Podcasts about Commonwealth

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Term for a political community founded for the common good

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Best podcasts about Commonwealth

Show all podcasts related to commonwealth

Latest podcast episodes about Commonwealth

Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies - The Beltway Briefing

The 2022 midterm elections are set to be historic, and Tuesday was the most dramatic night of the primary election season to date. Voters in five states, including Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Idaho, Kentucky and Oregon, cast ballots for Senate, governor and House. Some of the highest-profile battles were fought in Pennsylvania, where the night's marquee contest — the GOP Senate primary - has yet to be decided. Members of Public Strategies' Pennsylvania team – including Jim Davis, Joe Hill, and Kevin Kerr – join Howard Schweitzer and Mark Alderman to discuss the key takeaways from the primary election in the Commonwealth, which in many ways encapsulates America's choice in the 2022 midterms.

American Party Podcast
Episode 128 - Sunil Sharma

American Party Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 67:59


Sunil Sharma, COO of Conservative Friends of the Commonwealth, joins the show to talk about conservatism in the United Kingdom and its commonwealth nations, the political divide between urban and rural U.K. citizens, abortion in the United Kingdom, and how the West can move from China to India for manufacturing.      Buy Drinkin' Bros new Hard AF Seltzer Here!   Buy Drinkin' Bros Merch Here!   Go to ghostbed.com/drinkinbros and use code DRINKINBROS for 30% off EVERYTHING (Mattresses, Adjustable Base, and more) -- plus a 101 Night Sleep Trial and Mattresses Made in the USA!

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 19, 2022: New Jaunt CEO reintroduces agency to Charlottesville City Council; Albemarle preparing for affordable dwelling unit ordinance

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 19:13


The heat is on, on the street, and this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement is ready to get inside your head, on every beat. With apologies to Glenn Frey, this is not an 80’s music nostalgia newsletter and podcast, but the idea is to look back at some of what’s happened recently while anticipating the changes that will come this summer. It’s May 19, 2022, and I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. Sign up today to not miss a beat! On today’s show:The annual median income in the Charlottesville area has increased 19 percent over last yearAlbemarle Supervisors further discusses ways to incentivize developers to build housing for those with lower than that median incomeThe new CEO of Jaunt explains that a new page is turning toward cooperation with Charlottesville Area TransitA Pittsylvania County group seeks a second referendum on sales tax increase for education Shout-out: RCA seeks input on the restoration of Riverview ParkThe first Patreon-fueled shout-out today is for the Rivanna Conservation Alliance and their work with the City of Charlottesville on the restoration of Riverview Park. The RCA aims to restore a 600-foot section of the Rivanna riverbank in an area that’s designated for public access to the waterway as well as a 200-foot section of a dangerously eroding stormwater channel nearby. Another community meeting will be held in the near future to get your feedback on the work should be prioritized. Visit rivannariver.org to learn more about the project, which seeks to help Riverview Park continue to be a welcoming place to exercise, cool off, paddle, fish, play, explore, observe nature, and escape from the day-to-day stresses of life. Spring COVID-19 surge continuesTo begin today, a quick look at the latest COVID numbers from the Virginia Department of Health. Today the VDH reports another 3,836 positive COVID tests done through the PCR method, and a number that does not count at-home tests. The seven-day positivity rate for tests has increased to 15.2 percent. The seven-day average for new cases is now at 3,078. This surge of cases has so far not resulted in fatalities anywhere near what was seen in previous ones before vaccines were easily available. The seven-day average for new daily deaths is at three per day. According to the Virginia Healthcare and Hospital Association, there are 60 COVID patients in intensive care in Virginia, with 23 of them on ventilators. Pittsylvania County group wants to try again on sales tax referendum Last November, voters in Pittsylvania County on the south side of Virginia’s Fifth Congressional District had on their ballot a referendum on whether or not to approve a one percent sales tax increase to fund school improvement projects. The measure failed on a 23-vote margin according to election night results from the State Board of Elections. This Tuesday, the seven-member Board of Supervisors got an update on a campaign to try hold the referendum again this year, based on enabling authority that passed the General Assembly in 2020. Martha Walker is the chair of Pittsylvanians for a Brighter Future, an advocacy group that seeks passage this time around.“One cent, one penny, will generate $3.8 million each year for the 19 years that we will be allowed to have that one cent sales tax added,” Walker said. Under the same enabling authority, Danville voters voted in favor of the referendum and the sales tax increase has gone into effect. Speaking directly to the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, Walker said her organization will be seeking to educate the public on what improvements would be funded. “You know that ten elementary schools will be focused on safety and getting rid of those trailers by building those new classrooms,” Walker said. Charlottesville asked the General Assembly to be allowed to hold a referendum for its school system. Legislation passed the Democrat-controlled Senate, but failed to get out of a committee in the Republican-controlled House of Delegates. There is still no state budget, an issue of increasing concern to school systems throughout the Commonwealth. Jaunt CEO talks transit with Charlottesville City CouncilThe relatively new CEO of the transit agency Jaunt introduced himself to the Charlottesville City Council Monday and also had the chance to re-introduce a public service organization plagued by recent controversy. Ted Rieck started with fundamentals. “Our basic goal is to enable people to live their lives independently and with dignity and we’ve been doing this for about 42 years,” Rieck said. (view his presentation)Jaunt serves the six localities of the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission as well as Buckingham County. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires equivalent service to fixed route transit for disabled individuals, and Rieck said Jaunt performs this role for CAT for those who live within three-fourths of a mile of a bus stop. “We also provide in some of the outlying counties circulator or intra-county service,” Rieck said. “We also provide links from the counties to Charlottesville and then we also provide commuter services into Charlottesville and [the University of Virginia].”Rieck was hired last October by Jaunt. The agency’s Board of Directors asked the previous CEO to resign after irregular transactions were reported. That continues to have an impact on Jaunt’s budget. “We had our CEO make some judgment errors in terms of spending money,” Rieck said. “That triggered an audit and that discovered some issues that Jaunt wasn’t doing very well.” Rieck said Jaunt was making progress in correcting the errors pointed out in the audit, including misapplication of funds intended for rural use for urban purposes. There were also questions about administrative costs. “We overstated some of our statistics which allowed us to get more state funding and federal funding that we were entitled to,” Rieck said. “This was an error that the prior CEO basically hoarded the data and did not share that with anybody.”Rieck said Jaunt had to pay Virginia back a over a million dollars and that has happened. Record-keeping has now been improved. The previous CEO was Brad Sheffield, who also served one term on the Albemarle Board of Supervisors. During that time, he was hired on as Jaunt’s director. Rieck said other anomalies have been discovered and Jaunt is cooperating with the ongoing investigation. He said Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation officials will visit Jaunt’s headquarters next week for further discussions. Better cooperation?Rieck said as the legacy of the Sheffield era continues to play out, he wants to build a partnership with Charlottesville Area Transit, and he’s in close contact with CAT Director Garland Williams.“We are working together,” Rieck said. “I don’t believe Jaunt and CAT have played very well together in the past. We are turning a new page on that I believe.” That includes more frequent meetings to discuss common issues, such as driver shortages. Another issue is how to transition to a fleet that doesn’t run on fossil fuels to meet the community’s expectations on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Jaunt is also seeking members to join an Alternative Fuel Advisory Committee to oversee a study for which Kimley Horn has been hired to run. Applications are due May 27, and the process will build off of a study that Charlottesville Area Transit is also running for their fleet. (apply)They are also building off of conversations that have been taking place at the Jefferson Area Regional Transit Partnership. In April, that group heard from transit officials in Burlington, Vermont about how fixed-route transit can carry students to public schools. Those conversations are now occurring here, according to Rieck. “Today we discussed opportunities where we could see CAT bus routes overlapping areas where Albemarle County students live,” Rieck said. “Many of these people could conceivably take a bus to the high school, other schools as well. If that works out, we could save five or six bus operators for the school district. Doesn’t sound like much, but it’s really huge.”Other avenues of regional exploration include the creation of a Regional Transit Authority and development of an app to help people navigate public transportation. Rieck said Jaunt could also play a role in addressing the need for service to Crescent Halls, a Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority property whose residents have demanded door-to-door service be restored when the building reopens. He said the current service by Route 6 sees a large bus trying to navigate a small access road for which it was not designed. “And my understanding is that’s an awkward movement for a larger vehicle to do so the thought would be to have Jaunt provide that service instead of the main route,” Rieck said. Details to come in the future as Rieck said detailed conversations had not yet occurred. Council pressed Rieck on whether Jaunt’s troubles with the Virginia Department and Rail and Public Transportation were over. “First of all, are there any more shoes about to drop, and second, do you have a sense of when you will be past the shoe-dropping phase?” asked Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook. Rieck said the long-standing issue is a pattern of mixing rural and urban funds that dates further back into Jaunt’s recent history. He said he’s being transparent with city, county, and state officials, as well as his board of directors. “So I don’t think that there’s any more shoes to drop and if there is, that’s the one,” Rieck said. Second shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign It’s springtime, and one Patreon subscriber wants you to know the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign is a grassroots initiative of motivated citizens, volunteers, partner organizations, and local governments who want to promote the use of native plants. This spring the group is working with retailers across the region to encourage purchase of plants that belong here and are part of an ecosystem that depends on pollination. There are plenty of resources on the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page, so sign up to be notified of lectures, plant sales, and more!Albemarle Supervisors discuss incentives for housing planThe Albemarle County Board of Supervisors continued a conversation earlier this month about how to incentivize developers to build units to be sold below market value. The six-member Board last discussed the matter in February and pushed back on the idea of creating an overlay district in the county’s zoning ordinance. (previous coverage)“The main question today that we would like some feedback on after listening to the information that’s provided is [whether] an affordable dwelling unit program something the Board would be interested in and staff reviewing?” asked Stacy Pethia, the county’s Housing Policy Manager. (view her presentation)The General Assembly has already granted Albemarle enabling authority to pursue such a program, which would allow the county to require a certain percentage of units be rented or sold at affordable prices to households at 80 percent or lower than the median income. This requirement would be triggered by a rezoning or a special use permit. Supervisors adopted the Housing Albemarle plan last July but delayed much of the implementation until these details could be worked out. Before they got too deep into the conversation, Pethia said the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has now released updated calculations for area median income for 2022. “That is now $111,200 annually and to put that into perspective, that is a 19 percent increase over last year’s area median income increase,” Pethia said. The median income for the Washington metropolitan area is $142,300 and the median income for the Lynchburg metro is $78,900.  We’ll come back to this in future stories about housing. (find the calculations for your favorite metro area)Pethia said after the work session in February, staff opted to come forward with the affordable dwelling unit program that is authorized under state code. “And the enabling legislation really doesn’t place many restrictions on what the county can do and what that program looks like,” Pethia said. “It does require we provide density bonuses but beyond that we are pretty open in the percentage of the affordable unit set-asides that we may require, the depth of that unit affordability, the length of the affordability for those units, and we also have the opportunity to include additional incentives within that ordinance above and beyond the density increases.”Pethia said there are about 500 such programs across the United States. Commonalities between them include: An identification of how many units the locality needs to be affordable standardized amount per unit for developers to pay into a fund rather than build units The right for the locality or its designee to purchase or rent affordable units that are actually constructed. Several localities in Virginia have such a program, such as Loudoun County. “They adopted their ordinance in 1999 and do require 6.25 to 12.5 percent of the units in projects to be affordable housing,” Pethis said. “Those units need to be affordable for 15 to 20 years depending on whether they are for sale or rent.” Pethia said around 2,500 units have been created under this policy in Loudoun. Fairfax County has a similar ordinance and has created nearly 3,000 units. For Albemarle, Pethia said county staff are recommending density bonuses, requiring 20 percent of total new units to be affordable as per Housing Albemarle, allowing non-profits to purchase “affordable” units for which the developer can’t find a qualified buyer, and a cash-in-lieu fee is a developer doesn’t want to build the units. Such a program is not yet ready and Pethia wanted feedback on whether they should proceed. Supervisor Ann Mallek had this question. “Is there a way that we can put a hold on new applications until we get this process adopted?” Mallek said. “I’m very concerned that another 5,000 units will come in in application that we will somehow be forced to accept the applications and then we will lose the opportunity to get a much better result.” Supervisor Bea LaPisto-Kirtley said she supported the idea of the creation of a waiting list of people and families who are eligible to rent or purchase affordable units due to their income level. “The waiting list would be extremely important to have a waiting list otherwise I can see this whole project failing if we don’t have a waiting list of qualified income buyers,” LaPisto-Kirtley said. Supervisor Ned Gallaway said that he did not want to see a list of stiffly-written incentives that might preclude flexibility. “I hope we don’t get caught in the trap of saying that even if we put an example of incentives our, or encouraged incentives, or whatever the wording is, that we’re saying that that’s it, and that we have a process in place that allows for consideration of other incentives,” Gallaway said. “Each project will be different. Each spreadsheet is different.” Gallaway also supported the cash-in-lieu program in order to be able to pay more funds into the county’s affordable housing trust rather than rely on surpluses. A more detailed plan will come before the Board of Supervisors for a work session in August followed by a public hearing in September. Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Nightside With Dan Rea
Paving The Way For Cannabis Cafes (8 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 36:20


Today the MA House met to vote on new cannabis reform bills. One bill in particular, if passed, would pave the way for about 12 communities in the Commonwealth to allow licensed cannabis cafes as part of a 3-year pilot program. The MA Senate already passed this reform bill back in April. If the House approves the bill, it could be on Governor Baker's desk this summer. How would you like a cannabis café in your town or neighborhood?

The Briefing
An election cheat sheet if you tuned out ages ago

The Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 25:32


What do I do when I get handed the two ballot papers on election day?  One is the size of a tablecloth...and the other makes no sense at all.   AND what key policies should I consider before I cast my vote?   Annika Smethurst joins Antoinette Lattouf on today's Briefing to take us through the issues that matter pre-election day.  Annika not only goes through the policies.....but also explains how the parliament works.....and why it's so important to make sure you vote correctly.   So, on today's Briefing.....an election cheat sheet if you tuned out ages ago.   Todays Headlines Campaign update: real wages Key witness in Dawson trial speaks Inquiry launched into the case of Australia's “worst female serial killer” Russian pleads guilty in first war crime trial Cody Simpson books spot in Commonwealth games   Follow The Briefing DON'T FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR THE BRIEFING NEWSLETTER. LINK IS IN OUR BIO ON INSTAGRAM Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

IN Construction with Nate Lelle
Michael B. Cline, P.E., PTOE, Senior Vice President, Administrative Operations

IN Construction with Nate Lelle

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 49:55


This week's guest is Michael B. Cline the Vice President, Administrative Operations which is a mouth full and had to have him help me with his title during the introduction. Michael is a professional engineer with decades of leadership and engineering experience in both the public and private sectors. We talk about the mind shift that happened upon his return to Purdue in 2013 around Planning and Construction by prioritizing customer care, innovation and management accountability, Cline ensures the organization delivers high quality services at the lowest possible cost. Cline, who earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from Purdue University, returned to the University in July 2013 as the Vice President for Physical Facilities with responsibility for the design and construction of all university facilities, the operation and maintenance of existing buildings, and the Wade Utility Plant. Since 2013, Cline's role expanded to include capital programming, campus master planning, sustainability, real estate, procurement, environmental health and public safety, supplier diversity, parking, transportation, and Purdue's airport. In this role, Cline manages 1,200 employees on the West Lafayette campus, a $250M capital program, and a $150M annual operating budget. Current major capital projects underway include the $140M Dudley and Lambertus Halls for the College of Engineering and Purdue Polytechnic Institute, $22M Hagle Hall for bands and orchestra, $41M Hypersonics and Applied Research Facility, $73M High Speed Propulsion Lab and $52M Schleman Hall and Stewart Center Renovations for data science and student services . From 2015 through its completion in December 2018, Cline played a pivotal leadership role in delivering the $120M State Street Redevelopment Project in an unprecedented ‘town-gown' P3 or Build-Operate-Transfer (BOT) with the City of West Lafayette. This project has sparked over $500M in private investment adjacent to Purdue's campus since 2017. Cline was also instrumental in the completion of the 2018 Giant Leaps Master Plan for the West Lafayette campus—the launch of which coincided with the University's Sesquicentennial Anniversary. Prior to joining the University, Cline served as the Commissioner of the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) from 2010-2013, where he was entrusted with overseeing all aspects of one of the state's largest agencies. He successfully led INDOT's delivery of Governor Mitch Daniels' $10B Major Moves infrastructure investment program, while reducing annual operating spending by $70M. Noteworthy projects completed under Cline's leadership include the $700M I-69 project (sections 1-3) and the procurement of the Ohio River Bridges project, a unique $2.4B P3 with the Commonwealth of Kentucky.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Chris Stigall Show
President Trump Returns - Tees Off On McConnell, Toomey, and Election Integrity

The Chris Stigall Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 33:13


Today is Primary Day for Pennsylvania voters.  President Trump stopped by to share his thoughts on the state of the country, Congress, and weigh in on his picks for today's primary battle for US Senate and Governor in the Commonwealth.  Plus you'll hear Stigall visit with WMAL's Larry O'Connor in Washington D.C. as media from all over the country try to make sense of a race that could go any direction today.

Costing the Earth
Sustainable Sport for the Future

Costing the Earth

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 27:47


Two of the biggest sports events of the year, the Commonwealth games in Birmingham and the FIFA world cup in Qatar have pledged to be the most sustainable and green sporting events to date. Both have made bold statements 'the first sustainable commonwealth games' and the ‘first carbon-neutral FIFA World Cup'. Qasa Alom finds out if they can really deliver and just how sustainable and green these global sports events will be. Starting off with his home city of Birmingham Qasa discovers some of the changes taking place, from stadium infrastructure to transport and offsetting. Will these commonwealth games be the first games with a carbon neutral legacy and set a benchmark for future games? The sporting world is starting to rise to the challenge, and it must, already major International tournaments are being adversely affected by a warming climate. At the FIFA World Cup in Qatar teams will be playing in artificially cooled stadiums with games held, controversially, in the cooler month of November and December. Qasa finds out if future world class sports events will require radical solutions in a changing climate, and what sporting events can do to curb their own emissions. Producers for BBC Audio in Bristol: Perminder Khatkar and Helen Lennard

Front Burner
Can Canada cut ties with the monarchy?

Front Burner

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:10


This year is the Queen's Platinum Jubilee, which marks her 70 years on the throne and as our head of state. But as Elizabeth ages, she's been stepping back and paving the way for her son, Charles, to become King. This week, Charles and his wife, Camilla, are coming to Canada — visiting St. John's, Ottawa and Yellowknife — on a trip they say will focus on Indigenous reconciliation and climate change. Today we're exploring whether we should follow in the footsteps of other Commonwealth nations that have recently abolished the monarchy — notably, Barbados and Jamaica. According to a recent Angus Reid poll, 51 per cent of respondents said Canada should not remain a monarchy in coming generations. But abolishing the monarchy is a lot more complex than you might think. We're talking about why that is with David Schneiderman, a law and political science professor at the University of Toronto, and Jordan Gray, a policy analyst with Indigenous Affairs Canada.

Oral Arguments for the Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
South Branch LLC v. Commonwealth Edison Company

Oral Arguments for the Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 32:13


South Branch LLC v. Commonwealth Edison Company

The Adviser Podcast Network
In Focus: Building cyber resilience in the banking and finance sector

The Adviser Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 37:22


Major General (Ret'd) Marcus Thompson and Phil Tarrant highlight the need for cyber security awareness across the banking and finance sector. In this episode, created by our sister title, CyberSecurity Connect, the retired Major General from the Australian Defence Force and the co-founder and director of Momentum Media discuss the spike in malicious cyber activity from Russian actors following the Commonwealth government's decision to impose sanctions on the country in response to its invasion of Ukraine, and what can be done to protect financial services business and their clients. The duo discuss their tour of the country for The Adviser's Better Business Summit 2022, and why brokers need to be working on their cyber protections and resilience now - noting its critical infrastructure. Tune in to find out: Why cyber attacks are increasing How brokers can better protect their businesses How public policy and government-backed institutions can better equip organisations with the tools to combat cyber threats. And much more!

Love Conquers Alz
ASST. ATTY GENERAL RICK MOUNTCASTLE (HULU'S DOPESICK) & LEAD INVESTIGATOR JOHN PEIRCE - The TRUTH About Nursing Home Neglect

Love Conquers Alz

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 95:02


In episode 56 of Love Conquers Alz, my outstanding guest co-host, Rosanne Corcoran and I have a very candid and extremely important conversation for anyone who has a loved one in a nursing home or anyone planning to live a long and fulfilling life.  Like me, Rosanne cared for her mother, Rose, over a 12 year span.  in 2019, Rosanne started a regional Daughterhood Circle in the Philadelphia suburbs . In November of that year she created Daughterhood The Podcast: helping Caregivers navigate their new role. You can also visit Rosanne on her website HeyRoe.com for  information, inspiration and a little company. Previously, I spoke with Rick Mountcastle -Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Virginia and retired Federal Prosecutor.  Rick and his partner, Randy Ramseyer, led the investigation and prosecution of Purdue Pharma, for falsely marketing OxyContin as told in the Hulu miniseries "Dopesick", where I literally gasped out loud when it was revealed in the last episode that they were going to go after Abbott Laboratories for falsely marketing  Depаkote, to nursing homes- the drug responsible for rendering my physically healthy mother non ambulatory and incontinent in a matter of seven days. Rick led the investigation and prosecution of Abbott Labs which resulted in criminal and civil penalties totaling $1.5 Billion.  He is back to continue the  conversation we started along with one of his lead investigators, John Peirce – who had boots on the ground inside Nursing Homes  across the US. and  witnessed the many negative results of understaffing that is now too common in too many nursing homes - where people are viewed as commodities and compassion is a liability.  John  was employed as a Special Agent – Criminal Investigator with the Criminal Investigation Division of the IRS in western VA, eastern TN, & western NC.  investigating numerous cases of tax fraud and financial crimes In 2007, John was hired as a Criminal Investigator by the Virginia Office of the Attorney General, Medicaid Fraud Control Unit. In 2013, he was promoted to Investigative Supervisor. While employed by the OAG, he assisted in several healthcare fraud investigations of providers including physicians, pharmaceutical companies, nursing homes, & pain clinics. Many of these investigations were conducted in conjunction with the US Attorney's Office before he retired in 2021.Note: There are many facilities that still provide excellent care,  but there is nevertheless a crisis that must be stopped now. Subscribe to CARETRAINR (dIscount Code: Susie)Try Memory Lane TV free!.   Support the show

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 16, 2022: Divided Charlottesville Planning Commission recommends permit for 390-room, seven-story building on JPA

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 23:32


There is a month and a week left until the summer solstice, and the time when the days begin growing shorter. Until then, there are now over 14 hours of sunlight in the section of the Earth on the day when the May 16 edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement is produced. That’s enough time to ensure that this newsletter and podcast at least tries to bring as much information as possible. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. On today’s program:Charlottesville Planning Commission recommends a seven-story building on Jefferson Park AvenueA fatal crash on U.S. 29 near Greenbrier Road has claimed the life of a Charlottesville manAn Augusta County elections official is the latest appointee to the State Board of ElectionsA quick update on COVID-19 from the UnivToday’s first shout-out goes to LEAPWe’re now well into spring, and many of us may have already turned on our air conditioning units for the first in months. To see what you can do to get the most out of your home, contact LEAP, your local energy nonprofit, to schedule a home energy assessment this month - just $45 for City and County residents. LEAP also offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If someone in your household is age 60 or older, or you have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!COVID cases still increasing; UVA Health urges renewed maskingAs the week begins, the Virginia Department of Health this morning reports a seven-day average for new COVID-19 cases at 2,750 a day and the seven-day percent positivity has increased to 14.6 percent. The actual amount of spread is likely higher due to the number of home tests that have become common as a first diagnosis for many people. “There are many people calling saying they’re COVID positive and importantly and interestingly, a fair number of those people have been vaccinated,” said Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology for the University of Virginia Health System. With more cases in the community, UVA officials say its time to take precautions again.“Personally I’m masking back up and I think a lot of people are making the decision,” said Wendy Horton, the CEO of the UVA Health System. “It’s people that have been really careful, been vaccinated, and I think we’re just in this interesting time where we’re really tired of masking but I think it’s alive and well. We know it. We see it in our workforce. We see it in our patients.” The latest COVID model from the UVA Biocomplexity Institute was released on Friday. “Models forecast a significant surge of cases in the coming weeks,” reads the model. “Case rates are not expected to reach levels seen during the January wave. But they will likely exceed those seen in pre-Omicron waves.” Dr. Sifri said ebbs and flows are likely to continue as COVID-19 continues to transition from pandemic to endemic. He said the same public health advice exists. “In a period of time like now where we’re starting to see a surge in cases, this is the time to say okay, in this time and place right now, wearing a mask is helpful to prevent transmission,” Dr. Sifri said. “It’s also important because with COVID it still remains the case that probably half or more than half of cases are in people who are asymptomatic or have such mild symptoms that they don’t recognize that they’re sick.” This week the Virginia Department of Health is retiring several dashboards and ways of reporting COVID. People who seek to know cases by vaccination status will need to go to the Centers for Disease Control website. Cases and Deaths by Date Reported will also be phased out. The changes will take place on May 19. The VDH already has stopped reporting cases by locality on its website. Learn more about the changes on their website.Fatal crash on Seminole TrailAlbemarle County police are investigating the cause of a fatal crash last night in the 1200 block of U.S. 29 near Greenbrier Drive. Thirty-six-year old Justin Michael Tilghman of Charlottesville died at the scene of the crash which happened at 9:21 p.m. last night. The driver of a second vehicle was taken to the University of Virginia hospital. The Albemarle County Police Department’s Fatal Crash Reconstruction Team is leading the investigation. This is the fourth fatality on Albemarle County roads so far in 2022. Augusta County official named to State Board of ElectionsGovernor Glenn Youngkin has named a member of the Augusta County Board of Elections to serve on the Virginia State Board of Elections. Youngkin named Georgia K. Alvis-Long to the position. A press release identifies her occupation as a registered nurse instructor. Under Virginia law, the State Board of Elections is a five-member body that will have three members from the political party that won the Governor’s mansion in the last election. “Each political party entitled to an appointment may make and file recommendations with the Governor for the appointment,” reads Section 24.2-102 of Virginia Code.Alvis-Long fills a position left by the resignation of Jamilah D. LeCruise. For more recent appointments, take a look at the full release. Second shout-out: Charlottesville Jazz Society spotlighting benefit show for UkraineIn today’s second subscriber supported shout-out. The Charlottesville Jazz Society is spotlighting a benefit event to support the people of Ukraine at the Whiskey Jar this Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Young jazz students near the besieged city of Mariupol sent guitarist Royce Campbell a plea to help, and several area musicians have jumped into help. Vocalist Monica Worth has organized the event, and Campbell will play for Ukraine with bassist Andre La Vell and drummer Jim Howe. Many of Charlottesville’s best jazz musicians will sit in. Donations will be collected and sent to Global Giving’s Ukraine Crisis Relief Fund, and you can also go ahead and support this effort with a payment online. That’s We Play for Ukraine at the Whiskey Jar this Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Divided Planning Commission approves seven-story building on Jefferson Park Avenue A divided Charlottesville Planning Commission voted 4-3 on May 10 to recommend that City Council approve a special use permit for additional height and density for a seven-story U-shaped building at 2005 Jefferson Park Avenue.  They’ve also recommended reducing parking requirements by 22 percent over what would otherwise be required.“The [special use permit] is required to accommodate a development being proposed for 119-units of multifamily dwellings within one building with underground parking,” said city planner Matt Alfele. This project was filed after the city adopted a new Comprehensive Plan and Future Land Use Map created as part of the Charlottesville Plans Together initiative, which is still underway. There are currently 17 units across multiple structures across the property. “The Future Plan Use Map, the Comprehensive Plan that we went through, is increasing density and increasing density in certain areas of the city, and this area of the city is one that is looking to increase density and to increase density at especially this scale is going to create a big building,” Alfele said. The developer would pay $500,000 into the city’s affordable housing fund rather than provide required affordable units on-site or at another location nearby. They’ll build 125 parking spaces in an underground garage with access on Washington Avenue. Residents would not be eligible to park on that street or Observatory due to restricted parking. The building would be seven stories taller from JPA and would be five stories tall at the back. “The biggest concern I think staff had was the rear elevation, the five story building going down into the mainly single-family, two-family neighborhood,” Allele said. This request comes after City Council adopted a new Comprehensive Plan with a Future Land Use Map that encourages more residential density, but before the new zoning rules have been written. “Do you happen to know and can you remind me what in our Future Land Use map, what this area is designated as, and what the by-right height would be in that corridor?” asked City Councilor Michael Payne. “This is Urban Mixed Use Corridor and the height is five stories or up to eight at key intersections,” Alfele said. “This is one of the areas where our Comprehensive Plan land use conflicts with our current zoning because our Comprehensive land use map is anticipating our zoning changing. The Future Land Use Map measures in stories and not feet.” Under the existing zoning, the structure could be 35 feet tall without a permit. This is one of the areas that will be clarified in the zoning rewrite. The term “key intersection” is also currently not defined. Payne pointed out the Comprehensive Plan seeks to encourage more units that would be rented to people below market. “The framework that we’ve adopted for that is that if we’re going above the by-right height, the reason we’re doing that is to have an inclusionary zoning program that’s going to required affordable housing as part of that,” Payne said. Payne also suggested $500,000 as an affordable housing contribution would not go far. “I know it’s their choice and we don’t have any control over it but I would just note for the record that we got an affordable housing report that included data on the total subsidy needed to construct a new affordable unit, and I can’t remember the exact number but I know in Virginia that total subsidy to build one new unit could be around $300,000,” Payne said. Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook noted that there had been a lot of concerns during the Future Land Use Map from other neighborhoods such as North Downtown, but he had not heard much from the JPA neighborhood at that time.“The one area where it seemed clear that everyone was willing to agree we should have increased density was along JPA yet there was no basically no public discussion of that fact,” Snook said. Until the rezoning is finalized, individual applications like this are the forum for how the city will look in the future. The project will need a certificate of appropriateness from the Entrance Corridor Review Board, which is also the Planning Commission. They’ll get to influence the design. The developer said the area was already predominantly occupied by renters, and that this level of density is served by transit. “We are one block away in each direction from the trolley stops,” said Erin Hannegan with Mitchell + Matthews Architects and Planners. Hannegan acknowledged the Future Land Use Map designation of Urban Mixed Use Corridor and said this project meets the goals of the Comprehensive Plan.“The further definition is ‘higher intensity mixed-use development’ for this area and that’s exactly what we’re trying to do,” Hannegan said. “A higher intensity development. Mixed use is not allowed under the R-3 mixed-use currently designated.” Hannegan acknowledged that the new building would be out of scale with what is currently there, but anticipated the future conditions of JPA.“This building might be taller than its current neighbors but it won’t be out of character with the future implementation of the Comprehensive Plan and the implementation of the vision that’s been in the works for over 20 years for this particular neighborhood,” Hannegan said. At the public hearing, Nina Barnes of the Jefferson Park Avenue Neighborhood Association said the Comprehensive Plan compels Council and the Planning Commission to take adverse effects into account when considering a special use permit. “Adverse impacts may include traffic or parking congestion, undue density and population, and massing and scale,” Barnes said. “This project has adverse effects in all of these ways.”Barnes said the seven-story building would block the sun from existing one and two story buildings.Ellen Contini-Morava said the staff reports seemed to be in favor of the developer, and noted the gap between an adopted Comprehensive Plan and older zoning. She said this undermines the spirit of the Cville Plans Together Initiative. “This application treats the rezoning that’s proposed in the Future Land Use Map as if it were already in place,” Contini-Morava said. “This application not only aims to short-circuit the rezoning process but even requests a height that is two stories higher than the five stories suggested in the Future Land Use Map for the JPA corridor.” Fifeville resident Matthew Gillikin spoke for the group Livable Cville, which is not a registered entity with the State Corporation Commission but is active in promoting higher density in the community. Gillikin said the answer to affordability in Charlottesville is more housing. “And the developer is planning to contribute nearly $500,000 to the Charlottesville affordable housing fund as a condition to build,” Gillikin said. “This will fund groups like [Charlottesvile Redevelopment and Housing Authority], LEAP, [Albemarle Housing Improvement Program], [Piedmont Housing Alliance], and Habitat for Humanity in the work to address local housing issues.” Gillikin said approval of this project would prevent students from moving into local neighborhoods such as Tenth and Page and Fifeville. These units would have no affordability provisions. For comparisons let’s look at the Standard, another building designed by Mitchell + Matthews Architects. According to their website, the lowest rent for a room in a four-bedroom unit goes for $1,029 a month. Double occupancy in a single bedroom in a three bedroom unit can go for $845 a month. One and two bedroom units in the Standard are sold out. Pricing is not available online for the Flats at West Village. The Lark on Main has a one bedroom unit with a study for $1,879 a month. A room in a four bedroom, four bathroom costs $955 a month. Garage parking is an extra $100. Commission discussionAfter the public hearing, Commissioner Hosea Mitchell said he supported the project, but did want the massing to be a little more consistent with the rest of the neighborhoods. “We do need more housing in Charlottesville and we do a bit of relief valve,” Mitchell said. “We need housing in Charlottesville that is closer to UVA so that the housing that is further away from UVA can be used by the rest of our citizenry,” Mitchell said. Commissioner Taneia Dowell said if the developer is going to additional density based on the future zoning for the property, the spirit of the Affordable Housing Plan must also be honored. “That’s where I’m really having some heartburn,” Dowell said. “If we’re going to go off future endeavors for this project and this special use permit, then we need to go off future endeavors for everything related to this.” Commissioner Jody Lahendro said he could not support this level of density in the area and especially with a building with that much massing. He said the Comprehensive Plan also calls for development on Entrance Corridors to be compatible with existing neighborhoods. “I am not in favor of sacrificing a long term neighborhood for providing student housing for the University,” Lahendro said. “I think the people who have lived here and the single-family homes in this neighborhood deserve… we can’t just pretend that they’re not there.” Commissioner Rory Stolzenberg said he was reviewing the permit request under existing rules and not looking ahead to the new zoning. Quoting the standards of review, he noted that the Commission must review whether a proposal would be “harmonious with existing patterns of use and development in the neighborhood.”“But it will shock you guys to learn that harmonious is not actually defined in the code so the question I think before us is whether a five-story building can co-exist near or next to even smaller buildings including detached houses,” Stolzenberg said. “I’d note there’s already a four and a half story building at the head of the street.” Bill Palmer is with the Office of the Architect at the University of Virginia and sits as a non-voting member of the Planning Commission. He said UVA is not in an era where they are being required by the Commonwealth of Virginia to increase enrollment. According to the UVA office of Institutional Research and Analytics, there was an on-Grounds enrollment in Fall 2021 of 16,793 undergraduates and 6,928 graduate students. (enrollment data)“If you look at our official projects, they are flat,” Palmer said. Palmer said UVA is building additional housing on Grounds, including a second new structure in the Brandon Avenue Corridor. He also said the UVA initiative to build up to 1,500 new affordable units in the community includes a site further down from 2005 JPA in Albemarle County at the Piedmont housing site. “In terms of having affordable housing close in the future, that will be a place where the University is trying to provide something,” Palmer said. Council thoughtsCouncil will have the final decision, but did not vote during what is their first reading.Councilor Payne said he was frustrated that the affordability rules of the future are not yet in place. “This happened with another [special use permit] a few weeks ago where we’re in this strange situation where we’re sort of evaluating the Future Land Use Map and zoning map rewrite in mind, but if we’re using that in our evaluation, that will include our framework of inclusionary zoning and affordable housing overlays which are critical to the success of that plan for affordable housing,” Payne said. Councilor Brian Pinkston said he is learning toward support because it did provide more housing close to the University of Virginia. “I’m not able to fully articulate how we square that with point number one which is whether it is harmonious,” Pinkston said. “To some degree I think harmoniousness might be in the eye of the beholder. I will say that in terms of how the design was laid out and that you have seven stories in the front and five stories in the back, I thought there was some care and attention to trying to integrate into the neighborhood.” Snook also said he had issues with the word “harmonious” and said the traditional form of land use control known as “Euclidean zoning” is not good at dealing with change. “It doesn’t allow for us to grow gradually from a little bit of density to a little bit more density,” Snook said. “It allows us to say okay, we’re going to rezone the entire block of the entire neighborhood but it doesn’t let us go bit by bit.” As the Entrance Corridor Review Board, the Planning Commission voted unanimously on a motion to acknowledge there would be an adverse impact, but those impacts can be mitigated through the design process. As the Planning Commission, they consider a motion made by Stolzenberg to recommend approval. The was 4-3 with Stolzenberg, Mitchell, Habbab, and Commission Chair Lyle Solla-Yates voting in favor. Lahendro joined Dowell and Commissioner Liz Russell in voting no.  Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
In Pennsylvania, A Dead Heat For GOP Senate Nominee

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:26


With the Pennsylvania primary just one day away, GOP candidates for Senate are making their last campaign pushes across the Commonwealth. The latest Fox News polling suggests a tight race ahead of the May 17th primary, with Dr. Mehmet Oz, Kathy Barnette and David McCormick in a virtual dead heat. Businessman and GOP Pennsylvania Senate candidate David McCormick joins the Rundown to break down why he believes the undecideds will vote for him and how his upbringing in Pennsylvania inspired him to run for Senate. Later he explains the value of his military and business background and what he would do on Day 1 as senator to reverse the economic policies of the Biden administration.   With the pandemic came a number of supply chain issues frustrating Americans at stores. The most recent product missing from shelves? Baby formula. Following the shutdown of an Abbott Formula plant in Sturgis, Michigan, families across the country have been scrambling to find solutions to feed their infants. Lauren Simonetti, FOX Business correspondent and host of the "We're Momming Today!" podcast, joins the Rundown to discuss the causes of the shortage, the impact of the crisis on families, and what she believes the White House and manufacturers must do to solve the problem.    Plus, commentary from FOX News Contributor Joe Concha. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The FOX News Rundown
In Pennsylvania, A Dead Heat For GOP Senate Nominee

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:26


With the Pennsylvania primary just one day away, GOP candidates for Senate are making their last campaign pushes across the Commonwealth. The latest Fox News polling suggests a tight race ahead of the May 17th primary, with Dr. Mehmet Oz, Kathy Barnette and David McCormick in a virtual dead heat. Businessman and GOP Pennsylvania Senate candidate David McCormick joins the Rundown to break down why he believes the undecideds will vote for him and how his upbringing in Pennsylvania inspired him to run for Senate. Later he explains the value of his military and business background and what he would do on Day 1 as senator to reverse the economic policies of the Biden administration.   With the pandemic came a number of supply chain issues frustrating Americans at stores. The most recent product missing from shelves? Baby formula. Following the shutdown of an Abbott Formula plant in Sturgis, Michigan, families across the country have been scrambling to find solutions to feed their infants. Lauren Simonetti, FOX Business correspondent and host of the "We're Momming Today!" podcast, joins the Rundown to discuss the causes of the shortage, the impact of the crisis on families, and what she believes the White House and manufacturers must do to solve the problem.    Plus, commentary from FOX News Contributor Joe Concha. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
In Pennsylvania, A Dead Heat For GOP Senate Nominee

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:26


With the Pennsylvania primary just one day away, GOP candidates for Senate are making their last campaign pushes across the Commonwealth. The latest Fox News polling suggests a tight race ahead of the May 17th primary, with Dr. Mehmet Oz, Kathy Barnette and David McCormick in a virtual dead heat. Businessman and GOP Pennsylvania Senate candidate David McCormick joins the Rundown to break down why he believes the undecideds will vote for him and how his upbringing in Pennsylvania inspired him to run for Senate. Later he explains the value of his military and business background and what he would do on Day 1 as senator to reverse the economic policies of the Biden administration.   With the pandemic came a number of supply chain issues frustrating Americans at stores. The most recent product missing from shelves? Baby formula. Following the shutdown of an Abbott Formula plant in Sturgis, Michigan, families across the country have been scrambling to find solutions to feed their infants. Lauren Simonetti, FOX Business correspondent and host of the "We're Momming Today!" podcast, joins the Rundown to discuss the causes of the shortage, the impact of the crisis on families, and what she believes the White House and manufacturers must do to solve the problem.    Plus, commentary from FOX News Contributor Joe Concha. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

America's Roundtable
A Conversation with Ambassador Carla Sands | Principled Solutions for America — Advancing Freedom and Affirming Peace through Strength

America's Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 24:35


Honorable Carla Sands, U.S. Ambassador to the Kingdom of Denmark, Greenland, and the Faroe Islands (2017-2021) and a U.S. Senate candidate for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania joins America's Roundtable Radio co-hosts Natasha Srdoc and Joel Anand Samy for a conversation focusing on the U.S. soaring inflation, growing concerns of an impending recession, the urgency of restoring America's energy independence and significance of empowering parents and children through school choice and charter schools. As the Biden administration pushes for an Iran nuclear deal in Vienna, the discussion will also highlight the fact that an agreement with the state sponsor of terrorism will give Tehran access to some $100 billion in frozen funds. These dangerous developments including a nuclear-armed Iran raise the risk of a potential Middle East crisis impacting the region and beyond. Concerns are raised about the $40 billion Ukraine aid being rushed through Congress without greater oversight of spending. As America's top diplomat to Denmark, a NATO and European Union member state, Ambassador Sands was instrumental in blocking the Nord Stream 2 natural gas pipeline running under the Baltic Sea from Russia to Germany. During Ambassador Sands tenure, Denmark increased its defense spending, while U.S. exports to the Kingdom of Denmark rose over 43%, resulting in the creation of additional jobs in America. Prior to her appointment as America's top diplomat to the European Union member state, Ambassador Sands had a diverse career in the entrepreneurial, investment, and philanthropic sectors, with a focus on real estate, community service and education. As Chairman of Vintage Capital Group, she also served on President Trump's Transition Finance Committee and Economic Advisory Council in 2016, and was the California Delegate for the 33rd Congressional District to the 2016 Republican National Convention. Further reading — Ambassador Carla Sands' biography: https://carlasands.com/about/ Deutsche Welle (DW) | Germany's international broadcaster: Europe must retain control of its energy security (https://www.dw.com/en/opinion-europe-must-retain-control-of-its-energy-security/a-47399924) Co-authors: US Ambassador to Denmark Carla Sands, US Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland and US Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell. A key to America's growth lies beneath Pennsylvania's soil | By Ambassador Carla Sands (https://www.inquirer.com/opinion/commentary/natural-gas-pennsylvania-fracking-us-energy-production-20210331.html) Link: https://www.inquirer.com/opinion/commentary/natural-gas-pennsylvania-fracking-us-energy-production-20210331.html https://ileaderssummit.org/services/americas-roundtable-radio/ https://ileaderssummit.org/ | https://jerusalemleaderssummit.com/ America's Roundtable on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/americas-roundtable/id1518878472 Twitter: @CarlaHSands @ileaderssummit @NatashaSrdoc @JoelAnandUSA @supertalk America's Roundtable is co-hosted by Natasha Srdoc and Joel Anand Samy, co-founders of International Leaders Summit and the Jerusalem Leaders Summit. America's Roundtable radio program - a strategic initiative of International Leaders Summit, focuses on America's economy, healthcare reform, rule of law, security and trade, and its strategic partnership with rule of law nations around the world. The radio program features high-ranking US administration officials, cabinet members, members of Congress, state government officials, distinguished diplomats, business and media leaders and influential thinkers from around the world. America's Roundtable is aired by Lanser Broadcasting Corporation on 96.5 FM and 98.9 FM, covering Michigan's major market, SuperTalk Mississippi Media's 12 radio stations and 50 affiliates reaching every county in Mississippi and also heard in parts of the neighboring states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Tennessee, and through podcast on Apple Podcasts and other key online platforms.

Defence Connect Podcast
CYBER SECURITY UNCUT: Building cyber resilience in the banking and finance sector

Defence Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 36:02


Hosts MAJGEN (Ret'd) Marcus Thompson and Phil Tarrant highlight the need for cyber security awareness across the banking and finance sector. The pair begin by issuing a warning over the spike in malicious cyber activity from Russian actors following the Commonwealth government's decision to impose sanctions on the country in response to its invasion of Ukraine. MAJGEN Thompson and Tarrant go on to discuss their contributions to strengthening cyber security awareness across the country, with the pair touring Australia to help inform the banking and finance community at The Adviser's Better Business Summit 2022. The hosts stress the importance of building cyber resilience in the sector, which they agree should be treated as critical infrastructure. Finally, the pair explain how public policy and government-backed institutions can better equip organisations with the tools to combat cyber threats. Enjoy the podcast, The Cyber Security Uncut team.

The Carla Podcast
Carla Audio Book, Issue #28

The Carla Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 120:17


Audio book of Carla issue #28, published May 2022. Individual articles can be accessed by navigating to the timestamps below. Read the full issue, access photos and more at contemporaryartreview.la/print. Read by Lindsay Preston Zappas. Purchase the issue or a 1-year subscription. Contents: Letter from the Editor (2:30) –Lindsay Preston Zappas The Performance Artist and the Politician (6:41) –Julie WeitzTurn and Return: The Artist's Practice During Trauma (20:35) –Beth PickensIn Formation: How Early SoCal Feminist Artists (34:40) Forged their Identities through Collaborative Practice –Ashton CooperInterview with Tidawhitney Lek (49:33) –Tina BaroutiTertiary: On Workers, Pictures, and Power (1:06:30) –Rodrigo ValenzuelaReviews Who is it that I am writing for? at Certain Fallacies –Vanessa HolyoakClarissa Tossin at Commonwealth and Council –Reuben MerringerDale Brockman Davis at Matter Studio –Georgia LassnerAlicia Piller at Track 16 –Renée Reizman(L.A. in Manchester) Suzanne Lacy at the Whitworth and Manchester Art Gallery –Rosa Tyhurst(L.A. in Long Island) Mis/Communication: Language and Power in Contemporary Art at Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery –Diana Seo Hyung Lee

Terry Meiners
Jason Nemes talks early voting, no income tax, and power to the states

Terry Meiners

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:38


Kentucky State Representative Jason Nemes talks about early voting options in the Commonwealth, eliminating the state income tax, power to the states, and the upcoming race for Governor...

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: A Tremendous Machine

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 160:55


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by opening up the phone lines, asking listeners about baby formula shortages across the U.S. Rick Steves shares the highlights of his recent return to Europe, where he spent over a month and a half updating his guidebooks to reflect how the continent has changed after two years of the pandemic. Steves is an author, television and radio host and the owner of the Rick Steves' Europe tour group. You can catch his television show, "Rick Steves' Europe," weeknights at 7:30 p.m. on GBH 2 and his radio show, “Travel With Rick Steves,” Sundays at 4 p.m. on GBH. Callie Crossley talks about a mother in Mattapan alleging that Boston Public Schools delayed calling 911 as her teen son had a stroke. She also shares her thoughts on DuoLingo opening a taqueria next to their Pittsburgh headquarters to help customers practice Spanish. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Juliette Kayyem discusses the January 6 committee's subpoenas to five GOP lawmakers, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Kayyem is former assistant secretary for homeland security under President Barack Obama, and the faculty chair of the homeland-security program at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Mass. Senate President Karen Spilka discusses Beacon Hill's measures to protect abortion rights in Mass., and shares her thoughts on the potential for legalizing sports betting in the Commonwealth. Spilka is president of the State Senate. Sue O'Connell explains why the U.S. is facing a nationwide baby formula shortage, and weighs in on Elon Musk's decision to pause his deal to buy Twitter. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News, and contributor to Current, on NBC L-X and NECN. We end the show by asking listeners how they romanticize their lives.

Terry Meiners
Russell Coleman is running for Kentucky Attorney General

Terry Meiners

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 10:48


Former U.S. Attorney Russell Coleman announced that he is running to be Kentucky's Attorney General. He stopped by the studio to discuss the changes that need to be made in the Commonwealth (innovation and collaboration), his relationship with current AG Daniel Cameron, how to deal with gang violence in our community, and increasing police staffing across the state...

Forgotten Australia
The First Dismissal – Part One: The Last Days of Jack Lang

Forgotten Australia

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 55:18


On this day 90 years ago, firebrand NSW Premier Jack Lang was sacked by Governor Sir Phillip Game. In this first of two instalments, we look at Lang's early life and business career, the scandalous aspect of his personal life and his embrace of the White Australia policy, his political rise and the massive opposition he faced from his own party, from big business, from the newspapers and from the fascist New Guard. Then, in early May 1932, during the worst of the Great Depression, Lang's collision with the Commonwealth government threatened chaos and civil violence. But it would be one forgotten man who actually brought about Lang's downfall. In part two, The First Dismissal: The Public Servant Who Toppled the Premier, we'll explore the role played in Lang's dismissal by Robert Beardsmore. Usually he's written in and out of the story in a sentence or two, and if there's any elaboration it's to characterise him as a faceless public servant who merely did his duty. But we're taking a deep dive into the background and potential motivations of a man who – between 1900 and 1932 – was like the Forrest Gump of Australian history.Part 2 will be available early next week for Patreon supporters and be on general release on 20 May. To support the show: patreon.com/forgottenaustralia See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jake Of All Trades
Recession Proof Your Finances

Jake Of All Trades

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 31:42


Although Jake and Kirk make no guarantees about the future, one would be wise to recognize a recession is a likely near-term scenario. So what does one do to prepare for a recession? What decisions might change? Jake and Kirk discuss this and more. *“Tax preparation, planning, IRS representation, and business valuation services offered through iFile Tax Planning and Preparation Services are separate and unrelated to Commonwealth.” Have questions about managing your financial lifestyle? Email Jake@youandifinancial.com and Jake Rivas may read your questions on the show! Follow Jake on Twitter and Facebook @jakestwocents Securities and advisory services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. Fixed insurance products and services offered through CES Insurance Agency.  Actual performance and results will vary. These interviews do not constitute a recommendation as to the suitability of any investment for any person or persons having circumstances similar to those portrayed. Consult a Financial Advisor regarding your specific circumstances. I*financial is located at 1901 NW Military Hwy. STE. 102. San Antonio, TX 78213. Phone number 210-342-4346

The Messy Truth - Conversations on Photography

In this episode, Gem Fletcher chats to artist and professor Elle Pérez. Elle generously lets us into their world from the early but formative days as a Bronx punk to the ways in which their art has shifted strategies and metaphors and now explores the subtle and visceral moments of emotion and power. We talk about the profound love and intimacy that is the lifeblood of their art and how threads and relationships between types of images and modes of working bring about new gestures.Elle Pérez has had solo exhibitions at MoMA PS1, 47 Canal and Commonwealth and Council. Their work has also been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, the Brooklyn Museum, the Barbican and in the 2019 Whitney Biennial. They are also the Assistant Professor of Art, Film and Visual Studies at Harvard University. Follow Elle on Instagram @elleperex - Follow Gem @gemfletcher on Instagram. If you've enjoyed this episode, PLEASE leave us your feedback and maybe five stars if we're worthy in the Apple Podcast store. Thank you for listening to The Messy Truth. We will be back very soon. For all requests, please email hello@gemfletcher.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Blabbin' In the Bluegrass
S5E19 - The Gospel According to Gary Chapman

Blabbin' In the Bluegrass

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 57:33


Episode Notes It was a true joy and honor to speak with the retired Reverend Gary Chapman, who is spotlighted in my "Preacher Feature" on this week's episode! Mr. Chapman has an impressive resume, which includes service at churches big and small across the Commonwealth...including my church, Henderson's First United Methodist. Take in the fascinating story of Gary's extensive background in preaching, his eye-opening travels as a minister, and his exciting plans for the near future! And yes, he'll offer words of wisdom for future pastors seeking to follow in his footsteps. Come along with me and Reverend Chapman for lots of learning and laughter!! Find out more at https://blabbin-in-the-bluegrassblabbi.pinecast.co

KentOnline
Podcast: Suspect pictured near 'murder scene' day after PCSO Julia James was killed

KentOnline

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 24:54


More details have emerged at the trial of a man accused of murdering Kent PCSO Julia James. Jurors have heard from the first witness - a local gamekeeper who took a picture of the suspect and called police the day after the 53-year-old was killed. Hear from our reporter Sean Axtell who's following the case at Canterbury Crown Court. Also in today's podcast, the largest probation service in Kent is failing to stop ex-offenders from returning to a life of crime, while staff are overworked and badly managed - according to a damning report. Inspectors have been looking at the work done by the service in West Kent which has offices in Maidstone, Tunbridge Wells, Gravesend and Chatham. We've got reaction from a former criminal who now helps people turn their lives around. A council leader in Kent has been branded insensitive after being photographed smiling, alongside a mayor, at the opening of a foodbank. Dartford's Jeremy Kite - who's a Conservative - can be seen cutting the ribbon of the new facility - we want to know what you think. The podcast has been told how some women are feeling forced to give up work as they struggle to cope with symptoms of the menopause. We've been chatting to a woman who runs a clinic in Whitstable and has spoken out after the issue was highlighted by Davina McCall. Children at a school in Kent have become the first in the country to try out new tech to help with their mental health. This week is all about raising awareness and we've been along to Laddingford St Mary's school in Maidstone to find out more. And, find out where in Kent the Queen's Baton will be visiting ahead of this summer's Commonwealth games in Birmingham.

O'Connor & Company
05.11.22: Virginia Attorney General Jason Miyares Interview

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 10:24


Virginia Attorney General Jason Miyares, joined WMAL's "O'Connor and Company" radio program on Wednesday about how abortion protesters are getting more aggressive and violent in the Commonwealth. Bullet shot into Virginia Attorney General Jason Miyares' office building window Governor Glenn Youngkin @GovernorVA: We have been coordinating with @FairfaxCountyPD, @VSPPIO, and federal authorities to ensure that there isn't violence. Virginia State Police were closely monitoring, fully coordinated with Fairfax County and near the protests. AG Miyares Slams Vandalism at Virginia Pro-Life Clinic Virginia AG Jason Miyares Promises Legal Action Against Church Protestors Who Violate Law For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor, @Jgunlock,and @patrickpinkfile. Show website: https://www.wmal.com/oconnor-company/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Eventful Entrepreneur with Dodge Woodall
#85. Chris Billam-Smith: British, Commonwealth and European Cruiserweight Champion

The Eventful Entrepreneur with Dodge Woodall

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:48


Bournemouth's own, Chris Billam-Smith, is a boxer the whole country should get behind.He's the Commonwealth, British, and European Cruiserweight Champion, and has been under the guidance of Shane and Barry McGuigan since turning professional.He's sparred with the likes of David Haye and George Groves, and during the pandemic he even fought at Matchroom's Fight Camp in my old mate Barry Hearn's back garden!In a sport full of in-your-face trash talkers, Chris remains a very calm, thoughtful and articulate athlete, who lets his performances do the talking. Website: DodgeWoodall.comInstagram: @Dodge.WoodallLinkedIn: Dodge WoodallYouTube: Dodge Woodall See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
#LondonCalling: The Queen's Speech by the Prince; & What is to be done? @JosephSternberg @WSJOpinion

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:16


Photo:  Caricature of Sir Augustus William James Clifford, 1st Baronet: Black Rod. Black Rod (officially known as the Lady Usher of the Black Rod or, if male, the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod) is an official in the parliaments of several Commonwealth countries. The position originates in the House of Lords of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The position is similar to one known as a serjeant-at-arms in other bodies. #LondonCalling:  The Queen's Speech by the Prince; & What is to be done?   @JosephSternberg @WSJOpinion https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/may/10/queens-speech-boris-johnson-bereft-of-ideas-to-tackle-cost-of-living-crisis

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!
Albemarle County Commonwealth's Attorney Jim Hingeley Joined Jerry Miller On The I Love CVille Show!

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 71:42


Albemarle County Commonwealth's Attorney Jim Hingeley joined me live on The I Love CVille Show! The I Love CVille Show airs live before a worldwide audience Monday – Friday from 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm on The I Love CVille Network.

Scruffy City Sports
Episode 59, The Commonwealth

Scruffy City Sports

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 35:36


I recap the week over on the Hill for the Diamond Vols. #Vols #CollegeBaseball #GoBigOrange #Knoxville #GoVols --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scruffycitysports/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scruffycitysports/support

Trash To Cash Podcast
EPISODE 30: COMMONWEALTH PICKER IS M.I.A? WHAT HAPPENED??

Trash To Cash Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 94:17


Mountain man treasure: https://www.youtube.com/c/mountainmantreasure American Bubble Boy http://www.americanbubbleboy.com/TTCPodcast Dave - Buy me a coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/ncpicker Kevin- Buy me a coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Commonwealth Cary- Buy me a coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/AmericanArb Make sure to subscribe to all of these amazing youtube channels American Arbitrage Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxs44smov62Ji15DKtpDhBg NC Flipper Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/NCFlipper NC Picker Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtBrQYaAg5uCEwXSliZT7lg Commonwealth Flipper https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJohtR7UmjJ0n3AVaa5TYaQ Commonwealth Picker https://www.youtube.com/c/CommonwealthPicker Commonwealth Auctions https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjZEZyIDxG1F4jd8mGUDfMw

Oborne & Heller on Cricket
Writer, broadcaster, cricketer Isabelle Westbury celebrates the upward trajectory of women's cricket

Oborne & Heller on Cricket

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 56:07


After a playing career in the Netherlands, Middlesex and Somerset Isabelle Westbury has become one of Britain's most acute writers and broadcasters on cricket, in combination with a professional legal career. She is the latest guest of Peter Oborne and Richard Heller in their cricket-themed podcast. In Peter's unavoidable absence, Roger Alton shares the bowling in this edition.Read the full description here: https://chiswickcalendar.co.uk/episode-89-writer-broadcaster-cricketer-isabelle-westbury-celebrates-the-upward-trajectory-of-womens-cricket/Get in contact by emailing obornehellercricket@outlook.com

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 627 (5-9-22): A Trio of Songbirds with Tree Nests Near Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-6-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 9 and May 16, 2022.   This episode from is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental. That's part of “New Spring Waltz,” by the late Madeline MacNeil, who was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Each new spring brings a chance to focus on the life cycles of wildlife.  This mid-spring episode of Water Radio explores some connections among nesting birds, trees, and water.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds to three mystery sounds, and see if you know these three bird species who nest in trees near water, either always or at least sometimes.  And here's a hint: you'll be singing a melodious trill, if you hit this mystery out of the park. SOUNDS  - 29 sec. If you guessed two warblers and an oriole, you're right!  And you get bodacious bird bragging rights if you recognized, first, the Prothonotary Warbler; second, the Northern Parula, also a kind of warbler; and third, the bird for which Baltimore's baseball team is named, the Baltimore Oriole.  All three of these songbirds are found in Virginia in the spring and summer breeding season.  During that period, the Prothonotary Warbler is common in Virginia's central and southern Coastal Plain and can occasionally be found in some other parts of the Commonwealth; the Baltimore Oriole is common outside of the Coastal Plain; and the Northern Parula is common statewide.  The three species show a range of attachment to water-side trees as their nesting habitat.  The Prothonotary Warbler is particularly known for nesting in cavities in trees around water; in fact, the bird is sometimes called the “Swamp Warbler” in the southeastern United States.  The Northern Parula typically nests in trees along rivers and wetlands, especially in areas where it can find the materials it prefers for making its hanging nests: Spanish Moss or a kind of stringy lichen; this bird is also known to make nests out of debris left in trees after floods.  The Baltimore Oriole is the least water-attached of these three species, being found nesting high in trees in many areas outside of deep woods, including parks and yards; however, streamsides are among the species preferred areas for the bird's fibrous, hanging nests. If you're near streams, rivers, or wetlands and you see or hear any of these three birds, look to nearby trees for cavities or hanging materials that may be harboring the birds' next generation. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “New Spring Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “New Spring Waltz” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. The sounds of the Baltimore Oriole, Northern Parula, and Prothonotary Warbler were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Baltimore Oriole at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, W. Va., August 2015.  Photo by Michelle Smith, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph washttps://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17342/rec/2, as of 5-9-22.Northern Parula at Kennebago Lake in Maine, July 2011.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12961/rec/1, as of 5-9-22.Protho