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Largest Christian church, led by the Bishop of Rome

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Best podcasts about catholic

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Latest podcast episodes about catholic

Rosary Daily with Bruce Downes Catholic Ministries
Pray The Rosary - The Joyful Mysteries

Rosary Daily with Bruce Downes Catholic Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:51


Join us every day at https://BruceDownes.org/Rosary where you can request prayer from us as well as find all of the prayers and mysteries for you to pray along with us.  Get your free Rosary Prayer Guide at https://BruceDownes.org/PrayTheRosaryCONNECT WITH BRUCE AT: ► Website: https://BruceDownes.org ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheCatholicGuyBruceDownes ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecatholicguy ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/thecatholicguy ► Online Store: https://brucedownes.org/store 

Cross Word
Providence Blue

Cross Word

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 32:57


From HP Lovecraft, Edgar Ellen Poe, and to Penitent Angels join me in with Dr David Pinault, author of  Providence Blue; A Catholic Fantasy , published by Ignatius Press.  Dr Pinault's book is a  great example of the Catholic  literary explosion occurring in  the US today.  A well written narrative, with great character development, Providence Blue is a rollicking read using historical and fictional characters to ultimately tell a story of redemption. Set in Providence, Rhode Island, Catholic author and professor of religious studies,   Dr Pinault weaves a tale between the present day and 1936 when HP Lovecraft and Robert E Howard were creating out of the world characters.  A great primer for Halloween   You can order Providence Blue and other great Catholic Books on   https://www.ignatius.com/You can follow Michele on Twitter @ MicheleMcAloon1    

Doctor Doctor
DD #235 - Specialty Focus: Dermatology

Doctor Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 52:00


Cohost Dr. Tom McGovern talks about his day job as a practicing dermatologist. He shares why he chose the specialty, the most rewarding and most difficult aspects of his work, how his faith guides him in his work, and some basic advice for everyday skin concerns. For more links and resources visit https://doctordoctor.org/episode235/

Balls Deep
Unfuckable Vampires, Spooky Sex, and Seances with Patti Negri

Balls Deep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 87:30


Happy Friday BOOs! This week on Balls Deep, Arielle is busy being alone, Rachel has flashbacks to Catholic school, and the girls debate what makes a vampire fuckable. In schmooze, the hosts chat about poo-phoria, why Sex and the City wasn't feminist, and Hollywood's hottest couples. For the listeners, the girls explain why watching porn ISN'T cheating and reveal some of the Blue Baller's sex horror stories. Later on, Rachel shares some stats on rising dating show viewership and falling marriage rates and Arielle talks about three shitty Spanish men who posed as a female author. Guh-ross!  Hold onto your broomsticks y'all, shit's about to get spooky! Hollywood Psychic Medium Patti Negri joins the girls to spill all the saucy stories in her cauldron—from conducting a seance at age eight to conjuring the spirit of Marilyn Monroe. She tells us about the different ways people have sex with ghosts and why she thinks Ouija boards shouldn't be sold in toy stores. Listen up, and don't forget to suspend your disbelief! Okay, so… a Blue Baller gained weight during Covid (relatable) and is afraid of catfishing her dating app suitors, and another listener wants to test the submissive waters but has no idea where to start. Got a question? Call 8555-OKAYSO Follow us everywhere @ballsdeepwith Follow Patti Negri @patti.negri BBoutique —> Get 15% off sex toys with code BALLSDEEP15 Bellesa Plus —> Pay what you want for the Netflix of Porn Powered by Bellesa

Catholic Sprouts: Daily Podcast for Catholic Kids
CS 832: 10-22-21: The Kingdom of Heaven with Anthony D'Ambrosio: Friday

Catholic Sprouts: Daily Podcast for Catholic Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 8:51


Grab Anthony's new book right here: http://beaklebook.com/ Thanks for listening to Catholic Sprouts! Please consider sharing this with another Catholic Parent, or Catholic Teacher so that we can all work together to plant seeds of Faith! OSV Magazine: http://osvkids.com/sprouts   Let us help you build your Domestic Church! Join us inside our NEW APP for the Domestic Church Project Bootcamp: a six week experience for the whole family that will enable ANY parent to build and lead their own Domestic Church. Find out more at https://domesticchurchproject.com     Support this podcast by SHOPPING Catholic Sprouts. We offer lots of Catholic Materials for the WHOLE FAMILY! https://shop.catholicsprouts.com     Check out the Catholic Sprouts Podcast ARCHIVES! https://catholicsprouts.com/podcast-archives/    Find fun, meaningful, faith-filled projects for your own family in the Catholic Family Resource Library. https://catholicsprouts.com/catholic-family-resource-library-signup/    Catholic Sprouts is a production of Spoke Street Media. For more great Catholic podcasts, check out spokestreet.com 

Catholic Morning Offering Podcast
Catholic Morning Offering, Friday, October 22, 2021

Catholic Morning Offering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 12:00


Starting the morning off with God is the key to strength and success in your day!Join me in praying the Catholic morning offering, as well as hear meditations, learn about the saint of the day,  and hear today's Scripture readings from Holy Mass.To sign up to receive a daily email of the Morning Offering through The Catholic Company, go to https://www.morningoffering.com/Excerpts from the English translation of The Roman Missal © 2010, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved.If you have any comments, please email me at Deanna.pierre25@gmail.com.

Reformed Forum
Nature, Grace, and Covenant: The Deeper Protestant Conception and Twentieth-Century Roman Catholicism

Reformed Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 72:36


The beatific vision (1 John 3:2) is the consummation of God's relationship with his people. While Christians of all traditions acknowledge this blessed future to some degree, there are significant differences as to how it all works out. The Reformed tradition has understood this future and its genesis in terms of a covenantal relationship between God and Adam. If you have listened much to our podcasts or courses at Reformed Forum, you likely have heard us discuss “the deeper Protestant conception.” This is a phrase first used by Geerhardus Vos in his Reformed Dogmatics. It involves the notion that man originally was created good yet with an eschatological purpose. Even before the fall into sin, Adam was intended to advance to a higher, more glorious, eschatological life with God in heavenly places. Elsewhere, this is captured in the phrase, “eschatology precedes soteriology.” Yet developments in Roman Catholic theology throughout the end of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth century gave rise to a movement that also advocates for eschatology preceding soteriology and a dismantling of the traditional dualistic separation of nature and grace. In this address, Camden Bucey traces the historical developments of Roman Catholic theology in the twentieth century. In so doing, we may deepen our understanding of the already deeper Protestant conception while improving our ability to represent the diversity of Catholic thought leading up to and following the Second Vatican Council. This address was delivered at our 2021 Theology Conference held at Providence OPC in Pflugerville, Texas.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 295: Israel's Expectations

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 20:58


Fr. Mike mirrors the story of 1 Maccabees and Israel's expectations of continued success onto our own lives, emphasizing that God's marvelous plan exceeds our expectations and what we think should happen next in our lives. He invites us to worship and give to the Lord with freedom and generosity in response to God's sacrificial love for us. Today's readings are 1 Maccabees 14, Sirach 34-35, and Proverbs 23:22-25. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

Saint Faustina’s Diary in a Year
Day 204: Diary Entries 1062-1068

Saint Faustina’s Diary in a Year

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 7:15


The Lord's “Secretary of Divine Mercy,” St. Faustina, wrote what has become a modern-day spiritual classic — a blueprint for living a sacramental life in union with Jesus Christ. For anyone who may think the Diary is too thick and formidable, Fr. Joseph Roesch, MIC, has the solution. Join him for a few minutes each day as he reads from the Diary and offers commentary. Over the span of one year, you will have “read" the Diary, beginning to end, and absorbed its rich teachings.To order a copy of the Diary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska, visit  ShopMercy.org. Support our Ministries here. 

Adoptees On
193 Mar

Adoptees On

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 49:52


Do we have to choose between our biological family and our adoptive family? What about choosing between their religions or spiritual practices? Mar shares how they are both Jewish and Catholic. We talk through how they chose adult conversion to Judaism as a way to feel permanently grafted to their adoptive family. Mar is also very open about how recovery programs have helped them to identify as spiritual but not religious. Full Show Notes Here Show Notes Recommended Resources Adoptee Voices & their new E-Zine Adoptees & Addiction support group. You can hear Miguel talk more about it on Adoptees On episode 176 Connect With Us Mar Miram: rebelliondogs (at) yahoo (dot) com | Facebook Haley Radke: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook Adoptees On: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook Subscribe Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | iHeart Radio | Spotify | Stitcher | YouTube Support Adoptees On One Time Donation | Monthly | Secret Facebook Group Connect Occasional Newsletter | Send a Note

Gotta Be Saints
The Importance of Personal Prayer

Gotta Be Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 46:40


On episode seventy-three of the Gotta Be Saints Podcast, I talk about the importance of personal prayer.Thank you to our sponsors!Syndicate Strategies, a full-service marketing agency owned and operated by two Catholic business partners for over 25 years. Syndicate helps connect businesses to customers using the most current technology. They can help YOU create powerful, engaging websites and eCommerce stores that bring results. Find out what Syndicate can do for you at syndstrat.com/saints.Check out  The Catholic Company for all your Catholic merchandise needs! Use code "GOTTABESAINTSTODAY" for 15% off your next purchase!If you enjoyed this episode, please give provide a review and make sure to subscribe!Want to support Gotta Be Saints as a monthly sponsor? Join my support team so I can do more with this great ministry! Check me out on Patreon! 

Catholic Answers Live
#10333 Open Forum - Jimmy Akin

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


Questions Covered: 04:30 – What does metanoia mean? 11:00 – Are there any arguments from the early Church Fathers in favor of iconography? 13:00 – I have a question about preterism. Who is the man of lawlessness? Could it be Nero? 17:35 – How would you approach the topic of suicide with someone who hasn't brought it up but might be showing hints? 23:55 – What are your thoughts on Jesus being able to custom-tailor Mary to be the perfect mother of him and the Church? 31:45 – How is the first chapter of Genesis compatible with science? What's the general opinion of the Church on how it should be interpreted? 37:40 – How can I explain to a Protestant our understanding of cooperation with God's grace? 44:20 – What's the Catholic understanding of faith vs works and how they play into salvation? 46:10 – I spoke with some Protestants who talked about an idea of “Mother God.” They believed in the persons of the Trinity, but also believed that, taken all together, there was one “Mother God.” Has this idea come up before? Did the Church have to address it? 48:25 – Is it okay to play Dungeons & Dragons? 50:30 – Is there any circumstance in which a Catholic married couple, under the guidance of a priest, could use condoms? 52:45 – How should we submit to authority when there's so many laws we don't know about? …

Catholic Family News's Podcast
Weekly News Roundup 10/21/2021

Catholic Family News's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:35


Our stories this week include: (1) the tragic story of Sir David Amess' murder (a Catholic member of the British Parliament) and how he was denied access to the sacraments before dying from his mortal wounds, (2) Rome's approval of an episcopal conference specifically for the Amazon region, (3) two related events that took place last week (one focused on religion, the other on environmentalism) and their connection to "synodality" (and possibly even a new Council!), (4) a homosexual music video filmed inside a Capuchin church in Brazil (a video clearly intended to mock the Faith), and (5) the latest from Archbishop Viganò.

Journey to Marriage - For Catholic Brides & Grooms

Follow us on Instagram: @journeytomarriageAre you wanting to grow into the best you can be for your future spouse? Check our resource page for tools we recommend that can help you in your life, spiritual, and relationship development! journeytomarriage.com/resources

FORward Radio program archives
Solutions To Violence, Catholic Peace Inititive, David Cochran,10 - 16 - 21~0

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 56:00


Solutions to Violence features the second interview with David Cochran. David's Ph.D. is from the University of Maryland. Dave has taught in the Politics Program at Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa, since 1996, offering a range of courses primarily in the areas of political thought and American politics. His primary teaching and research areas are religion, race, and ethnicity in American politics; political thought; war and peace; and Irish studies. In addition to a wide array of articles and book chapters, he has published five books, most recently, as author, Catholic Realism and the Abolition of War, and, as editor with his colleague John Waldmeir, The Catholic Church in Ireland Today. In addition to teaching, Dave is the co-director of the Peace and Justice

Catholics With Bibles
Episode 70: Bird's Eye View of the New Testament

Catholics With Bibles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:31


We begin our new series today! Chase will be setting the stage for us studying ALL of the books of the New Testament! Enjoy!

Following The Truth with Gary Zimak

On today's show, Gary owns up to the fact that he doesn't always follow his own advice. We'll also take a closer look at Jesus as a source of division. It's going to be a jam-packed show. Don't miss it!

THE OUR CATHOLIC PRAYERS PODCAST
A House Built On Solid Rock: For A Firm Catholic Foundation

THE OUR CATHOLIC PRAYERS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 14:43


Are you feeling somewhat shaky these days? Let Jesus help you find, and hold, your ground in these turbulent times! The transcription for this podcast can be found at https://www.ourcatholicprayers.com/house-built-on-solid-rock.html SOME GOOD SUPPLIES FOR YOUR "HOUSE-BUILDING TOOLKIT" You can find vendors for these books and other items from various search engines on the Internet. (As mentioned above, Amazon.com is a great source for many of the books, but a number of them are also available for free on the internet, such as the Catechisms and the Bible. There are even some good apps for some of these books for smartphones!) We also have some of these items available in our Web Store. A Catholic Bible Prayer books The Catechism of the Catholic Church The Baltimore Catechism Books of biographies of the Saints (see also this reading list). Rosaries (see this page for some background information) Scapulars (see this page for some background information) Blessed salt Holy Water St. Benedict Medals Miraculous Medals (see this page for some background information)    

Frolicking Chronicles
The Conjuring Universe Love and Light what?

Frolicking Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:08


We are enamored with the Conjuring Universe movie franchise and the couple behind the movies.  Being raised Catholic our faith crosses paths with delight in what these movies bring to life. With jump scares, superstition and Jesus winning.Our conversation visits some fun facts about Liz and Lorraine Warren.  But how exactly did Tamantha get a hold of some Vatican Holy Water? Oh and she just happened to attend the Annabell 2 movie premiere as a guest of Stephanie Sigman?  Total name drop. Full Moon Martini1/2 cup Coconut Cream1/2 cup Water1 oz Vodka *we like King St.Blackberries to garnishSugar to rim glassCombine 1/2 cup water w/a 1/2 cup coconuts cream, mix well and pour into circular ice cube molds. Place into freezer for 5-6 hours.  We popped our coconuts spheres into a coupe glass, poured our vodka right over the sphere and garnished with blackberries.  This step is different from the recipe link below.  We enjoyed watching our coconuts cream spheres melt down to create a lovely vodka slush.Recipe courtesy of Jojotasic.com August 18, 2016.  Check out our @FrolickInc insta reels and @ParanormalCocktails TikTok.Frolick Inc YouTube Playlist The Conjuring UniverseMental Floss 10 facts Ed and Lorraine WarrenThe VaticanNew England Soviet for Psychic Research

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: October 21, 2021 – Hour 3

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:43


Patrick further clarifies the teachings of the Catholic Church regarding annulments. He recommends a book titled Annulments & the Catholic Church: Straight Answers to Tough Questions by Ed Peters Monica – Her husband's coworker is Catholic, and the fiancé is not. She and her husband were invited to the wedding. Should they go? Sal – […] All show notes at The Patrick Madrid Show: October 21, 2021 – Hour 3 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC182 - Dr. Judith Grisel Author of Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:26


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!  Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Link to Judy's Book:  https://amzn.to/3DTeXet     Hello Loves, Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and that just goes to show, if I can do it, you can too.   Today I'm talking with Judith Grisel. She holds a PhD in Neuroscience, she's a professor at Bucknell University and author of the highly impactful book “Never Enough: the Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction”   What is so interesting about her is that once she got sober, like a lot of us, she wanted to help others suffering from addiction, but she took it to a whole other level! She got her Phd in neuroscience to try to cure addiction! I'm so in awe of her.    This book is full of the mechanics and mechanisms of addiction which really takes the shame out of having mental illness because it demonstrates that anyone could fall prey to addiction. I listened to the audio version of the book, which, btw, I loved  because her voice is so soothing, but I also got the paperback because I wanted to really study some of the concepts she goes into. Plus there's a few pictures in it so there's that.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did! With that, please enjoy this episode with Judy.   Transcript: Arlina Allen  0:08   Let's see. Judy, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. I'm really happy to be here. Arlina is it okay to call you, Judy? Oh, yes. Dr. Chris. No, please. Thank you. Well, listen, I am so excited to talk to you. I have your book. I posted on social media, I was like, I have a big announcement. And I'm talking to the author of never enough the neuroscience and experience of addiction. those that know me know that I'm completely obsessed with the mind the brain. I know sometimes people think of those as two different things, but we can kind of get into it. But what I thought was so good about this book, right? And what I love about science in general, is that it has a way when we you understand sort of the mechanics of it, it kind of depersonalized us and helps us to answer or resolve the things like guilt and shame which she which seemed to me to be a block or a barrier to healing. So I thought maybe we could start first with your a little bit of your story. Like what is I know you've been sober for 35 years? Congratulations.   Unknown Speaker  1:29   It is long time. Yeah. really grateful. Yeah, I it's funny that you mentioned guilt and shame, because I, I could see in my own life, how initially, drugs end up including alcohol were sort of the self or guilt and shame that was just it is still sort of deep in my bones. I'm not sure if it's genetic, or environmental or what, but I am, well acquainted with self criticism, and just, I guess, feelings of unworthiness. And I almost didn't realize that until I had my first drink, which was right about the time of my 13th birthday. And I was a good drink. I mean, I had little sips here and there, but I got loaded for the first time at that age. And more than anything else, it was this great relief, because I suddenly either didn't care or was made, you know, kind of transiently whole in a way that was so profound, so people talk about it all the time. But it did literally feel as if that absence was running over and you know, with fullness, I guess and so, I because I was off to the races pretty pretty dramatically. I grew up in a I guess there's no such thing as a typical home, but I was certainly fairly advantaged and you know, had no big traumas. I guess that's also kind of a funny thing to say. But you know, in light of how hard it is to grow up, I think I was fairly on the easy half anyway. And, but I got this alcohol, I spent 10 years taking as much of every single mind altering drug I could find. I remember one time I found some pills and I just, you know, took them, I was kind of, and I still am, I guess a little bit all or none so I, I was definitely I went from none to all. And as a result, I was kicked out of my first school in 10th grade. It was a, you know, girls Catholic school, so they didn't go for the kind of thing I was up to. And then to colleges I was expelled from and I was homeless intermittently, often, I contracted hepatitis C sharing dirty needles. And I hated myself really, I did hate myself that was probably my bottom was as kind of self loathing, so that I was just a teeny bit unwilling even though at the time, right around the time my 23rd birthday, I thought, drugs and alcohol were the solution to my problems of the cause. I was sort of willing to go to what I thought was going to be like a spa, an educational spa, which they was treatment. This was in the 80s so I had no idea about drug treatment at all. I just heard the word treatment and it seemed to be something I deserved. So anyhow, I ended up in what was more like a hospital for crazy adolescence and, and there without drugs in my body for a few weeks, I got kind of scared at the disaster of my life. And, and I guess I wasn't you know, it's an interesting thing as we talk about how we have to sort of see it and be willing to change. I was barely willing, I feel like I was kind of plucked out of my situation. And I had just enough grace or openness. I am sort of an experimentalist at heart. And I, I think I figured they were all saying to me from going on too much, by the way. Arlina But anyway, I was saying, you know, if you want to live, you're gonna have to quit using and I thought, No way. There's got to be another way work around. Yeah, work around, there's a backdoor somewhere. So I figured I would cure my addiction was going to take me seven years, I was going to stay clean for that seven years. Well, I solved the disease of addiction, which is what everybody was saying. And then I would use and so I was open minded and totally, you know, arrogant ignorance, naive, I don't know. But I, I was willing to do seven years, I guess,   Arlina Allen  6:26   what was the seven years to get your degree? You know,   Unknown Speaker  6:28   no, I think I wasn't thinking that clearly. I figured that I started when I was 13, I was 23, I decided I wasn't really in terrible shape, you know. So it was like seven years of intense addiction. Somehow it seemed balanced to me, if I could clear it up in seven years, and then there was just no way you were gonna tell me, I was going to spend the rest of my life without drugs, which is what my life is completely about by that time. So yeah, I was scared enough to be willing enough to be open enough to try a different way temporarily. And I remember when seven years came, by the way, and went and I looked around my life was a zillion times better. It wasn't, you know, easy, by any means. But it was definitely better. And my curiosity had kind of come back. And so I, you know, kind of a data time is, you know, stuck it out. And so here I am, 35 years clean and sober, still have not cured addiction, still very interested in the role of science in understanding and treating and preventing addiction, but also recognize that there's a lot that science doesn't know. And so, yeah, I think, yeah, it's been a it's been a fun, rich trip.   Arlina Allen  8:07   It's fun. That's, that's awesome. I mean, we were people who insist on having a time that's for sure. I think that's so amazing that so so you became abstinent at 23. From then on, he became abstinent.   Unknown Speaker  8:22   I mean, I smoked a few cigarettes and I'm completely addicted to coffee, but I don't think that his account had other than nicotine, any mind altering chemicals, and I've been tempted many times, so it's not like I just said, you know, that's it for me, I guess. Yeah, just a long, long time.   Arlina Allen  8:46   You know, I knew that you and I were going to be friends when you talked in your book about like, the your love of weed. Oh, my gosh, if I there was a period of time that if I was awake, I was high. Right? I grew up in the church and the preacher's daughter. The pastor's daughter once told me she's like, I'm high. So often that not being high was as my altered reality. And I was like, Oh, my God, you're my hero. I want to be just like you. And I was. But in your book, you talk about how I see after I got sober. It took me a little over a year to go a single day without wishing for a drink. That is rough. But it was more than nine years before my craving to get high abated during that, and I think I'm so glad that you've mentioned that because I think a lot of people especially those who are 12, step oriented, are you know, they hear stories about like, the obsession to use is lifted, or they're on this pink cloud. And I think for people who don't have that experience, they feel They're doing something wrong. Right. But   Unknown Speaker  10:02   I think for Bill Wilson, right, it was just an overnight thing. And for many of us, it's sometimes slowly and for I was definitely have a slow variety. I, I really, and when I say, you know, for the craving to abate, I really seriously wish to get high for most days, those nine years. Yeah. And I, you know, the more time that went by the more, I could see what was at risk. So when I first got clean, you know, there's nothing to lose, because you're at rock bottom. But, you know, as a result of putting one foot in front of the other things got much better. So, you know, then I could kind of see that, and then I remember so well, I can almost taste it the experience of not wanting to smoke, and I can remember how all the sudden, I was okay to be in concerts that were indoors with good weed around me. Or, you know, I was sort of indifferent. Like I was like, I had been to alcohol. You know, I'm, I have served alcohol to friends. And I was kind of in that position, like, I don't care if you smoke or not. And then it got I had the craving come back. I was, I was joke about this, but right around menopause. I just knew that, for me, an antidote to the anxiety and just sort of the brittle angst of hormonal changes, I guess was going, you know, could be smoking. And, you know, anxiety is so epidemic, and I hadn't really had a ton of it until, and there was other things going on in the world, we can just say at that. But, anyhow, oh my gosh, and I think I say this in the book, too. But I, I, at the time, I was thinking maybe I'll get cancer and my doctors make me smoke. And then little I do you know, I mean, I was wishing for, you know, some kind of serious illness. So   Arlina Allen  12:23   our minds play funny tricks on us, it doesn't matter how long you're sober. It's just weird layer. If that was ever a solution in your mind. I've heard that dopamine is like the Save button. Right? I don't know if you've ever heard of Dr. Andrew Haberman, he talks about how in nature like a deer that will find water, they get like dopamine is released. And that's how they remember where the water is. And it's almost similar for us. Like when we do something that makes us feel good. Dopamine is then released. And it helps us to remember what made us feel good. And I feel like it's burned in my psyche that if I take a bomb hat that I'm going to feel good. And I have other solutions, but it's all it's I don't think that idea is ever gonna leave me, you know, 27 years sober. I was telling you earlier that my younger son went to rehab. And this all was predicated because we found a Bag of Weed in his room and duty, I had not held a bag of marijuana for almost 30 years. And when it was in my hand, this plastic baggie, it was like I was a teenager again. And my inner drug addict was like, well, maybe we should, maybe we could maybe maybe. And I was like, I was actually a little alarmed almost a little bit of shame. Like seriously, after all this time, after all the work I've done. It's still there. I mean, it's just so engrained in my brain, I guess.   Unknown Speaker  14:00   Absolutely. And I think the one of the interesting things about the story, you just told us that the ability of a drug to make to release dopamine is different across the population. So for some people, that marijuana let's say, or alcohol doesn't do much to that for me, and for other people. It's really a potent signal. And I think that is part of the reason some of us are more at risk than others and and also the reason why it's not a really reasonable argument to say, you know, why don't they just put it down because it is like a thirsty person finding water as opposed to somebody who's completely satisfied finding water, you know, you can take it or leave it. So I think that's true. And also the brain. You know, learning is absolutely persistent. So Pretty sure we will both be I guess subject to those kinds of, you know, triggers through our until we die.   Arlina Allen  15:11   Yeah, maybe, maybe this is a good time to ask you, you know, what is what's different in that? So you're you have your PhD in neuroscience. And you know, he got sober and went on this quest to cure addiction. What have you found that's different about the brain of people who get addicted so quickly?   Unknown Speaker  15:34   Mm hmm. Well, I guess the, what I want to say first is that it's not simple, I thought I was gonna be a little switch that we were going to discover, and I wasn't alone in this, I think this was scientific understanding in the 80s, we'll find that, you know, broken switch or molecule or circuit and fix it. It's definitely not that way. So the causes of addiction are very complex and intersectional. They involve differences in dopamine and other genetic liabilities, or protective factors that make the the initial sensitivity to a drug, different across different people. So some try a drug for the first time and absolutely love it. About a third of people, for instance, try opiates and don't like them at all. And they usually try them in the doctor's office, but they find them aversive. So obviously, that's a good protective,   Arlina Allen  16:40   meaning, meaning they don't like the way they feel. Yeah, so weird to me,   Unknown Speaker  16:45   largely genetic. I know. Right? So very big individual differences. And then there are sex differences. So women tend to appreciate drugs that provide relief. And then justice is overgeneralizing a little bit Sure, overall, tend to appreciate drugs that make them feel good. And so women don't want to feel bad, and drugs help with that, certainly, especially and men like to feel good. Another big factor, and probably the largest factor more than genetic liability is adolescent exposure. So kids, like your son and my daughter are tuned into Well, they have, they have a particular kind of brain that is the adolescent brain that is really prone to trying new things, really prone to not worrying is certainly abstractly worrying about consequences. So they're less cautious. And they, they want to buck against whatever they're told, they shouldn't do. And those three traits like novelty seeking, and risk taking, and not really caring about consequences are ones that help them to become adults, if they just listened to their parents until they were 35. No one would really like that. So they they're designed to kind of say, not this, you know, I'm making my own way, which would be good if there wasn't so many high potency, dangerous ways of escaping at their fingertips. So I think through most of our evolutionary history, these you know, kids having that tendency is is no problem. The other thing that kids have in their brains are different about is that, and we all know this, they are terrific at learning. I'm teacher, and it's crazy, because and you probably noticed this with your own children, but they don't seem to even be paying attention. yet. They are like sponges information really goes in. And if they were learning French, or if they're learning addiction, both ways, their brain is really quick to take the experience and build it into the structures so that it's lasting, and I can learn French, or addiction, but your chances are so much lower. So if you start using any addictive drug, before you're 18 you have about a 25% chance of developing a substance use disorder. And the earlier you start using, the higher the chance, I started 13 so you know it was basically more likely than not. And that's because 13 year olds are great at picking up new information, much better than 33 year olds. So they if you if you Wait, on the other hand till you're 21, your chances are one in 25.   Arlina Allen  20:06   Wow, I told   Unknown Speaker  20:07   my kids that and I tell my students that and they all ignore me. Why? Because they're high novelty seeking high risk taking, and they don't really want to listen to the, you know, concerns or worries. I mean, that's not how they're designed. So we're in a kind of a perfect storm for them. And that, that is the best predictor of developing a problem starting early is starting or like,   Arlina Allen  20:30   you know what terrifies me nowadays I have a nephew who's 26 years old. And he's had four friends died from accidental fentanyl overdose, because for whatever reason, drug dealers are putting fentanyl and everything. And you know, these are pretty well adjusted kids. I don't think it's I know that there's a certain percentage of the population who indulge a little bit who don't have a disorder. Or maybe that's Yeah, is that is that true?   Unknown Speaker  21:02   Well, it's, it's more true if you start at 26. And if you start at 16, as I just said, but I think the reason that nose and everything is because it is so is it a traffic, it's so so potent, that a tiny bit can get the whole town high. So it's really advantageous to traffickers. And also, because people are having access to more and more chemicals. And when they start early, especially their reward pathway, the dopamine pathway we've been talking about is kind of desensitized, so they can't, you know, have a cup of wine coolers that doesn't do the trick at all anymore, they need something a little more, because they're sort of immune to the that dopamine, squirt? So yeah, unfortunately, I think that's another reason it's not gonna. We, I think focus, we've also noticed lately that there's more and more overdoses from methamphetamine, and then from somebody who's been looking at the trends for a long time, it's always be something and there's always going to be more potent, whatever. So it's not the drug itself, as much as this very narrow ledge that more and more of us are on trying to, I guess, medicate reality. And and so, you know, I think, I don't know how that is for your nephew. But it's a terrible lesson to have to learn for all of us.   Arlina Allen  22:51   It's just, it just makes me sick. I mean, I think there was a report that was released, I think it was at the end of March, there was a 12 year period that they were measuring overdoses that ended in March, and I think they track like 80,000 deaths. And, and I just think about all the families like all the mothers, all the all the fathers and siblings, and just everybody that's affected by so many deaths, and   Unknown Speaker  23:19   and I think a 40% increase in those deaths over the last year with COVID. So the isolation as Alicia is, has made, and also the the higher, you know, the more likely you are to find fentanyl, and whatever it is you're taking at, which is just hard to prepare for I think, biologically. Yeah. Yeah, I think it's, it's tragic. It's so tragic.   Arlina Allen  23:50   And then and then so my mind naturally goes, Well, what can we do about it? You know, it's like, we can understand, I love how, you know, science will sort of break down the mechanics. And once we understand, you know, alcohol is addictive drugs are addictive. I mean, there's a reason why they're illegal, right? It's because they're so harmful. But, you know, and then we can get into the causes, right? Like you mentioned, it's a very complex issue, you know, we you mentioned, do you that you didn't have any big trauma growing up, but I feel like, you know, we were sort of in that generation where we were not like things like ADHD and anxiety and depression weren't really talked about a whole lot. And we really didn't know how to treat those. And so our parents handled us with a lot of tough love. I got a lot of tough love and you know, from reading your book and listening to your interviews, it sounds like you were raised with that as well. And then your Can we just talk a little bit about your dad, like I wonder what it was. We talk a lot about science and it sort of leaves God out a little bit. But in my experience, it feels like there are things that are sort of serendipitous or magical about the unusual things that happen that lead us to a life of recovery. Like, what was your dad's role and your recovery?   Unknown Speaker  25:23   Um, yeah. So, so much in that question, especially, I guess I want to start by saying that I agree that we did not recognize trauma, and anxiety and all mental illnesses, wait, their response was, was so different, I think. And in my house, it was to push through both my father's parents were immigrants. And he dealt with life by controlling everything he could. And that worked great until he, you know, met 13 year old me. And I was absolutely out of control, by definition, and   Arlina Allen  26:11   he would have been terrifying to me.   Unknown Speaker  26:13   I was terrified. And I was I was, like, determinately, out of control. I mean, that was my goal to be absolutely out of control. And the more both my parents tried to kind of constrain me, the less manageable I was, and I guess I, I don't think I'm unique in this. I mean, I've raised three children. And so it's something built into the teenage neurobiology. And I had it probably in spades. So his way of life because   Arlina Allen  26:45   you're smart, smart kids are harder to race.   Unknown Speaker  26:48   I don't know. I'm also, one thing I like about myself more than if I have any smartness is, is that I'm, I guess, strong willed. And so I don't know if that actually goes with intelligence or not, but I'm not the one who's following so much. And so I wasn't named, I wasn't influenced really by too much of what people, you know, just like you said, you know, you try to get the information out. Drugs are dangerous, but it doesn't really have an impact my kids have grown up with man, they've been sort of forced to look at graphs and things. And, you know, they'll say to me, my daughter said to me the other day, you know, I know all this. But and that is sort of how I was, and I didn't know that much. My mother was giving me a reader's digest reprints you know, of how lead would damage your ovaries and stuff. But anyway, you're like,   Arlina Allen  27:49   Oh, good, I will get pregnant.   Unknown Speaker  27:51   No, I didn't. Yeah, wasn't on my radar at all. But anyhow, my father, because I think it was so painful to be around me. And to watch me his strategy, which is kind of in our family, I guess, was just denial that he even had a daughter. So during a period, after they kicked me out of the house, right about my 10th birthday. He, he would, and he would say that he had two sons. It was just too much for him. And this is kind of the way he is. So it's, and I think it's fragile. That's what he was. And he was raised to be fragile, because it was a lot to worry about, because they were poor immigrants and you know, a million ways to not make it and I think that's common for a lot of people today. So my father was just able to block it out. And we have a family friend who I dedicated the book to father, Marty Devereaux, who is this kind of an unbelievable, interesting person. He's in his 80s. Now, we're still good friends, but he is a psychologist, and has a lot of experience with addiction and also a Catholic priest. And he told my father, and don't my father's not really Catholic. I mean, he was raised Catholic, but that doesn't mean too much these days. So anyway, he   Arlina Allen  29:19   Where was he from? Marty Devereaux?   No, I'm sorry. Your said Your father was an immigrant. Oh,   Unknown Speaker  29:24   he was born in Atlantic City. But his mother was from Slovenia, and his father from Switzerland. And they met in Central Park. They were both, you know, one was a baker one was a housecleaner. And they sent two sons to college and wow. Yeah, I mean, you know, I think it's a pretty typical American story. Yeah, yeah. But um, anyway, Marty said take her out to dinner and bring her flowers like on a date. Well, I have No idea what how my father did this because he's, he's just not the type to waste any money on flowers, or two. And I was when I say I think I tried to convey this in the book. But when I imagined myself now at that moment, I was pretty deplorable. I was probably quite smelly and dirty. I was, at this point, sort of living in a one bedroom apartment with many people. And I was pretty gross. So anyway, this is when you were 23. I was not quite 23. So his takeaway? Yeah, so we he picked me up and you know, so not only was I gross, I was completely belligerent. I, I thought that my parents were terrible. And I didn't want any part of their fascist, you know, existence. And yet, I deserved a nice dinner, of course. So my big dilemma, I will not I really can still almost feel this was how we were going for early bird dinner, because it's my dad. And I'm very frugal. Yeah, he is wealthy and frugal. And   Arlina Allen  31:27   that's how I get wealthy.   Unknown Speaker  31:28   Yeah, I mean, this is sort of the first thing I guess. But anyway,   Arlina Allen  31:32   and that was a dad begged my dad, maybe it is a dead   Unknown Speaker  31:35   thing. He was also an airline pilot, so just not extremely cautious. He still is. And he's, he's in his 80s today, and we have a great relationship. But anyway, I was so stuck, because when he was picking me up, maybe quarter to five, but I had to figure out between 11 when I woke up and six hours later, how to be not too high when he came, you know, high enough, but not too high. And of course, this is harder and harder to achieve at this point in my life, because I could either be passed out or getting ready to be I mean, it was just hard to find that place. So anyway, he picks me up, he takes me out. And he said, and we talked about this still. Dude, I just wanting you to be happy. And I guess I should say, he doesn't remember saying that. But I know he said it. Because it was the most unlikely words that could ever come. And this is sort of what you were getting at, I guess where did those words come from? They're not my dad. My dad was worried about my teeth and the way you know, a lot of things but not my happiness ever. No, probably it's hard for him. And I had of course, no. No adequate response to that because I was absolutely miserable. And it went right into my heart. I fell apart. Yeah, it was a funny like tears   Arlina Allen  33:10   in my eyes. Just to think that the hard ass dad was so sweet, right? When you needed it the most. I know,   Unknown Speaker  33:17   you know what he tells me now it's funny. He, I was so out of it. I guess I don't remember the flowers. But he took me in his very clean car and my friends I guess to the beach to go for a swim that same day, that same after dinner. And we got to fill the sand. And that's what he remembers as his biggest stretch. And what I remember as his biggest stretch is him reaching across the table with his heart and saying, I want you to live basically. I mean, he sent me how I think he he met a lot by that. And my mother was not invited to the dinner. I hadn't spoken with her in a long time either. But she had been researching treatment centers for years she had had a court order actually in Florida, there's an act where you can commit somebody because of their addictions. And they thought over that a lot. But anyway, next thing I knew they flew me to a treatment center, which of course I had no idea what I was getting into and saved my life really. That place did. So I feel really fortunate that I had that opportunity to wake up a little bit as I think for the chances are that my father wouldn't have said that my mother wouldn't have had the resources to know what to do and I would have died on the streets probably not too much longer.   Arlina Allen  34:52   I feel like that really speaks to you know, people just didn't have solutions, right and they get so far straighted that their only choice is to disown right. Like I had that same experience with my mom, she disowned me on a regular basis, like she was an immigrant from Mexico. And although my father was, you know, his, his people have been here a long time. Like, they didn't know what to do with me either. And, you know, my dad was always the sweet and nurturing one, but he was, you know, he's former Marine, he was a government guy, he was kind of a hard ass, and in a lot of respects, but, you know, our parents, you know, just, it's just speaks to the love of a parent, you know, you want to save your kids. You know, you see your kids are suffering and like, my mother just didn't know how she was so frustrated that she would disown me on a regular basis. But I think when I think it's the contrast between like, a little bit of sweetness goes a long way, because it's not what we're used to. It's so shocking. Like, shocking to the system,   Unknown Speaker  36:00   let's thought about it a lot, because I do think there's a, I had a boyfriend at the time who died. Oh, overdose. And his parents were extremely sweet. So it's hard. And you could say they sweeted him into his last big use, but um, I don't know that there's a recipe I think if if there was one thing that, that I tried to do with is to show up and be honest, and I think it was so painful for my parents, both of my parents to just grapple with what happened to their little girl, that their tendency was to not show up. And I don't blame them. I mean, it's it's tough. It's tough raising teenagers sometimes because they're not that it's almost unrecognizable, you know, from the sweet nine year olds, or the 99 might become, but I think what we're called to do for each other is to tell the truth, not their truth. You know, I don't you know, you're speaking from him first himself. He said, Yeah, I was. I mean, I think this was true for him, I think, really at the core, and somehow he had the grace to find it. What all he really wants and all, probably any parent wants their kid to be well, and whatever well looks like for us. And I think the fact that he could say that was kind of miraculous.   Arlina Allen  37:42   Very, yeah, that was absolutely. sneak up for Marty, right?   Unknown Speaker  37:47   Yeah, yeah. Exactly. No, I   Arlina Allen  37:50   think yeah, it's, it's just, yeah, my mom was, she was really tough. And I remember growing up, she's going through her second divorce. And all my hair started falling out, like a lot I was under, and nobody knew what was going on. And you know, when it ended is one day, she let me curl up in her lap and cry. I had a good cry. And then my hair stopped falling out after that. Wow. Yeah. And I think it was like, there needs to be this balance. Like I feel like as a parent I attend like we tell our kids that we love them all the time. And I almost feel like maybe we maybe it's a little too much sweetness. You know, I have I have the the hard ass edge me because I think I inherited that from my mom. But you know it when you get something different from your parent, it is kind of jolting. It is kind of healing, it can be life changing, if it's different. So if you're sweet all the time, when you show up with boundaries that can be jolting. When you're a hard ass your whole life and you show up with a little bit of sweetness. It can be start, it's like a pattern interrupt, you know that. It's just kind of interesting. And I wanted to ask you a little bit   Unknown Speaker  39:09   of a story, by the way. But your mother obviously was disappointed, you know, and her own struggles, but that she was able to be with you. And warning I think that is really a bridge.   Arlina Allen  39:28   That was it made me feel you know, like the talk about original wounds, like I don't matter, or I'm unlovable because I'm either too much or not good enough. Right. Or maybe that I'm alone, you know, those original wounds, and I feel like I had all those but my mom, you know, in that moment, it's like those, like that moment that your dad had like they were willing to do something different. Like they had a glimmer of hope, like somebody gave them hope and they decided to do something different. And that's kind of what But you said your dad reached across the table with his heart, you know, and it was like, there is something that's transmitted, like when people are really vulnerable and honest and coming from their heart. That's so healing. Right? And I feel like that's a lot of what recovery has been about for me is that just that willing to be vulnerable and have a degree of humility, it's a lot of times kind of, like forced humility. It's like, like, I have to get honest about what what's really going on, so that I can get the solution. But you know, as a parent, you know, we're talking about our kids, and how do we reach our kids, because I think that's, you know, in this day and age, a lot of us that have had addiction issues, you know, we're worried about passing it down to our kids. And we thought we were talking earlier about leading by example, right, we need to lead by example for our kids, and it's so hard to know, I felt like we're walking this fine line. Because, you know, kids commit suicide all the time, like, you know, and the, there's all these ideas, like kids are like, a very aware of anxiety and depression, and being socially awkward, and there seems to be, you know, and as a parent, it's like, you want to encourage them to get help and take responsibility for their feelings at the same time, you don't want to push them too hard, because that is the ultimate threat is that they will commit suicide. Right. And it's, and I know that they're taking drugs to medicate, I took drugs to medicate. And I used to say that, you know, drugs, drugs, were my savior for a long time. If, if I had to feel, you know, especially those young years 1415 if I had to feel all the feelings, because I didn't have any coping skills, I don't know that I would have survived. So, you know, I know you've been trying to cure addiction, and what are some of the things that, you know, besides leading by example, for our kids, how can we, how do we, how do we fix this duty? How do we,   Unknown Speaker  42:08   I think we show up for each other is to start I don't know. But I, I do feel, and everybody says this, I guess every generation notices this, but I do think it is an inordinately challenging time to be growing up. I was saying to a student in my office, not too long ago, you know, if you're not anxious, you're crazy. Because and crazy is probably not the right word for Psychology at it. You know, and here I am a psychologist, I'm not all that correct times. But I think that you at least if you're not anxious, and you're growing up right now, you're somehow blind and deaf, or in denial, yeah, or in a massive denial, which I don't even know, I think that I think what's different, and what shifted for my dad, and what continues to be something that I work on, is to respond to all this pain, the natural response is to sort of curl up and close in, and to hide, and to take ourselves away. And as addicts you know, I still have a great capacity for denial that I have to check all the time. But I also found many tools to use. And that's why drugs are so compelling, because it was like, boom, you know, you've got a 10 foot wall now, between you and any realities, are safe and cozy, and delightful. And I think kids find drugs, you know, to do the same thing, but they also are stuck in a way because face it, that it's a tear, it's a hard time for any of us to be on the planet. And there's not a lot of great models of going through that awake and an honest and I guess, you know, I just try to put myself in the position of a nine year old, knowing, you know, probably on Instagram and every other thing, you know, how much suffering there is or is about to be. And then seeing the many ways, drugs and other ways that adults around are medicating and escaping. And even though you and I have been able to put down drugs, I think, at least for me, I guess I can still do want I naturally want to distance myself. And I don't I think that is a way to kind of abandon the nine year olds. I don't know how old you were when you're here was five out but I think as about maybe than nine or 10 Yeah, the metaphor is put our heads on each other's laps and, and just cry, you know, cry or or whimper or hope or try or touch each other I think in touch each other in the in the true spot where there is anxiety and depression and fear because if we can't do that and there's so many opportunities to escape I you know we're in a kind of a vortex going down the drain here because the more we escaped the worst things grow around us because we don't have to deal with them. And then the young people see oh my gosh, it's, you know, this is a crazy house. This being Earth. So I, I think or your family, I suppose but I, I guess we're both your mother and my father were able to do was recognize, you know, the truest piece of themselves and their children and respond honestly. Yeah. And that sometimes that might be kindness, sometimes that might not be kindness. But I think it's honesty, that's the, the, the thing we're really lacking or, or, you know, maybe the, the lifesaver would be Yeah,   Arlina Allen  46:44   I think in that moment, there was, you know, a high degree of empathy. Bernie Brown is a shame researcher, she talks about empathy is the antidote to shame. Right? I've heard people say that, you know, this is a disease of isolation and connection is the cure. And you know, I really feel like connection is one of those one of those solutions to all this, like, we need to connect with each other. We're, you know, as human beings, we actually really need each other.   Unknown Speaker  47:15   Oh, my goodness, yeah.   Arlina Allen  47:17   Yeah, I need to be around easily cope with stress   Unknown Speaker  47:20   is by social support. And there's tons of evidence that social support, not only mitigates, but also reverses the effects of stress. And it is, you know, surely a big part of, of getting better as individuals and also as communities and families, I think, recognizing that and it's tough because my parents kicked me out your your mother disowned you. And partly for me that facing the consequences of my decisions was helpful. But I do think that's harder because fentanyl wasn't around. You know, you you don't want to face them in the ultimate, you know, right, way too early. So I guess as parents we, we try to block a very tough line these weird. Yeah, it is hard.   Arlina Allen  48:23   Yeah. But I'm glad to hear that there's evidence that shows that social support mitigates and reverses stress, that's amazing. It kind of confirms everything that we knew, right? Like, we got sober we got social support, we, you know, had lots of people who had done it before us so learning by example, I hear that hope I've heard hope is hearing other people's experiences, which is why I do the podcast right? You know, people that listen, go Okay, you know, we can talk about the mechanics how, how the brain works, and all that and how it's affected by alcohol. And you know why it's a bad idea. But then hearing about like the turning point, like when your dad reached out to you, and you were at that place where I'm sure you had you were sick and tired of being sick and tired. Ready, just ready enough, you talk about just having just a tiny bit of willingness. It's a little chink in the armor. How long were you in that? That rehab in the 80s   Unknown Speaker  49:29   I was in for 20 days, which seemed like nine years and then I was in a halfway house for three months, which I calculated at the time so I know this is true was 1/27 of my life or something. I forget how I did that or something like that. I had some kind of crazy mula totally a rip off. I was so furious. But I, I was, like I say at the turning point, and there's been so many times, you know, I know where things are. Lena, we're talking about openness. And I think one way I could be honest, is to say, even after setting addiction for 35 years, and having all this personal and scientific experience, I still need to be open to all I don't know. And certainty is a lie, you know, certainty is the biggest illusion. And so here we are kind of trying to get through. And I think that is what I first had in my I was very certain until I'm in the treatment center. And I'm asked to try a different way. And I was troubled, because on one way I went, and I could see my way was not going great. Like it was really not going well. And I could see that without the drugs, you know, for a few weeks. But to do an another way that was extremely vague and chancy, and, you know, just seemed really crazy. To me. I was just stuck. And that, like you say this, just a tiny bit willing to say, I don't know. And, okay, you know, and this is a still, I think where I am I one of the things I love about recovery the most is that it is always different. And, you know, I thought that drugs were gonna give me this great, you know, every day is a big surprise, you know, who knows if it's the cops or that whatever. It just turned out to be adrenaline, but it was a grind, it was not really novel or interesting. And in fact, 35 years later, I'm I'm just astounded by how much mystery there is, in any day. It's just breathtaking. So I guess that I have to show up for that, you know, I have to not buy into the lie that I know exactly what I'm doing. Right?   Arlina Allen  52:20   I think the more we learn, the more we realize we don't know, a lot. You know, yeah, that is a I do love that about recovery is that every day is kind of new again, you know, and that we don't have to, and there's so much interesting research going on. Now I know that, you know, and I didn't I feel like we're running out of time, but that there is so much research now on helping people with chronic addiction through things like psychedelics. It's just like, you know, I I practice abstinence. So that's, let's face it, my life is fine. Like I don't, you know, need that. But for the chronic alcoholic who meets some criteria of like, you know, post traumatic stress disorder, and things like that. I know, Johns Hopkins is doing some interesting studies about that. That Yeah, there's still so much to learn about, about the brain and addiction and how to help people. Where do you see the focus of your work in the next, I don't know, five to 10 years?   Unknown Speaker  53:28   Well, can I just respond to this thing about the psychedelic so   Arlina Allen  53:33   Oh, sure. Yeah, cuz Yeah, you wrote a lot about it, and you're But well, I read some about   Unknown Speaker  53:36   And I think it's congruent with what other people are writing to that it may be those drugs may be a useful tool. But it reminds me that they go back to what you were saying earlier, the the benefit of those drugs is in their ability to help us connect with something bigger than ourselves, you know, which could be the love of other people. And I think that it reminds me that every drug is only doing nothing new, it's a total we have the capacity to do ourselves. So the way the pharmacology goes is that drugs work by exploiting pathways we already have. So in a way, this opportunity for transcending ourselves to connection with others, maybe helped by psychedelics, but those are not the answer. The answer is transcending ourselves by connecting with ourselves in something bigger than ourselves. So I would say that what I'm working on now Well, I there's so much that I am excited to do I wish I could stay up later, but I've got my research lab going. I'm studying sex differences in addiction. I'm also studying initial responses. to drugs and I'm interested in the genetic difference, individual differences that are mediated by an interaction of genes and say stress or other kinds of environmental influences. But I'm also hoping to write another book and I have this is funny because I'm, I don't really consider myself the book writing type, I'm kind of like the short, quick, get it done thing. And the first book took 10 years. So I don't have that a 10 years. I know so sad. Because I was busy, I was raising children and I was trying to get grants and we're, you know, grade papers and all that. So I can't do that, again, I don't, I have three books, so I'm probably not going to live long enough. So three books I want to write and I have a sabbatical coming up. And I'm hoping that I will have an opportunity to spend the year getting at least one of those out either on the adolescent vulnerability to addiction or on sex differences in the causes and consequences of addictive drugs, or just a kind of more philosophical take on. Because so a response to the opportunity that everybody alive on the planet has today to take substances and just as you were saying, sometimes for some people, those and some substances might be beneficial, and sometimes not. And I think that understanding and sort of finding your way to a personal ethic of how, what drugs in my life requires and appreciation of science, but also of you know, our honest assessment of who and where we are our development and what drugs are doing for instance, I this is just a little thing, but I read the other day that the marijuana industry is really exacerbating the droughts on the west coast. And that is a sort of a dilemma for this idea. And I mean, I I think there may be benefits also, but you know, it's not that our choices, if we know anything in October of 2021, we realize that our individual choices have impact on others, and so and on ourselves. So I guess I want to just consider that and not in a you know, there's a lot that can be said about it. So anyway, I'm excited about all those things. Who knows what tomorrow will bring, but I'm hoping to take a break from teaching it's been a tough year and a half with COVID Yeah, routines and yeah, yeah, I think we're all kind of hobbling through   Arlina Allen  58:03   Yeah, my heart goes out to all the teachers I know it's just been it's we're living in through unprecedented time so I really so grateful to all the teachers who've been able to hack it out and help our kids right it's it's really important work. You know, they I think they need as many people in their corner as they can get. So thank you for hanging it out and being available to all these kids. But I am so excited about your your book projects. I will personally be rooting for the one about adolescence.   Unknown Speaker  58:38   Me too, that one almost could write itself the data, you know, in the last 1520 years are overwhelming. And so it's really a good time to get that out. And, and adolescents are like sitting ducks today. And that is not their problem. That's all of our problem.   Arlina Allen  59:00   Oh yeah, they're our future. Right? I remember people saying that about us. Listen, thank you so much for your time today. When you get done with that book. You come on back and we'll talk about that one too.   Unknown Speaker  59:13   Okay. Arlina Thank you for having me. It's been really nice. Yeah, such   Arlina Allen  59:16   a pleasure. We'll talk soon thanks. Bye bye.

Homilies from the National Shrine

These difficult times demand that we turn back to the beautiful mystery of who God is and what it means to be His cherished children. Listen in to the daily homilies from the Marian Fathers at the National Shrine of The Divine Mercy, including Fr. Chris Alar, Fr. Kaz Chwalek, and many more. May they help you to live by God's will that you may play an active and effective role in a world whose wellbeing requires authentic Christian witness!Support our Ministries here. ★ Support this podcast ★

The Tipsy Teacher Podcast
Episode 85: Sunday Scaries

The Tipsy Teacher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 45:30


Be sure to use the code "tipsypod" at checkout for 12% offOur Nation's classrooms are severely underfunded. Tipsy Teacher is a teacher-owned online wine company that donates 15% of the proceeds from your wine delivery directly to underfunded teachers allowing you to do something meaningful every time you pour a glass of Tipsy Teacher wine. Go to TipsyTeacher.com now and place a wine order that makes a real impact.Brittany, a public school kindergarten teacher, and Dylan, a private Catholic middle school teacher are ready to sit down after a long day of school and start drinking!  Get ready for laughs as each talk about the hilarious high jinks of their week, share funny stories, compare their unique teaching backgrounds, and give their no-holds-barred tipsy take on school-related news, all while drinking Tipsy Teacher Wine

The Catholic Underground
CU Weekly 455: Doctrinal Duties.

The Catholic Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


When it comes to doctrine, dogma, and the development of Catholic belief, what's a person in the pew to do? We break it down plus our picks of the week!

Philokalia Ministries
Letters of Spiritual Direction to a Young Soul - Letter Sixty-Seven, Part I

Philokalia Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 78:35


I love St. Theophan. The reason I say this is because one can see so clearly how deep his love is for the young Anastasia. He is a true spiritual father.  At this point in their correspondence, Anastasia has come to a deeper understanding of the spiritual life and Theophan has shared with her the great riches of the spiritual tradition. Yet, his love for her makes him at times speak the truth to her with a kind of sternness. Not anger, but rather with a clarity about the weightiness of the matter they are discussing and its importance for her spiritual life and future.  Tonight we began Letter 67 on “Diligent Confession”. Theophan rejoices with Anastasia over the fruits of her pilgrimage to the monastery of Saint Sergius. However, he rebukes her for something that she told him about the nature of her confession. Despite having made the pilgrimage with its physical and emotional rigors and having embraced the practice of unceasing prayer throughout the journey, when the moment came for her to experience the full fruit of the spiritual practice she held back. She did not confess all of her sins; she did not open her mind and her heart fully to God in order that she might also reap the benefits and all the grace that the sacrament offers. Theophan tells her that the essence of the mystery of repentance consists in the resolution of the sin one has confessed. Her preparation should have illuminated her heart fully enough that she would leave no sin unconfessed because she would see no sin is “small”.  Every sin has the capacity of growing and taking hold of one's life and leading one away from God. She must avoid the craftiness of the worldly mind that seeks to rationalize certain behaviors and to minimize their effects. --- Text of chat during the group: 00:12:29 Eric Williams: I would very much be interested in a desert father society or similar. The Catholic men's groups I've seen are either mostly social or have an Evangelical vibe.   00:24:09 Art: I'm in!   00:31:00 Joseph Muir: What page number?   00:31:09 Carol Nypaver: 265   00:31:19 Joseph Muir: Spacibo   00:38:34 Rachel: The quote from St. Climacus, about striking the final blow and still having hope...which chapter is that from?   00:49:41 Rachel: lol yep   00:50:32 Rachel: @ the quirkiness...yet there is hope   00:54:57 Erick Chastain: the horologion and the pre-Vatican II breviary pray the entirety of that psalm, but it was deemed too difficult for moderns to include in the new breviary   00:55:19 Erick Chastain: (as far as I know, the horologion does, but I'm not sure)   00:56:08 Erick Chastain: that is, I think it does, since the byzantine psalters all include it in ther prayer rule   01:02:29 Joseph Muir: Speaking to Sue's last point, one very real issue is how little time the average parish assigns each week for confession. In my hometown, most of the Roman Catholic churches had an hour each week; in the various places where I've lived, I've never seen a Byzantine church that has actual confession times, always seeking to leave it up to penitents to ask the priest. While a penitent must obviously take initiative, I assure you that there are far fewer Byzantine Catholics who make a regular confession than would if there were set times throughout any given week (on the latter point, the nearly total absence of daily vespers or matins at these Byzantine churches is also a shame)   01:04:03 Eric Williams: Confession has become juridical - we go to seek removal of criminal guilt at the price of some symbolic atonement in penance. It should be medicinal, though, such that we seek healing from skilled physicians, who work methodically, patiently, and compassionately. Too few priests were taught or bother to use good bedside manners.   01:05:37 Joseph Muir: This is also why there is value in having a regular confessor, particularly one who knows one well enough so as to call them out on their BS

Drinkin' Bros Sports
Outside The Top 25 - Conference America

Drinkin' Bros Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 70:06


Making the best picks on America's most mediocre college football teams. Will Kansas State upset Texas Tech on the road? How many points will Mississippi State dump on Vanderbilt? Can Syracuse stay feisty on the road against Virginia Tech? Plus breaking down Washington State coach Nick Rolovich's firing over not taking the vaccine (apparently because he's Catholic), the new additions to the American Athletic Conference, and Coach O hitting on pregnant ladies in Baton Rouge.   Sign up today at MyBookie.com and use promo code DRINKINBROS to get your first-ever deposit matched dollar-for-dollar.   Ghostbed.com/DrinkinBros   Kill Cliff is offering Drinkin' Bros an exclusive offer, 30% off, go to KillCliff.com and use promo code DRINKINBROS.

Rosary Daily with Bruce Downes Catholic Ministries
Pray The Rosary - The Sorrowful Mysteries

Rosary Daily with Bruce Downes Catholic Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 20:03


Join us every day at https://BruceDownes.org/Rosary where you can request prayer from us as well as find all of the prayers and mysteries for you to pray along with us.  Get your free Rosary Prayer Guide at https://BruceDownes.org/PrayTheRosaryCONNECT WITH BRUCE AT: ► Website: https://BruceDownes.org ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheCatholicGuyBruceDownes ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecatholicguy ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/thecatholicguy ► Online Store: https://brucedownes.org/store 

Ask Father Josh (Your Catholic Question and Answer Podcast)
Vocation Confusion and Taking the Morning After Pill

Ask Father Josh (Your Catholic Question and Answer Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:52


Fr. Josh answers questions about experiencing confusion and doubts discerning one's vocation, and why taking the morning after pill is a serious sin, but a sin that God forgives through the sacrament of Reconciliation because there is no sin that God doesn't forgive in confession. Snippet From the Show "My Lord God, I have no idea where I am going. I do not see the road ahead of me. I cannot know for certain where it will end. Nor do I really know myself, and the fact that I think that I am following your will does not mean that I am actually doing so. But I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you." Text “askfrjosh” to 33-777 to subscribe to Fr. Josh's shownotes or go to www.AscensionPress.com/askfatherjosh Submit your questions and feedback to Fr.Josh by filling out a form at www.ascensionpress.com/askfatherjosh

Verdict with Ted Cruz
Ep. 91 - A Senator, a Catholic, and a Cactus Walk Onto a Campus

Verdict with Ted Cruz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 74:26


We survived UW-Madison's arbitrary mask mandate in Madison, WI. Michael finally passed gym class at Texas A&M. Now, Senator Ted Cruz and Michael Knowles are live from the swamp at Catholic University. In the thrilling season finale of the Verdict with Ted Cruz YAF campus tour, the Senator and Michael get back to the heart of Verdict with a one-of-a-kind, never-seen-before, all-mailbag live episode. You have questions, they have answers. Some people will like the answers, some people won't. One thing is for certain—this will be everything you've come to know and love about Verdict with Ted Cruz. Get more politics, more mailbag, more cactus, and more Verdict with the new all-access subscription, Verdict+. Use promo code LIVE for a one-month, risk-free trial: http://verdictwithtedcruz.com/plus. You asked, we answered. Verdict merch is HERE! Snag your exclusive Verdict swag and get 10% off your entire order with promo code LIVE at checkout: http://shop.verdictwithtedcruz.com.

Dude Soup
Who Had the WORST Childhood Costume Ever? - Funhaus Podcast

Dude Soup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 64:22


This week the gang shares most regrettable Halloween costumes from childhood! Plus, all the new stuff coming to Animal Crossing, growing up Catholic, and all the Zoo Nooz you can handle! Follow Us On Social: https://twitter.com/_JacobFullerton https://www.instagram.com/ekombokom https://twitter.com/mc_lotta https://twitter.com/MandoDoesStuff Tshirts n stuff: https://store.roosterteeth.com/collections/funhaus Welcome to Funhaus, the internet's ONLY comedy, gaming, and variety channel since 2015! About Funhaus Podcast: All the gaming, nerd culture, and meat-packing industry commentary you can handle. Join FIRST to watch episodes early: http://bit.ly/2uNNz0O

Raising 8: A couple of sinners trying to raise saints

A lot of losing going on, including Michael losing sleep due to one of the cats. Lori and Michael talk about being intentional spending time with each child in the family.

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 10.21 - Transgender Four-Star Admiral

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:31


Hour 1 -  Nick Reed talks about a variety of topics in the news, including:  The Biden administration's Department of Health and Human Services announced that Rachel Levine, the transgender assistant secretary of health for HHS, had been named the nation's first openly transgender four-star officer across any of the eight uniformed services of the United States. According to the press release, this makes Levine, a biological male, the “highest ranking official in the USPHS Commissioned Corps and its first-ever female four-star admiral.” North Carolina parents attending a high school football game were stunned by a banner implying a Catholic high school was privileged and populated with "rich, White" families.  The banner read, "Sniff, Sniff. You smell that? $Privilege$." 

Plaid Skirts & Basic Black
Plaid Skirts and Basic Strong Black Women

Plaid Skirts & Basic Black

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 90:00


In this episode the ladies talk to power lifter and personal trainer Ogechi Akalegbere (@gechmeifyoucan on IG) about being strong,  Black, and Catholic! This episode is chock full of insight, powerful takeaways, and shenanigans! 

Alpha and Omega Ministries
Yes, Lillibell, We Did Another Radio Free Geneva, and It Was Two Hours Long!

Alpha and Omega Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 126:00


Well, it was actually OVER two hours long, and I still did not finish up, but we made good progress. First I responded to Evangelist Ted Alexander's comments wherein he not only identified Reformed theology as fundamentally Roman Catholic, but said I am a Catholic, and a plant in the church, etc. and etc. So, we demonstrated he is suffering from some serious cognitive dissonance to be sure. After that full refutation of his claims we moved back to Leighton Flowers and moved into the section where he proves, repeatedly that Provisionism has not efficacious grace. He has passive, powerless, unintentional provisions, but no powerful, purposeful, intentional grace. We will finish up our response to him later, but may not dedicate an entire episode of RFG to it, we will see.

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!
Catholic Drive Time - Thursday October 21, 2021

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 119:59


Recorded on Thursday October 21, 2021

Catholic Momcast
Encouraging Our Kids #164

Catholic Momcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 35:53


This week Danielle Bean and Lisa Hendey discuss ways we can encourage our kids. As parents, we have so many opportunities to help our kids discover their gifts and strengths and learn how best to use them in the world. Lisa shares lessons she learned from her own mom and the ways her mother supported her work at Catholic Mom through the years. Danielle discusses large family dynamics and the powerful role parental support and expectations can play in helping our kids thrive. Join us for an enlightening discussion, and then share your thoughts with us! You can comment here or on social media, or send us an email at editor@catholicmom.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Jesus Brings Division? by Rory Mitrik

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:45


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Thursday of the Twenty-ninth Week of Ordinary Time by Mr. Rory Mitrik. First Reading: Romans 6: 19-23 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 1: 1-2, 3, 4 and 6 Alleluia: Philippians 3: 8-9 Gospel: Luke 12: 49-53 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Rebel Buddhist
Stop Apologizing

Rebel Buddhist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:36


“I'm sorry I made you mad.” “I'm sorry I upset you.” “He hurt my feelings.” We hear these things and say these things throughout our lives and assume they are true. But they are not. In reality, believing that we can control how people think and feel actually keeps us from accessing genuine compassion and kindness. Over the past few months, I've talked a lot about how other people and external circumstances don't cause our feelings, but rather it's our thoughts about them and what they do that create our feelings. When we start to accept our role in our own suffering and get curious about how our perceptions, thoughts, and stories can add to our suffering, we grow into a level of emotional maturity (*please note this podcast is not meant to be applied to deep unprocessed/unhealed trauma without the support of a therapist who feels it is an appropriate time to explore these concepts).  Today, we're going to the next level: integrating that wisdom with the reality that in the same way, we don't cause other people's thoughts and feelings. Yes, this is true even when you might think you're being extra rude, or when you're feeling guilty about how you acted because you feel/know it was unskillful (breaking agreements, violating boundaries etc). But for some reason, this is even more challenging for many people to grock than the first concept. It definitely was for me. (Anyone else a Catholic-raised guilt expert?) Other people's thoughts come from their brains. Their stories are running in their mind in the same way it happens in yours. We all have our own stories, narratives, biases, and thought patterns that determine how we think or feel. You've heard me mention that all circumstances are neutral – empty of inherent qualities. It's when we add thoughts to them that take on qualities like “good” or “bad.” The same is true for us as individuals: we are a neutral circumstance that someone else is having a thought about, and we can't control how they interpret what you say and do. We can see this more clearly when we do the exact same thing and two different people have very different reactions. This happens because they have two different brains and will interpret that action totally differently! Through their own filters. They have different reactions because their thoughts are different. Heck, sometimes even the same exact person can change how they react to the same thing day-to-day, right? Now, this isn't a get-out-of-jail-free card or permission for you to be an asshole to anyone you want because you don't “cause” their feelings. That would be some serious spiritual bypassing and gaslighting. Rather, this is about showing up in the world in the way you want to, and doing your best to do that with wisdom, integrity, and compassion, and then releasing responsibility for whatever others think or feel about you. Why are we so hell-bent on taking responsibility for other people's feelings? And why are we always apologizing for how people feel - as if we control that? I think we apologize a lot for how someone feels because we think if we don't take responsibility for other people's feelings, then we are a “bad” person. We're taught from a young age that if we love or care about someone then it means we make them have good feelings and help them to not have bad feelings. So often we believe that if we don't act on that, then we're being selfish. But what's being missed here is that we don't need to take responsibility for their feelings. If we break an agreement or violate a boundary, then we can take responsibility for what we DID. How someone feels about what we did is out of our area of control, and if we keep thinking we are responsible for that, we can spin in an endless cycle of trying to change how other people think about us so we can feel better about ourselves but since we can't control what people think and feel we end up spinning. Remember: not taking responsibility for another person's feelings doesn't mean we're selfish. It doesn't mean we're a “bad” daughter, manager, partner, mother, sister, friend. We are simply releasing that which we have no control over. In fact, believing that you cause other people's feelings doesn't actually make us a “better” anything. It's not a kind action when we try to change how people feel because we want to feel better about ourselves, because it stops being about them and ends up being about us instead, and we have less access to genuine compassion and kindness. When we release responsibility for other people's feelings, we can actually have more genuine compassion for their suffering. We don't try to change them. We can love them and be more present and more in our hearts than in our heads. That's authentic kindness! Now, we also can't control whether someone else notices or appreciates your felt experience of compassion and kindness and acceptance. But you will feel more kindness, compassion, and unconditional love. Which is something you can control. In this Episode you will learn:// How we literally cannot be responsible for how people feel and act// Why this concept is important to us… and how NOT to use the knowledge// Why we're always apologizing for how people feel// How to correctly apologize to someone (and when)// How owning others' feelings is actually LESS kind to them and yourself Resources:// Episode 2, How to Not Care What Other People Think About You// Episode 11, How to Stop People Pleasing// Episode 28, Practical Emptiness// Episode 74, How to Set Healthy Boundaries// If you're new to the squad, grab the starter kit I created at RebelBuddhist.com. It has all you need to start creating a life of more freedom, adventure, and purpose. You'll get access to the private Facebook group where you can ask me questions! Once you join, there's also a weekly FB live called Wake the F*ck Up Wednesday, where you can ask questions that come up as you do this work – in all parts of your life.// If you're interested in finding out more about how to free your mind and free your life, join Freedom School. Enrollment is open, and we are diving DEEP into ways to cultivate clarity and courage so you can create your best life. There are also some sweet bonus courses for you there. It will set you up to live the best version of you in the year to come. Learn more at JoinFreedomSchool.com.

Catholic Sprouts: Daily Podcast for Catholic Kids
CS 831: 10-21-21: The Kingdom of Heaven with Anthony D'Ambrosio: Thursday

Catholic Sprouts: Daily Podcast for Catholic Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:39


Grab Anthony's new book right here: http://beaklebook.com/   Thanks for listening to Catholic Sprouts! Please consider sharing this with another Catholic Parent, or Catholic Teacher so that we can all work together to plant seeds of Faith! OSV Magazine: http://osvkids.com/sprouts   Let us help you build your Domestic Church! Join us inside our NEW APP for the Domestic Church Project Bootcamp: a six week experience for the whole family that will enable ANY parent to build and lead their own Domestic Church. Find out more at https://domesticchurchproject.com     Support this podcast by SHOPPING Catholic Sprouts. We offer lots of Catholic Materials for the WHOLE FAMILY! https://shop.catholicsprouts.com     Check out the Catholic Sprouts Podcast ARCHIVES! https://catholicsprouts.com/podcast-archives/    Find fun, meaningful, faith-filled projects for your own family in the Catholic Family Resource Library. https://catholicsprouts.com/catholic-family-resource-library-signup/    Catholic Sprouts is a production of Spoke Street Media. For more great Catholic podcasts, check out spokestreet.com 

Run The Race
#84: Abortion Survivor Melissa Ohden Now Fights for Life, Called by God

Run The Race

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:24


With abortion back in the headlines, this week's guest on the podcast is at the center of the pro life fight, having survived an abortion just 4 years after landmark decision Roe v. Wade allowed abortions. We tackle this polarizing issue on "Run The Race," which hopefully you subscribe to. (5:48) Melissa Ohden is the survivor of a failed saline infusion abortion. She describes being in a toxic solution in her mother's womb for 5 days, living through that, then being adopted, only to find out at the age of 14 about the abortion attempt. (11:05) Faith intersects with this issue of abortion and Ohden thinks churches should be bolder about rights for babies, just like womens' rights. (14:40) She has testified before Congress in her pro-life fight, talks to us about God calling and using her to help babies and moms. (17:12) Ohden also shares the story of reconnecting with her birth mom, after going through a lot of pain and anger, but finding real healing through forgiveness. It took her more than 10 years to find her biological parents. What's it been like for her mom, who had the abortion forced on her? (25:22)As the founder and director of The Abortion Survivors Network, she talks about what their non-profit does to support families. (27:22) It's come full circle, as she's now a mom of 2 herself, sacrificing for them. (29:02) Ohden's first book "You Carried Me" was reprinted in 2020 and she has a new book coming out next Spring 2022. (31:51) What can be done for the moms who have an abortion or choose not to have one? (34:38) How can pastors approach the issue of abortion? What if being pro-life makes you appear judgmental? Ohden answers these tough questions. (38:20) We dive into the latest developments and why Ohden has hope that Roe v. Wade may be overturned. (42:33) Our guest, who I met at the Sound Choices Pregnancy Clinic gala in Columbus GA last month, closes us in Prayer. (46:30) The final segments are "Food for Thought" about House Speaker Nancy Pelosi defending her pro-choice stance as a Catholic and "Parting Gift" with the Bible's take on the value of life. Thanks for listening! And please share it with your friends using #RunTheRace podcast. Also, write a quick review about it. For more info, go to www.wtvm.com/podcast/.

Catholic Morning Offering Podcast
Catholic Morning Offering, Thursday, October 21, 2021

Catholic Morning Offering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:51


Starting the morning off with God is the key to strength and success in your day!Join me in praying the Catholic morning offering, as well as hear meditations, learn about the saint of the day,  and hear today's Scripture readings from Holy Mass.To sign up to receive a daily email of the Morning Offering through The Catholic Company, go to https://www.morningoffering.com/Excerpts from the English translation of The Roman Missal © 2010, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved.If you have any comments, please email me at Deanna.pierre25@gmail.com.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 294: Judea Gains Independence

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 20:43


In our reading of 1 Maccabees today, Fr. Mike highlights the the establishment of the new independent sovereign nation of Israel in the land of Judah. We learn how Simon takes command and enforces the law all around the land. Fr. Mike reminds us that even today, Christians are governed by Jesus himself and ultimately to belong to him. Today's readings are 1 Maccabees 13, Sirach 32-33, and Proverbs 23:17-21. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

Saint Faustina’s Diary in a Year
Day 203: Diary Entries 1056-1061

Saint Faustina’s Diary in a Year

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 6:44


The Lord's “Secretary of Divine Mercy,” St. Faustina, wrote what has become a modern-day spiritual classic — a blueprint for living a sacramental life in union with Jesus Christ. For anyone who may think the Diary is too thick and formidable, Fr. Joseph Roesch, MIC, has the solution. Join him for a few minutes each day as he reads from the Diary and offers commentary. Over the span of one year, you will have “read" the Diary, beginning to end, and absorbed its rich teachings.To order a copy of the Diary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska, visit  ShopMercy.org. Support our Ministries here. 

Mamas in Spirit
Moms, Teenagers and Spiritual Warfare with Nadine Sestich

Mamas in Spirit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 41:37


Nadine Sestich shares about a time of heightened spiritual warfare in her family. Nadine explores how it is essential to be aware of how darkness can sneak into the lives of parents and their children to lure them away from God. Mothers must stay vigilant about what they and their children consume and rebuke the devil whenever necessary.

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik
Michael Hichborn Exposes the Vatican's Involvement With the Occult, Abortion & The Great Reset

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:30


Many Evangelical Christians have been fighting the infiltration of Cultural Marxism the past few years, yet the Catholic Church has been waging this war for decades. Michael Hichborn, who is Catholic, exposes the sinister infiltration and overthrow of the Catholic Church and its ties to the World Economic Forum, promotion of abortion and event the occult.Sponsors:- Freedom First Coffee - Drink the coffee of Patriots. Use code JEFF for 10% off at http://freedomfirstcoffee.com - Freedom First Apparel - Look as patriotic as you feel. Use code JEFF for 10% off at http://freedomfirstshop.com

Middle-Aged and Mediocre
The Exorcisms of Latoya Ammons

Middle-Aged and Mediocre

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 93:16


Season 2 Episode 3--- This one is out of control right from the start. We have a story that seemed creepy and perfect for this time of year the first time Cash read it but as you'll find out while listening to this episode, it mostly just makes for an entertaining story that is perfect to mock for its absurdity. With that being said, credit for this story goes to Marisa Kwiatkowski at the IndyStar. Hope you enjoy! A woman and three children who claimed to be possessed by demons. A 9-year-old boy walking backward up a wall in the presence of a family case manager and hospital nurse. Gary police Capt. Charles Austin said it was the strangest story he had ever heard. Austin, a 36-year veteran of the Gary Police Department, said he initially thought Indianapolis resident Latoya Ammons and her family concocted an elaborate tale as a way to make money. But after several visits to their home and interviews with witnesses, Austin said simply, "I am a believer." Not everyone involved with the family was inclined to believe its incredible story. And many readers will find Ammons' supernatural claims impossible to accept. But, whatever the cause of the creepy occurrences that befell the family — whether they were seized by a systematic delusion or demonic possession — it led to one of the most unusual cases ever handled by the Department of Child Services. Many of the events are detailed in nearly 800 pages of official records obtained by The Indianapolis Star and recounted in more than a dozen interviews with police, DCS personnel, psychologists, family members and a Catholic priest. Ammons, who swears by her story, has been unusually open. While she spoke on condition her children not be interviewed or named, she signed releases letting The Star review medical, psychological and official records that are not open to the public — and not always flattering. Furthermore, the family's story is made only more bizarre because it involves a DCS intervention, a string of psychological evaluations, a police investigation and, ultimately, a series of exorcisms. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/middleagedandmediocre/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/middleagedandmediocre/support

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 293: Discipline Grounded in Love

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:23


Fr. Mike focuses on the theme of disciplining children, reflected in our readings from Sirach and Proverbs today. He clarifies that there is a crucial difference between discipline and destruction, and emphasizes that disciplining children should always be grounded in love and oriented towards their success in the future. Today's readings 1 Maccabees 12, Sirach 30-31, and Proverbs 23:13-16. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.