Podcasts about George Washington

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1st president of the United States

  • 2,639PODCASTS
  • 4,307EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 22, 2021LATEST
George Washington

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Best podcasts about George Washington

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Latest podcast episodes about George Washington

A10 Talk Podcast
Fordham, Mason, George Washington, Duquesne Preview w/Daniel Frank and Edward Major.

A10 Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 49:42


Sam, Daniel, and Ed break down the biggest questions regarding four A10 teams this season; What does a successful season for Fordham look like? Will Josh Oduro get some help in the paint? Is Keith Dambrot meeting expectations? These questions and more are answered on the A10 Talk Podcast!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cwic Media
Thomas Jefferson Statue Removal

Cwic Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 17:57


Many in the media call this action in New York City a menial occurrence. But the media also said in 2017 that the removal of Confederate statues would not lead to the founding fathers like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. They are wrong again. This is part of a national plan by supporters of CRT and Critical Social Justice to "reset" the founding of America.   Website - https://www.cwicmedia.com  

Radio Free Hillsdale 101.7 FM
Great Men Back Then: George Washington

Radio Free Hillsdale 101.7 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:00


Washington left his farm to fight for the independence of the United States and to become the first president. He set many traditions and precedents that are still followed today.

Todd Feinburg
John Berlau; Rob Sampson Join Todd (HR 1 - 10/21/21)

Todd Feinburg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 38:36


Todd opens the show with two interviews; first he is joined by John Berlau author of “George Washington, Entrepreneur: How Our Founding Fathers Private Business Pursuits Changed America and the World”. Todd and John break down the entrepreneur spirit found within George Washington and his history as a businessman which gets lost in his presidential background. Then, in the second half of the hour Todd is joined by CT state senator Rob Sampson to speak on the climate of politics, and the way the public is swinging as the democrats continue to hang their hat on COVID related issues. Rob and Todd then break down the constant mixed messaging from CT Dems as well as the Lamont administration. Tune in weekdays 2-6 PM EST on WTIC Newstalk 1080 ;or on the new Audacy app! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kings of Democracy
American Voices: Ethan Craft, License Plate Collector. THIS IS ACTUALLY REALLY INTERESTING OK SO LISTEN TO IT

Kings of Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 46:30


SHUT UP! OK SHUT UP!  Do you know how long it takes to research and write and record one of these episodes?  I just got a new job.  I'm busy, i got my own stuff going on.So instead of that, today we are going to spend some time with Ethan Craft another dude I met on Tiktok and we're gonna talk about License Plates, which he collects.  Now I know you are thinking, Andrew aren't license plates just a piece of unnoticed ephemera that reveal a shockingly rich culture of changing material design that also reflects our national transition to an hyper-individualistic society?   And the answer is yes, but some of them have bird on them.Actually I'm really in to this kind of stuff, its actually the exact kind of thing that inspired this podcast.  Most of us object to the Great Man of History TM ideas, but the reaction to this has been to assume a kind of photo negative inverse of it.  We no longer celebrate how George Washington built this county, we morn how he was the worst.  The reality is that the Great Men of History rarely shape your daily life as much as you'd think.  It's also the tiny little decisions of material culture.  License plates are a perfect example of that.  Why are there so many diffrent kinds of license plates?  Why are they made in jail?  What is the rarest license plate?  Where can I get a license plate?  

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency
Season II, Episode III: Bleeding Kansas and the Utah War

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:20


This week on The Past, The Promise, The Presidency: Presidential Crises we examine two presidential crises from the 1850s: Bleeding Kansas and the Utah War.So far this season, we've seen the nation solidify under George Washington's leadership. Then, we saw the city named for our first president nearly burned to the ground by British forces little more than a generation later. The United States survived each of those crises, but by the 1850s, the new nation was starting to come apart.    This week, we took a look at two crises from the 1850s: the violent struggle between pro and anti-slavery factions over the political fortunes of future states, known as "Bleeding Kansas," and the less well-known fight between federal authorities, president James Buchanan in particular, and Mormon leaders over governance of Utah. To put the coming Civil War into context and better understand these intertwined crises of federal expansion in the 1850s, we spoke with professor Sarah Barringer Gordon--Sally, to her friends--the Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Barringer Gordon is one of the nation's experts on questions of constitutional religious freedoms. We then turned to professor Kellie Carter Jackson, who teaches in the department of Africana studies at Wellesley college. Dr. Carter Jackson's work focuses on Black abolitionists and the role of violence in the ongoing battle for slavery's abolition. Explore all this and more in Season II, Episode III: Bleeding Kansas and the Utah War. To learn more, visit pastpromisepresidency.com.

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast
Creating Dream Teams with Mike Zani

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 35:31


You know when you are on a good team. In fact, you feel energized and productive when you work with that team. The question becomes, can we get engagement, productivity, and happiness at work? Mike Zani believes it can and when you have a happy and engaged team, productivity goes through the roof. Mike is the author of The Science of Dream Teams: How Talent Optimization Can Drive Engagement, Productivity and Happiness. He shares with Kevin that most CEOs have a business strategy and a financial plan. However, few have a talent strategy. Yet, productivity and the bottom line are the results of our talent. Engagement begins with an intentional mission and culture. When you get your team connected to the mission and values, you get discretionary effort. In this episode, Mike breaks down the title of the book and shares his ideas on: A dream team. Talent Optimization. Engagement. Happiness. This episode is brought to you by… Unleashing Your Remarkable Potential, Kevin's free weekly e-newsletter. It's full of articles and resources to help you become a more confident and successful leader. Book Recommendations The Science of Dream Teams: How Talent Optimization Can Drive Engagement, Productivity, and Happiness by Mike Zani Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives — How Your Friends' Friends' Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do by James H. Fowler PhD , Nicholas A. Christakis MD PhD In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown (The American Revolution Series) by Nathaniel Philbrick Connect with Mike Book Website Company Website Related Podcast Episodes The Leader's Role in Employee Engagement with Michael Lee Stallard. Creating Happiness in the Workplace with Kris Boesch. Understanding Employee Engagement with Jacqueline Throop-Robinson. Putting Happiness to Work with Eric Karpinski. Follow the Podcast Don't miss an episode! Follow this podcast through the options below. Apple Podcasts Stitcher TuneIn Soundcloud RSS Or your favorite podcast app. Leave a Review If you liked this conversation, we'd be thrilled if you'd let others know by leaving a review on Apple Podcasts. Here's a quick guide for posting a review. Join Our Facebook Group Join our Facebook community to network with like-minded leaders, ask us questions, suggest guests and more. We welcome your wealth of experience and hope you will join us in sharing it with others on their leadership journey. You can join the group here: facebook.com/groups/RemarkableLeadershipPodcast/

Plausibly Live! - The Official Podcast of The Dave Bowman Show
There Is No Secret Formula For Success

Plausibly Live! - The Official Podcast of The Dave Bowman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 15:23


All men are flawed. Period. I am. You are, George Washington was, Donald Trump is, and… yes, Colin Powell was flawed. All men – ahem, all people, are flawed. So when it was announced yesterday morning that General Powell had passed away, there was a great number of people lining up in my various feeds and texts and eMails to explain to me that General Powell was badly flawed and therefore it was the opportune moment to take out of their day to point out those flaws to me because I wasn't doing it for them. Even in death, an eighty-four year old man who did a hell of lot more to serve this nation than 95% of the people who wanted me to know about his flaws, was “controversial” and “flawed.” I can only hope that when I die, people talk as badly about me as they did Colin Powell yesterday…

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 1 - Do You Have A Costume Yet?

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 15:28


We discuss what percent of people still don't have their Halloween costume picked out, the Tennessee Titans narrowly beating the Buffalo Bills on Monday Night Football, and Are You Smarter Than Jason Dick. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Epic Order of the Seven - The Podcast
Season 2 - The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key - Chapter 30

The Epic Order of the Seven - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 42:00


Chapter 30 – A tale of two Founding Fathers in training! While Patrick Henry learns the hard lessons of farming tobacco and raising a family – Col. George Washington learns the hard lessons of war – and a stubborn commanding officer. Wisdom can be found in both old – and young! The Order of the Seven animal team helps birth one nation under God by entering the lives of a unique generation of children chosen to become the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. Each episode is hosted by Max, Liz and Nigel – and includes a selection from the audiobook, “The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key!” For your very own copy of the audiobook, written by Jenny L. Cote, read by our own “Announcer Lad” Denny Brownlee – go to Audible.com. Just click here:  http://bitly.ws/cik6 (http://bitly.ws/cik6) And if you'd like to help ensure this podcast can continue to bless future listeners – please consider supporting Playful World Ministries and this podcast through: https://actintl.givingfuel.com/brownlee (https://actintl.givingfuel.com/brownlee) And we'd love to hear from you, too! Email: Jenny@epicorderoftheseven.com This episode features: -       1:33 –Liz & Nigel help a confused Max figure out who's fighting who in the French and Indian War -       5:02 – The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key - Chapter 30 “Plowshares and Swords” -       35:10 – Nigel's News Nuggets ponders why so many of our downloads are from Council Bluff, Iowa -       37:03 – Jenny's Corner: So young – and so responsible - a look at the lives of young Patrick Henry and George Washington in 1755.  -       40:35 – Announcer Lad closes the show with a zinger – take that, Max! Support this podcast

The Ezra Klein Show
The Story of America's Founding You Weren't Taught in School

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 56:53


There are few periods of U.S. history that are as vigorously debated, as emotionally and civically charged as the American Revolution. And for good reason: How Americans interpret that period — its heroes, its villains, its legacy — shapes how we understand our social foundations, our national identity, our shared political project.Woody Holton is a historian at the University of South Carolina, a leading scholar of America's founding and the author of numerous books on the period, including, most recently, “Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution.”Holton's work presents a fundamental challenge to the version of the American Revolution that most of us were taught in grade school. In his telling, America's “founding fathers” were far less central to the country's founding than we imagine. Class conflict was just as important a cause of the Revolution as aspirational ideals, if not more. And the way Holton sees things, the American Constitution was a fundamentally capitalist document designed to rein in democracy, not expand it.But Holton's work shouldn't be understood solely as a revisionist account of a particular era in history. It also provides a unique lens for rethinking some of the defining features of our present — the disconnect between the kinds of policies that democratic majorities support and what our systems of government enable, the fervor to which we cling to national heroes like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, the enduring challenges of governing a fractious, deeply divided society, the complex relationship between material interests and ideology and much more.Mentioned“Rhetoric and Reality in the American Revolution” by Gordon S. WoodThe Framers' Coup by Michael J. KlarmanUnruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution by Woody HoltonBook recommendationsA Midwife's Tale by Laurel Thatcher UlrichThe Negro in the American Revolution by Benjamin QuarlesRebecca's Revival by Jon F. SensbachThis episode is guest-hosted by Jamelle Bouie, a New York Times columnist whose work focuses on the intersection of politics and history. Before joining The Times in 2019, he was the chief political correspondent for Slate magazine. You can read his work here and follow him on Twitter @jbouie. (Learn more about the other guest hosts during Ezra's parental leave here.)You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Mary Marge Locker and Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

Short Talk Bulletin
Freemasons At Valley Forge V47N7

Short Talk Bulletin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 12:15


Brethren, this Short Talk Bulletin Podcast episode written by Bro Ronald E. Heaton, and was first published in July of 1969. We know that George Washington was a Brother, as were many of his generals. But was there Masonry at Valley Forge? Here, we find an excellent discussion of that very question. Enjoy, and do […]

TopMedTalk
Tracheotomies and COVID 19 | EBPOM 2021 Chicago/Dingle

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 18:52


"I think it really comes down to teamwork" How rapidly should you perform a tracheotomy? When do you "start the conversation" about the procedure? What about when it comes to patients with COVID19? Where does a data driven approach take us to? This essential piece is provided to TopMedTalk listeners as a sneak preview of EBPOM Dingle and Chicago; recorded in advance of the meeting and shared with you as a preview of this year's Evidence Based Perioperative Medicine's global conference offering. We would like to thank Medtronic, for their generous support which enabled us to bring this piece to you for free. Presented by Desiree Chappell and Monty Mythen with their guest Babak Sarani, Professor of surgery and emergency medicine and Director for the Center for Trauma and Critical Care at George Washington.

Travel Time
33 - Mother/Son Road Trip 2 - Fort Necessity

Travel Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 11:25


My youngest and I set out on a road trip - first stop Fort Necessity - George Washington's First battle and only surrender and the start of the French and Indian War.  I share some of the history and context of the battle and our stop there on the way to Antietam.

The Drive with Paul Swann
October 15, 2021

The Drive with Paul Swann

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 44:43


Paul Swann is joined in the studio by Bill Cornwell. WCHS-TV 8 Sports anchor C.J. Harvey joins Swann and Cornwell live from Denton, Texas in the first segment to preview the Marshall match-up with North Texas. Spring Valley play-by-play announcer Matt Perry previews Spring Valley at Capital. Cabell Midland broadcaster Chris Tatum joins the program with a look at George Washington at Cabell Midland. Andrew Rodgers and Woody Woodrum set the scene for St. Albans at Huntington. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-drive-with-paul-swann/support

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 5/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:04


Photo:  View of the Attack on Bunker's Hill with the Burning of Charlestown, by Lodge CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 5/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 6/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:55


Photo:  First page of Paine's The American Crisis              "The morale of the Patriot forces was boosted on December 19 when a new pamphlet titled The American Crisis written by Thomas Paine, the author of Common Sense, was published. "These are the times that try men's souls; the summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph."Within a day of its publication in Philadelphia, General Washington ordered it to be read to all of his troops. It encouraged the soldiers and improved the tolerance of their difficult conditions." CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 6/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 3/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:35


Photo:  Gen. Sir William Howe CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 3/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 2/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:00


Photo:  Brooklyn Heights in 1854. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 2/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 7/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:20


Photo:  George Washington praying at Valley Forge Dr Bond inoculated Washington's troops: "Finding the Small pox to be spreading much and fearing that no precaution can prevent it from running through the whole of our Army, I have determined that the troops shall be inoculated. This Expedient may be attended with some inconveniences and some disadvantages, but yet I trust in its consequences will have the most happy effects. Necessity not only authorizes but seems to require the measure, for should the disorder infect the Army in the natural way and rage with its usual virulence we should have more to dread from it than from the Sword of the Enemy. Under these circumstances I have directed Doctr Bond to prepare immediately for inoculating in this Quarter,1 keeping the matter as secret as possible, and request that you will without delay inoculate All the Continental Troops that are in philadelphia and those that shall come in as fast as they arrive."*             CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 7/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution. ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  *  The Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond had a problem. During the Battle of Lexington and Concord, in obedience to his Hippocratic Oath, he had treated British soldiers. For performing his duty as a doctor, he was falsely accused of being a Loyalist and had his life threatened by an angry mob.     "Doctor Nathaniel Bond, of Marblehead, having been charged before this Committee with having acted an unfriendly part to this Colony, the said Committee appointed Joseph Warren, Esq., Colonel Thos. Gardner, and Lieut. Colonel Joseph Palmer, as a Court of Inquiry, to examine witnesses in the case, and hear and determine the same; and upon full enquiry into the case, they are clearly of the opinion that said Bond's general behaviour has been friendly to American liberty; and though he may have discovered an imprudent degree of warmth in some instances, yet we do not find any proof of an inimical temper or disposition to this Country, and therefore recommend him to the esteem and friendship of his Country, that (as the errour which occasioned his being brought before this Committee appears to have been altogether involuntary, and was such as several of our most firm friends were led into, by false rumours spread, of the transactions of the nineteenth instant) no impressions to the Doctor's disadvantage may remain on the minds of any person whatsoever.             [signed] Joseph Warren, Chairman.”  April 26, 1775. .

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 1/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:20


Photo:    A portion of Howes Map (1776) showing "The Heights" [of Guan, which is a variant of Gowanus], north of the village of Flatbush. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1762: 4/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:25


Photo:  John Glover (November 5, 1732 – January 30, 1797) was an American fisherman, merchant, and military leader from Marblehead, Massachusetts, who served as a brigadier general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 4/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 8/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:50


Photo:   Colonel John Glover directs the evacuation of the American army from Brooklyn, on the night of August 29-30, 1776. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 8/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

Write About Now
Surprising Facts About George Washington You Probably Didn't Know

Write About Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 39:59


It's no easy task to follow in the footsteps of George Washington. But author Nathaniel Philbrick did just that — albeit 229 years later. For his latest book Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy, Nathaniel followed George Washington's 1789 tour of the country and pieces together the story of how one man traveled to 13 colonies in an effort to understand — and ultimately unite — them. On the pod, Nathaniel talks about how retracing George Washington's travels helped him understand the U.S. president as an individual far more complex than the figure he presents on the dollar bill. He also parallels the current state of the United States to the country as it was in 1789, and what he thinks George Washington would say if he saw the state of our union today.

The Daily Gardener
October 12, 2021 Top Trees For Fall Color, Berthe Hoola van Nooten, George Washington Cable, Cecil Frances Alexander, Terri Irwin, Carving Out a Living on the Land by Emmet Van Driesche, and Beatrix Potter

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 38:37


Today in botanical history, we celebrate a Dutch botanical illustrator, a writer from New Orleans, and a hymn writer - who wrote over 400 hymns. We'll hear an excerpt from Terri Irwin - just fabulous - wife of the late great Steve Irwin. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book about Living on the Land. A hot topic since 2020. And then we'll wrap things up with a touching story about Beatrix Potter.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.       Curated News TOP TREES FOR FALL COLOR | Garden Design | Mike MacCaskey Fall Foliage Prediction Map   Important Events October 12, 1817 Birth of Berthe Hoola van Nooten ("Bair-tah Hole-lah van NO-ten") Dutch botanical artist. Berthe's life story is incredibly moving. She was born in Utrecht in the Netherlands. She married a judge named Dirk Hoola van Nooten who secured a position in the Dutch colony of Suriname SurahNAM in South America. The couple frequently traveled between Jakarta and Suriname. Along the way, Berthe collected and drew plant specimens which she would send back home to the botanical gardens in the Netherlands. By the mid-1840's the couple moved to New Orleans to establish a Protestant school for girls on behalf of the Episcopal Church. But in the summer of 1847, New Orleans was ravaged by an epidemic of yellow fever that wiped out ten percent of the population. After the yellow fever claimed Dirk's life, Berthe was left to fend for herself and her five children at the age of thirty. She attempted to open another school in Galveston but was unable to pay her creditors. Eventually, Berthe joined her brother on a trip to Java. There she opened another school, but she also had a patron in Sophie Mathilde, the wife of William II (Netherlands). The result was her masterpiece - a collection of forty plates of her botanical art - called Fleurs, Fruits et Feuillages Choisis de l'Ile de Java or Selected Flowers, Fruits and Foliage from the Island of Java (1863-64). Berthe's work was dramatic, featuring rich colors and bold illustrations. Most Europeans had never seen such magnificent plants. In the introduction, aware of her station as a woman and penniless widow during the Victorian age, Berthe apologized for her daring attempt at creating such work, writing, You may not, like myself, have tasted the bitterness of exile… you may not, like myself, have experienced, even in the springtime of life, the sorrowful separation from home and country – the absence of the friendly greeting, on a foreign shore… Death may not have snatched away from you, the arm which was your sole support… bereavement may not have entered your dwelling, like mine, as with one sudden stroke to tear away the veil of sweet illusions, which, as yet, had hidden from your eyes the stern realities of life – to place you, with a lacerated heart, a shrinking spirit, and a feeble and suffering body, before an unpitying necessity, which presents no other alternative than labour. In 1892, Berthe died impoverished on the island of Jakarta. She was 77.   October 12, 1844 Birth of George Washington Cable, American writer, and critic. A son of New Orleans, he has been called the first modern southern writer. Despite being a German Protestant, instead of French Catholic, George understood Creole culture and is most remembered for his early fiction about his hometown, including Old Creole Days (1879), The Grandissimes "Gran-DE-seem" (1880), and Madame Delphine "Delphine" (1881). Today the George Washington Cable House is open to visitors. The house was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1962. Located at 1313 8th Street, in the Garden District of New Orleans, the home features gardens that George designed. In fact, The neighborhood is known for outstanding restaurants and beautiful gardens. The beauty of New Orleans inspired George, and he was especially fond of nature and gardens. In The Taxidermist, his story begins with these words, One day a hummingbird got caught in a cobweb in our greenhouse. It had no real need to seek that damp, artificial heat. We were in the very heart of that Creole summertime when bird-notes are many as the sunbeams. The flowers were in such multitude they seemed to follow one about, offering their honeys and perfumes and begging to be gathered. Our little boy saw the embodied joy fall, a joy no longer, seized it and, clasping it too tightly, brought it to me dead. He cried so over the loss that I promised to have the body stuffed. This is how I came to know Manouvrier “Man-vree-yay,” the Taxidermist in St. Peter Street. In My Own Acre, he wrote, A garden, we say, should never compel us to go back the way we came; but in truth, a garden should never compel us to do anything. Its don'ts should be laid solely on itself.  “Private grounds, no crossing”–take that away, please, wherever you can, and plant your margins so that there can be no crossing. Wire nettings hidden by shrubberies from all but the shameless trespasser you will find far more effective, more promotive to beauty, and more courteous. “Don't” make your garden a garden of don'ts. For no garden is quite a garden until it is “Joyous Gard.” Let not yours or mine be a garden for display. Then our rhododendrons and like splendors will not be at the front gate, and our grounds be less and less worth seeing the farther into them we go. Nor let yours or mine be a garden of pride.  And let us not have a garden of tiring care or a user up of precious time.  Neither let us have an old-trousers, sun-bonnet, black fingernails garden–especially if you are a woman. Finally, in The American Garden, he wrote, One of the happiest things about gardening is that when it is bad, you can always–you and time–you and year after next–make it good. It is very easy to think of the plants, beds, and paths of a garden as things which, being once placed, must stay where they are; but it is shortsighted, and it is fatal to effective gardening. We should look upon the arrangement of things in our garden very much as a housekeeper looks on the arrangement of the furniture in her house. Except buildings, pavements, and great trees–and not always excepting the trees–we should regard nothing in it as permanent architecture but only as furnishment and decoration. At favorable moments you will make whatever rearrangement may seem to you good.   October 12, 1895    Death of Cecil Frances Alexander, Anglo-Irish hymn writer, and poet. She wrote over 400 hymns. In addition to There Is a Green Hill Far Away and the Christmas carol Once in Royal David's City, she wrote All Things Bright and Beautiful. Here are the garden and nature-related verses, along with the refrain at the end. Each little flower that opens, Each little bird that sings, He made their glowing colours, He made their tiny wings. The cold wind in the winter, The pleasant summer sun, The ripe fruits in the garden, He made them every one; The tall trees in the greenwood, The meadows for our play, The rushes by the water, To gather every day; All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small, All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all.   Unearthed Words The name of the zoo was the Queensland Reptile and Fauna Park. As I crossed the parking area, I prepared myself for disappointment. I am going to see a collection of snakes, lizards, and miserable creatures in jars, feel terribly sorry for them and leave. It was October 1991. I was Terri Raines, a twenty-seven-year-old Oregon girl in Australia on an unlikely quest to find homes for rescued American cougars. A reptile park wasn't going to be interested in a big cat. I headed through the pleasant spring heat toward the park, thinking pessimistic thoughts. This is going to be a big waste of time. But the prospect of seeing new species of wildlife drew me in. I walked through the modest entrance with some friends, only to be shocked at what I found on the other side: the most beautiful, immaculately kept gardens I had ever encountered. Peacocks strutted around, kangaroos and wallabies roamed freely, and palm trees lined all the walkways. It was like a little piece of Eden. ― Terri Irwin, Steve & Me   Grow That Garden Library Carving Out a Living on the Land by Emmet Van Driesche ("DRY-sh") This book came out in 2019, and the subtitle is lessons in resourcefulness and craft from an unusual Christmas tree farm. Well, I have to confess that I'm a huge fan of Emmett's YouTube channel. He does everything that he's talking about in this book - Even carving his own spoons. But what I especially love about this book is learning about what it's like to be a Christmas tree farmer. I find this fascinating.  (And to me, this book is an excellent option for a Christmas gift. So keep that in mind as well.) Now what Emmett is writing about is simplicity - living a life that's in tune with nature,   A life that is away from the hustle and bustle of the city and the daily grind. Emmett is busy,  but he has plenty of time to do the things that matter - Even pursuing his favorite pastime of spoon carving. Now I have to confess that I discovered a very pleasant surprise when I started reading Emmett's book; he's an excellent writer. And I wanted to give you a little taste for his writing, a little sample.  Just by reading what he wrote in the introduction to his book. He wrote, The air is cold enough for my breath to show.  But I'm about to break a sweat.  I'm harvesting balsam branches, grabbing each with one hand and cutting them with the red clippers in the other. ...I work fast and don't stop until my arm is completely stacked with branches and sticking straight out, and I look like a kid with too many sweaters on under his jacket.  Pivoting on my heel.  I stride back to my central pile of balsam boughs and dump the armload on top, eyeballing it to gauge how much the pile weighs.  I decide I need more and head off in another direction into the grove.   The balsam fir grows from big wild stumps and thickets that can stretch 20 feet around, the trees crowded so closely together, in no apparent order or pattern, that their branches interlock. Instead of single trees, each stump has up to three small trees of different ages growing off of it. They are pruned as Christmas trees, and I am a Christmas tree farmer.   Isn't that fascinating? Well, this book is 288 pages of self-reliance and the Christmas spirit. You can get a copy of Carving Out a Living on the Land by Emmet Van Driesche and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $13.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart October 12, 1907 On this day, a 41-year-old Beatrix Potter wrote to Millie Warne, the sister of her publisher, friend, and former fiance Norman Warne (who died two years earlier - a month after their engagement - at the age of 37). Beatrix wore Norman's ring on the ring finger of her right hand until she died three days before Christmas in 1943 at the age of 77. My news is all gardening at present and supplies. I went to see an old lady at Windermere and impudently took a large basket and trowel with me. She had the most untidy garden I ever saw. I got nice things in handfuls without any shame, amongst others a bundle of lavender slips ...and another bunch of violet suckers. Incidentally, twenty years earlier on this day, in 1887, that a 21-year-old Beatrix drew her first fungus, the Verdigris Toadstool "Vir-dah-greez" (Stropharia aeruginosa).   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Booknotes+
Ep. 31 Nathaniel Philbrick, "Travels with George"

Booknotes+

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 59:26


After he became president in 1789, George Washington visited all thirteen former colonies to talk to citizens about the United States and what it meant to be an American. In 2018, historian Nathaniel Philbrick, along with his wife and dog, set out to retrace Washington's journey to find out how much has changed since then. He chronicled the trip in a new book, "Travels with George." We talked to Mr. Philbrick about Washington's journey and legacy and what he learned from following in Washington's footsteps over two centuries later.     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FratChat Podcast
Season 4 Ep#1: Presidents That F*cked!

FratChat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 69:36


This week! On our sweet sweet return to the airwaves, the FratChat Podcast takes a look back at some classic US Presidential history to find the horniest of the Commander in Chiefs! Which Presidents turned the Oval Office into the Oral Office? Find out now on the FratChat Podcast! Get 20% OFF + Free Shipping on all MANSCAPED products with promo code FRATCHAT at MANSCAPED.com! Follow us on all social media: Instagram: http://Instagram.com/FratChatPodcast Facebook: http://Facebook.com/FratChatPodcast Twitter: http://Twitter.com/FratChatPodcast Follow Carlos and CMO! Carlos on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/CarlosDoesTheWorld CMO on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/Chris.Moore.Comedy

Charlotte Talks
Historian Nathaniel Philbrick follows in the footsteps of George Washington in 'Travels With George'

Charlotte Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 49:25


Historian Nathaniel Philbrick recreated the epic road trip traveled by George Washington in his quest to unify the fledgling United States. He shares what he learned in his book "Travels with George."

American POTUS
POTUS 1 Saves the Nation…for a 2nd time

American POTUS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 60:33


The British had left, and the Revolution was won, but the freedom that was fought so hard for, was in danger of a mighty implosion!  The 13 states were still thinking like 13 separate states, and if our new nation was to survive, it would take something special…someone special to get the government on the right track.  Politics, Personalities, and Personal agendas.  Our nations 1st POTUS uses his own power and prestige to fight through it all!  The American Cincinnatus, George Washington, he's on this episode of American POTUS!

Grim Podcast
The Barber Surgeon

Grim Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 62:21


Medieval barber shops bled and performed surgeries on patients between hair dressing and a shave while operating as a tavern. Join Grim for the lost wonderous and terrifying world of the barber-surgeon with dark history stories of George Washington and medical tobacco enemas to educate and entertain.

The Daily Gardener
October 11, 2021 Bulb Planting Tips, Zaccheus Collins, Hermann Wendland, Arthur William Hill, Helena Rutherford Ely, Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally by Robert Kourik, and Thích Nhất Hạnh

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 29:59


Today in botanical history, we celebrate a Philadelphia plant lover who we get to know only through his correspondence to other botanists, we'll also learn about the German palm expert and the man who became a director at Kew - but not before becoming an expert in the graves of the fallen during WWI. We'll hear an excerpt from the amateur gardener Helena Rutherford Ely. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book from one of my favorite modern garden experts Robert Kourik. And then we'll wrap things up with a Thay - the Buddhist monk, writer, and peace activist.  And I'll also add naturalist to his list of titles because he draws so much insight from nature - as should we all.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News 14 Tips for Planting Your Favorite Bulbs | BHG | Editors   Important Events October 11, 1818  On this day, the Philadelphia botanist Zaccheus Collins to Jacob Bigelow in Boston. Zaccheus was a big-time plant collector and he had a large herbarium of most of the plants in the vicinity of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Zaccheus never published anything, but he corresponded with the botanists of his time, especially Henry Muhlenberg, Frederick Muhlenberg, Stephen Elliott, and Jacob Bigelow. In his letter to Jacob, written on this day, Zaccheus wrote, The schooner Hero [with] Capt. Daggett... may be at Boston as soon as the present letter. On board [is] a little open box containing a growing plant of Aristolochia serpentaria (Virginia snakeroot), roots of Euphorbia ipecac (American ipecac), Spiraea trifoliata( Bowman's Root), & Convolvulus pandurata (wild sweet potato vine).  These were put up under the direction of the worthy Mr. Bartram, my friend, still living at the old Bot. gardens, home of the father of Amer. Botany.  You will only have to pay the freight. October 11, 1825 Birth of Hermann Wendland, German botanist. He followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, both botanists, and served as director of the Royal Gardens of Herrenhausen in Hannover. Each generation of Wendlends had their specialty; the grandfather worked with ericas or heather, the father's focus was phyllodineous acacias, and Hermann's love was the palm family, the Arecaceae. Hermann's monograph established the classification for palms. He's remembered in the South American palm genus Wendlandiella. During his life, Hermann turned Herrenhausen into the world's leading garden for palm cultivation and research. Herrenhausen's palm collection was unrivaled, and the focus on these stately and elegant trees resulted in Herrenhausen's construction of the tallest glasshouse in all of Europe. In addition to naming over 500 palm species, Hermann named the Arizona palm Washingtonia filifera in memory of George Washington. Hermann is also remembered for calling the genus Saintpaulia (African violet) after Baron Walter von Saint Paul. In 1882, Baron Walter was the Governor of the Usambara (“Ooh-sahm-bar-ah”) District in German East Africa. During his time there, he explored the Usambara Mountains located in northeastern Tanzania. There, in the cloud forests, he collected seeds and specimens of a small herb, which he sent home to Herrenhausen. Hermann immediately cultivated the little plants, and he recognized that they were an entirely new species in an entirely new genus. And so, he named the plant Saintpaulia ionantha (“saint-paul-ee-ah ii-o-nan' thah”). Today we call the plant by its common name, the African violet. Hermann also called it the Usambara veilchen ('Usambara violet'). Today, African violets continue to be one of the most popular house plants. But, at home in their native Usambara Mountains, the plants face extinction.   October 11, 1875 Birth of Arthur William Hill, English botanist, and taxonomist. He served as Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Before he became director of Kew, he worked on a project for the Directorate of Graves Registration and Enquiries, the entity in charge of locating the graves of Britains service members who died during WWI.  In 1915, Arthur became part of this project and served as horticulture advisor. The job required visits throughout Europe and the middle east. Anywhere the war was fought, Arthur visited - from France to Turkey, Italy to Palestine. In 1916, during the month of March alone, Arthur visited thirty-seven cemeteries. In 1917, Arthur visited the Somme Battlefields in France and wrote poignantly about the poppies and wildflowers that grew in the aftermath of the fighting that had occurred in the summer and fall of the previous year. Although the landscape was pockmarked from shells, Arthur wrote, ...One saw only a vast expanse of weeds of cultivation, which so completely covered the ground and dominated the landscape that all appeared to be a level surface. In July, poppies predominated, and the sheet of colour as far as the eye could see was superb; a blaze of scarlet unbroken by tree or hedgerow. No more moving sight can be imagined than this great expanse of open country gorgeous in its display of colour, dotted over with half-hidden white crosses of the dead. In no British cemetery, large or small, however beautiful or impressive it may be, can the same sentiments be evoked or feelings so deeply stirred. Nowhere, I imagine, can the magnitude of the struggle be better appreciated than in this peaceful, poppy-covered battlefield hallowed by its many scattered crosses.   Unearthed Words After five or six years, I dig up my Roses about October tenth, cut the tops down to about twelve inches, cut out some of the old wood, cut off the roots considerably, trench the ground anew, and replant. The following year the Roses may not bloom very profusely, but afterward, for four or five years, the yield will be great. My physician in the[128] country is a fine gardener and particularly successful with Roses. We have many delightful talks about gardening. When I told him of my surgical operations upon the Roses, he was horrified at such barbarity and seemed to listen with more or less incredulity. So I asked him if, as a surgeon as well as physician, he approved, on occasion, of lopping off a patient's limbs to prolong his life, why he should not also sanction the same operation in the vegetable kingdom. He was silent. ― Helena Rutherford Ely, A Woman's Hardy Garden   Grow That Garden Library Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally by Robert Kourik  This book came out in 1986. And in 2005, it was back in print by popular demand. Now, as per usual, Robert is ahead of the curve here. He's talking about incorporating edibles into the landscape and he was doing this way back in the eighties. So props to Robert. Now, what I love about all of Robert Kirk's books.   Is how practical and experience-based is advisive. And as with his other books, he puts tons of resources at the end of this book as well.  So make sure to check that out. In this book, Robert mainly focuses on the edible plants you can put in your garden. That will help fertilize the soil and attract beneficial insects like pollinators and then provide additional benefits like helping your garden with issues like erosion or sheltering your home from cold heat and wind. Robert also talks about how to incorporate edibles in trouble spots.  So think about areas where water is a problem or where you maybe don't get that much sun. Well. Robert guides you through all of that and makes edible suggestions for those areas as well. In this book, Robert also talks about making your soil better. He walks you through a ton of tree pruning styles. And he even dishes up some gourmet recipes. Because, of course, if you're growing edibles, You're going to want to eat them. That's the best part. This book is 382 pages of edible landscaping from a master. Robert installed his very first edible landscape back in 1978.  And he brings all of that experience to bear in this fantastic resource. You can get a copy of Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally by Robert Kourik and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $18.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart October 11, 1926 Birth of Thích Nhất Hạnh (“Tick Nyot Hahn”), Vietnamese Thiền Buddhist monk and peace activist. His students call him Thay (pronounced “Tay” or “Tie”), which is Vietnamese for “teacher.” In 1982 he cofounded The Plum Village, a Buddhist monastery in southern France. Thay often uses nature to teach. In 2014, he wrote No Mud, No Lotus: The Art of Transforming Suffering.  He once wrote, Wilting flowers do not cause suffering.  It is the unrealistic desire that flowers not wilt that causes suffering. In Fidelity: How to Create a Loving Relationship That Lasts (2011), Thai wrote, Every time you breathe in and know you are breathing, every time you breathe out and smile to your out-breath, you are yourself, you are your own master, and you are the gardener of your own garden. In his 1992 book, Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life, Thay wrote, I have lost my smile, but don't worry. The dandelion has it.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Munger Place Church - Dallas, Texas
George Washington & Judgment Day

Munger Place Church - Dallas, Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 35:11


“Judge not, that you not be judged.” “Who am I to judge?” Yeah, well: This week I want to tell you why George Washington needs to face judgment. Actually, I want to tell you that it's a good thing and a healing thing for George Washington to face judgment. More than that: I want to tell you why God's judgment is actually a good thing for all of us. In fact, the reason our politics are so bitter is because we no longer believe in divine justice. But divine justice believes in us. And that's a good thing. Preacher: Andrew Forrest Scripture: Romans 2:1-4

Success Habits of Super Achievers
Mitzi Perdue, Turning Obstacles Into Victories, Overcoming Timidity, Fighting Human Trafficking and Using Wealth to Do Good with Jim Rohn Int Founder, Kyle Wilson

Success Habits of Super Achievers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 67:25


Jim Rohn International Founder, Kyle Wilson has an in-depth conversation with philanthropist, entrepreneur, speaker and author, Mitzi Perdue, Mitzi is the daughter of the founder of the Sheraton Hotel Chain and her late husband was business titan Frank Perdue. But Mitzi is also an incredible thought leader, business person and philanthropist! Mitzi holds degrees from Harvard and George Washington and is the past president of 35,000 member American Agra women. Mitzi was a syndicated columnist for 22 years. The author of more than 1600 newspaper and magazine articles on family businesses, food agriculture, the environment, philanthropy, biotechnology, engineering, women's health and much more. She is the author of Tough Men, Tinder Chicken, Business and Life Lessons from Frank Perdue and I Didn't Bargain For This, her story of growing up as a hotel heiress. Mitzi is a woman of many talents. She has programmed a computer app and is an artist and designer, and she is the founder of WinThisFight.org, which is combating human trafficking. To access books, interviews and many free resources from Mitzi go to  Mitzipurdue.com And to help support WinThisFit.org send a text to  55312 and put in the subject WIN ------------------------- Kyle Wilson, Founder Jim Rohn International, YourSuccessStore, LessonsFromExperts.com and KyleWilson.com Follow Kyle Wilson: Instagram: instagram.com/kylewilsonjimrohn Facebook: facebook.com/kylewilsonmarketing YouTube: youtube.com/KyleWilsonMarketing Twitter: twitter.com/kwmarketing Get FREE Your Copy of the Recent Book I Published,  Success Habits of Super Achievers, including powerful lessons from Darren Hardy, Brian Tracy, Les Brown, Lisa Haisha, Denis Waitley, John Assaraf, Phil Collen of Def Leppard and over 80 thought leaders. Send an email to info@kylewilson.com with "send SH book" in the subject.  Learn More About the Kyle Wilson Inner Circle Mastermind https://kylewilson.com/mastermind/ What Others are Saying About Kyle “Kyle, thank you for our partnership and friendship. Friendship is wealth and you make me a rich man. Love and Respect!” Jim Rohn, Iconic Philosopher & Speaker “I guard my endorsements carefully. Regarding Kyle, he is simply a marketing genius! No joke. Kyle was the wizard behind the successful business of my mentor Jim Rohn. Every marketing dilemma I have ever had Kyle has given me the brilliant and elegant solution on the spot. Kyle's consulting has saved and earned me hundreds of thousands of dollars over the years.” Darren Hardy, Former Publisher SUCCESS Magazine  "Kyle Wilson is brilliant and so very knowledgeable and an icon in this industry. He was the power behind Jim Rohn. Kyle is my longtime friend and someone I have a great deal of respect for." Les Brown, Iconic Speaker and Author “I have worked closely with Kyle Wilson for 20 years. He is one of the best all-around marketers, promoters, business-builders and entrepreneurs in the business today. We have generated more than a million dollars together.” Brian Tracy, Int Speaker & Author “Kyle is a valued friend, a marketing superstar and one of the most knowledgeable people in the personal development industry.” Robin Sharma, Monk Who Sold His Ferrari  “I've known and worked with Kyle Wilson for over 20 years. Kyle is the ONLY person that ALWAYS under-promised and over-delivered every single time my dad Zig and I worked with him. He is a valued friend and someone I have great admiration and respect for!" Tom Ziglar, President of Zig Ziglar Corp “Kyle is one of my old and dear friends and one of the smartest marketing guys I have had the opportunity to work with. He is the scrappy marketing guy. What I mean by that is, there are lots of guys who will put out business plans and do all kinds of nonsense and swing for home runs. Kyle is the real deal and finds ways to create product, add value, help people, build community, he's unbelievable.” Eric Worre, Author of Go Pro Subscribe, Rate & Review (plus bonuses) Please subscribe to the Success Habits Podcast and leave an honest rating & review. This will encourage other people to listen and allow us to grow as a community. The bigger we get as a community, the bigger the impact we can have on the world. Once subscribed, send an email to podcast@kylewilson.com to receive over $200 in cool bonuses.

Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution
E136: Justin McHenry: The Varick Transcripts

Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 21:40


This week our guest is JAR contributor Justin McHenry. The papers of George Washington were voluminous, and their survival was due largely to the efforts of one man. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com.

The Lee Brothers
The Lee Brothers

The Lee Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 105:39


Fairfax County wants voting laws changed because of COVID! Here we go again… Crystal clear choice for Governor in Virginia: Former Speaker Kirk Cox explains. Local school boo's the American Flag FBI targets parents…Would McAuliffe agree? McAuliffe hate private school options and charter schools! No choice for you! Except abortion. Ketchup severed by request only! New law in California. Fauci says no individual rights in pandemic. Good thing George Washington didn't think that! Anti-gun groups spend $500k in Virginia to help…TMAC!

Hacking The Afterlife podcast
Hacking the Afterlife with Jennifer Shaffer

Hacking The Afterlife podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 72:49


Jennifer is away from the desk for a moment or three.  In the meantime, I was looking through our old interviews.  These were not made for the podcast - they follow the same format, but were not meant to be shown. The idea was that Jennifer and I would have lunch once a week and see who came forward. These recorded conversations are part of the book "Backstage Pass to the Flipside."  If you haven't read any of them, it's a good place to start. By this time, we are speaking in short hand.  I know that the restaurant is noisy, but I'm not filming for broadcast. I'm just filming so I have a record of what she is saying. This clip is part of the film "Paul Allen, Junior Seau and Dave Duerson" on YouTube (free).  But this is the raw footage - the uncut version of what happened that day. I went to the restaurant with the idea that I wanted to speak to someone  I'd never met before, Paul Allen - to see if it was possible to do so. I have friends who know him - so I asked John Lennon for help because I know his son (He's in Cannes Man), I asked Anthony Bourdain for help guessing he might have met Paul and asked Steve Jobs for help. All three of these people we've interviewed in the past. So if you're not aware of the process, or have seen our podcast, this clip won't make any sense.  It will seem entirely random and all over the map. I mean at some point I ask Abraham Lincoln to come forward to clarify a point from a previous interview we'd done with him. I wanted to ask him what his favorite poem was.  ("Mortality" - he knew it by heart.) There are more jumps around the map - George Washington stops by. If you can't imagine how that can work, then start over at the first podcast to understand how it works. But since she's not available, and some are addicted to listening to her - her is 80 minutes of Jennifer.  Will Shakespeare shows up at the end.  Is it really Will? I don't know. But I ask him the same questions and the answers are just as mind bending as every other one in this session. Enjoy.

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency
Season II, Episode I: George Washington and Executive Power

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 87:46


Our first topic this season is our first president, George Washington, father of the country, general, surveyor, statesman, slave owner, whiskey distiller, debtor, and a man whose dental history every poor kid with braces hears about. Washington was the first man to hold the office, of course, and some still argue that he was the best.  Everyone agrees that he set the standard by which all other presidents would be judged. Today, we will explore the presidency of George Washington and his biggest challenge: the creation of the presidency itself. Article II of the Constitution, which lays out the powers of the President, is remarkably short. It was one of the last things that the founders wrote down during the Constitutional Convention, and it does not give many details about the role of the president in American life. Instead, the founders left George Washington, our nation's first president, in charge of figuring out what kind of day-to-day role the executive would play in leading the nation.So how did our first president, George Washington, legitimize the new nation, respond to crises like the Whiskey Rebellion, and create key presidential norms? To answer these questions, we turned to two scholars. First, we talked to Dr. Julian Davis Mortenson, the James G. Phillip Professor of Law at the University of Michigan. As a scholar of constitutional law and presidential power, he had a lot to teach us about how George Washington shaped the presidency. Next, we turned to a familiar voice, the Center for Presidential History's own Dr. Lindsay Chervinsky. Lindsay revealed how the decisions Washington made in office set the precedent for generations of presidents to come. In the process, George Washington created the scaffolding for a very powerful executive branch and a very powerful president.Explore all this and more in our first episode of Season II: George Washington and Executive Power. To learn more, visit pastpromisepresidency.com.

Portraits of Liberty
The Colossus of Independence: John Adams (with C. Bradley Thompson)

Portraits of Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 36:00


Despite being the first-ever vice president and second president, until very recently, John Adams was ignored by historians in favor of figures like George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin. But Adams was one of the practical and philosophical powerhouses of the American Revolution. Without the lifelong dedication of Adams, it is arguable the American Revolution might never have succeeded. C. Bradley Thompson joins Portraits to vindicate why Adams deserves a place amongst the greats of American history. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Conversations at the Washington Library
212. Recruiting the Hero of Two Worlds with Mike Duncan

Conversations at the Washington Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 56:12


To kick off Season 6, we bring you the story of America's Favorite Fighting Frenchmen. In 1777, the Marquis de Lafayette sailed from France with a commission as a major general in the Continental Army. Unlike many other European soldiers of fortune, Lafayette paid his own way and had no expectation that he would be placed at the head of American forces. We best remember Lafayette for his service in the American Revolution, his close relationship with George Washington, and the key to the Bastille that now hangs in the main entrance to Washington's Mount Vernon. But Lafayette was more than meets the eye. On today's show, podcasting legend and author Mike Duncan joins Jim Ambuske to discuss his new book, Hero of Two Worlds: The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution, published by PublicAffairs Books in 2021. You may know Duncan from his two podcasts, The History of Rome and Revolutions, and in his latest book, he tackles a complex man who was at the center of the Age of Democratic Revolutions. It's great to be back with you; we have a great season ahead of us, and we have a brand new segment in which our guests talk about the work that inspires them. About our Guest: Mike Duncan is one of the most popular history podcasters in the world and author of the New York Times–bestselling book, The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic. His award-winning series, The History of Rome, remains a legendary landmark in the history of podcasting. Duncan's ongoing series, Revolutions, explores the great political revolutions that have driven the course of modern history. His most recent book is Hero of Two Worlds: The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/support

Texas Standard » Stories from Texas
The Young Lieutenant Who Crossed the Wild Horse Desert

Texas Standard » Stories from Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 4:10


American history sometimes snuggles up close with what might be better termed American mythology. Take that story about a young George Washington chopping down a cherry tree. But other bits of history based quite a bit more in fact are less well known — though just as extraordinary. Texas Standard commentator WF Strong offers up […]

Loving Liberty Radio Network
10-04-2021 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 109:37


Hour 1 * Guest: Lowell Nelson – CampaignForLiberty.org – RonPaulInstitute.org. * General Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. * Russell M. Nelson encouraged church members to follow the teachings of Jesus Christ – “There has never been a time in the history of the world when knowledge of our Savior is more personally vital and relevant to every human soul,” * Temples offer a firm foundation for the faithful – President Nelson emphasized the importance of temple worship – “Please make time for the Lord in His holy house,” – “Nothing will strengthen your spiritual foundation like temple service and temple worship. * Several speakers warned us not to stir up “contention” or contribute to the contention that seems to prevail in the world. Contention is of the devil. We must learn how to disagree without being disagreeable. If we hope to live without contention, then we must give place for the love of God to dwell in our hearts. That is the sure way to avoid contention. * US Officials Free Meng Wanzhou – Jacob G. Hornberger. * US foreign policy should be changed to one of non-intervention. No more sanctions. No more undeclared war. No more embargoes – Let's discard our current foreign policy, and embrace George Washington's policy of friendly neutrality and no entangling alliances. * Mike Pompeo: ‘No Apologies' for Plan To Kill Julian Assange. * COVID-19 Detention Camps: Are Government Round-Ups of Resistors in Our Future? – John and Nisha Whitehead. * We Are Being Lied to Our Deaths – Paul Craig Roberts – One reason they are refusing the clot shot is because they have seen first hand how these shots have killed and injured people, including members of their own families. * Nullify the Vaccine Mandate! Hour 2 * Guest: Sheriff Richard Mack Founder and President of CSPOA – A partnership between citizens and local law enforcement, especially sheriffs. Mack encourages those not in law enforcement to stand with their sheriffs. – CSPOA.org. * Bacon is more expensive for Americans than it has been in the past 40 years – CNN. * Citing Anti-Second Amendment Climate, Smith And Wesson Will Move Headquarters From Massachusetts To Tennessee. * Joe Manchin: “We have 11 million jobs that we haven't filled, 8 million people still unemployed. Something's not matching up here.” * Larry Klayman & Freedom Watch File Criminal Complaint Against Joe Biden with the ICC! – In addition to holding Biden and his rogue generals to account before the International Criminal Court, Freedom Watch's Citizens Grand Jury has already indicted Biden for negligent homicide, manslaughter and treason, for which he will soon be tried before a Citizens Court. * Obama Undercuts Biden, Slams ‘Open Borders'. * Dr. Fauci: ‘Migrants Coming Over the Border – That's Not How You Get Diseases Into the Country'. * Obama-Appointed Federal Judge Caught Presiding Over Stunning Number of Cases in Which He Had Financial Interests. * United States Could Lose Its AAA Credit Rating, Fitch Warns. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Public Square
TPS Express: The American Mind - Conversations with Dr. William B. Allen

The Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 29:49


Welcome to a special series featuring esteemed professor and colleague Dr. William B. Allen. Today we discuss Micah 6:8 and how this passage connects to the hope for the current American government. However this isn't a brand new idea. We go all the way back to 1783,  when George Washington himself shared this biblical truth with our young nation. Let's dive in today on the Public Square®. Topic: Rediscovering American History The Public Square®  with your host David Zanotti. thepublicsquare.com Release Date: Wednesday, October 6th, 2021

The Epic Order of the Seven - The Podcast
Season 2 - The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key - Chapter 28

The Epic Order of the Seven - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 35:15


Chapter 28 –“Starting a War” - Colonel Washington continues to inadvertently cause trouble - and we all learn how faulty information and jumping to conclusions can make a mountain out of a … chipmunk hole! The Order of the Seven animal team helps birth one nation under God by entering the lives of a unique generation of children chosen to become the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. Each episode is hosted by Max, Liz and Nigel – and includes a selection from the audiobook, “The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key!” For your very own copy of the audiobook, written by Jenny L. Cote, read by our own “Announcer Lad” Denny Brownlee – go to Audible.com. Just click here:  http://bitly.ws/cik6 (http://bitly.ws/cik6) And if you'd like to help ensure this podcast can continue to bless future listeners – please consider supporting Playful World Ministries and this podcast through: https://actintl.givingfuel.com/brownlee (https://actintl.givingfuel.com/brownlee)  And we'd love to hear from you, too! Email: Jenny@epicorderoftheseven.com This episode features: -       1:43 - Max and Announcer Lad overhear Liz greeting a neighborhood chipmunk – that can't be good! Does it leave Liz and Nigel – at odds? -       5:58 – The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key - Chapter 28 -       27:13 – Liz and Nigel are still fuming! But not at each other. -       29:26 - Jenny's Corner – She shows us that God can work our mistakes for good – including mistakes made by George Washington! -       32:56 – Max and Announcer Lad realize their errors – and find a way to make it up to everyone Support this podcast

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes
Who was Marquis de Lafayette? with Mike Duncan

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 56:15


Time for a fun one, America's favorite fighting Frenchman. You may have seen streets, parks, and subway stations that include the name Lafayette, but may not know much about the man other than the show-stopping performance of Daveed Diggs, who played Lafayette in Hamilton. The actual Marquis de Lafayette was born in France to immense wealth and privilege, allowing him to mingle in the most elite circles of the time. He shipped off to the US colonies to find his fortune and endeared himself to George Washington, fought for US independence and then returned to France to play a crucial role in *their* revolution as well. Mike Duncan, a fish monger turned wildly popular history podcaster, wrote about Lafayette's story in his new book, “Hero of Two Worlds: The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution.” He joins to discuss Lafayette's fascinating life, his research and life in Paris during Covid and whether the US is on the precipice of revolution and democratic decline.

A Very Brady Podcast - A Brady Bunch episode re-watch
The Brady Bunch - S:4/E:12 Everyone Can't Be George Washington

A Very Brady Podcast - A Brady Bunch episode re-watch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 104:16


Tach & Jimmy look back and hilariously dissect S:4/E:12 - Everyone Can't Be George Washington of THE BRADY BUNCH. Laugh along and have a super groovy time! HALLOWEEN COSTUMES PROMO!! Use this link to get 20% OFF one item, one use per customer.. Valid thru 11/6/21 https://www.halloweencostumes.com/?CouponCode=TRNHALLOWEEN2021 A VERY BRADY PODCAST is now a part of THE RETRO NETWORK! https://www.theretronetwork.com/ http://www.averybradypodcast.com Merch Shop!! http://tee.pub/lic/averybradypodcastmerch NEW TIKI IDOL SHIRT!! LIMITED FOR SEASON 4!! https://www.teepublic.com/t-shirt/22734146-a-very-brady-tiki-idol?ref_id=10329 Contact: Instagram: @averybradypodcast Email: averybradypodcast@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/averybradypodcast Music by: Music from https://filmmusic.io "Your Call" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) HALLOWEEN COSTUMES DOT COM PROMO Video Dungeon Crawl by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4584-video-dungeon-crawl License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/averybradypodcast/message

Amazin' Avenue: for New York Mets fans
From Complex To Queens, Episode 136: Living that minor league life

Amazin' Avenue: for New York Mets fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 60:09


Welcome to From Complex to Queens, the Amazin' Avenue podcast focusing on the Mets' minor league system. This week, the team discusses Thanksgiving sides in Promote, Extend, Trade, as George Washington called for a national day of prayer and thanksgiving on this date back in 1789. Following that, the team recaps the past week in Mets minor league baseball. After, they discuss the players who won the Mets Player Development Position Player/Pitcher of the Year Awards and Mets Dominican Academy Position Player/Pitcher of the Year Awards. Next, on the heels of a yet another emotional expose, this time by Joon Lee of ESPN, the team talks about the conditions that minor league players deal with year in and year out. Next, the team goes big for the last Oh Yeah, That Guy! of the year and reminiscences about the teenage hitting machine himself, Fernando Martinez. Wrapping things up, the Wilponery of the Week. As always, you can listen or subscribe to the podcast through Apple Podcasts, where we encourage you to leave a review if you enjoy the show. It really helps! And you can find us on the Stitcher app, Spotify, or listen wherever you get podcasts. Got questions? Comments? Concerns? You can email the show at fromcomplextoqueens at gmail dot com, and follow us on Twitter: Steve (@stevesypa), Lukas (@lvlahos343), (@KenLavin91), and Thomas (@sadmetsszn). And don't forget to follow Amazin' Avenue on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Until next week, #lovethemets #lovethemets! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Thoughts from a Page Podcast
Nathaniel Philbrick - TRAVELS WITH GEORGE

Thoughts from a Page Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 26:14


Nathaniel and I discuss Travels with George, why and how Nathaniel, his wife, and his dog recreated George Washington's travels during the first two years of his presidency, how people tend to idealize the past, wading through the myths and traditions surrounding Washington, the book's fabulous cover, and much more. Nathaniel's recommended reads are: Another Side of Bob Dylan: A Personal History on the Road and off the Tracks by Victor Maymudes Adam Bede by George Eliot Support the podcast by becoming a Page Turner on Patreon.  Other ways to support the podcast can be found here.    Thanks to the Jung Center for sponsoring this episode. Click here to learn more about the Delia Ephron event on October 5th. Use "Thoughts from a Page" to get $10 off your ticket price. Thanks to Maggie Garza of HTX Real Estate Group for sponsoring this episode. If you enjoyed this episode and want to listen to more episodes, try Julie Metz, Adam Stern, Ly Tran, Cate Doty, or Ty Seidule.  Travels with George can be purchased at the Conversations from a Page Bookshop storefront.       Connect with me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment
How Values-Based Decision Making Provided Us Clarity On When To Sell One Of Our Multifamily Properties

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 24:40


“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage.” - Anais Nin In this episode, Jake and Gino discuss how values-based decision making has impacted a tough choice they had to recently make in their real estate investing business.  They recently sold a multifamily property in Louisville, KY, which is a rare occurrence as they typically like to hold assets for the long term. There were some changes in the state of Kentucky that did not align with their values. George Washington said “Freedom and Property Rights and inseparable. You can't have one without the other.” We value freedom and property rights and therefore, it was time for us to walk away. We challenge you to begin creating core values for your business, if you haven't already. If a situation arises that is not in alignment with your values, then you can act on it and continue to live by those values.   Key Insights: 00:00 Introduction 01:00 Why values-based decision making 02:01 Non-alignment with your core values can cost you dearly 03:42 How to figure out your core values 06:18 How Jake & Gino apply values-based decision making in their Multifamily deals/transactions 11:40 The 100 Year Mindset 14:38 “Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage.” - Anais Nin 19:15 Your happiness with your spouse is most important 21:10 You need clarity to design your life 23:20 “We see the world, not as it is, but as we are──or, as we are conditioned to see it.” - Stephen R. Covey Check out the podcast to learn how values-based decisions can help you transform your life too. Additional resource: Why Values-Based Decision Making with Rick Sapio: https://ytube.io/3M3a Download our eBook on how you can leverage on our Dual Asset Strategy and become your own source of financing: https://100yearrei.com/ebook-download/   If you want to learn how 100 Year Mindset can help you create consistent cash flow income streams and long-term generational wealth, get in touch with our Team now: https://100yearrei.com/callnow/

The Eric Metaxas Show
Nathaniel Philbrick

The Eric Metaxas Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 42:25


Nathaniel Philbrick, his wife, and his dog traveled the same route that George Washington traveled to help unite the newly-founded America, and tells stories from "Travels with George." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SmartLess
"Ken Burns"

SmartLess

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 67:01


We are blessed to have Ken Burns sit down with us this week. Ken clears up the rumors about George Washington's wooden teeth and teaches us how much sap it takes to make syrup... amongst other things like The Civil War, Baseball, and his upcoming series, Muhammed Ali. After all, history is “story” plus ‘hi.” See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.