with his distinguished guests professor Brad R. Roth, journalist Ray Hanania, Dr. Edmund Ghareeb, journalist Said Arikat. Brad R. Roth is a Professor of Political Science and Law at Wayne State University in Detroit. He holds a J.D. from Harvard University (1987), an LL.M. in international and foreign law from Columbia University (1992) and a Ph.D. in jurisprudence and social policy from the University of California at Berkeley (1996). He is the author of Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law (Oxford University Press, 1999), Sovereign Equality and Moral Disagreement (Oxford University Press, 2011), and a wide range of book chapters, journal articles, and commentaries dealing with questions of sovereignty, constitutionalism, human rights, and democracy. Journalist Ray Hanania is an award-winning former Chicago City Hall political reporter. Currently, he writes columns for the Southwest News Newspaper Group in Chicagoland, the Patch Online, and is the US Special Correspondent for the Arab News Newspaper based in Riyadh. Dr. Edmund Ghareeb is an internationally recognized academic, author and a specialist on American, Arab and international affairs. He taught at the American University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, the University of Virginia, Pepperdine University and McGill University. He was the American University's Center for Global Peace's first Mustafa Barzani Distinguished Scholar in residence in Kurdish Studies and launched the first regularly offered courses on the Kurdish history, politics and society in the US. He has been widely interviewed by various Arab, American and other international media outlets. Journalist Said Arikat is a long time Washington based Palestinian journalist and analyst. He is an accomplished media and public affairs specialist who served for several years as the United Nations' chief spokesman in Iraq. He holds an MS from California State University, in Long Beach, CA and is an adjunct professor at the American University in Washington where he teaches a course on the role of media in society. He regularly appears on various media outlets both domestically and internationally. The episode was broadcast: 1/10/2021 US Arab Radio can be heard on wnzk 690 AM, WDMV 700 AM, and WPAT 930 AM. Please visit: www.facebook.com/USArabRadio/ Web site : arabradio.us/ Online Radio: www.radio.net/s/usarabradio Twitter : twitter.com/USArabRadio Instagram : www.instagram.com/usarabradio/ Youtube : US Arab Radio

Politicology
Dear Leader Zuckerberg — The Weekly Roundup

Politicology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 69:41


To access this week's Politicology+ segment and unlock more exclusive content, visit: https://politicology.com/plus National security writer and Georgetown University adjunct professor Molly McKew and political strategist Lucy Caldwell join Ron Steslow to look at some of the most important stories of the week: (01:30)The ongoing debates over passing the Biden Agenda (19:43) Facebook and the fight to get tech giants to reveal their data (39:51) The struggles of women and LGBTQ people in Afghanistan under the Taliban [Politicology+ Exclusive] The first round of subpoenas issued by the January 6th committee // Unlock now and get your private podcast feed at politicology.com/plus Are you learning from Politicology? Contribute now at https://politicology.com/donate Follow this week's panel on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RonSteslow https://twitter.com/lucymcaldwell https://twitter.com/MollyMcKew

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation
398: Ignite Your Team with a Whole Life Approach with Lisa McCarthy and Wendy Leshgold

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 39:33


How do you think big and achieve “whole life” success while dealing with the pressure and pace of today's workplace? Listen as co-founders of the Fast Forward Group, Lisa McCarthy and Wendy Leshgold share their Bold Vision Exercise and how they use this proven method to help companies like Amazon, Facebook, Google, TikTok and JPMorgan Chase transform culture, uplevel talent, and accelerate business growth. This powerful tool is also used to help individuals think big, manage stress, and achieve holistic success. Whether you run a small business, lead a large organization, or simply want to better your life and reach your personal goals, this is for you! Lisa McCarthy Bio: Prior to starting Fast Forward, Lisa McCarthy spent 25 years leading sales organizations at prominent media companies, including ViacomCBS and Univision. She experienced firsthand the toll of high-pressure workplaces where people feel professional success requires personal sacrifice. She and co-founder, Wendy Leshgold, set out to challenge this belief and through their vision, created the Fast Forward Group. Recognized as a people-first leader and change agent with significant commercial impact, Lisa has been named a “Woman to Watch” by Advertising Age and Crain's New York “Business 40 Under 40.” Lisa received her BA from Georgetown University. She lives an “overly fulfilled” life in Port Washington, NY with her husband and three children. Wendy Leshgold Bio: After many years leading teams and coaching executives, Wendy Leshgold understood the challenges people face in high-pressure, always-on corporate environments. In 2012, she and her childhood friend, Lisa McCarthy, launched the Fast Forward Group to help people live their best lives and do their best work. Wendy brought her experience as a successful executive coach to Fast Forward. Prior to her work as an executive coach, she spent more than a decade in advertising, leading teams at Ogilvy & Mather, BBDO and Deutsch, where she worked with brands including Apple, Kodak, IBM, Bank of America and Mitsubishi. Wendy received her BA in History from the University of Virginia, and she is an active board member of the California League of Conservation Voters. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children. In her free time, Wendy can often be found watching her son play baseball and walking her beloved dogs, Scout and Cali. What We Discuss With Lisa McCarthy and Wendy Leshgold in This Episode Workplace trends in terms of training needs The role that leaders play in helping their people manage stress and uncertainty Their unique bold vision exercise Overcoming the fear of setting bold audacious goals Reverse engineering your goals Favorite whole life outcomes and success stories What are power outages and how to get back on track quickly (Demo) Episode Show Notes: https://tinyurl.com/ybr2a2mr

I Want To Believe: Season 2
S4 Halloween 2021 Special | The Exorcism of Roland Hunkeler

I Want To Believe: Season 2

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 30:18


I Want to Believe Podcast – Halloween 2021 – The Exorcism of Roland Hunkeler Music at the top of the episode: Space and Time by Hannah Harleen Voice & Lyrics by Hannah Harleen | Produced by Steve Bops | Hannah's Link Tree Music at the bottom of the episode: The Exorcist Theme by Starfighter (Re-Work) Documentary clips throughout the episode: The Exorcism of Roland Doe on Discovery+ __ On December 26, 1973, The Exorcist was unleashed upon the American public. Some people were sickened by the film's imagery and violent scenes. Some claimed to have fainted, vomited, suffered heart attacks, and more. Despite all the chaos, most movie goers loved the movie and it was the highest grossing, R rated horror movie until the 2017 release of IT. Years before “Based on” or “Inspired by a true story” would ever be seen on the screens of countless horror movies, the general public, at that time, were mostly unaware of the origins of William Peter Blatty's book and screenplay. Those origins transpired about 24 years prior to the film's release. Before we jump into the episode, I did want to give a reminder that ALL of our I Want to Believe social media & email are listed below. My brand-new book, We Only Come Out at Night, is now available for purchase. This book is a collection of short horror stories and can be found online at: SlevikStore.Company.Site. Valerie's Tangled Web of Friends book series can be found on Amazon. In 1949, Blatty was attending Georgetown University when he read an article in The Washington Post titled, Priest Frees Mt. Rainier Boy Reported Held in Devil's Grip. It was written by Post Reporter Bill Brinkley, and according to Blatty, it inspired him to write his 1971 novel, The Exorcist. It was a relatively short article, approximately 500 words, and read in part, “In what is perhaps one of the most remarkable experiences of its kind in recent religious history, a 14-year-old Mount Rainier boy has been freed by a Catholic priest of possession by the devil, Catholic sources reported yesterday." Listen to the episode to hear the whole, reportedly true story about how Roland Hunkeler became possessed and eventually exorcised. Sources: Washington Post | Diabolical Confusions | Alex Matsuo | TFP.org | River Front Times Social Media & Email: Insta | Email --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/207believe/support

Learn Skin with Dr. Raja and Dr. Hadar
Episode 104: Plant-Based Diet and Its Influence on Gut Permeability and Metabolic Syndrome (Paleovedic)

Learn Skin with Dr. Raja and Dr. Hadar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 26:58


Hankering for a little ancient wisdom? Aren't we all. This week, Dr. Akil Palanisamy weaves Ayurveda, western medicine, the gut, and plant based diets into an integrative practitioner's dream! Each Thursday, join Dr. Raja and Dr. Hadar, board certified dermatologists, as they share the latest evidence based research in integrative dermatology. To learn more about increased intestinal permeability in dermatological disease and metabolic syndrome, attend Dr. Palanisamy's lecture at the 2021 Integrative Dermatology Symposium.   Akil Palanisamy, MD is the author of the bestseller "The Paleovedic Diet - A complete program to burn fat, increase energy, and reverse disease." Dr. Akil studied biochemistry at Harvard University, received his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and completed his residency at Stanford University. He also completed a fellowship in integrative medicine with Dr. Andrew Weil at the University of Arizona and is certified by the Center for Mind-Body Medicine at Georgetown University.

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership
125: The Surprising Gift of Doubt for Nonprofit Leaders (Marc Pitman)

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 51:44


125: The Surprising Gift of Doubt for Nonprofit Leaders (Marc Pitman)SUMMARYAs a nonprofit leader, you constantly face new challenges for which none of your training and previous experience can prepare you. Under such circumstances, it's easy to lose confidence and succumb to those feelings of doubt, and wonder where leadership solutions might come from.  As a long-time leadership coach and fundraiser in the nonprofit sector, Marc Pitman understands these feelings of insecurity, and has written a fascinating book called The Surprising Gift of Doubt, which offers practical advice for any leader to better embrace their innate confidence and abilities. In episode #125 of the Path Podcast, Marc and I discuss this gift of doubt, the flaws in how we typically learn about leadership, and what we can do to better embrace all four of his leadership quadrants. A must-listen for current and aspiring nonprofit leaders!ABOUT MARCConcord Leadership Group founder Marc A. Pitman, CSP® has been leading organizations and teams for decades. His latest book is The Surprising Gift of Doubt: Use Uncertainty to Become the Exceptional Leader You Are Meant to Be. He's also the author of Ask Without Fear!®  which has been translated into Dutch, Polish, Spanish, and Mandarin. He's also the executive director of TheNonprofitAcademy.com and a former Advisory Panel member of Rogare, a prestigious international fundraising think tank. Marc's expertise and enthusiasm has caught the attention of media organizations as diverse as The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Real Simple, SUCCESS Magazine, NBC, Al Jazeera, and Fox News. Marc tweets regularly at @marcapitman. Over the past 18 years, Marc's organizational and leadership coaching and trainings have helped tens of thousands of nonprofits advance their missions, meet revenue goals, and improve the lives of their staff and supporters including clients like Maine Public Broadcasting, Georgetown University, In Defense of Animals, Habitat for Humanity, Chabad on Campus, and Islamic Relief USA. He is the husband to his best friend and the father of three amazing kids. EPISODE TOPICS & RESOURCESMarc's books The Surprising Gift of Doubt and Ask Without Fear®Sir John Whitmore's book Coaching for PerformanceReady for a Mastermind?  Apply Today!

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Constraining Putin's Russia

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Thomas Graham, distinguished fellow at CFR, leads a conversation on constraining Putin's Russia. FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Thomas Graham with us to talk about Putin's Russia. Mr. Graham is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior advisor at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He is cofounder of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program at Yale University, and is also a research fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale. He previously served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and director for Russian affairs from 2002 to 2004. His résumé is very distinguished. I will just also say that he is a U.S. diplomat who served two tours of duty in Moscow, where he worked on political affairs. So, Mr. Graham, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought you could get us started by talking about the primary interests at stake in U.S.-Russia relations. GRAHAM: Great. Thank you very much, Irina, for that introduction, and it's a real pleasure to be with all of you here today. I want to start with three broad points that will frame the rest of our discussion. The first is that the problem that the United States faces is not simply with Putin; it is with Russia more generally speaking. The last seven years of very difficult, challenging adversarial relationship is really not an aberration in the history of the relationship between our two countries. In fact, from the moment the United States emerged as a major power on the global stage at the very end of the nineteenth century, we have had a rivalry with Russia. And the issues that divide us today are the ones that divided us 125, 150 years ago: We have opposing worldviews. We have different geopolitical interests. And clearly, we have different systems of values that inform our domestic political systems. This rivalry has intensified, ebbed and flowed during the twentieth century. But the effort we made at partnership after the breakup of the Soviet Union up until 2014, marked by the eruption of the crisis in Ukraine, is really the aberration in the history of relations between our two countries and one that was founded very much on the fact that Russia endured a period of strategic weakness. So the issue we have to deal with Russia and how we're going to deal with Russia well into the future, even after Putin departs—which he will, obviously, at some point, if only for biological reasons. The second point that I would make is that Russia is not going to go away. We hear a lot in the public debate in the United States about Russian decline, about the population/demographic problems it has, about its stagnating economy, and so forth. None of this is necessarily untrue, but I think it tends to exaggerate the problems that Russia faces. It ignores the problems that all other major countries face—including China, the United States, and many major European countries—but it also overlooks the very great strengths that Russia has had for decades that are going to make it a player and an important player on the global stage, nuclear weapons to begin with. We should never forget that Russia remains the only country that can destroy the United States as a functioning society in thirty minutes. Russia has the largest natural endowment of any country in the world, a country that can pretend to self-sufficiency and, in fact, is better placed than most other countries to deal with a breakdown in globalization in the decades to come if that, indeed, happens. It has a veto on the U.N. Security Council, which makes it an important player on issues of importance to the United States, and it has a talented population that has fostered a scientific community that, for example, is capable of taking advances in technology and developing the military applications from them. Just look at the strength that Russia exhibits in cyberspace, for example—again, a major challenge for the United States. So Russia is going to continue to be a challenge. One other thing that I should have mentioned here is that the Russian state throughout history and Putin's Russia today has demonstrated a keen ability to mobilize the resources of their own society for state purposes. So even if in relative terms they may be weaker and weakening vis-à-vis China and the United States, in some ways that political will, that ability to mobilize, allows Russia to play a much larger role than mere indicators of its economic size and population size would suggest. Now, Russia clashes with the United States across a whole range of issues, and as I said that is going to continue for some time. And this brings me to my third point: How we should think about American foreign policy, what our guidelines should be in dealing with Russia. And here there are three, I think, key elements to this. First, the United States needs to preserve strategic stability. We need to have that nuclear balance between us (sic) and the United States. This is an existential question. And as I already mentioned, Russia does have a tremendous nuclear capability. Second, the United States should seek to manage its competition with Russia responsibly. We want to avoid or reduce the risk of a direct military conflict that could escalate to the nuclear level. This is—also, I think, recognizes that the United States is not going to be able to compel Russia to capitulate on issues that are of interest to us, nor are we going to be able to radically change the way they think about their own national interests. So it's a competitive relationship and we need to manage that responsibly. And finally, given the complex world that we live in today—the very real transnational challenges we face: climate change, pandemic diseases, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction—the United States should seek, to the extent possible, ways to cooperate with Russia in dealing with these issues. We should recognize that Russia is not necessarily the only player nor necessarily the most important player in dealing with these challenges, but it does have a role to play along with other major powers in handling these transnational issues. So those, I think, are three sort of broad points that help set the stage for our discussion. Now let me turn sort of very briefly to the questions about U.S. policy. How do we deal with this Russia? What are sort of—the way we should think about American foreign policy? And here the point I would make is that we should think of the policy in terms of what I would call the three Ds: defense, deterrence, and dialogue. Now, defense and deterrence in many ways go together. If you have a very good defense, if you demonstrate an ability and willingness to defend your interests effectively and deliberately, then you tend to deter another power. They have less reason to want to attack you. But if deterrence fails, you very much need to be able to defend yourself—to disrupt Russian operations in cyberspace, for example, or disrupt military operations by the Russians that you find problematic in some way. So defense and deterrence go together, and we need to think about that. Now, you build these elements on a number of other things that we're all familiar with. A strong military—strong, capable military—is, obviously, an element of both defense and deterrence, and something that we have managed quite well in the past and I imagine will manage quite well going into the future. Cyber defenses are also an important element of constraining Russia on the global stage. Now, here the United States really has much room for improvement. We built our internet, our cyberspace largely for the accessibility, the ability to pass information from one entity to another, and we spent much less attention to the security of that system. As cyberspace has become more important to our socioeconomic and political lives, we really need to devote much more attention to cybersecurity, hardening our commuter—computer networks, for example, making sure we have strong passwords and so forth, something that I think we now recognize but we need to put a much greater effort into doing that. Third area of defense and deterrence is strong alliances. When we're thinking about Russia, this is clearly the transatlantic community, NATO, our relations with our other European partners. And here, we need to develop the types of military/defense cooperation that we need to demonstrate quite clearly that the United States, along with the rest of the NATO allies, is ready and prepared to meet its Article 5 guarantees to collective security should the Russians do something that is untoward in our neighborhood. And then, finally, and I think of increasing importance, is the question of national unity. National unity, national resilience, has really become a key element in defense and deterrence at this point. We need to demonstrate to the Russians that we have sufficient national unity to clearly identify what our interests are and pursue them on the international stage. One of Putin's close colleagues several years ago said that what Putin is doing is messing with the Americans' minds, and certainly we've seen that over the past several years. Putin hasn't sowed the discord in the United States, but he certainly has tried to exploit it for Russian purposes. And this is something that he's going to concentrate on in the future, in part because he recognizes the dangers of military confrontation with the United States. So great-power competition, from the Kremlin's standpoint, is going to move very, very quickly from the kinetic realm to the cyber realm, and we need to be able to deal with that. So building national unity at home, overcoming our polarization, is really perhaps one of the key steps in constraining Russia on the global stage. And then, finally, some very brief words about dialogue. We tend to downplay this in our national discussion. Many believe that diplomatic relations are—should not be branded as a reward for bad behavior. But I think if you look at this objectively, you'll see that diplomatic relations are very important as a way of defending and advancing our national concerns. It's a way that we can convey clearly to the Russians what our expectations are, what our goals are, what our redlines are, and the responses that we're capable of taking if Russia crosses them. At the same time, we can learn from the Russians what their goals are, what their motivations are, what their redlines are, and we can factor that into our own policy. This is a major element of managing the competition between our two countries responsibly. You'll see that we have begun to engage in negotiations and diplomacy with the Russians much more under President Biden than we did under President Trump. We've already launched strategic stability talks with the aim of coming up with a new concept of strategic stability that's adequate to the strategic environment of the present day and the near future. We've engaged in cybersecurity talks, which my understanding is have, in fact, had some success over the past several weeks. Where we, I think, have lagged is in the discussion of regional issues—Europe, Ukraine, the Middle East, for example. These are areas where there is still potential for conflict, and the United States and Russia ought to be sitting down and talking about these issues on a regular basis. So three Ds—defense, deterrence, and diplomacy or dialogue—are the ways that we should be thinking about our relationship with Russia. And obviously, we'll need to adjust each of these three elements to the specific issue at hand, whether it be in Europe, whether it be in the nuclear realm, cyberspace, and so forth. Now, with that as a way—by way of introduction, I am very pleased to entertain your questions. FASKIANOS: Tom, thanks very much for that terrific overview and analysis. We're going to go to all of you now for your questions. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the icon, and I will call on you, and you can tell us what institution you are with; or you can type your question in the Q&A box, although if you want to ask it you can raise your hand. We encourage that. And if you're typing your question, please let us know what college or university you're with. So I'm going to take the first raised-hand question from Babak Salimitari. And unmute yourself. Q: Can you guys hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hello. I'm a third-year UCI student, economics. I have a question. I'm going to sound a bit like Sean Hannity here, so please forgive me, but I have a question about that Nord Stream 2 pipeline that you constantly hear on the news, and it just doesn't make that much sense for me of why this pipeline was allowed to be completed into the heart of Europe considering Russia's strength with natural gases and the leverage that they have over Europe with that pipeline. Why was that allowed to be completed? GRAHAM: Well, I think from the standpoint of the Biden administration this was a matter of what we call alliance management. Germany is clearly a key ally for the United States in Europe, and the Germans were very committed to the completion of that pipeline, starting with Chancellor Angela Merkel down through I think both the leading political parties and the German business community. So I think they made the decision for that. But let me step back because I'd like to challenge a lot of the assumptions about the Nord Stream 2 project here in the United States, which I think misconceive it, misframe the question, and tend to exaggerate the dangers that is poses. The first point that I would make is that Europe now and in the future will have and need Russian gas. It's taken a substantial amount in the past—in the past decades, and even as it moves forward towards a green revolution it will continue to take considerable amounts of Russian gas. It can't do without that gas. So the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, contrary to what you hear in the United States or at the U.S. Congress, I don't think poses an additional threat to Europe's energy security, no larger than the threat that was posed before that pipeline was completed. The Europeans, I think are aware of the problems that that poses, and they've taken steps over the past several years to integrate the gas—the gas distribution network in Europe, to build facilities to import liquified natural gas, all as a way of eroding the leverage that Gazprom might have had over energy markets in Europe. And that has been quite successful over the past—over the past several years. Now, I think, you know, the other issue that comes up in the discussion in the United States is Ukraine, because Nord Stream 2 clearly provides Russia with a way to import the gas into Europe and bypass Ukraine at the—at the same time. And Ukraine is going to suffer a significant loss in budgetary revenue because of the decline in transit fees that it gets from the transportation of Russian gas across its territory. You know, that is a problem, but there are ways of dealing with that: by helping Ukraine fill the budgetary gap, by helping Ukraine transition away from a reliance on gas to other forms of energy, of helping Ukraine develop the green-energy resources that will make it a much more important partner in the European energy equation than it is now. And then finally, you know, it strikes me as somewhat wrongheaded for Ukraine to put itself in a position where it is reliant on a country that is clearly a belligerent for a significant part of its federal revenue. So we need to think hard with the Ukrainians about how they deal with this issue, how they wean themselves off Russian transit fees, and then I think we have a situation where we can help Ukraine, we can manage the energy-security situation in Europe, we can reduce any leverage that Russia might have, and that Nord Stream 2 really doesn't pose a significant risk to the United States or our European allies over the long run. FASKIANOS: Thank you. We're going to take the next question from the written queue from Kenneth Mayers, who's at St Francis—sorry, that just popped away; oh, sorry—St. Francis College. Thinking beyond this triangular framework, what pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually, even globally, beneficial ways? GRAHAM: What triangular relationship are we talking about? FASKIANOS: His—thinking beyond this triangular framework and— GRAHAM: Oh, OK. So I think it's defense, deterrence, and diplomacy is the— FASKIANOS: Correct. GRAHAM: OK. Can you repeat the final part of the question, then? FASKIANOS: What pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually beneficial ways? GRAHAM: Well, there are a number of areas in which we can work together beneficially. If you think about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, for example, the United States and Russia over the past two decades have played a major role in both securing weapons that were located in Russia, but also in securing highly-enriched uranium that was in Soviet-designed reactors throughout the former Soviet space. We have taken a lead together in setting down rules and procedures that reduce the risk of nuclear material—fissile material getting into the hands of terrorist organizations. And we have played a role together in trying to constrain the Iranian nuclear program. Russia played an instrumental role in the conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that we signed in 2015 that the Trump administration walked away with, but they will continue to play a role in constraining Iranians' nuclear ambitions going forward. And we've also worked in a cooperative fashion in dealing with the North Korean nuclear program. So there are areas in nonproliferation where the two countries can work together. On climate change, I mean, I think the big challenge for the United States is actually persuading Russia that climate change is a significant threat to their own security. They're slowly beginning to change that view, but as they come around to recognizing that they have to deal with climate change there are a number of areas where the two countries can cooperate. One of the things that climate is doing is melting the permafrost. That is destabilizing the foundation of much of Russia's energy infrastructure in areas where gas and oil are extracted for export abroad. The United States has dome technologies that the Russians might find of interest in stabilizing that infrastructure. They suffer from problems of Siberian fires—peat-bog fires, forest fires—an area that, obviously, is of concern to the United States as well. And there may be room for cooperation there, two. And then, finally, you know, the United States and Russia have two of the leading scientific communities in the entire world. We ought to be working together on ways that we can help mitigate the consequences of climate change going forward. So I see an array of areas where the two countries could cooperate, but that will depend on good diplomacy in Washington and a receptivity on the part of the Russians which we haven't seen quite yet. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Jeffrey Ko. You can unmute yourself. Thank you. Q: Hi. So I'm Jeffrey Ko. I'm an international relations master's student at Carnegie Mellon. And my question has to deal with these private military forces, and especially the Wagner Group. And so I would like to know, you know, how does this play into our security strategy regarding Russia in countries that have seen proxy warfare? And how does this—how difficult will it be to engage with Russia either diplomatically or militarily on the use of these gray-zone tactics, and specifically utilizing the Wagner Group as an informal branch of Russia's military? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, I do think that we need, one, to sit down and have a discussion with Russia about the use of these private military forces, particularly the Wagner firm, which has played a significant role in a number of conflicts across the globe in the Middle East, Africa, and in Latin America. But we also ought to help the countries that are of interest to us deal with the problems that the Wagner Group causes. You know, the United States had to deal with the Wagner Group in Syria during the Syrian civil war. You know, despite the fact that we had a deconfliction exercise with the Russians at that point, tried to prevent military conflicts between our two militaries operating in close proximity, when the Wagner forces violated those strictures and actually began to attack a U.S. facility, we had no hesitation about using the force that we had to basically obliterate that enemy. And the Wagner Group suffered casualties numbering in the hundreds, one to two hundred. I think the Russians got the message about that, that you don't—you don't mess with the United States military, certainly not while using a private military company like Wagner. You know, in places like Libya, where Wagner is quite active, I think the United States needs a major diplomatic effort to try to defuse the Libyan crisis. And part of the solution to that would be negotiating an agreement that calls for the withdrawal of all foreign military forces and certainly private military groups from Libyan territory, and lean on the Russians to carry that through. In any event, you know, this is not going to be an easy issue to resolve. I think we deal with this by—country by country, and we focus our attention on those countries where our national interests are greatest. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Jill Dougherty, who's at Georgetown University. The Putin administration appears to be hardening its control of Russia's society with the purpose of keeping Putin in power at least until 2036. Most recent example is the Duma elections that just took place. Will this crackdown domestically affect or damage U.S.-Russia relations? GRAHAM: Thank you, Jill. Always a good question and always a difficult question to answer. You know, I think the issue here is the extent to which the Biden administration wants to make the domestic political situation in Russia a key item on its agenda with Russia over the next—over the next few years. You know, my impression from the conversations I've had with people in the administration—in and around the administration is that President Biden is not going to focus on this. You know, his focus really is going to be China, and what he wants to do is maintain something of a status quo in the relationship with Russia. You will notice that the second round of sanctions that the United States levied with regard to the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, something that was mandated by U.S. law, were actually quite mild—much less extreme, much less punitive than the legislation allowed—I think a signal that the Biden administration was not going to let domestic political issues in Russia overwhelm the agenda that the United States has, which is going to be focused on strategic stability, cyber issues, and so forth. So my immediate reaction is that the Duma election is really not going to have a dramatic impact on the state of the relationship between our two countries. We accept the fact that Russia is an authoritarian system. It is becoming more authoritarian. We will continue to try to find ways to support those elements of civil society we can, but always being careful not to do it in ways that causes the Russian government to crack down even harder on those individuals. This is a very sort of difficult needle to thread for the United States, but I think that's the way we'll go and you won't see this as a major impediment to the improvement of relations—which, as we all know, are at a very low level at this point in any event. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. Let's go next to Sujay Utkarsh. Q: Hi, yeah. Can you hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. So, regarding the issue about cyber warfare, I was wondering if you can go into more detail about what advantages the Russians have in cyberspace and what the United States can do to compete with those advantages. GRAHAM: A good question and a difficult question for people outside the government to answer, since we're not privy to all the information about Russian cyber capabilities nor are we privy to the information about American cyber capabilities. Both countries cloak those programs in a great deal of secrecy. You know, it seemed to me that one of the advantages that perhaps Russia has is that it's a much more closed society than the United States. Now, I'm thinking simply in terms of the way societies can be disrupted through cyberspace. We're a much more open society. It's easier to access our internet. We are—just as I mentioned before, we are a polarized society right now. That allows Russia many avenues into our domestic political system in order to exacerbate the tensions between various elements in our society. The United States can't reply in the same way in dealing with Russia. You know, second, Russia, in building its own internet, its own cyberspace, has paid much more attention to security than the United States has. So, you know, I would presume that its computer systems are somewhat harder to penetrate than American systems are at this point, although another factor to take into account here is that much of the initial effort in building up cyberspace—the Web, the computer networks—in Russia was built with American technology. You know, the Googles, the Intels, and others played an instrumental role in providing those types of—that type of equipment to the Russians. So I wouldn't exaggerate how much stronger they are there. And then, finally, I think what is probably one of the strengths, if you want to call it that, is that Russia is probably a little more risk-prone in using its cyber tools than the United States is at this point, in part because we think as a society we're more vulnerable. And that does give Russia a slight advantage. That said, this shouldn't be a problem that's beyond the capability of the United States to manage if we put our minds to it. We have done a lot more over the past several years. We are getting better at this. And I think we'll continue to improve in time and with the appropriate programs, the appropriate education of American society. FASKIANOS: Thank you. The next question is a written one from Kim-Leigh Tursi, a third-year undergraduate at Temple University. Where do you see Russia in relation to the rise of China, and how does that affect how the U.S. might approach foreign policy toward Russia? GRAHAM: Well, you know, that's an important question, obviously one that a lot of people have focused on recently. You know, Russia and China have developed a very close working strategic relationship over the—over the past several years, but I think we should note that the Russian effort to rebuild its relations with China go back to the late Soviet period to overcome the disadvantages that then the Soviet Union felt they had because of the poor relationship with China and the ability of the United States to exploit that relationship to Moscow's detriment. So relations have been improving for the past twenty-five, thirty years; obviously, a dramatic acceleration in that improvement after 2014 and the breakdown in relations between Russia and the West. Now, there are a number of reasons for this alignment at this point. One, the two countries do share at a very general level a basic view of for—a basic dislike of what they see as American ambitions to dominate the global—the global security and economic environment. They don't like what they consider to be American hegemonic goals. Second, the economies seem to be complementary at this point. Russia does have a wealth of natural resources that the Chinese need to fuel their robust economic growth. You have similar domestic political systems. And all of this, I think, is reinforced by what appears to be a very good personal relationship between President Putin and President Xi Jinping. These two leaders have met dozens of times over the past five to seven years and have maintained, I think, very robust contact even during the—during the pandemic. So there are very good strategic reasons why these two countries enjoy good relations. They are going to step those up in the near term. The Russians are continuing to provide the Chinese with significant sophisticated military equipment. They've also undertaken to help the Chinese build an early warning system for ballistic missiles, and when that's completed it will make China only the third country in the world to have such a system along with Russia and the United States. Now, I would argue that this strategic alignment does pose something of a challenge to the United States. If you look at American foreign policy or American foreign policy tradition, one of the principles that has guided the United States since the end of the nineteenth century, certainly throughout the twentieth century, was that we needed to prevent the—any hostile country or coalition of hostile countries from dominating areas of great strategic importance, principally Europe, East Asia, and more recently the Middle East. A Russian-Chinese strategic alignment certainly increases the chances of China dominating East Asia. Depending on how close that relationship grows, it also could have significant impact on Europe and the way Europe relates to this Russian-Chinese bloc, and therefore to the United States as a whole. So we should have an interest in trying to sort of attenuate the relationship between the two countries. At a minimum, we shouldn't be pursuing a set of policies that would push Russia closer to China. Second, I think we ought to try to normalize our diplomatic relationship with the Russians. Not that we're necessarily going to agree on a—on a range of issues at this point, but we need to give the Russians a sense that they have other strategic options than China going forward—something that would, I think, enhance their bargaining position with the Chinese going forward and would complicate China's own strategic calculus, which would be to our advantage. I think we also should play on Russia's concerns about strategic autonomy, this idea that Russia needs to be an independent great power on the global stage, that it doesn't want to be the junior partner or overly dependent on any one country as a way, again, of attenuating the tie with China. The one thing that I don't think we can do is drive a wedge between those two countries, in part because of the strategic reasons that I've mentioned already that bring these two countries together. And any very crude, I think, effort to do that will actually be counterproductive. Both Beijing and Moscow will see through that, quite clearly, and that will only lead to a closing of the ranks between those two countries, which as I said is a strategic challenge for the United States going forward. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Holli Semetko, who's at Emory University. Polarization is something we must overcome, as you said, but those of us working on social media have some evidence to suggest that social media has fostered political polarization in the U.S. Yuri Milner, a Russian Israeli entrepreneur, invested in an early round of Facebook funding with help from VTB, a Russian state-controlled bank, as well as his investment in Jared Kushner's real estate firm. What is the level of FDI from Russia in the U.S. and do you see it as a threat to national security? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, the actual level of Russian FDI in the United States is quite small. You know, you have some few, I think, good examples of it—the one that you've mentioned with Yuri Milner, for example. There was some investment in a steel factory some years ago. But by and large, there hasn't been a significant amount of Russian foreign direct investment in the United States. I think our growing concerns about Russia have made us even more leery of allowing Russian investment, particularly in sectors that we consider critical to American national security. So I'm not deeply concerned about that going forward. I think we probably face a much greater challenge from the Chinese in that regard. Of course, you've seen efforts by the United States to deal more harshly or look more closely at Chinese investment in the United States over the past several years. Let me just make one sort of final point on social media since it's come up. You know, Russia is a problem. We need to pay attention to Russia in that space. But again, I don't think that we should exaggerate Russia's influence, nor should we focus simply on Russia as the problem in this area. There is a major problem with disinformation in social media in the United States, much of that propagated by sources within the United States, but there are a host of other countries that also will try to affect U.S. public opinion through their intrusions into American social media. You know, given our concerns about First Amendment rights, freedom of speech and so forth, you know, I think we have problems in sort of really clamping down on this. But what we need to do, certainly, is better educate the American public about how to deal with the information that crosses their electronic devices day in and day out. Americans need to be aware of how they can be manipulated, and they need to understand and know where they can go to find reliable information. Again, given the political polarization in our country today, this is a very real challenge and difficult one. But I think if we think long term about this problem, the key really is educating the American public. An educated American public is going to be the best defense against foreign countries, other hostile forces trying to use social media to undermine our national unity and exacerbate the politics of our country. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Eoin Wilson-Manion, who's raised his hand. Q: Hello. Can you hear me now? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. Well, thank you. I just wanted to ask if you could touch a little bit more on Russia's presence in Syria and what that means for U.S. interests in Syria and I guess the larger Middle East. I'm Eoin from Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks very much. GRAHAM: Well, you know, the Russians entered Syria in 2015 militarily largely to save Assad from what they thought was imminent overthrow by what they considered a radical Islamic force, a group of terrorists that they thought would challenge Russian interests not only in Syria but would fuel extremist forces inside Russia itself, particularly in the North Caucasus but farther afield than that—even into Moscow, into areas that were Muslim-dominated inside Russia itself. So they had very good national security reasons for going in. Those ran—I mean, the Russian presence in Syria clearly has run counter to what the United States was trying to do at that point since we clearly aligned against Assad in favor of what we considered moderate reformist forces that were seeking a more sort of democratic future for Syria as part of this broader Arab Spring at that time. So there was a clear conflict at that point. You know, subsequently and in parallel with its continued presence in Syria, the Russians have extended their diplomatic—their diplomatic effort to other countries in the region. Russia enjoys a fairly robust diplomatic relationship with Israel, for example, that has been grounded in counterterrorism cooperation, for example. They have a sort of strange relationship, largely positive, with Turkey that they have pursued over the past several years. We know of the ties that they've had in Tehran, in Iran for some time. They have reached out to the Saudis and the Saudis have bought some military equipment from them. We see them in Egypt and Libya, for example. So they're a growing presence, a growing diplomatic presence in the Middle East, and this does pose some problems for the United States. From the middle of the 1970s onward, one of the basic thrusts of American foreign policy was to limit the role the Russians played in the Middle East. We sidelined them in the negotiations between the Arabs and the Israelis in the 1970s and in the 1980s. We limited their diplomatic contacts to countries that we considered critical partners and allies in that part of the world. Now I think the geopolitical situation has changed. Our own interest in the Middle East has diminished over time, in part because of the fracking revolution here in the United States. Gas and oil, we've got close to being independent in that area. We're not as dependent on the Middle East as we once were for energy sources. And also, as, you know, the Biden administration has been clear, we do want to pivot away from the Middle East and Europe to focus more of our energies on what we see as the rising and continuing strategic challenge posed by China. So I think that means that going forward the United States is going to have to deal with Russia in a different fashion in the Middle East than in the past. We're going to have to recognize them as a continuing presence. We're not going to be able to push them out, in part because we're not prepared to devote the resources to it. We have countries that are still important to us—Saudi Arabia, Israel for example—that do want a Russian presence in the Middle East. And so what we ought to do, it seems to me, is to begin that discussion about how we're going to manage the rivalry in the Middle East. Now, it's not all simply competition. There are areas for cooperation. We can cooperate in dealing with Iran, for example, the Iran nuclear dossier, as we have had in the past. Neither country has an interest in Iran developing nuclear weapons. Second, I think the two countries also would like to see a Middle East that's not dominated by a single regional power. So despite the fact that the Russians have worked together quite closely with the Iranians in Syria, they don't share Iranian ambitions elsewhere in the Middle East. And if you look at the diplomatic ties that the Russians have nurtured over the past with Turkey, with Israel, Saudi Arabia for example, none of these are friends of Iran, to put it mildly. So we can talk, I think, to the Russians of how our—you know, we can conduct ourselves so as to foster the development of a regional equilibrium in the Middle East that tends to stabilize that region, makes it less of a threat to either country, less of a threat to America's European allies, and use this as a basis for, again, sort of not escalating the tension in the region but moderating it in some ways that works to the long-term advantage of the United States. FASKIANOS: Next question from Michael Strmiska, who's a professor at Orange County Community College in New York state. Do you see any hope of persuading Russia to abandon its occupation of Crimea in the near term? Or do you think this is like the occupation of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia after World War II, where a very long timespan was needed before any liberation was realistically possible? GRAHAM: Well, I guess my answer to those two questions would be yes and no, or no and yes. On Crimea, you know, I see no sort of near-term scenario that would lead to the Russians agreeing to the return of Crimea to Ukraine. Quite the contrary, Russia has taken steps since 2014 they continue at this point to further integrate Crimea into the Russian Federation politically, economically, socially, and so forth. The Russians have also built up their military presence in Crimea as a way of enhancing their domination or their influence in the greater Black Sea region. So I see no set of circumstances that would change that, certainly not in the—in the near term. And I think, you know, the Ukrainian effort to focus attention on Crimea is not going to, in fact, gain a great deal of traction with Europe nor with the United States going forward, though we will maintain the principled position of not recognizing Russia's incorporation or annexation of Crimea. You know, I don't think that the Crimean and Baltic situations are necessarily analogous. You know, in the Baltic states there was a significant indigenous element, governments in exile, that supported the independence of those countries. There was a fulcrum that the United States or a lever that the United States could use over time to continue pressure on the Soviets that eventually led to the independence of those countries as the Soviet Union broke down and ultimately collapsed at the end of the 1980s into 1991. I don't see any significant indigenous element in Crimea nor a movement of inhabitants of Crimea outside Crimea that wants Crimea to be returned to Ukraine. I think we need to remember that a significant part of the population in Ukraine is Russian military, retired Russian military, that feels quite comfortable in—within the Russian Federation at this point. So if I were being quite frank about this, although I think the United States should maintain its principled position and not recognize annexation of Crimea, I don't see anything over the long term, barring the collapse of Russia itself, that will change that situation and see Ukraine (sic; Crimea) reincorporated into the Ukrainian state. FASKIANOS: So there are a couple questions in the chat about Russia's economy: What is their economy like today? And what are the effects of the sanctions? And from Steve Shinkel at the Naval War College: How do you assess the tie between Russia's economy and being able to continue to modernize its military and ensure a stable economy? And will economic factors and Russia's demographic challenges be a future constraining factor? So if you could— GRAHAM: Yeah. No, no, just take the economy. Obviously, a big issue, and it will be a constraining factor. I mean, the Russian economy is stagnating and it has for some—for some time. They enjoyed—the Russian economy enjoyed a very rapid period of growth during President Putin's first presidential—two presidential terms in the 2000s, but since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 Russia has run into very difficult economic times. In fact, it's never really recovered from that crisis. If you look at the past ten years, barely any growth in the Russian economy at all. If you look at the impact that that has had on Russians themselves, there's basically been no growth in real disposable income; rather, a decline over the past six or seven years. I think the Russians recognize that. The question is whether they can come up with a set of policies that actually will reverse that and that lead to a more robustly growing economy. Now, what the Kremlin has tried to do is not so much reform the economy—which I think is necessary if they're going to enjoy robust economic growth—as much as professionalize the economy; that is—that is, bring in a younger sort of cadre who are well educated, many of them educated in the West, who understand how modern economies function and can keep the economy stable at least at the macro level. And this is one of the reasons that Western sanctions have not had nearly the impact on Russian behavior that many had hoped for or anticipated back in 2014 when we began to turn repeatedly to this tool in response to Russian activities and operations against Ukraine. You know, it has had some impact. I think the IMF would say that it's probably taken a percentage point off—or, not a percentage point, but a tenth of a percentage point off of Russia's GDP growth over the past several years. That certainly hasn't been enough to change Russian behavior. But it hasn't been more, in fact, because the governors of the—of the central bank have dealt quite adeptly with that, and maintain said Russian macroeconomic stability and some sort of foundation for the economy to grow going forward. I imagine that's going to continue into the—into the future as well. So it is a constraining factor. Then I would end with what I—with a point that I made in my introduction. Russia does have a tremendous ability to mobilize its resources for state purposes, to extract what it needs from society at large to modernize the military, to maintain certainly Russia's defenses and also some capability to project power abroad. So I wouldn't write them off because of that. I think it's going—still going to be a serious power, but not nearly as great a challenge to the United States as if it, in fact, solved its demographic problems, its economic problems, and had a robustly growing economy, greater resources that it could devote to a whole range of things that would improve its standing on the global stage vis-à-vis the United States and vis-à-vis China. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we are at the end of our time. And I apologize to everybody. We had over twenty written questions still pending and raised hands. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you, but we do try to end on time. So, Thomas Graham, thank you very much for sharing your insights and analysis with us today. We appreciate it. And to all of you for your terrific questions and comments, we appreciate it. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, October 6, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. And we will focus on the Indo-Pacific with Dhruva Jaishankar, who is the executive director of the Observer Research Foundation America and nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute. And in the meantime, I encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. So, Tom, thank you very much. GRAHAM: Thank you. Good luck to all of you. (END)

Candid Leadership
Finding the right teammate with Dr. Rebecca Patterson

Candid Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 23:52


Dr. Rebecca Patterson is the Associate Director of the Center for Security Studies and Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. She educates the next generation of analysts, policymakers, and scholars about the range of international and national security problems and foreign policy issues of the 21st century. In this episode, we discuss the importance of learning in national security and the culture of graduate programs. Rebecca shares the importance of mentoring and finding the right teammate in life that can walk with you through all phases of the journey.

Diplomatic Immunity
It's Raining at Summit Greenland: The Geopolitics of the Arctic with Sherri Goodman and Jeremy Mathis

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 31:47


Season 3, Episode 3: ISD Director of Programs and Research Kelly McFarland talks about the Arctic with Sherri Goodman of the Wilson Center and Jeremy Mathis of the Science, Technology, and International Affairs program in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown. Sherri and Jeremy discuss the deteriorating climate situation in the Arctic, security challenges, defense capabilities, geopolitical competition between the United States, Russia, and China, and the recent death of a Russian official on an exercise in the region. Featured articles: The New Arctic: Navigating the Realities, Possibilities, and Problems, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (July 2018) Sarah Kaplan and Andrew Ba Tran, "Nearly 1 in 3 Americans experienced a weather disaster this summer," The Washington Post, September 4, 2021 Episode recorded: Monday, September 20th, 2021.  Episode image: U.S.-Canada Fourth Joint Mission To Map the Continental Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. Views of the U.S.-Canada fourth joint mission to map the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean in August and September 2011. The 2011 joint mission employed the flagship icebreaker from each country, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy and the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St-Laurent (LSSL), with each ship performing different functions and one ship breaking ice for the other [State Department photo/Public Domain]. Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.

The Fact Hunter
Episode 76: The Murder of Justice Scalia

The Fact Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 77:56


Scalia was born in Trenton, New Jersey. A devout Catholic, he received his undergraduate degree from Georgetown University. He then obtained his law degree from Harvard Law School and spent six years in a Cleveland law firm before becoming a law professor at the University of Virginia. In the early 1970s, he served in the Nixon and Ford administrations, eventually becoming an Assistant Attorney General. He spent most of the Carter years teaching at the University of Chicago, where he became one of the first faculty advisers of the fledgling Federalist Society. In 1982, President Ronald Reagan appointed Scalia as a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. In 1986, he was appointed to the Supreme Court by Reagan and was unanimously confirmed by the Senate, becoming the Court's first Italian-American justice.thefacthunter.comfacthunterradio.com

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview with Tra Williams Speaker, Author, Entrepreneur, and Nationally Recognized Expert in Entrepreneurship and Business Strategy

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 20:18


He has sat at the helm of two international brands and has supported thousands of entrepreneurs on their journey to self-employment.Tra holds a degree from the University of Georgia and is a graduate of the prestigious Franchise Management program at Georgetown University. He has been featured or quoted in numerous publications, including Forbes, Bloomberg, and Franchise Times, and he often speaks at economic development conferences and company conventions.In his new book Boss Brain, Tra reveals the shocking truth behind the decline of American entrepreneurship and provides a scientifically-proven system to unlock your entrepreneurial instincts so you can leave traditional employment forever —that's the real American Dream!Learn More: https://www.trawilliams.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-tra-williams-speaker-author-entrepreneur-and-nationally-recognized-expert-in-entrepreneurship-and-business-strategy

Business Innovators Radio
Interview with Tra Williams Speaker, Author, Entrepreneur, and Nationally Recognized Expert in Entrepreneurship and Business Strategy

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 20:18


He has sat at the helm of two international brands and has supported thousands of entrepreneurs on their journey to self-employment.Tra holds a degree from the University of Georgia and is a graduate of the prestigious Franchise Management program at Georgetown University. He has been featured or quoted in numerous publications, including Forbes, Bloomberg, and Franchise Times, and he often speaks at economic development conferences and company conventions.In his new book Boss Brain, Tra reveals the shocking truth behind the decline of American entrepreneurship and provides a scientifically-proven system to unlock your entrepreneurial instincts so you can leave traditional employment forever —that's the real American Dream!Learn More: https://www.trawilliams.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-tra-williams-speaker-author-entrepreneur-and-nationally-recognized-expert-in-entrepreneurship-and-business-strategy

The Pakistan Experience
Is Pakistan safe for Journalism? - Raza Rumi - New Media and Naya Daur - TPE # 131

The Pakistan Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 92:05


Raza Rumi joins us on this deep dive podcast to discuss why he had to leave Pakistan, the shrinking space for Journalism in the country, how digital journalism is changing the landscape, the philosophy behind Naya Daur, new media and nation building. What do we need to do to build a Pakistani state? Should journalists be scared of the new laws? What is the role of journalism? Find out this, and more on this week's episode of The Pakistan Experience. The Pakistan Experience is an independently run podcast. Please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thepakistanexperience And Please stay in touch: https://twitter.com/ThePakistanExp1 https://www.facebook.com/thepakistanexperience https://instagram.com/thepakistanexpeperience The podcast is hosted by comedian and writer, Shehzad Ghias Shaikh. Shehzad is a Fulbright scholar with a Masters in Theatre from Brooklyn College. He is also one of the foremost Stand-up comedians in Pakistan and frequently writes for numerous publications. He can be found on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Tinder. https://www.facebook.com/Shehzadghias/ https://twitter.com/shehzad89 Raza Ahmad Rumi is a Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist currently based in Ithaca, USA. He is the Director, Park Center for Independent Media, Ithaca College and has been teaching in Journalism department since 2015. He is also visiting faculty at Cornell Institute for Public Affairs and teaches courses in international development and public policy. Earlier, Raza was a global faculty fellow at the Gallatin School, New York University (Spring 2016). Raza was a fellow at New America Foundation (2014); United States Institute of Peace (Sept 2014-March 2015), a fellow at National Endowment for Democracy (summer 2016); and currently a member of Think Tank at Laboratory for Global Performance and Politics, Georgetown University. He is also a senior fellow at the Jinnah Institute in Islamabad. In recent years, Raza founded a digital media platform NayaDaur Media in collaboration with Pakistani diaspora in the United States. It is a bilingual multimedia portal with a Youtube channel. From 2017-2019, Raza was also the editor of Pakistan's national newspaper Daily Times. From 2005-2017, he was affiliated with weekly The Friday Times in various editorial positions. Raza was also a commentator and a current affairs talk show host in Pakistan and was affiliated with the Express TV, Pakistan before he left Pakistan in 2014. He contributes regularly to Foreign Policy, Huffington Post, New York Times, The Diplomat, Fair Observer, CNN and Al Jazeera, Daily O, Scroll India, The Hindu and Indian Express. His columns for the Express Tribune can be accessed here. Prior to his foray in journalism, Raza worked as a governance and capacity development specialist for the Asian Development Bank, the Government of Pakistan, a number of Pakistani nongovernmental organizations, and the United Nations Mission in Kosovo. He has also been an academic adviser to the Network of Asia Pacific Schools and Institutes of Public Administration and Governance (NAPSIPAG); a public policy adviser to LEAD Pakistan, a nonprofit focused on sustainable development; and was an advisory board member of both the ASR Resource Centre and the South Asian Institute of Women's Studies in Lahore. As a freelance policy professional/consultant he continues to advise international development organizations, governments and NGOs. Books: He is also the author of Delhi by Heart: Impressions of a Pakistani Traveler (Harper Collins, 2013); The Fractious Path: Pakistan's Democratic Transition (2016); Identity, Faith and Conflict: Essays on Pakistan & Beyond (2017); and Being Pakistani–Essays on Arts, Culture & Society (2018).

Disaster Zone
The Legislative Process in Congress

Disaster Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 51:17


Monica Sanders is a Georgetown University professor. Previously, she was a Senior Committee Counsel for both the House of Representatives and Senate Committees on Homeland Security. In this podcast we do deep dive into the legislative process of the Congress of the United States. The role of committee chairpersons and their staff is explored, along with the way in which bills are introduced in Congress and move through the legislative process. The role of committee staff is discussed. The importance of the Budget and Rules Committees is also highlighted. What can you do to influence the making of laws at the national level is also addressed. This podcast is sponsored by T-Mobile for Government, providing innovative connectivity solutions that help government better serve citizens by enabling agencies to work more intelligently, efficiently, and securely. Their mobile device management solutions help safeguard sensitive data and their network is ideal for unlocking game-changing loT technology.  T-Mobile provides 24x7x365 support, so they are ready to help you when communications are critical.  It all starts with America's largest, fastest, and now according to a third-party rating service umlaut, it is the most reliable 5G network, as well as the tools that help you take advantage of 5G.  T-Mobile offers an amazing customer experience and outstanding value—with no tradeoffs.  They have the most reliable 5G according to umlaut based on crowdsourced user experience data (Sept 2020 to Feb 2021). They also have the fastest 5G according to Opensignal Awards based on average speeds (USA: 5G User Experience Report April 2021). See 5G device, coverage, & access details at T-Mobile.com. 

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Dear Cancer: New Tests, New Treatments, and New Hope

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:03


The presenting sponsor for today's episode is Elevation Oncology, elevating precision medicine to the forefront of every cancer treatment journey. On the show today, I welcome the esteemed Dr. Stephen Liu, Associate Professor of Medicine, Director of Thoracic Oncology, and Director of Developmental Therapeutics at Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center of Georgetown University. At a time when cancer treatment is more about your DNA and your RNA than where in your body cancer is — it's more important than ever to continue elevating the conversation about making biomarker testing a mandatory part of care. Why napalm everything if your genes make you eligible for a specific kind of therapy that's wayyyy better than proverbial napalm? NRG1 Fusion is an RNA test done on solid tumors — for the purposes of this episode Lung Cancer tumors — but this is a test that everyone with lung cancer needs to get out of the gate. You enter the "I have lung cancer store" and — BOOM — you get this test, which can make or break the trajectory of your care. From the seriousness of Phase II enrollment challenges to inane musings about Dartmouth, Boston Market, and the children's book The Three Billy Goats Gruff, strap in for a serious discussion about precision oncology and biomarker testing, especially if you or someone you know has lung cancer. For more information visit https://nrg1fusion.com/pod.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Feudal Future
The Psychological Impact of the Pandemic

Feudal Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 44:36


On this episode of Feudal Future,  hosts Joel Kotkin and Marshall Toplansky are joined by Ross Elliot, Chairman of the Urban Land Institute of Australia, and Dr. Aaron Kheriaty, Professor of Psychiatry at UC Irvine. This show covered the psychological impact of Covid-19 and how governments are managing it.Ross is the co-founder of Suburban Futures (formerly The Suburban Alliance). He has 30 years' experience in the property and urban development industry, including a number of national leadership roles for the Property Council of Australia as its Executive Director, then Chief Operating Officer and later as National Executive Director for the Residential Development Council. In this time he pioneered a number of policy initiatives for the industry on urban growth and cities policies for Australia. He has both authored and edited a number of monographs on urban development policy, housing and cities policies for Australia.  Ross was also founding CEO of Brisbane Marketing, winning an International Downtown Association's (USA) award for City Marketing in 2003.  A frequent speaker, author and commentator on urban development policy, he was in 2016 invited to be international keynote speaker for the American Planning Association's Utah conference and in 2017 was published in a global joint MIT/Chapman University project “Infinite Suburbia.”Aaron Kheriaty is Professor of Psychiatry at UCI School of Medicine and Director of the Medical Ethics Program at UCI Health. He serves as chairman of the medical ethics committees at UCI Hospital and at the CA Department of State Hospitals. Dr. Kheriaty graduated from the University of Notre Dame in philosophy and pre-medical sciences, earned his MD degree from Georgetown University, and completed residency training in psychiatry at UCI. He has authored books and articles for professional and lay audiences on bioethics, social science, psychiatry, and religion. His work has been published in the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, Public Discourse, and First Things; he has conducted print, radio, and television interviews on bioethics topics with The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, CNN, Fox, and NPR. On matters of public policy and healthcare he has addressed the California Medical Association and has testified before the California Senate Health Committee.Join the 'Beyond Feudalism' Facebook group to share your story, ask questions and connect with other citizen leaders: https://www.facebook.com/groups/beyondfeudalismTweet thoughts: @joelkotkin, @mtoplansky, #FeudalFuture #BeyondFeudalismLearn more about Joel's book 'The Coming of Neo-Feudalism': https://amzn.to/3a1VV87Sign Up For News & Alerts: http://joelkotkin.com/#subscribeThis show is presented by the Chapman Center for Demographics and Policy, which focuses on research and analysis of global, national and regional demographic trends and explores policies that might produce favorable demographic results over time.

To Dine For
Adan Gonzalez

To Dine For

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 32:54


Adan Gonzalez – Executive Director – Puede Network   When Adan Gonzalez was a high school senior, he got a full ride to Georgetown University. When he arrived at the airport to go to school his bags were overweight. He could not pay the overweight fees on his luggage, so he had to put his belongings in trash bags. He arrived at Georgetown with trash bags in hand. He says it was that moment that inspired him to create the Puede Network.  Gonzalez, a first-generation college student himself, launched a luggage drive in 2012. His organization provides new luggage to students who are going to college and can't afford them. He has given away thousands of suitcases to students in Texas, and that's not all. In fact, it's just the beginning of his work.   Follow To Dine For: Official Website: ToDineForTV.com Facebook: Facebook.com/ToDineForTV Instagram: @ToDineForTV Twitter: @KateSullivanTV Email: ToDineForTV@gmail.com   Thank You to our Sponsors! American National Insurance Spiritless - Use promo code TODINEFOR for free shipping   Follow Our Guest: Official Site: PuedeNetwork.org Facebook: Facebook.com/PuedeNetwork Instagram: @PuedeNetwork Twitter: @AGonzalez_Puede

10% Happier with Dan Harris
#382: Stoicism 101 | Nancy Sherman

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 67:41


You may have heard about stoicism, in the common parlance, as having a stiff upper lip, sucking it up, grinning and bearing it, suppressing your emotions, etcetera. Or you may have heard of Stoicism, the ancient Greco-Roman philosophy, that has become the de rigeur set of life hacks among millennial self-optimizers. In this episode, guest Nancy Sherman argues that Stoicism is way deeper than any of that. She will argue that, in fact, Stoicism is kind of the opposite of all the above. It's a way to truly know your patterns of thought and emotion. Nancy is a Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University. She is an expert in ethics, the history of moral philosophy, moral psychology, military ethics, and emotions. Her most recent book is called Stoic Wisdom: Ancient Lessons for Modern Resilience. In this conversation we cover the basics of Stoicism, how and why capital “S” Stoicism is often misinterpreted, a meditation practice called “premeditation of evils” (which is far more practical than it may sound), and another practice designed to make you feel “at home in the world." Please note: This interview includes a brief reference to suicide.  Download the Ten Percent Happier app today: https://10percenthappier.app.link/install Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/nancy-sherman-382

10% Happier with Dan Harris
#382: Stoicism 101 | Nancy Sherman

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 71:26


You may have heard about stoicism, in the common parlance, as having a stiff upper lip, sucking it up, grinning and bearing it, suppressing your emotions, etcetera. Or you may have heard of Stoicism, the ancient Greco-Roman philosophy, that has become the de rigeur set of life hacks among millennial self-optimizers. In this episode, guest Nancy Sherman argues that Stoicism is way deeper than any of that. She will argue that, in fact, Stoicism is kind of the opposite of all the above. It's a way to truly know your patterns of thought and emotion. Nancy is a Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University. She is an expert in ethics, the history of moral philosophy, moral psychology, military ethics, and emotions. Her most recent book is called Stoic Wisdom: Ancient Lessons for Modern Resilience. In this conversation we cover the basics of Stoicism, how and why capital “S” Stoicism is often misinterpreted, a meditation practice called “premeditation of evils” (which is far more practical than it may sound), and another practice designed to make you feel “at home in the world." Please note: This interview includes a brief reference to suicide.  Download the Ten Percent Happier app today: https://10percenthappier.app.link/install Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/nancy-sherman-382

The Be More Today Show
EP 75: "Inch By Inch" featuring Track and Field Olympian Samyr Laine, Esq.

The Be More Today Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 53:27


As a track and field athlete representing Haiti in international competitions for nearly a decade, Samyr Laine was not only among the very best athletes that Haiti has ever seen, he was very easily among the best in the world in his discipline: the triple jump. He is Haiti's national record holder with a jump of 17.39 meters (just over 57 feet), won multiple medals for Haiti at various international competitions (one bronze and one gold at the Central American and Caribbean Games as well as a silver at the Pan American Sports Festival to name a few) and represented Haiti at 3 Pan American Games, 7 World Indoor or Outdoor Championships and 1 Olympic Games. Many times, Samyr was the lone Haitian athlete to qualify for those global championships but he didn't merely attend, he qualified for the finals at the 2012 Olympic Games and the 2013 World Championships, finishing 11th at both global competitions. On several occasions he finished in the top 10 on the world ranking list of top triple jump distances in a particular year, and year in and year out he was a staple on the IAAF Diamond League circuit, which is the top competitive circuit in the sport. Before representing Haiti, Samyr was an NCAA All-American in college, and held the Ivy League conference record for a time; he still holds the Harvard University school record in the triple jump to this day. Aside from his athletic accomplishments, Samyr earned degrees from the aforementioned Harvard University, as well as a master's degree from The University of Texas and a law degree from Georgetown University; the latter of which he earned while traveling the world, competing as a professional athlete and representing Haiti. He is a member of the New York State Bar and is currently the Senior Vice President of Operations and Strategy at Westbrook Inc. where he heads up the company's Good Goods division and oversees all consumer brand incubation, and licensing. Prior to joining Westbrook Inc., Samyr was the Senior Director of Operations for Roc Nation. There, he spearheaded the operations for key growth initiatives for Roc and some of its affiliated companies, launched their new literary division as a partnership with Penguin Random House ,and managed several notable multi-platinum recording artists. Before Roc Nation, Samyr was the Director of Player Relations and Competition for Major League Soccer. He is a published author and also spent several years as an adjunct professor at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. More important than anything mentioned already is Samyr's work as a member of the board of directors of l'Ecole de Choix (a school in Mirebalais, Haiti), and formerly as an advisory board member of the Business of Sports School (a Career and Technical Education school in Manhattan). Beyond that, he works with a number of organizations in and related to Haiti and hopes to have a lasting impact on the lives of children there, particularly through sport and education; although he frequently works with high schools and mentors student-athletes here in the U.S. as well. Follow his story on IG @iamsamyrlaine. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bemoretoday/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bemoretoday/support

EETimes On Air
Building a Framework to Trust AI 

EETimes On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 29:58


This week's podcast: Some amazing things have been accomplished with AI, but if AI is to become widely adopted, it must be safe and reliable, and there is no framework for demonstrating AI is either. Helen Toner, Director of Strategy at Georgetown University's Center for Security and Emerging Technology, talks about what safe, reliable AI should look like.

The Tea Leaves Podcast
Dr. Michael J. Green on the Quad Summit and Suga’s Successor

The Tea Leaves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


Dr. Michael J. Green is senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and director of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Previously, Dr. Green served on the National Security Council staff from 2001 through 2005, first as director for Asian affairs, and then as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director for Asia. Today we are lucky to work with Mike at The Asia Group, where he is a senior advisor. In this episode, Mike and Rexon delved into Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga's resignation, the race for leadership of Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party, the AUKUS security pact, and the first in-person Quad Leaders Summit. You can find a full video of this episode at www.youtube.com/wSvkY8tzvEq21kNOjYILXQ

The Takeaway
“Other Than Honorably” Discharged LGBTQ Veterans Could Be Eligible for VA Benefits 2021-09-23

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 45:44


“Other Than Honorably” Discharged LGBTQ Veterans Could Be Eligible for VA Benefits  The Takeaway talks to two LGBTQ veterans about the VA's guidance. Jennifer Dane, is the CEO and executive director of the Modern Military Association of America, and Richard Brookshire, is the Board Chair and co-founder of the Black Veterans Project. He also wrote this piece for the New York Times Magazine, "Serving in the Army as a Queer Black Man Opened My Eyes to Racism in America." Afghanistan's Healthcare System is on the Verge of Collapse Deepmala Mahla, Vice President of humanitarian affairs for CARE, an international humanitarian organization fighting global poverty and world hunger, joins us to discuss this potential disaster. Reforming the System from Within  The Takeaway spoke with Joel Fitzgerald Sr.,  Waterloo's first Black chief of police whose reforms are facing backlash. We' re also joined by Roy Austin, former federal prosecutor and former defense attorney, and Paul Butler, Albert Brick Professor in Law at Georgetown University, former prosecutor and author of Choke Hold: Policing Black Men. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

Optimal Business Daily
357: A Subtle Mistake About How to Acquire Useful Career Skills by Scott Young with Cal Newport

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 7:17


Scott Young with Cal Newport warns us of a subtle mistake about how to acquire useful career skills Episode 357: A Subtle Mistake About How to Acquire Useful Career Skills by Scott Young with Cal Newport Cal Newport is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University, who specializes in the theory of distributed algorithms. He previously earned his Ph.D. from MIT in 2009 and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2004. In addition to studying the theoretical foundations of our digital age as a professor, Newport also writes about the impact of these technologies on the world of work. His most recent book, Deep Work, argues that focus is the new I.Q. in the knowledge economy, and that individuals who cultivate their ability to concentrate without distraction will thrive. The original post is located here: https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2019/11/15/a-subtle-mistake-about-how-to-acquire-useful-career-skills/ Please Rate & Review the Show! Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group Join the Ol' Family to get your Free Gifts Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily

The Amber Lilyestrom Show
David J. Kundtz on The Art of Stopping

The Amber Lilyestrom Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 49:38


David J. Kundtz is a retired licensed marriage and family therapist, a former Catholic  priest and author of seven books.  Kundtz earned graduate degrees in psychology and theology and his doctoral degree, a  Doctor of Science and Theology in the field of Pastoral psychology, from the Graduate  Theological Union in Berkeley, CA. Originally from Cleveland, Ohio, he attended  Georgetown University in Washington, DC, and St. Mary's Seminary and University in  Baltimore, Maryland.   After spending twenty years as an ordained priest working in the Catholic Diocese of  Boise, Idaho and Cali, Colombia, he went on to build a successful private marriage and  family counseling practice in Berkeley, CA, for twenty some years. He also offered  workshops in the areas of human resources, stress management, and emotional health  as the director of Inside Track Seminars.  In this episode, David shares how he finally made a decision to stop, and in doing so, he found his way. He talks about the three different ways in which we get to the art of stopping: still-points, stopovers, and grinding halts. Plus, David explains why we are in the place of having less time, less energy, and too much to do. Later, David teaches us how to shift the way we live to be in the space of greater fulfillment and joy. In this Episode You'll Learn:  All about today's guest, David J. Kundtz [ 0:45 ] The inspiration behind David's book, The Art of Stopping [ 6:10 ] How stillpoints are opportunities to stop, breathe, and remember [ 9:10 ] Ways to find meaning within the spaces [ 17:10 ] Why spending time alone is doing something [ 20:15 ] The best thing about stopping [ 27:50 ] How to find what we want in life during a grinding halt [ 30:30 ] The importance of stopping when it comes to living life [ 38:15 ]   Soul Shifting Quotes:  “If you really want something, you'll do it.” “Each of us has the wisdom and the self-knowledge that we need.” “Spending time alone is doing something.” “The purpose of stopping is going.” “The best thing about stopping is it happens on its own.” Links Mentioned:  Learn my 7 Secrets to Uplevel Your Brand & Land Your Dream Clients  Grab your FREE training, How to Call in Your Tribe + Create Content that Converts  Text me at 603-931-4386 Learn more about David by following him on Facebook or heading to https://davidkundtz.com. Tag me in your big shifts + takeaways: @amberlilyestrom  Did you hear something you loved here today?! Leave a Review + Subscribe via iTunes  Listen on Spotify 

Diane Rehm: On My Mind
Mandates, Boosters And America’s Ongoing Vaccination Problem

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 45:30


Mandates, boosters and global supply. Georgetown University's Lawrence Gostin talks about what is legal -- and what might be most effective -- when it comes to getting Americans vaccinated.