Podcasts about George Washington

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1st president of the United States

  • 3,242PODCASTS
  • 5,674EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST
George Washington

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    Best podcasts about George Washington

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    Latest podcast episodes about George Washington

    The John Batchelor Show
    3/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 3/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnel

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:05


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 3/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

    The John Batchelor Show
    2/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 2/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:24


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 2/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

    The John Batchelor Show
    4/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 4/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:35


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 4/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

    The John Batchelor Show
    5/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 5/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:30


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 5/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

    The John Batchelor Show
    8/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 8/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 8:50


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 8/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders:  8/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

    The John Batchelor Show
    6/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 6/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 7:20


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 6/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

    The John Batchelor Show
    1/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 1/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:25


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 1/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

    The John Batchelor Show
    7/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 7/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 12:19


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 7/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

    Our American Stories
    The WWII Attack America Chose to Forget

    Our American Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 38:16


    On this episode of Our American Stories, because of the devastating nature of the attack, the U.S. government chose to keep the details of the HMT Rhona hushed. Grove City College PoliSci professor Paul Kengor brings us the details through the eyes of Sergeant Frank Bryer. T.J. Stiles tells the dramatic story of Cornelius “Commodore” Vanderbilt's humble birth during the presidency of George Washington to his death as one of the richest men in American history. The Commodore helped to launch the transportation revolution, propel the Gold Rush, reshape Manhattan, invent the modern corporation, and create the modern American economy. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)   Time Codes: 00:00 - The WWII Attack America Chose to Forget 10:00 - The Epic Life of Cornelius VanderbiltSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Sonntagsspaziergang - Deutschlandfunk
    Mount Vernon und George Washington

    Sonntagsspaziergang - Deutschlandfunk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 21:09


    Steinbuch, Anja und Marek, Michaelwww.deutschlandfunk.de, SonntagsspaziergangDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

    The Accidental Entrepreneur
    Remembering Jack Killion

    The Accidental Entrepreneur

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 128:14


    This is a re-release and a compilation of our first two episodes where I interviewed Jack Killion to share his story and his knowledge about entrepreneurship and networking.  Jack died on November 5, 2021 leaving behind his wife, son, daughter-in-law and one grandchild.  His passing leaves a void in both his family and the entrepreneurial community worldwide. I believe its important to continue to share Jack's story and his knowledge, advice and guidance.  To my friend, mentor and advisor, I miss you dearly. To learn more from Jack, purchase his book, Network All The Time, from Amazon. For general information about the podcast, send an email to info@beinhakerlaw.com To follow Mitch and the podcast, go to linktr.ee/beinhakerlaw. You can subscribe and listen to episodes on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Spotify and most other directories. Please review us whenever possible and thanks for your continued support! Sponsorships and paid guest appearances are available. Connect with us by email or on social media. The Accidental Entrepreneur is brought to you by Beinhaker Law, a boutique business & estates legal practice in Clark, NJ. To learn about shared outside general counsel services and how to better protect your business, visit https://beinhakerlaw.com/fractional-gen-counsel/ Please support our affiliate sponsors (https://beinhakerlaw.com/podcast-affiliates/). Also, support the show and get your own podcast merch! (https://beinhakerlaw.com/podcast-store/) One of One Productions - a New Jersey-based studio, just over the George Washington bridge, that caters to the booming business of podcasting. Be sure to check out the guesting kit that they've created exclusively for our listeners! https://one-of-one-productions.myshopify.com/products/mitchell-beinhakers-guesting-kit North Authentic - NorthAuthentic.com is a conscious hair care marketplace offering the cleanest brands from around the world. Their pro stylists curate only the most fabulous non-toxic hair products. Use our affiliate link for all your purchases! https://shrsl.com/38heu The Healthy Place - Findyourhealthyplace.com has thousands of supplements to help you live a better quality of life; as well as natural solutions for chronic pain, stress, anxiety, depression, sleep and much, much more. Need guidance? Use their Live Chat feature and talk to a Wellness Consultant right on their website. The Accidental Entrepreneur is a trademark of Mitchell C. Beinhaker. Copyright 2018-2022. All rights reserved.

    Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie
    Ep. 128 - Article II - Executive Orders

    Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 54:49


    The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by one in 1863.  One created the precursor to the Department of Homeland Security in October 2001. George Washington issued 8 of them, including one establishing our Thanksgiving Holiday.  President Harrison issued none, while President Franklin Roosevelt issued 3,721 (by some count).  Today we are discussing Executive Orders.  What are they?  How are they used?  How does the Constitution grant this immense power to the president and what are the mechanisms we have to modify or revoke them?  Join our special guest, Kara Rollins, Litigation Counsel with the New Civil Liberties Alliance, and our student panel as we examine the history and current application of executive orders.

    Real Spies, Real Lives
    Prologue to Terror Part 1

    Real Spies, Real Lives

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 39:02


    Duncan explains what reader magnets are for, as well as the structure of a genre novel, and provides a brief review of the Amazon Prime movie The 355. Heavy on the writing stuff this week--but a bit of early, American espionage history surrounding George Washington's Culper Ring. Prologue to Terror, the prequel/reader magnet for TERROR, book one of the series Meeting the Enemy, is only 99 cents at amazon.com/dp/B0B1F64YLQ.

    Blind Spot
    Season 3, Episode 2: Nuclear George

    Blind Spot

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 46:13


    Joe and Tom discuss the top five countries, the nuclear power industry, and why people hated George Washington at the end. It's a great listeing experience. 

    Pastor Greg Young
    David Shestokas discusses the federal police force / Dr. Robert Marks on AI

    Pastor Greg Young

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 60:01


    David Shestokas discusses the lack of Constitutional basis for a federal police force. The Attorney General was a part of the original cabinet with George Washington; thus, the DOJ is an extension of that but the FBI as a federal police force is not. Impact of an illegal or lawless FBI. Dr. Robert Marks Non-Computable You discusses the limits on AI and its ability to learn beyond that which is put in the program. AI suing for the right to hold a patent.

    Young Heretics
    Ep. 116: The Man Who Would Not Be King

    Young Heretics

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 61:59


    Does history only ever move in one direction? Is decay inevitable? In this episode of Young Heretics, Spencer Klavan argues that it is not, using the example of America's greatest founding figure—George Washington. Washington's refusal to seize more power than he needed made him the anti-Caesar, and the perfect hero for our nation. -- Public Goods is the one stop shop for sustainable, high quality everyday essentials made from clean ingredients. Receive $15 off your first Public Goods order at https://publicgoods.com/HERETICS. -- Bambee is an HR platform built for small businesses. Automate the most important HR practices and get your own dedicated HR Manager. Get your FREE HR audit right now at https://bambee.com/heretics. -- Don't let the stress of daily life weigh on your body. Make it through the day tension-free with Theragun. Try it for 30 days starting at $199: https://therabody.com/heretics. -- Truebill is the new app that helps you identify and stop paying for subscriptions you don't need, want, or simply forgot about. Save thousands of dollars a year: https://truebill.com/heretics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Whence Came You? - Freemasonry discussed and Masonic research for today's Freemason
    Whence Came You? - 0556 - The Trouble In Washington D.C.

    Whence Came You? - Freemasonry discussed and Masonic research for today's Freemason

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 63:21 Very Popular


    This week we're talking about the Masonic Philosophy of George Washington. In previous episodes, we've explored George Washington's religion and specific notions of the founding fathers. The two-part series presented this week will dive even deeper. Then we'll read a 25-year-old article published in the Washington Post about Washington D.C.'s Map. From Satan to the Sphinx--the Masonic mysteries of DC. In this article, the author traces the various claims of notable and influential Americans to crackpots and more when referring to the multiple claims of occult and Masonic designs within the city of Washington D.C., our nation's capital. Finally, we'll wrap it up with a discussion on beginning new spiritual paths and manifestations and what that has in store for us. Links: TMR - on SPML Masonic Con 2022 https://themasonicroundtable.libsyn.com/the-masonic-roundtable-0391-the-golden-coasts-spml-masonicon George Washington's Masonic Philosophy Pt. 1 http://www.midnightfreemasons.org/2012/07/masonic-philosophy-of-george-washington.html George Washington's Masonic Philosophy Pt. 2 http://www.midnightfreemasons.org/2012/08/the-masonic-philosophy-of-george_29.html From Satan to the Sphinx - DC's Masonic Map https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1995/11/05/from-satan-to-the-sphinx-the-masonic-mysteries-of-dcs-map/9bff53f2-0fa5-4149-bcae-6b8a2c77203d/ Solomons Builders - Hodapp https://amzn.to/3Q6BcDZ Masonic Con Kansas Http://www.masonicconkansas.com Craftsman+ FB Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/craftsmanplus/ WCY NFT https://wcypodcast.com/nft Get a Tarot Reading by RJ http://www.wcypodcast.com/tarot Masonic Curators https://www.youtube.com/c/MasonicCurators WCY Podcast YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/WhenceCameYou Ancient Modern Initiation: Special Edition http://www.wcypodcast.com/the-Shop The Master's Word- A Short Treatise on the Word, the Light, and the Self - Autographed https://wcypodcast.com/the-shop Get the new book! How to Charter a Lodge https://wcypodcast.com/the-shop Truth Quantum https://truthquantum.com Our Patreon www.patreon.com/wcypodcast Support the show on Paypal https://wcypodcast.com/support-the-show Get some swag! https://wcypodcast.com/the-shop Get the book! http://a.co/5rtYr2r The links listed may or may not be Amazon affiliate links.

    Who's That Girl? A New Girl Podcast
    S3 E10 - Thanksgiving III

    Who's That Girl? A New Girl Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 56:38


    This podcast covers New Girl Season 3, Episode 10, Thanksgiving III, which originally aired on November 26, 2013 and was written by Josh Malmuth and directed by Max Winkler. Here's a quick recap of the episode:After Coach makes Nick question his own masculinity, Nick forces the gang to go camping in the woods for Thanksgiving. They attempt to forage for their own food which lands Jess in an interesting predicament.We discuss Pop Culture References such as:Hunt: Bonnie and Helen - When at the campsite, Winston shares the only “hunt” he likes are named Bonnie and Helen, referring to the actresses Bonnie Hunt and Helen Hunt.Additional Pop Culture References such as:Viggo Mortenson / Hidalgo - When commenting on his hat, Schmidt says it's “an exact replica of the hat Viggo Mortenson wore in the movie Hidalgo.” Viggo Peter Mortensen Jr. is an American actor, writer, director, producer, musician, and multimedia artist who is best known for his role as Aragorn in The Lord of Rings trilogy. Mortensen starred as Frank Hopkins in the film Hidalgo, which is the story of an ex-army courier who travels to Arabia to compete with his horse, Hidalgo, in a dangerous desert race.We also further cover Schmidt and his hat as our “Schmidtism” this episode. For “Not in the 2020s” we briefly mention some ongoing racist and fatphobic themes but also talk more in depth about the way “men” are portrayed. We refer to this article where they discuss a different take on the way this episode handles the mens' masculinity. For our “Yes in the 2020s” we chat about how Coach let Schmidt feel he was a better camper for the first half of the episode. There were no guest stars in this episode.This episode we discuss the reference Schmidt made back to S1E14 (Bully), talk about the diseases that Jess supposedly had, and share a fun fact about the naming of the last episode. We did find the bear in the “bear hole” this episode.While not discussed in the podcast, we noted other references in this episode including:Eagle Scout - Coach reveals that he's actually good at camping because he was an Eagle Scout. An Eagle Scout is the highest rank achievable in Boy Scouts that only about 4% of Boy Scouts ever achieve.George Washington - Nick tries to get the loft excited about camping by saying that George Washington hunted cats rather than having a pet cat [like Winston]. Washington was the United States' first president and a Founding Father of the USA.This episode got a 7/10 rating from Kritika whose favorite character was Jess and Kelly rated this episode an 8/10 and her favorite character was Winston!Thanks for listening and stay tuned for Episode 11!Music: "Hotshot” by scottholmesmusic.comFollow us on Twitter, Instagram or email us at whosthatgirlpod@gmail.com!Website: https://smallscreenchatter.com/

    On the Brink with Andi Simon
    323: Maura Carlin and Christie Derrico—Isn't It Time For Us To Solve The "Balance Dilemma" For Working Women?

    On the Brink with Andi Simon

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 49:24


    Hear how to be bolder and braver at balancing your life Suppose you are a working woman with children. I bet you have experienced the "Balance Dilemma." How can you find the right balance between home life, family, a business or professional career, and even your own self-care? You, your partner or spouse, your friends and your family will enjoy this podcast. My guests, Maura Carlin and Christie Derrico, have an awesome podcast called The Balance Dilemma. Yes, the title is exactly what we want to share with our audience today. Need some help balancing all the different parts of your life? Listen in! Watch and listen to our conversation here How to help women and men have families, careers, and a life to live A little background: Maura and Christie are both attorneys. Maura describes herself as: “Litigation attorney turned journalist, writer, podcaster, still asking questions.” Christie is an entrepreneur, lawyer, podcaster and author who combines her multi-disciplinary talents with her passion for giving back. Making work life and home life successfully coexist together shouldn't be so hard, but as most of us know, it is. Even after decades of women trying to balance their lives and their careers, very little has changed. Sadly, we're still trying to figure it out. Questions the three of us delved into which affect all of us When we consider the declining birth rate, the later ages at which women are getting married and the limitations of childcare, as well as its cost, we as a society must step back and rethink, What we are doing? What do we value? How do we provide a more balanced life, and why is it even more essential to do it now? Listen in and enjoy. And please share with us your ideas at info@simonassociates.net.  To contact Maura and Christie You can connect with Maura on LinkedIn or email her at mauracarlin@gmail.com. You can find Christie on LinkedIn. Want a deeper dive into how you can achieve work-life balance? Start with these:  Podcast: "Work PAUSE Thrive" with Lisen Stromberg Podcast: Melissa Greenwell—Gender-Balanced Leadership Doesn't Just Happen Blog: Rising To The Occasion, Women Are Proving To Be The Heroines In This Crisis Additional resources for you My two award-winning books: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Businessand On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Our website: Simon Associates Management Consultants   Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. I'm your host and your guide. And as you know, my job is to get you off the brink. We've moved into our 300+ podcast and it truly is an honor to celebrate with you. Every time we have a new one, we get lots of people across the globe coming to us asking for more. How do I get you off the brink? How do I help you soar? Well, I do that by letting you listen to people who are doing just that. They help you see, feel and think in new ways so you can add some tools into your portfolio. The world is going through a great transformation. So today, I bring you two amazing women. I have Maura Carlin and Christie Dericco. I met them through a mutual friend who then introduced me and I was absolutely honored to be on their podcast, The Balance Dilemma. This was a terrific in-person WVOX recording of a podcast. And today we're going to talk a little bit about podcasting. Actually a lot about podcasting, because I do them with great pleasure. I haven't monetized it. I don't want to, I don't want have advertisers. I just want great people to help you see, feel and think in new ways. So today, let me tell you a little bit about these two wonderful women. And then they'll tell you about their own journey. But listen carefully to their own experiences. There's something there for you, each of you, to begin to understand how in our life's journey, we continue to soar only if we get off the brink. So here we go. I have Maura Carlin here, who spent over 15 years as a litigator at law firms. Now remember, I could have been an attorney or an anthropologist. But it was my husband who said to me, "Be an anthropologist and I'll be here for you," and he doesn't mind my telling you that because it was 55 years ago and I am still an anthropologist. But she started as a litigator while raising her family and left law and focused on journalism, working as a producer and host on LMC media's news programming. So this is an interesting blend here. Her natural talent and live on-air interviews was on display weekly during roundtable discussions with elected officials, newsmakers and more. She received a BA from Cornell and a JD with honors from George Washington. But she is really on another part of her own journey. Now Christie Derrico grew up in a world encouraged by female entrepreneurs and she and I love to share stories about those female entrepreneurs. I often thought I should write a book called What I Learned On My Grandmother's Knee because it was my grandmother who taught me all about how to count money at the end of the day. It was so interesting, beginning with Christie's grandmother and continuing to her mother, a tech entrepreneur. She established her law practice in 1998 and tailored her firm to meet her community and family needs. She lives in Westchester. Maura has three sons, and Christie has four children. They are truly the epitome of "the balance dilemma." Thank you for joining me today. I'll start with Christie. What's your journey? And then I'll get to Maura and then we'll go deep into what has podcasting taught us and what we're trying to do with it. Christie, how about yourself? Christie Derrico: Well, Andi, like many people, I was inspired by reading To Kill a Mockingbird. I knew that I wanted to be a lawyer from freshman year of high school when that is usually assigned. And I went right from college to law school, and I was a college athlete. And then I went to compete in law school. As you know, more than I can attest, law school is not an easy feat. Each level you go up in your education, it's harder and harder. But I have loved being an attorney. And I've handled litigation, handling many cases, criminal and civil. And I also established a local practice where I got to connect with people in the community. And that's one of my favorite things. I'm not very good at tracking my pro bono hours because there are just so many of them. If someone walks in with a problem, I'm there to help even if sometimes they can't pay what would be the customary rate. So I met Maura on a show a few years ago. And we just struck up a friendship and started a conversation that became The Balance Dilemma and it had a launch in this pandemic where many people had an opportunity to pivot and try new things. And that's our story. Andi Simon: What I love about it, you must know Adam Grant's book, Give and Take. Givers just really are essential to the beauty and joy of our society. And as you said about your pro bono, givers, you know, it's sort of like, How can I help? As opposed to, How can you pay me? And that is a real mark of a woman I want to have on my podcast. Maura, what about you? Maura Carlin: You know, it's funny, I hadn't even realized how similar Christie and I were in those beginning years because I too wanted to be a lawyer after reading To Kill a Mockingbird in eighth or ninth grade. And I did not come from a family of lawyers or business people, for that matter. My father was an artist. And my mother was a teacher, and both grew up poor. And I didn't want to do what they did. And I wanted to be a lawyer. So I went to college. I too, was a college athlete for a couple of years, and went straight to law school also. And during law school, I really didn't know much about the practice of law as it turned out, and ended up going to a big firm in New York City, and started my law career that way. And then along the way, like two intense career couples with children, couldn't really make it work very well. And there were things going on at home. And I went home thinking it was temporary. And we then actually had a third kid, and I got involved in local journalism, which is something I had always been interested in. I did radio in college, and I really pursued that while I was home. I needed flexibility, I needed to be around. So there we have it. And Christie and I met on the set of this new show, which was a combination of news and a discussion roundtable. And we hit it off right away talking about the struggle. Andi Simon: The struggle has accelerated during the pandemic. It was there before, people talked about work-life balance, and I used to say, Why is work not life? I couldn't quite figure out what this balance was that we were trying to get. But it was always about women in that work-life balance. And it is an interesting time for us to take a look at how women have creatively solved an unexpected challenge. And now we're trying to figure out how the next challenge is going to put more strain or opportunities for creative ideas to come forth, as people are being asked to come back to the workplace. And I'm hearing this constant recurring theme: Well, you knew before the pandemic, to work at home was a gift you gave me. It was part of my benefits. During the pandemic, you gave me a day to figure out how to do it. And now you want me to come back to the office. And some folks are going back in the office and sitting on zoom in the office because their colleagues are still removed. We haven't figured this out. So go ahead. Christie Derrico: So Maura and I, the three of us, have used the same word: flexibility. So adding to my bio, I had a formula for flexibility from having a mother and a grandmother who were working mothers. And I learned things, and things have been tweaked through the generations. I have my mother's sisters who still run the family business and they have children. And so I had a benefit of things that many women don't: I have rules. I try to keep things hyperlocal like Maura. I'm very involved in the community. So if something falls apart, you're a known entity and somebody can swoop in and drive your kid home or something like that. But what really brought Maura and I together was an article that was at that time, 30 years old: Confessions of a Superwoman. Maura why don't you tell Andi about how this spawned our project? Maura Carlin: This is actually a funny story. Your parents dump everything in your attic when you have a house to get you out of theirs. So at that time I was finally hitting the boxes and I found this article from December 1980. I don't know where or how I got it, but I clearly didn't read it. And this woman was trying to do it. And this was what really hit me. She was trying to have this high flying career and she was a prominent scientist. And she had a child and she couldn't make it work. And what really struck me and what Christie and I talked about 30 years later, was very little had changed, and even more so, we were speaking about it in the same terms and that was just unbelievable and kind of horrifying at the same time. Christie Derrico: And I will just add to that, that in the pandemic, even leading up to it, progress has been with fits and starts. And we've seen in our community, I think there are less day cares here than when I moved here in the late 90s. Why is that? And how can we move forward unless we address the elephant in the room—childcare—and other issues that help women stay in the workforce. And our project, The Balance Dilemma, has been a super interesting social science, so to speak, analysis of all the machinations of this work-life balance. What has been most interesting to me is that our guests have been entrepreneurs, re-inventors, creators, executives, parents, partners. We have had fine artists, other types of artists, writers, all people telling the story, not just women. There are men too of how they have made a life for their families and themselves and keeping their identity and making livings and things like that. It's been absolutely fascinating. Andi Simon: I'm curious, maybe you can provide perspective on this. How do we make changes, because to your point, there's less childcare, there are fewer childcare workers. I didn't have childcare, I had to hire a nanny. I remember my husband and I navigating the complex waters of who was going to work on which days, and I worked Wednesdays and Saturdays at the university, so he could take care of the kids on Saturdays. There was always navigating. But on the other hand, we never really thought back and said, What did we do here? This was sort of just how we got it done. But how do we make the changes that are going to be necessary to create something we're calling a work-life balance or something? I'm not quite sure that vision of what we're going toward, and I'm not sure how to help us get there. Maura Carlin: I think we need to figure out the childcare piece of it, as Christie was saying. Someone has to be there at some time, whether it's a parent, or another family member, or someone you hire. I don't see another solution. But it's something that keeps getting ignored. And one of the things on the balance limb is, interestingly, we don't talk politics, but this is the one policy area where we kind of have to go into it and see how different people have handled it. And it always seems, and this is where my husband and I actually had a problem because it comes back to this: someone seems to have some flexibility. You know, even our last guest, who was the lead parent, she from the very beginning was able to work from home long before work from home was a thing. And that allowed her to be around for the children. She also hired someone that you could delegate to, but she had the flexibility. And I don't know how you do it otherwise. Why are children the afterthought instead of the thought in our society? Christie, do you have perspective? Christie Derrico: Absolutely, I mean, we've had some common links with Frank Schaeffer. I found his book, Fall in Love, Have Children, Stay Put, Save the Planet, Be Happy. It's a big, big, long title. But I found some of the things, I'm not saying Frank and I agreed on everything, but it was refreshing that he was discussing it and putting it out there. And we were discussing just this weekend with my mother when she was finishing her college degree and she was at community college, there was a childcare facility. And I remember being there. That didn't mean I was there 7-to-7, but in the time that she had to take some classes, I could go there. I wonder how many colleges have childcare facilities these days? I don't think many. And it has made it an afterthought. But childcare is just one component of it. The thing that Maura and I have touched upon is planning. Young people, young women, young men, don't often think about, How do I want my life to look 20 years from now? They kind of spontaneously go into things that they like without really thinking, Oh, wait, is this going to be the career that gives me the best work-life balance? And Maura and I were not fond of the book...what was the name of it, Maura? It had a Wall Street exec in London and it was so depressing that she would come home at night and couldn't stand to see her husband. She would buy store-bought pies and distress them to bring them into school for the school play. Like it was such a Debbie Downer of a working woman. I couldn't stand to read the book, not that it wasn't well written or entertaining, it just hit a nerve with me. So how can we make this, as you say, something that there is some forethought, or there is some flexibility. I think the change in the marketplace in the economy is allowing people in general to change careers easier. You're not staying in one place. So we have to be open to, Maybe I'm going to shift to this, maybe I won't earn as much money, but I'm in it. And maybe I need to be there for four years, and then it could shift again. So hopefully these changes that were coming out of this pandemic can facilitate that flexibility that did not used to exist. I also think that the flexibility is coming from employers. If you ask for it, because of the pandemic, allowing people to work from home or understanding that people do have other people to watch over. And it's not just children, it's their elderly, elderly families as well, which is also huge. Andi Simon: Let's think big. Frank Schaeffer was on the podcast and I loved his ideas. And I said, So why is it so hard for employers to realize that if they opened up a child-friendly culture, they could attract people who would not only come and want to come and stay, but see them aligned with their own values? Is that such a foreign idea? As we're talking about it, and he and I talked about it, I said, Frank, this isn't so hard, just open up the gap. My daughter worked for The Gap. The Gap had a daycare where you can bring them in at three months. And they did it. So why is this such a mystery? And why do they fight it? Well, you don't have to go into politics and figure out why society and government doesn't. But how many businesses could do it tomorrow? Christie Derrico: Well, I think we have to look at successful examples. So we're lawyers, and Maura and I love to research. So I am a fact-, evidence-based person. So we can have a theory and it sounds great, but if I can't find the data to support that, even if it's a good formula, I'm not going to be behind it. And I won't bore you, Maura knows, I've gone down the rabbit hole of some of these issues. And we have a running Google document with our research that I find absolutely fascinating on the issues of family and work. But we have to do things here that have been proven to be successful. The evidence just shows that if you have flexibility, women do stay in the jobs longer. But we have to be in agreement that there's some professions that you just can't bring your kid to work. So maybe this is why I think it needs to be a broader societal solution. And another thing that we found is, it's a lot easier to achieve flexibility when you're at the top of your game. If you're having to do this at the beginning of your career, before you've had the chance to do internships and put in long hours and prove yourself, it is a lot harder. So these are the discussions that we have to have and stop kicking the can down the road. Andi Simon: Well, is that why the birth rate in this country is declining and declining at a very high rate and marriage rate is declining. And people aren't getting married till they're older. They are having kids at high risk levels and 40% of the kids are born to single parents and not to the guys. And so now you have an interesting demographic. Now, it's telling us something to your point, How can we not plan ahead? Well, we are planning ahead, sort of, which is, I'm not going to get married, we live together, I've done my savings. I think that the generation that's coming is so different from the Boomers and even different from Gen X and Gen Y somewhat. But they see this and they're beginning to talk about the changes they can bring. And I'm hoping that they can visualize something that addresses the balance dilemma. Christie Derrico: We have discussed this quite a bit. Our oldest children are the same age and they're in a similar line of work. But we can't answer whether these are for social scientists to study but I was curious. I did read the book. It's a dialogue with the Boomer and the Millennial. And it did open my eyes to see some of the reasons why some of the things you are talking about exist. We can't sit there and say, Well, back in my day we did it this way. There's a reason they feel insecurity. They went through some national crises, the 2008 meltdown, 911. These are part of the reasons that they feel they need huge security before they go on to that next step, aside from the socio expectations and living together and things like that. So I think that we have to look at them, address them, and try to give support, otherwise this is going to keep trending and we're not alone. All developed countries have low birth rates, but some have been more successful than others. And I think when we say fact- or evidence-based, that's what we need to look at: How do they do it in the countries where it's worked? And how can we have takeaways from those examples? Maura Carlin: Well, I actually don't 100% agree with Christie in terms of the age groups just because looking at them, I don't think that our older children fall into that. And it may be because I think they're considered young millennials, as opposed to the older millennials. So at least for my son, I don't think he was affected by those things the way some of the older ones were. I also think what they've seen is, how hard it is. I don't think it's just because of external things like crashes and, you know, real big crises, like 911. I think that they've seen their parents trying to figure out how to do this. And my eldest was keenly aware of the decision that I made, that someone needed to be there. And there, they haven't seen a solution. Andi Simon: Let me shift the focus aspect. Men. I'm married to a fantastic guy who went into his own business. When I was an executive at a bank, and I'm traveling up to Buffalo, and he's taking care of the kids, not that he's not employed, working and building his own business. But without Mr. Mom, it would have been more challenging. And we always had nannies, but they weren't the same. My kids' relationship to Mr. Mom is fantastic. And I think that's because he did become like a mom. And he was the guy who made sure they had a driver to pick them up and take them. And he was the one who picked them up and took them out for dinner. And we made it work. And they are both professional women doing the same. How are the men handling the roles they play? Are they shifting? Are they reinventing what masculine means? Are they good at staying at home? Moms: I had some executive coaching clients where the guys were sitting on the couch, and the kids were crying, and they were on the phone with me, on Zoom. And they said, How do I deal with this certain child who's a husband and two children who are children? Christie Derrico: We've had two guests, and we've had a number of men, but we've had two guests, for sure, men who did that. One in particular. And he really was. He liked to be called Mr. Dad, as he told us. His wife is a very prominent orthopedic surgeon, and he took over the homefront. And that was in fact the title of our episode. It was a choice he made, he was a lawyer also. And he was happy with having done that. And the kids grew up, they're happy. And they probably do, according to him, give a hard time to mom sometimes for that. Another one was a teacher, a journalist, who flew all over the world, and was never around. And ultimately decided that he would step back from that and take things that kept him around more. So I mean, they are starting to make those kinds of decisions. But what it's showing us is not that two people can have these high-flying careers at the same time, but rather that somebody has to step back, and it almost doesn't matter who it is. Someone has to step back. Go ahead, step back at home. So the other guest we had was a teacher. And he gave us an insight on paternity leave. And what he told us, one question we had had was when men take paternity leave, what are the stats? Are they home while the wives are home just giving a hand or they really, you know, coming in and staying home with the child alone, because obviously that's a big difference. And Steph explained, as did another guest of ours, a female guest, that they staggered the paternity leave so that someone who was a family member could be home with a newborn, and they could stretch out the time before they needed to hire a caregiver or bring them to a daycare. This is where analysis is important to understand how these families are cobbling it together. But as I'm hearing it, Andi, your perspective, you know, your voice here is men and how they're handling the situation. Women, we have found, also do something called gatekeeping. They're used to running the house, they say how the laundry is folded, dinner, what's prepared. We have to let go of some of those, our anal habits, and I'm speaking for myself, and just allow someone else. My husband did the shopping yesterday. I have to stop thinking in my head, all the things he forgot, or all the things that he bought that I don't like or don't usually buy. It's okay. And if he decides to make a meal during the week, I've got to eat it. I'm sure it's gonna be healthy. And I can't be the gatekeeper, which will be which penalizes me at the end of the day, if I can't delegate, if I can't accept that my children put their laundry away 60% perfect and some clean stuff goes back in the laundry bin or whatever they do, or dirty into the drawers. It's okay. And that's part of this discussion that we have to take up, maybe a little less perfect because we will be liberated if we can do that. Now we're gonna start sharing. Andi Simon: Your evidence is also grounded in a history where when the men came back from the war, the women who were doing just fine working were put back into their home. And welcome to the suburbs where they had their home. And I've met men who have wanted to sell the home, only to find out that it was a castle that the woman had controlled and built, and she was not going to sell that home. He thought it was a house. And she said, I'm not selling this, I built it. It was her career in a complementary fashion. Their identity is connected to their job, which was to care for the home. And I met another woman whose husband was an accountant, and she had dinner for him every night, the same time, when he came home. I'm going to think of it as theater, they knew those roles really well. They could play them in a heartbeat. Could they change roles and play a new one? Oh, it was terrifying. The thought of, How will I do this? So there's so much complexity into something that on the tip of our tongue says, But of course you can. And I'm not sure it's that easy. Maura Carlin: Something I don't think we talk about enough is the work demands and how they've changed over the generations. No jobs or few jobs are nine to five anymore, or even less than that. And I'll just tell you that my mother was a teacher, she was still home in the afternoon. My father, while he wasn't a businessman, actually negotiated for shorter hours and did freelance on the side. And he was home on Fridays. But even when he worked full time in the city, it wasn't the same kind of hours that we are expected to work now. And you know, that makes it harder. For one, to deal with the children, but it's harder to get childcare for those who want to work 9-7 or 7-9. So that's another piece that I don't think we talk about enough. Christie Derrico: I'm sorry, the entrepreneurial solution. That's, I don't advocate any 9-9. No. And believe me, I work hard. But a lot of my work and my husband's work, we do bring it home. What I was going to say, before we did mention Confessions of a Superwoman. But another great article is, Why I Want a Wife, which I had to write an essay on in high school. One of my teachers had me write an essay and it has nothing to do with, you know, partners, sexual partners. It's a support system. And this hidden workload. Running a house is laborious if you are cleaning in COVID. So many people couldn't have their cleaning help come in and they realized, this is really tough work. And there's a lot more I think that can go into parenting than just, you know, the ministerial making the sausage, as they call it. I mean, there are issues that come up with children, or at least in some families, that can't be addressed by other people. Andi Simon: Yep, they need their parents. Now that leads to the role of parents. Because, you know, we started the conversation: Has our society put on the side burner the child? And it worries me because rather than the child being the foremost most important thing that we should be working for, that we should be developing society around, it's almost a sidebar, and as Frank was discovering by taking care of his grandchild, this is exciting. It's wonderful. It's exhilarating. Why are we all built around our children? So as you're doing your research, why aren't we all built around the children? What is it in our American society where children are hard, both wonderful, but also challenging. How do we get our values on that stuff? Christie Derrico: The word helicoptering has come up. And in the course of our research, the UN study on birth rates has found that over-parenting has contributed to the lower birth rates, the expectations, and truthfully, I think children are less independent. The days of "just be home at six" are gone. They're very orchestrated with lots of activities. And a lot of parents' involvement is required driving. Even if you hire someone to drive, you have to be careful that it has to be somebody who's very skilled with your precious cargo. But that is a part of this discussion. And now we found again, with the pandemic, with the schools closed, a huge bulk of the support system that parents had disappeared overnight. And not only did you have them home, you are expected to do their schooling in front of a computer. But I will say that from the guests we've spoken to and our personal experiences, I actually don't think people have put the parenting on the backburner. I think that they're expecting to do it all. And they're expecting to do parenting at a much higher level than at least my parents did. Some of it's from society, and some of it is internal. Yeah, and some of it is the kids. Andi Simon: You're raising some interesting questions about society because I remember that I was pretty free and I had a bike, and I could ride my bike after school over to Lord and Taylor's and I had my own allowance. I could spend it however, I didn't have to explain much of anything. We went outside onto the street and played kickball, whoever was around. I still know my next-door neighbor. And Bobby and I laugh sometimes how free we were to be, and to learn through that becoming. But today, everything is different. And if you don't have them in lacrosse, and then soccer and then rugby, then they hang around with nothing to do because nobody's outside hanging out playing kickball. So you're caught between the two. So let's assume that's just going to be our society for a while. As you look forward to coming out of the pandemic, any thoughts for the women who are willing to look for that balance dilemma and somehow address it in some fashion because the businesses are full of a balance dilemma. Maura Carlin: I think it's going to have to be flexible. And it's going to have to be flexibility coming from the employers. The problem that I see, and I think about this all the time is, it's one thing to be flexible. But if the workload doesn't change, it's very hard. And I'm not talking about those who allow the workload to fill as many hours as you have. But there are things that just can't be flexible. I tried it at one point. After having kids, if the judge needed me to be in court, I had to be in court. And it really didn't matter whether it wasn't my day, or I had a parent-teacher conference. So, you know, there's a society piece in control. And those are two good insights. Christie Derrico: Well, I have managed to make my career flexible. And I have been before judges and I can remember a couple of tough experiences. I did have one story. My husband cut his finger one morning, and all I had was a Mickey Mouse or princess Band-Aid. And I said, "This is it. You're gonna have to go to court with this." So he puts it on and he goes, "This is great. The jury is gonna love this. They'll know I'm a dad." And I walked out and I said, "Ah, if I had walked in with the Mickey Mouse Band-Aid, I think that they would have thought, She's a terrible mom. She can't even get a Band-Aid. See the symbolism? Isn't it the same Band-Aid? In any event, this comes back to the issue of change. You know, when deciding careers and which position, the thing that we have addressed on our show are pivots, divots, pitfalls, curveballs...they happen, and how do you handle it. Or if you did decide to stay home for 10 years for great reasons, we have to stop thinking of parenting as pure drudgery. It's the most wonderful time and you only get that one chance. So if you decide to stay home, what happens? It takes a lot of courage. And we have featured many guests who have done return-ships. One woman was like a 40-year-old intern. And we didn't get to address this in one of our recent shows, but it was on my mind. She said that she felt that her managers could turn to her and talk about business problems because she was the only adult in the room, or, you know, a senior adult, not somebody who was 22 years old and didn't even know where to put the stamp on an envelope. So there are aspects, and now we can look at different careers, see where we might fit in best and aim for that. It probably takes us a couple years to reenter. But looking at these pivots, I think you have to just build yourself up and do it. Andi Simon: It's interesting listening to you because I hope those who are listening to us begin to think to themselves, How do we begin to change our attitudes or values, our minds? I did a workshop for the Petroleum Association in Pennsylvania in June last year, and they're all struggling without drivers. I said, Have you thought of hiring women? And they looked at me. I said, Well, listen, what is wrong with having drivers from 10-3? And let them do it when they drop the kids off at the schoolbus and pick them up after? And they looked at me. I said, You're short, you know, you have a challenge. And how can you then compliment them differently? How do you start to think about it from the eyes of what's possible? Because they're all sitting there waiting for jobs. And you simply say, Well, that's not our job. Why? Christie Derrico: These are the discussions we need to have because benefits are tied to employment. So if you have an employee, and they have a benefits package, it's harder to rationalize what is part time. Does a person want to take that on and have no benefits? So those are the solutions and the discussions we need to have. So we can have people that just can't commit to 40 hours a week, or 38-42 hours a week. And there are places for them. The biggest thing though when you return to the workforce is your family and getting them to adapt to loading the dishwasher, doing their own laundry, picking up a night to cook something. This is part of the cooperation. Andi Simon: You know, as a conductor of the family orchestra, everyone had an instrument to play. And if you conducted it well, they enjoyed it, it was an opportunity to shine as opposed to a penalty box because they were trialed. We can talk about how I trained my family, because part of it was to give them the confidence that they could have the opportunity to learn the training, and not to do and to be them. I was the enabler, the facilitator, the lover, the hugger, but not the "I'll take charge, you really messed it up" person. And that requires maturity on our part, to see this as a conductor might, where they aren't all playing their instruments yet, but nobody's trained them to play them. And so the metaphor that works for me might be something to share as you're thinking about them. I do have two thoughts to talk about. What is self-care? We have a 30-day challenge, actually a 60-day challenge, for a group of women presidents down in Nashville, it's going on now. And it's called Time to Take Care of You. And they're all stressed out. But the research is extraordinary that self-care can reduce stress. And what's happened is that for many successful women, they think it's guilty to take care of themselves. What does that mean, anything from having a cup of coffee on their porch, to working out, to setting aside time on their calendar for quiet time, a quiet walk, to go and have a hobby that they can do and how to program it so that it's part of their day. What are you seeing in terms of self-care, because this is our third and I'm going to be doing these as often as I can because everyone who gets into them doesn't want it to stop. Taking care of themselves is something to overcome, called guilt. And then when they do it, they go, "Oh, this makes me feel like I'm valued. I'm worth something." What do you see? Maura, do you want to start? Maura Carlin: Well, I mean, personally, I'm one of those people who needs to exercise. I need to move. Not everyone feels that way. I think the problem is finding the time. It's very hard to set aside that time. And Christie and I do talk about that you need to have friends. If that's important to you, you need to get exercise for health reasons. But for some people, it's sort of like what energizes them. I think you need time to yourself. And I will tell you that I have started doing a gratitude compassion class that I'm failing at miserably. But that's okay. And the big part of it is being kind to yourself. Yes. And I think that's what we all need more of. Andi Simon: Well, I find that the challenge is just fascinating. Because once they get into it, it takes a day or two or three, and then all of a sudden, they don't want to stop it. And it has a gratitude part at the end and the wall of wins with a high-fiving each other. Christie, do you find people with self-care as the afterthought also, because without it, you can't be happy? Christie Derrico: Well, in the evolution of my family, my grandmother unfortunately passed away before she was 60. And I feel that she nearly worked herself to death. She did have an illness, but she was not good at the self-care aspect of it. And she had the biggest heart. And I think of her all the time in terms of the lessons as a business owner, and a mother. And my mother brought that to the table to say, You got to have sports, you have to have friends. So it's something that's been part of my life. I get up very early to do my exercise, which sometimes can be, you know, exhausting, but it's maybe you do it three days a week, and not five, you know, you find a way to accommodate it. But in talking about pivots and trying new things, I went back to school, and I am almost halfway through a Masters in English. And I see our podcast as something that Maura and I did. That was a personal hobby that turned into something. We learned new things. And we had to make room for this. I mean, Maura edits the audio for our shows, I do the newsletter and the graphics. I can't even believe I've learned how to do that. I think it's really important to keep learning new things, especially with all the new technology. And it can be very frustrating. But I think actually keeping up with it is really important. From a mental standpoint, and to not feel like the world has passed. Andi Simon: So we are about ready to wrap up. So if that is your first: the world doesn't pass you by, you must stay up on top. Do you have one or two other things more and then I'll let Christie do hers. Maura Carlin: The thing that I keep telling myself that I wished I told myself earlier was to be bolder and be braver. And things that scare me, I have to go do them. Andi Simon: I love that be bolder, be braver. I never thought of it that way. But you're right. To be brave I think is what we need to be because the times have always been tough. And somehow we all had families that mustered through them. And I think these are going to be exciting times to come out and be brave, be courageous. Christie, your last thoughts. Christie Derrico: With the gratitude theme, sometimes we have to stop and reflect and really applaud ourselves about what we've achieved. Stop focusing on what we didn't do, the things that didn't turn out great. Never. You must love to have experienced love loss, like it's all part of it. And I think that Maura and I do a post mortem at the end of our season, and even sitting here today, I was thinking this weekend, how much we achieved on the goals we set for ourselves. And if some don't happen, that doesn't really matter. That's okay too. But it's important to take stock and be appreciative and compliment yourself that you've done a good job. Andi Simon: You know, the brain research I love because it's, you know, being an anthropologist and looking at culture, that the brain, the human being, needs gratitude, appreciation. It needs to have those three things every day that you did well. And all of a sudden, the car is actually toasted and the rain goes flying around and that love hormone makes you feel warm and fuzzy. If you don't, the cortisol has a great time making you feel angry. Somebody said to me at a meeting, "I have a friend who's angry all the time. How do they change?" He said, "Just take control of your mind. There's nothing in your mind. That's anger. It's just the way you think. So now what's happening is you're happy." How do you turn lemons into lemonade because nobody can do it but us. And we can each do it so that we can then smile every morning. So the first thing that my little 30-day challenge tells you to do is to wake in the morning and smile. And all of a sudden, the day looks very cool. Why not? It's perfect. This has been such fun. If they want to listen to The Balance Dilemma, or get a hold of you, where and how do they do that? Christie Derrico: We are on the internet at thebalancedilemma.com where you can find old episodes. We have show notes and things recommended by our guests. We're also on social media at The Balance Dilemma podcast on Facebook and LinkedIn. And any place you listen to your podcasts, which could be Apple, iTunes, Google Spotify. The Balance Dilemma, you can find all the episodes and listen in. We appreciate it. Andi Simon: You were bold and brave and courageous and true. And I loved having both of you here. So for my listeners, all of you have done a great job making us in the top 5% of global podcasts. I don't know how many podcasts there are, so I don't know what that actually means, other than it's fun to share. And we're in the top world 20's futures podcast. So I'm a real fan of Futurism because the signals are coming to us every day. And today's podcast makes me remember that there are signals coming to us that the times are changing fast. We know that. But how can we do this in a way that will be stronger for our kids and their kids and create a real strong culture and society where children are in the forefront of what we're doing and how we're doing it? And that doesn't mean just popping them in the car and helicoptering them over to the next lacrosse game. I mean, there's something broader here and even getting them to love to read and understand the joy of exploring ideas and staying on top of what's happening because they're going to lead us. These are great, great stories. You can reach me at info@andisimon.com. My books are on Amazon, Barnes & Noble: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business and On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights from which this whole podcast developed. And as we move into our post-300th podcast, I'm really happy to be sharing lots and lots of great stories. Thanks for coming. Have a great day. Stay well and enjoy the joy of living.

    Ag Economic Insights
    Talking about the Fed and how to define a recession

    Ag Economic Insights

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 13:50


    David and Brent discuss dry planting conditions, an episode of the Ag Interrupted series, farm loan delinquencies, the farm economy, and a book about George Washington.

    The Accidental Entrepreneur
    Juliana Whitney - Leafsheets

    The Accidental Entrepreneur

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 63:48


    Juliana Whitney, MBA, is President of Cann Strategy and Co-founder of Leafsheets.com. She specializes in new venture creation and development and has been focused on the cannabis industry since 2015.  She started out as a patient coordinator at the first dispensary in Las Vegas, went on to start Cann Strategy, a cannabis business strategy consulting firm and since 2017 has consulted with many companies and investors to develop their cannabis companies, and has composed high scoring and winning competitive license applications in Illinois, Nevada, and Ohio. Juliana, along with a co-founder, recently launched leafsheets.com which is a platform developed to simplify cannabis entrepreneurship and lower the barriers to entry and success by providing vital resources and information for starting and operating cannabis businesses — the things that the big shots have, but without the big shot price tag. In addition to listening to the episode, you can watch a video of their discussion on our YouTube Channel.  And be sure to subscribe to support the podcast! Other ways to connect with Juliana on social media: https://www.linkedin.com/in/julianawhitney instagram.com/officialjulianawhitney https://www.linkedin.com/company/cannabis-strategy-co/ Instagram.com/cannstrategy instagram.com/leafsheets https://www.linkedin.com/company/leafsheets/ For general information about the podcast, send an email to info@beinhakerlaw.com To follow Mitch and the podcast, go to linktr.ee/beinhakerlaw. You can subscribe and listen to episodes on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Spotify and most other directories. Please review us whenever possible and thanks for your continued support! Sponsorships and paid guest appearances are available. Connect with us by email or on social media. The Accidental Entrepreneur is brought to you by Beinhaker Law, a boutique business & estates legal practice in Clark, NJ. To learn about shared outside general counsel services and how to better protect your business, visit https://beinhakerlaw.com/fractional-gen-counsel/ Please support our affiliate sponsors (https://beinhakerlaw.com/podcast-affiliates/). Also, support the show and get your own podcast merch! (https://beinhakerlaw.com/podcast-store/) One of One Productions - a New Jersey-based studio, just over the George Washington bridge, that caters to the booming business of podcasting. Be sure to check out the guesting kit that they've created exclusively for our listeners! https://one-of-one-productions.myshopify.com/products/mitchell-beinhakers-guesting-kit North Authentic - NorthAuthentic.com is a conscious hair care marketplace offering the cleanest brands from around the world. Their pro stylists curate only the most fabulous non-toxic hair products. Use our affiliate link for all your purchases! https://shrsl.com/38heu The Healthy Place - Findyourhealthyplace.com has thousands of supplements to help you live a better quality of life; as well as natural solutions for chronic pain, stress, anxiety, depression, sleep and much, much more. Need guidance? Use their Live Chat feature and talk to a Wellness Consultant right on their website. The Accidental Entrepreneur is a trademark of Mitchell C. Beinhaker. Copyright 2018-2022. All rights reserved.

    Heritage Events Podcast
    A Tale of Three Presidential Houses: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    Heritage Events Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 58:09


    As the ideologies of identity politics and critical race theory march through America's institutions, even the homes of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison aren't safe. Some of these historic homes have taken seriously the legacy of the Founders and presented American history in a fair and unbiased manner. Unfortunately, others, with an overwhelming focus on historical grievances, neglect or malign the contributions of these remarkable individuals.Join us as we breakdown the state of play at Mount Vernon, Monticello, and Montpelier and discuss what Americans can and should do to save these cradles of the Republic. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    National Day Calendar
    July 29, 2022 - National Lipstick Day | National Chicken Wing Day

    National Day Calendar

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 3:30


    Welcome to July 29th, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate a perfect pucker and a bar food favorite.  Lipstick has sparked some controversy throughout the ages, and it may surprise you to learn who was on each side of the argument. George Washington himself wore lip rouge. Winston Churchill believed that lip color boosted morale in an excellent way. On the other hand Queen Victoria thought it was impolite to color your lips and in the 1770s, British Parliament banned lipstick, calling it a devilish attempt to trick men into marriage. Some people associated lipstick with witchcraft and it could be because it contained poisonous additives. Today our lips are liberated with multiple shades from shocking red to barely pink. On National Lipstick Day, celebrate with your signature shade.  Sometime in 1964, the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, NY received too many chicken wings from their supplier. Pub owner Teressa Bellissimo wasn't sure what to do with them, until her son and his friends showed up hungry. Teressa deep fried the wings and served them with a spicy sauce, in the hopes of using up the surplus wings. The guys loved them so much that chicken wings became a staple on the Anchor Bar menu ever since. Oh…and the bleu cheese dressing and celery? Teressa claimed she didn't have anything else to serve and added them to the plate. I don't know about you but I'm excited that it's National Chicken Wing Day. I'm Anna Devere and John McClain filling in for Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Hebrew Nation Online
    “Come out of her, My people” Show ~ Mark Call weekly

    Hebrew Nation Online

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 49:46


    The once 'united States of America' was never intended to have a king. George Washington made the point by refusing to stand for re-election after two terms. Now, elections are pretty clearly superfluous. And so is the 'oath' taken before a God of the Bible that those who stole the election not only don't believe, but openly hate. Mark begins by asking a question that will hopefully put a LOT of 'current events' -- and what we need to be thinking and praying about -- into perspective: Did the Russians know just how evil Stalin was? (Whether they could say so out loud, or not.) How about the Chinese under Mao? And yes, AmeriKa today under the Imposter-in-Chief. And even in ancient Israel. What did the people who lived under an evil, Baal-worshiping pagan king like Ahab think? Why does the Bible really not say much at all about what they thought, or did. The answers speak volumes.

    Salty Saints
    ep 99 - Was George Washington A Christian_ Richard Raines

    Salty Saints

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 62:39


    Have you ever wondered if George Washington was a Christan? This week Zack and Randy are joined by Richard Raines, author of Finding Washington: Why America Needs to Rediscover the Virtues of Her Most Essential Founding Father, as they discuss how historical figures like George Washington impacted our current culture.

    Threads From The National Tapestry: Stories From The American Civil War
    052 - ”Let Us Have Peace”: The Post-War Life Of U.S. Grant

    Threads From The National Tapestry: Stories From The American Civil War

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 79:52


    About this episode:  Since its creation, this nation has so embraced several of its victorious generals that it elected them as presidents.  Up until the American Civil War, most notably George Washington, Andrew Jackson and Zachary Taylor come to mind.  This, in the aftermath of war, is the story of another - a man who, like the president he served, came from the humblest of origins and found himself in this nation's highest elected office.  A man, who in many ways, found his political campaigns just as challenging - perhaps even more so - than his military ones.  With a tip of the cap in particular to William McFeely's biography, this is the story of Ulysses S. Grant, who not only was instrumental in winning the American Civil War, but in trying to win the peace that followed. ----more----   Some Characters Mentioned In This Episode: Andrew Johnson Philip Sheridan Julia Grant Edwin Stanton William T. Sherman Charles Sumner Rutherford B. Hayes Samuel Clemens   Get The Guide: Want to learn more about the Civil War? A great place to start is Fred's guide, The Civil War: A History of the War between the States from Workman Publishing. The guide is in its 9th printing.   Producer: Dan Irving   Thank you to our sponsor Bob Graesser, Raleigh Civil War Round Table's editor of The Knapsack newsletter and the Round Table's webmaster at http://www.raleighcwrt.org  

    Playmaker's Corner
    Playmaker's Corner Episode 188: Arvada, D'Evelyn, Faith Christian, The Pinnacle, Middle Park, Northfield, Lincoln, Denver North, George Washington, Kennedy, Riverdale Ridge, Thomas Jefferson Previews

    Playmaker's Corner

    Play Episode