Podcasts about Plato

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Classical Greek Athenian philosopher, founder of Platonism

  • 2,851PODCASTS
  • 5,584EPISODES
  • 50mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 3, 2022LATEST
Plato

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Plato

Show all podcasts related to plato

Latest podcast episodes about Plato

Give Them An Argument
Season 4 Episode 3: James O'Keefe Smears Ben + Marx's Theory of History (ft. Adnan Husain)

Give Them An Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 148:15


Last weekend, James O'Keefe did an ambush interview of Ben Burgis where he tried to claim that the segment Ben, Matt Lech & Producer Jake did last week ("James O'Keefe Hates Free Speech": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKX6tcOZxuQ) was somehow inaccurate. (It wasn't.) He then tried to twist Ben saying that workers who do bad or racist things shouldn't be punished without due process & shouldn't be doxxed to make some stupid anti-union point years later  into Ben saying that racism is good. It's asinine, but we have some fun watching it + the part of the debate Ben did with James, Tim Pool & Tusli Gabbard that was available at the point this episode came out. (The whole thing has been posted since.) We also talk a little Roe v. Wade, showing some of Ben's conversation w/Lillian Cicerchia, Jason Myles shows up to talk a little about his experience of the debate & the rest of the weekend in NYC, and Adnan Husain comes on as the main guest for a philosopher/historian dialogue with Ben on Marxist analytic philosopher G.A. Cohen's book "Karl Marx's Theory of History."  Finally, there's a philosophy segment w/Dr. Jennifer Burgis on Plato's Meno and Noami Karavani hangs out in the postgame for patrons.Watch Ben's full conversation on fighting for abortion rights after Roe v. Wade with Lillian Cicerchia:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvARAN4Bv8kRead the transcript in Jacobin:https://jacobin.com/2022/06/roe-v-wade-reproductive-health-movement-abortionFollow Adnan on Twitter: @adnanahusainFollow Ben on Twitter: @BenBurgisFollow GTAA on Twitter: @Gtaa_ShowBecome a GTAA Patron and receive numerous benefits ranging from patron-exclusive postgames every Monday night to our undying love and gratitude for helping us keep this thing going:patreon.com/benburgisVisit benburgis.com

RhetoricLee Speaking
But Writer's Block!

RhetoricLee Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 18:45


In the inaugural episode of the Love, Academic Writing podcast, the Love Doctors, Allison and Lee, talk about this week's writing but: BUT WRITER'S BLOCK! Click here to get your buts therapized for free on the podcast!  “Talent is insignificant. I know a lot of talented ruins. Beyond talent lie all the usual words: discipline, love, luck, but most of all, endurance.” ~James Baldwin Plz plz plz rate and review the show so that other writers can find it! The struggle is real. Is writer's block real? What exactly is the “block”? Did you put it there or did someone else? Is the block depression, in which case maybe you need a break. Or is it just that you aren't sure of your argument, in which case you need to write. Are you in Jesus's cave or Plato's? If you asked Eve Sedgwick or Audre Lorde if they had writer's block while they were dying of cancer they probably would have said, “I have writer's block all the time, that's the whole reason I write.” When you're thinking (or bitching to someone else), that you have writer's block, think about what you actually mean:  I don't know what I'm trying to say This essay is a mess I'm never going to figure this out Nobody cares about this I don't have enough theory.  Connect with Allison @postphdtheblog or at allisonharbin.com Connect with Lee @rhetoriclee or leempierce.com Read the show transcript at: 

The Moral Imagination
Ep. 42: Whoever Owns the Test Owns the Curriculum: Classic Learning v. Industrial Model

The Moral Imagination

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 71:47


In this episode, I speak with Jeremy Tate, the founder of the Classic Learning Test about school testing, curriculum, and the classical versus industrial models of education. Jeremy argues that the current testing regime of the SAT and ACT have a tremendous influence on the curriculum taught in public and private schools. They promote a utilitarian vision of learning and drive students away from the classical Western tradition and serious reflection on what makes a good life. In response, Jeremy and his team developed the Classic Learning Test not only to be a better, more rigorous test, but to positively influence the curriculum toward more serious reading, and introduce students to the classic texts of the Western Tradition and those which shaped the founding of the United States, By ignoring these texts, the current testing and curricula regimes exclude students from engagement with the tradition. One of Tate's colleagues noted that she could go from Kindergarten through a Ph.D. without reading Homer, Plato, or Shakespeare. This unfamiliarity with the tradition makes people unaware of history and complexity, unable to make distinctions, and thus more susceptible to propaganda and manipulation. It excludes the poor from opportunity and indoctrinates the elites into utilitarian and progressive ideas that they think are simply facts. As C.S. Lewis described, “10 years hence” we can find ourselves on the side of the philosophical controversy that we didn't even know was up for debate. We discuss a number of themes including The revival of classical education Whether you should go to college or not? Education and virtue Human Formation C.S. Lewis's The Abolition of Man Eustace Scrubb and the Chronicles of Narnia Elite students focus on test scores rather than on learning Scientists with no sense of history or complexity The problems with critical thinking  The false dichotomy of Facts vs. Opinions How moral and value judgments are reduced to opinions and more.   Biography Jeremy Tate is the founder and CEO of the Classic Learning Test. Jeremy is also the host of the Anchored Podcast, CLT's top 2% global podcast that features discussions at the intersection of education and culture. Prior to founding CLT, Jeremy served as Director of College Counseling at Mount de Sales Academy in Catonsville, Maryland. He received his Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education from Louisiana State University and a Masters in Religious Studies from Reformed Theological Seminary. Jeremy and his wife Erin reside in Annapolis, Maryland with their six children. You can find Jeremy on Twitter @JeremyTate41. Resources Classic Learning Test For more on C.S. Lewis The Abolition of Man - See my interview with Michael Ward   For more on classical education see my interview with Heidi White and the importance of reading good books, my interview with Elizabeth Corey Jeremy Tate: Not Another Test, The Right Test

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 46. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 23 - Chapter 12B

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 42:47


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Polity and family exist for virtue, but virtue exists for friendship, for the activities of the virtues.   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Our Foundations Podcast
4.20 Secular Religion- Statism, The Church of Woke, and Scientism

Our Foundations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 62:23


Secular religion doesn't overtly follow a god or deity and thus seems to be a contradiction in terms. However, when we dive into Statism, the Church of Woke, and Scientism, we see that they do in fact have gods, and every other aspect of religion and worship for that matter, and are in fact religions. These secular religions are becoming dominant players in modern society and leading right into the heart of the Age of Science as well as Technocracy.   3.15 Secular Religion and Statism 3.16 The Church of Woke and The Dark Kingdom 3.17 Scientism and Plato‘s Republic 3.18 Scientism and Technocracy 3.19 Scientism and Technocracy, part 2 3.20 Technocracy, Transhumanism, and Current Trends   Our Foundations podcast:  - Website - http://www.ourfoundations.podbean.com/ - Email - ourfoundations@protonmail.com - SubscribeStar to support/ donate - https://www.subscribestar.com/ourfoundations - Patreon to support / donate - https://www.patreon.com/ourfoundations - Twitter - https://twitter.com/Foundationspc - Medium - https://medium.com/@OurFoundations - Bitcoin Address - 1AZFLCvmfXasChaaecgYMP3vtnUrnLJoY7 - Litecoin - LcXEqTS4ooNed1sxkbonuTrwM21ubWf2qi - Ethereum - 0x409D0F2766e208C1Ea97fF2429D38a3D9E3abd3a - Zcash - t1SZKfocBcghVMWVCsbSA9zAHr5fzsxi62H - Pivx - D7ziutb5gGNnJ5pXngwa3w9zJj2P1iNzUT - Bitcoin Cash - bitcoincash:qprk7ppzepzdnczvl6lffz8f5zcnjh0hyvwlgm983x - Nano - nano_16gh7igt8zb1cntbmq1hrnmnc9ea9qrj3zycscqywhak5dgtx1gwommekt7r  Resources: https://chattanoogavoluntarysociety.com/   - Music :  - Pied Piper by Shaolin Dub is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. - Jet Fueled Vixen Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License  - Hard Fragility by Bisou is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License  - Gjallar by Alexander Nakarada | https://www.serpentsoundstudios.com Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

THIRD EYE DROPS
Flavors of Consciousness, AI Souls, and Sentient Ideas with Michael Garfield | Mind Meld 309

THIRD EYE DROPS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 112:42


Artist, podcaster, and novelty-wielder, Michael Garfield, returns to the mind meld to muse about AI consciousness, the nature of the soul, sentient ideas, hyper objects, and more.  You can support him via his substack and patreon Protect Your Self Online with our sponsor, Nord VPN and get 69% off (seriously) at https://www.nordvpn.com/thirdeye Support Third Eye Drops: Crowd-sponsor us, join the community, and get rewards on Patreon Subscribe and check out our new video pods on Youtube Review and sub on Apple Podcasts Follow the show on Spotify Visit Thirdeyedrops.com  

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 45. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 22 - Chapter 12A

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 42:53


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Chapter 12 is on friendship. This is a question that arises in political philosophy and presents several fundamental enigmas that serve to conclude our reflections on the relation of revelation to political philosophy, why questions in political philosophy are open to answers of revelation.   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Midnight Train Podcast
The Antikythera Mechanism (Nerd Overload)

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 114:36


Sign up for bonus episodes at www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com    Well since last week's episode left Logan up at night with nightmares and I still can't get the stains out of my shorts; we have decided to make this week's episode a little more on the lighter side. So we are diving deep into the wonderful world of politics! You got it, today we are going to discuss The Biden Administrations wonderful and brilliant plans and maybe even get an interview with Brandon himself! HA like that would ever happen. Fuck those guys. We are actually talking about the Antikythera Mechanism, and the mysteries surrounding it.   The Antikythera mechanism is a hand-powered orrery( a mechanical model of our solar system) from Ancient Greece that has been dubbed the world's first analog computer since it was used to forecast celestial locations and eclipses decades in advance. The ancient Olympic Games' four-year cycle, which was akin to an Olympiad, could also be followed using this method.   In 1901, wreckage from a shipwreck off the shore of the Greek island of Antikythera included this artifact. Archaeologist Valerios Stais recognized it as bearing a gear on May 17, 1902. The gadget, which was found as a single lump and then fragmented into three primary components that are now divided into 82 individual shards following conservation efforts, was contained in the remnants of a wooden box that measured 34 cm 18 cm 9 cm (13.4 in 7.1 in 3.5 in). While several of these shards have inscriptions, four of them have gears. The biggest gear has 223 teeth and is around 13 centimeters (5.1 in) in diameter.   Using contemporary computer x-ray tomography and high resolution surface scanning, a team at Cardiff University led by Mike Edmunds and Tony Freeth was able to image inside fragments of the crust-encased mechanism in 2008 and decipher the faintest writing that had once been inscribed on the machine's outer casing. This shows that it contained 37 bronze meshing gears that allowed it to mimic the Moon's erratic orbit, where the Moon's velocity is higher in its perigee than in its apogee, follow the motions of the Moon and Sun across the zodiac, and anticipate eclipses. Astronomer Hipparchus of Rhodes researched this motion in the second century BC, and it is possible that he was consulted when building the device. It is believed that a piece of the system, which also determined the locations of the five classical planets, is missing.   The device has been variously dated to between 150 and 100 BC, or to 205 BC, and it is thought to have been devised and built by Greek scientists. In any event, it had to have been built prior to the shipwreck, which has been dated to around 70–60 BC by many lines of evidence. Researchers suggested in 2022 that the machine's initial calibration date, rather than the actual date of manufacture, would have been December 23, 178 BC. Some academics disagree, arguing that the calibration date should be 204 BC. Up to the astronomical clocks of Richard of Wallingford and Giovanni de' Dondi in the fourteenth century, comparable complicated machines had not been seen.   The National Archaeological Museum in Athens currently has all of the Antikythera mechanism's fragments as well as a variety of reproductions and artistic reconstructions that show how it would have appeared and operated.   During the first voyage with the Hellenic Royal Navy, in 1900–1901, Captain Dimitrios Kontos and a crew of sponge divers from Symi island found the Antikythera shipwreck. Off Point Glyphadia on the Greek island of Antikythera, at a depth of 45 meters (148 feet), a Roman cargo ship wreck was discovered. The crew found various huge items, including the mechanism, ceramics, special glassware, jewelry, bronze and marble statues, and more. In 1901, most likely that July, the mechanism was pulled from the rubble. The mechanism's origin remains unknown, however it has been speculated that it was transported from Rhodes to Rome along with other seized goods to assist a triumphant procession that Julius Caesar was staging.   The National Museum of Archaeology in Athens received all the salvaged debris pieces for storage and examination. The museum personnel spent two years assembling more visible artifacts, like the sculptures, but the mechanism, which looked like a mass of tarnished brass and wood, remained unseen. The mechanism underwent deformational modifications as a result of not treating it after removal from saltwater.   Archaeologist Valerios Stais discovered a gear wheel lodged in one of the rocks on May 17, 1902. Although most experts judged the object to be prochronistic and too complicated to have been created during the same era as the other components that had been unearthed, he originally thought it was an astronomical clock. Before British science historian and Yale University professor Derek J. de Solla Price developed an interest in the object in 1951, investigations into the object were abandoned. The 82 pieces were photographed using X-ray and gamma-ray technology in 1971 by Price and Greek nuclear researcher Charalampos Karakalos. In 1974, Price issued a 70-page report summarizing their findings.   In 2012 and 2015, two more searches at the Antikythera wreck site turned up artifacts and another ship that may or may not be related to the treasure ship on which the mechanism was discovered. A bronze disc decorated with a bull's head was also discovered. Some speculated that the disc, which has four "ears" with holes in them, may have served as a "cog wheel" in the Antikythera mechanism. There doesn't seem to be any proof that it was a component of the mechanism; it's more probable that the disc was a bronze ornament on some furniture.   The earliest analog computer is typically referred to as the Antikythera mechanism. The production of the device must have had undiscovered ancestors throughout the Hellenistic era based on its quality and intricacy. It is believed to have been erected either in the late second century BC or the early first century BC, and its construction was based on mathematical and astronomical ideas created by Greek scientists during the second century BC.   Since they recognized the calendar on the Metonic Spiral as originating from Corinth or one of its colonies in northwest Greece or Sicily, further investigation by the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project in 2008 showed that the idea for the mechanism may have originated in the colonies of Corinth. The Antikythera Mechanism Research Initiative contended in 2008 that Syracuse could suggest a relationship with the school of Archimedes because it was a Corinthian colony and the home of Archimedes. In 2017, it was shown that the Metonic Spiral's calendar is of the Corinthian type and cannot be a Syracuse calendar. Another idea postulates that the device's origin may have come from the ancient Greek city of Pergamon, site of the Library of Pergamum, and claims that coins discovered by Jacques Cousteau at the wreck site in the 1970s correspond to the time of the device's creation. It was second in significance to the Library of Alexandria during the Hellenistic era due to its extensive collection of art and scientific scrolls.   A theory that the gadget was built in an academy established by Stoic philosopher Posidonius on that Greek island is supported by the discovery of Rhodian-style vases aboard the ship that carried the object. Hipparchus, an astronomer active from around 140 BC to 120 BC, lived at Rhodes, which was a bustling commercial port and a center for astronomy and mechanical engineering. Hipparchus' hypothesis of the motion of the Moon is used by the mechanism, raising the likelihood that he may have developed it or at the very least worked on it. The island of Rhodes is situated between the latitudes of 35.85 and 36.50 degrees north; it has lately been proposed that the astronomical events on the Parapegma of the Antikythera mechanism operate best for latitudes in the range of 33.3-37.0 degrees north.   According to a research published in 2014 by Carman and Evans, the Saros Dial's start-up date corresponds to the astronomical lunar month that started soon after the new moon on April 28, 205 BC. This suggests a revised dating of about 200 BC. Carman and Evans claim that the Babylonian arithmetic style of prediction suits the device's predictive models considerably better than the conventional Greek trigonometric approach does. According to a 2017 study by Paul Iversen, the device's prototype originated in Rhodes, but this particular model was modified for a customer from Epirus in northwest Greece. Iversen contends that the device was likely built no earlier than a generation before the shipwreck, a date that is also supported by Jones.   In an effort to learn more about the mechanism, further dives were made in 2014 and 2015. A five-year investigative program that started in 2014 and finished in October 2019 was followed by a second five-year session that began in May 2020.   The original mechanism probably came in one encrusted piece from the Mediterranean. It broke into three main parts shortly after that. In the meanwhile, more little fragments have come loose from handling and cleaning, and the Cousteau expedition discovered other fragments on the ocean floor. Fragment F was found in this fashion in 2005, suggesting that other fragments may still remain in storage, undetected since their first retrieval. The majority of the mechanism and inscriptions are found on seven of the 82 known fragments, which are also mechanically noteworthy. Additionally, 16 smaller components include inscriptions that are illegible and fragmentary.    The twelve zodiacal signs are divided into equal 30-degree sectors on a fixed ring dial that represents the ecliptic on the mechanism's front face. Even though the borders of the constellations were arbitrary, this was consistent with the Babylonian practice of allocating an equal portion of the ecliptic to each zodiac sign. The Sothic Egyptian calendar, which has twelve months of 30 days plus five intercalary days, is marked off with a rotating ring that is located outside that dial. The Greek alphabetized versions of the Egyptian names for the months are used to identify them. To align the Egyptian calendar ring with the current zodiac points, the first procedure is to spin it. Due to the Egyptian calendar's disregard for leap days, a whole zodiac sign would cycle through every 120 years.   Now we cannot show you pictures because well you couldn't see them. So we will try to describe them as best we can and we can also post them online.    The mechanism was turned by a now-lost little hand crank that was connected to the biggest gear, the four-spoked gear shown on the front of fragment A, gear b1, via a crown gear. As a result, the date indicator on the front dial was shifted to the appropriate day of the Egyptian calendar. Since the year cannot be changed, it is necessary to know the year that is currently in use. Alternatively, since most calendar cycles are not synchronized with the year, the cycles indicated by the various calendar cycle indicators on the back can be found in the Babylonian ephemeris tables for the day of the year that is currently in use. If the mechanism were in good operating order, the crank would easily be able to strike a certain day on the dial because it moves the date marker around 78 days each full rotation. The mechanism's interlocking gears would all revolve as the hand crank was turned, allowing for the simultaneous determination of the Sun's and Moon's positions, the moon's phase, the timing of an eclipse, the calendar cycle, and maybe the positions of planets.   The position of the spiral dial pointers on the two huge dials on the rear had to be observed by the operator as well. As the dials included four and five complete rotations of the pointers, the pointer had a "follower" that followed the spiral incisions in the metal. Before continuing, a pointer's follower had to be manually shifted to the opposite end of the spiral after reaching the terminal month place at either end of the spiral.   Two circular concentric scales may be seen on the front dial. The Greek zodiac signs are denoted on the inner scale, which is divided into degrees. A series of similar holes underneath the movable ring that rests flush with the surface and runs in a channel that makes up the outer scale are marked off with what appear to be days.   This outer ring has been thought to symbolize the 365-day Egyptian calendar ever since the mechanism was discovered, but new study contradicts this assumption and suggests it is really divided into 354 intervals. The Sothic and Callippic cycles had previously pointed to a 365 14-day solar year, as evidenced in Ptolemy III's proposed calendar reform of 238 BC. If one accepts the 365-day presupposition, it is acknowledged that the mechanism predates the Julian calendar reform. The dials aren't thought to represent his intended leap day, but by rotating the scale back one day every four years, the outer calendar dial may be adjusted against the inner dial to account for the effect of the extra quarter-day in the solar year.   The ring is most likely seen as a manifestation of a 354-day lunar calendar if one accepts the 354-day evidence. It is perhaps the first instance of the Egyptian civil-based lunar calendar postulated by Richard Anthony Parker in 1950, given the age of the mechanism's putative manufacture and the existence of Egyptian month names. The lunar calendar was intended to act as a daily indicator of succeeding lunations and to aid in the understanding of the Metonic(The moon phases return at the same time of year every almost precisely 19 years during the Metonic cycle. Although the recurrence is imperfect, careful examination shows that the Metonic cycle, which is defined as 235 synodic months, is only 2 hours, 4 minutes, and 58 seconds longer than 19 tropical years. In the fifth century BC, Meton of Athens determined that the cycle was exactly 6,940 days long. The creation of a lunisolar calendar is made easier by using these full integers.) and Saros(The saros, which may be used to forecast solar and lunar eclipses, is a period of exactly 223 synodic months, or around 6585.3211 days, or 18 years, 10, 11, or 12 days (depending on how many leap years there are). In what is known as an eclipse cycle, the Sun, Earth, and Moon return to about the same relative geometry, a nearly straight line, one saros time after an eclipse, and a nearly similar eclipse will take place. A sar is a saros's lower half.) dials as well as the Lunar phase pointer. Unknown gearing is assumed to move a pointer across this scale in synchrony with the rest of the mechanism's Metonic gearing. A one-in-76-year Callippic cycle correction and practical lunisolar intercalation were made possible by the movement and registration of the ring with respect to the underlying holes.   The dial also shows the Sun's location on the ecliptic in relation to the current year's date. The ecliptic serves as a useful reference for determining the locations of the Moon, the five planets known to the Greeks, and other celestial bodies whose orbits are similarly near to it.   The locations of bodies on the ecliptic were marked by at least two points. The position of the Moon was displayed by a lunar pointer, while the location of the mean Sun and the current date were also provided. The Moon position was the oldest known application of epicyclic gearing(Two gears positioned so that one gear's center spins around the other's center make up an epicyclic gear train, sometimes referred to as a planetary gearset.), and it mimicked the acceleration and deceleration of the Moon's elliptical orbit rather than being a simple mean Moon indicator that would signal movement uniformly across a circular orbit.   The system followed the Metonic calendar, anticipated solar eclipses, and computed the time of various panhellenic athletic competitions, including the Ancient Olympic Games, according to recent research published in the journal Nature in July 2008. The names of the months on the instrument closely resemble those found on calendars from Epirus in northwest Greece and with Corfu, which was formerly known as Corcyra.   Five dials are located on the rear of the mechanism: the Metonic, Saros, and two smaller ones, the so-called Olympiad Dial (recently renamed the Games dial since it did not track Olympiad years; the four-year cycle it closely matches is the Halieiad), the Callippic(a certain approximate common multiple of the synodic month and the tropical year that was put out by Callippus around 330 BC. It is a 76-year span that is an improvement over the Metonic cycle's 19 years.), and the Exeligmos(a time frame of 54 years, 33 days over which further eclipses with the same characteristics and position may be predicted.)   Both the front and rear doors of the wooden casing that houses the mechanism have inscriptions on them. The "instruction manual" looks to be behind the rear door. "76 years, 19 years" is inscribed on one of its parts, denoting the Callippic and Metonic cycles. "223" for the Saros cycle is also written. Another piece of it has the phrase "on the spiral subdivisions 235," which alludes to the Metonic dial.   The mechanism is exceptional due to the degree of miniaturization and the intricacy of its components, which is equivalent to that of astronomical clocks from the fourteenth century. Although mechanism specialist Michael Wright has argued that the Greeks of this era were capable of designing a system with many more gears, it includes at least 30 gears. Whether the device contained signs for each of the five planets known to the ancient Greeks is a subject of significant controversy. With the exception of one 63-toothed gear that is otherwise unaccounted for, no gearing for such a planetary display is still in existence.   It is quite likely that the mechanism featured additional gearing that was either removed before being placed onboard the ship or lost in or after the shipwreck due to the enormous gap between the mean Sun gear and the front of the box as well as the size and mechanical characteristics on the mean Sun gear. Numerous attempts to mimic what the Greeks of the time would have done have been made as a result of the absence of evidence and the nature of the front section of the mechanism, and of course various solutions have been proposed as a result of the lack of evidence.   Michael Wright was the first to create a model that included a simulation of a future planetarium system in addition to the existing mechanism. He said that corrections for the deeper, more fundamental solar anomaly would have been undertaken in addition to the lunar anomaly (known as the "first anomaly"). Along with the well-known "mean sun" (present time) and lunar pointers, he also provided pointers for this "real sun," Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.   A solution that differs significantly from Wright's was published by Evans, Carman, and Thorndike. Their suggestion focused on the uneven spacing of the letters on the front clock face, which seemed to them to imply an off-center sun indication arrangement. By eliminating the requirement to imitate the solar anomaly, this would simplify the mechanism. Additionally, they proposed that simple dials for each individual planet would display data such as significant planetary cycle events, initial and final appearances in the night sky, and apparent direction changes rather than accurate planetary indication, which is rendered impossible by the offset inscriptions. Compared to Wright's concept, this system would result in a far more straightforward gear system with significantly lower forces and complexity.   After much investigation and labor, Freeth and Jones released their idea in 2012. They developed a concise and workable answer to the planetary indicator puzzle. They also suggest that the date pointer, which displays the mean position of the Sun and the date on the month dial, be separated to display the solar anomaly (i.e., the sun's apparent location in the zodiac dial). If the two dials are properly synced, Wright's front panel display may be shown on the other dials as well. However, unlike Wright's model, this one is simply a 3-D computer simulation and has not been physically constructed.   Similar devices A first-century BC philosophical debate by Cicero, De re publica (54-51 BC), discusses two devices that some contemporary authors believe to be some sort of planetarium or orrery, forecasting the motions of the Sun, Moon, and the five planets known at the time. After Archimedes' demise at the siege of Syracuse in 212 BC, the Roman commander Marcus Claudius Marcellus took both of them to Rome. One of these devices was the sole thing Marcellus preserved during the siege because of his admiration for Archimedes (the second was placed in the Temple of Virtue). The instrument was kept as a family heirloom, and according to Philus, who was present during a conversation Cicero imagined had taken place in Scipio Aemilianus's villa in the year 129 BC, Gaius Sulpicius Gallus, who served as consul with Marcellus's nephew in 166 BC and is credited by Pliny the Elder with being the first Roman to have written a book explaining solar and lunar eclipses, gave both a "learned explanation" and working demonstrations of the device.   According to Pappus of Alexandria (290–c. 350 AD), Archimedes had penned a now-lost treatise titled On Sphere-Making that described how to build these contraptions. Many of his innovations are described in the ancient documents that have survived, some of which even have crude illustrations. His odometer is one such instrument; the Romans later used a similar device to set their mile marks (described by Vitruvius, Heron of Alexandria and in the time of Emperor Commodus). Although the pictures in the literature looked to be practical, attempts to build them as shown had been unsuccessful. The system worked properly when the square-toothed gears in the illustration were swapped out for the angled gears found in the Antikythera mechanism.   This technique existed as early as the third century BC, if Cicero's story is accurate. Later Roman authors including Lactantius (Divinarum Institutionum Libri VII), Claudian (In sphaeram Archimedes), and Proclus (Commentary on the First Book of Euclid's Elements of Geometry) in the fourth and fifth century also make reference to Archimedes' invention.   Cicero also said that another such device was built "recently" by his friend Posidonius, "... each one of the revolutions of which brings about the same movement in the Sun and Moon and five wandering stars [planets] as is brought about each day and night in the heavens"   Given that the third device was almost certainly in Posidonius's possession by that time and that both the Archimedes-made and Cicero-mentioned machines were found in Rome at least 30 years after the shipwreck's estimated date, it is unlikely that any one of these machines was the Antikythera mechanism discovered in the wreck. The researchers who rebuilt the Antikythera mechanism concur that it was too complex to have been a singular invention.   This proof that the Antikythera mechanism was not unique strengthens the argument that there was a tradition of complex mechanical technology in ancient Greece that was later, at least in part, transmitted to the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. During the Middle Ages, complex mechanical devices that were still simpler than the Antikythera mechanism were built in these cultures.A fifth- or sixth-century Byzantine Empire geared calendar fragment that was mounted to a sundial and maybe used to help tell time has been discovered. The Caliph of Baghdad commissioned Bani Ms's Kitab al-Hiyal, also known as the Book of Ingenious Devices, in the early ninth century AD. Over a hundred mechanical devices were detailed in this document, some of which may have been found in monastic manuscripts from antiquity. Around 1000, the scholar al-Biruni described a geared calendar that was comparable to the Byzantine mechanism, and a 13th-century astrolabe also had a clockwork system that is similar to it. It's probable that this medieval technology was brought to Europe and had a part in the region's development of mechanical clocks.   Su Song, a Chinese polymath, built a mechanical clock tower in the 11th century that, among other things, measured the positions of several stars and planets that were shown on an armillary sphere that spun mechanically.   Conspiracy Corner The Antikythera Mechanism was thought to have been created between 150 and 100 BCE at first, but recent research dates its development to approximately 205 BCE. It's interesting that this technology seems to have just vanished because comparable items didn't start turning up until the 14th century. But why did the ancient Greeks permit such a significant development to be forgotten over time? Posidonius carried on the work of the Greek astronomer Hipparchus by instructing students at an astronomy academy. Posidonius invented a contraption that "in each rotation reproduces the identical motions of the Sun, the Moon and the five planets that take place in the skies every day and night," according to Cicero, one of Posidonius' students. Which remarkably resembles the Antikythera Mechanism. However, when the Mechanism was created in the second century BCE, Posidonius was not yet alive. Hipparchus was, though. Posidonius could have built an instrument based on Hipparchus' Antikythera Mechanism, which he made many years before. What about Posidonius' instrument, though? A time traveler from the future may have developed the Mechanism, or it may genuinely be a futuristic gadget that was taken back to ancient Greece and put there on purpose if it dates to the second century BCE and equivalent technology didn't start emerging until decades later. Some people think the entire thing is a hoax despite overwhelming scientific proof to the contrary. After all, it is challenging to reconcile the Antikythera mechanism's antiquity with its growth in technology. The Turk, a fictional chess-playing robot constructed in the 18th century, has been likened to the mechanism by some. But scientists easily acknowledge that The Turk is a fraud. Why would they fabricate evidence of the mechanism's reliability? What would they be attempting to conceal? Even though it is quite old, the Antikythera mechanism represented an enormous advance in technology. So how did the Greeks of antiquity come up with the concept, much alone construct it? They didn't, according to The Ancient Aliens: “Beings with advanced knowledge of astronomical bodies, mathematics and precision engineering tools created the device or gave the knowledge for its creation to someone during the first century BC. But the knowledge was not recorded or wasn't passed down to anyone else.” Therefore, aliens either provided humanity the ability to make this gadget or the knowledge to do so, but they didn't do anything to assure that we built on it or learnt from it. It seems like the aliens weren't planning ahead very well. This theory, like the extraterrestrial one, is based simply on the observation that the Antikythera mechanism seems to be too technologically sophisticated for its period. The mythical Atlantis was a highly developed metropolis that vanished into the ocean. Many people think the city genuinely exists, despite the fact that Plato only described it in a sequence of allegories. And some of those individuals believe the Antikythera mechanism proves Atlantis existed since it was too sophisticated for any known culture at the time; they believe Atlantis, not Greece, is where the mechanism originated. According to the notion of intelligent design, a higher power purposefully created many things on Earth because they are too sophisticated to have arisen by simple evolution. Because the Antikythera mechanism is so much more sophisticated than any other artifact from that age, some people think it is proof of intelligent design. If this is the case, you have to question what divine, omnipotent creature would spend time creating such a minute object for such a trivial goal. Greece's coast is home to the island of Rhodes. Greek artifacts were placed into the ship transporting the Mechanism, which was sailing for Rome. One explanation for this might be that the Antikythera mechanism was taken together with the spoils from the island of Rhodes. How come Rhodes was pillaged? following a victorious war against the Greeks, as part of Julius Caesar's triumphal procession. Could the loss of one of history's most significant and cutting-edge technical advancements be accidentally attributed to Julius Caesar? The Antikythera mechanism may have predicted the color of eclipses, which is thought to be impossible by scientists, according to new translations of texts on the device. Therefore, were the forecasts the mechanism provided only educated guesses, or did the ancient Greeks have knowledge that we do not? According to legend, an extraterrestrial species called the Annunaki (possible episode?) invaded and inhabited Earth (they were revered as gods in ancient Mesopotamia), leaving behind evidence of their presence. The Antikythera mechanism could be one of these hints. The Mechanism uses what appears to be distinct technology that was, as far as we are aware, extremely different from anything else that was built about 200 BCE. It estimates when lunar eclipses would occur, which advanced space invaders would undoubtedly know something about. An intriguing view on the process is held by Mike Edmunds from Cardiff University. The uniqueness and technological innovation of the item are frequently highlighted in reports about it. However, Edmunds speculates that the mechanism may have been in transit to a client when the ship carrying it went down. If one device was being delivered, might there possibly be others — if not on this ship, then potentially on others from Rhodes? — he asks in his essay. There may have been more of these amazing machines that have been lost to the passage of time or are still out there waiting to be found. MOVIES - films from the future - https://filmsfromthefuture.com/movies/

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 44. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 21 - Chapter 11

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 73:39


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Chapter 11 is on the relation between freedom, truth, and law. It is important so see how they are related to each other in a limited polity that is open to the truth and transcendence.   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

The Nietzsche Podcast
44: Cartesian Dualism

The Nietzsche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 63:16


In this episode, I'm reading a chapter of my book, Unconscious Correspondences. I considered an episode on Cartesian Dualism, but realized I'd already said everything I needed to say, in a chapter in this book. Rather than repurposing the same content into a new form, why not just read directly from the book? As Nietzsche tended to do when introducing his own earlier works, I shall do the same. I will introduce this essay: "Body and Mind: The Life and Meditations of Rene Descartes - A Polemic" with, "An attempt at self-criticism". This essay has its flaws, and belabors the point a bit too stringently at places. In retrospect, I made some very overgeneralized claims about academia and modern attitudes towards Descartes that one could easily challenge. I should also say that these claims derived from personal experience with my own professors, and the professors of many of my friends. Descartes was always taught as being "basically a secret atheist who didn't believe the religious stuff at all and included it just to please the church." Not only did one of my own professors say some version of this, I heard this from others, attending different universities. This always struck me as odd, because the central premises of his Meditations on First Philosophy are completely derived from Christian presuppositions, which are simply taken from theology and put into philosophical language. Thus, I challenged: whether Descartes was truly a departure from past philosophy (Plato, of course, sets up figures to raise assertions and Socrates to raise skeptical objections/doubts); whether Descartes was actually an atheist or a deist (or whether we could understand him within the assumption he was a Christian, perhaps a Rosicrucian); whether our own interpretations of Descartes have to do with our embrace of the "mind as self" ego-consciousness (thus leading us to be confused and embarrassed by Descartes' invocation of God as the ultimate certainty). While I wrote in a way that was somewhat clumsy in my eyes now, and while I may have spent too much time in a detour talking about the background historical context in which Descartes emerged, I feel these challenges are raised in a forceful and meaningful enough way to be useful for people to think about. https://app.thebookpatch.com/BookStore/unconscious-correspondences/3fe82dc3-d4ac-4d61-81c3-9ce9a7abe483

Innovation Leaders by TogetherbyTech_

Voici un podcast pour découvrir le cœur du réacteur de Zendesk. A travers une discussion passionnante avec Pierre-Alain Bouchard, Director of engineering, vous découvrirez les coulisses et les secrets de cette impressionnante scale-up. Zendesk, société danoise fondée en 2007 et cotée au Nasdaq depuis 2014, est une pépite tech qui compte plus de 160 000 clients et 5500 collaborateurs. C'est une plateforme SaaS de service client que vous avez forcément utilisée sans même vous en rendre compte et qui vient tout juste d'annoncer son rachat par un fonds d'investissement pour la modique somme de 10 milliards+ de dollars. Dans cet épisode, vous découvrirez :

Plato's Cave
Ep. 43 - Garrett Pendergraft: "Free Will and Human Agency" (50 Thought Experiments)

Plato's Cave

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 72:55


In this episode, I speak with Garrett Pendergraft about his forthcoming book: FREE WILL AND HUMAN AGENCY: 50 PUZZLES, PARADOXES, AND THOUGHT EXPERIMENTS, which will be out in July 2022! We discuss three chapters on the Garden of Forking Paths, Uncertainty and Deliberation, and Divine Foreknowledge. Here's any links you'll need to dive deeper: https://seaver.pepperdine.edu/academics/faculty/garrett-pendergraft/#:~:text=Most%20of%20his%20research%20focuses,foreknowledge%2C%20and%20situationism%20in%20psychology. https://www.routledge.com/Free-Will-and-Human-Agency-50-Puzzles-Paradoxes-and-Thought-Experiments/Pendergraft/p/book/9780367641948 Twitter: @JordanCMyers You can also get in contact by emailing me at platoscavepodcast@gmail.com Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCD1RiH1j-M6C59z1upPXkWw?disable_polymer=true Plato's Cave Website: https://platoscave.fireside.fm/ Special Guest: Garrett Pendergraft .

Chasing Consciousness
Pim Van Lommel MD - A NEAR DEATH EXPERIENCE STUDY

Chasing Consciousness

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 66:10


Can we have conscious experiences after clinical death? In this episode we have the bizarre phenomena of Near Death Experiences to examine. The intense experience reported by about %25 of patients whose hearts are restarted after a short time of clinical death, has fascinated researchers for many years going right back to Plato. However, advances in cardiology techniques in the last 50 years have permitted doctors to save many more people, and thus to study the phenomenon in a controlled manner: so, exactly how many people have the experiences, exactly how dead they were at the time and so to start assessing the controversial part of this discussion, whether these experiences can be explained in simply neurobiological terms or if there is evidence that consciousness can ‘survive' clinical death, if that is in fact the best way to talk about it. So who better to help us understand this than cardiologist, scientist and author Dr. Pim Van Lommel from The Netherlands. During his 35 year career as a Cardiologist, Dr. Van Lommel saw the need for a detailed study on this to nail down the physiological variables like medication, length of time without oxygen and to connect those to the psychological data, about the content of the experiences and how long they remained influential in the patients lives. The prospective study he spearheaded was published in the respected Lancet medical journal in 2001, and his book about the research ‘Consciousness beyond life, the science of the near death experience' was published in 2007. He also recently won second prize in the Bigelow Foundation for consciousness studies essay prize, which discusses the study and its implications. Full references, shownotes and links here Please donate a cup of coffee if you're enjoying the show What we discuss in this episode: 03:19 Common experiences during an NDE 05:30 NDEs are possible even when the brain is fully functional e.g. Fear of death emergency 06:44 Carl Jung's NDE was the first description of viewing planet earth from above 07:45 Transformation of world view via NDE + STEs (Spiritually transformative experiences) 08:14 Scientific curiosity about NDEs in clinically dead brains 11:00 1988-1998 Pim's medical and psychological study of NDEs 17:15 Examining neurobiological explanations 27:45 Implications: consciousness must be non-local and the brain an interface 38:30 NDEers report heightened intuitive skill, empathy, precognition and telepathy 46:00 Organisations researching post-materialist science 51:50 Is the information perceived in an NDE different to normal perceptive information? 54:00 Non-local information exchange 59:30 Heightened sense of interconnection with nature and other beings - oneness 01:01:00 Life review: Experiencing from a different consciousness' point of view References: Pim's book ‘Consciousness beyond life: the science of near death experiences'. Pim's medical and psychological study Pim's Bigelow essay prize text 2022 Bigalow Insitute for Consciousness Studies IONS The Journal of Consciousness Studies

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 43. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 20 - Chapter 10B

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 38:28


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. "A polity open to truth is open both to revelation and science without in any way denying that a polity has its own existence and actions- themselves seeking to put truth into its laws and ultimately  into the things of common importance that take place among human beings."   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 42. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 19 - Chapter 10A

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 34:48


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Chapter 10 begins the last series of chapters which, in contrast to earlier chapters, arise out of man's nature and not from some Fall or fault. Science, technology, and law are all good things. They can be abused, but as such are proper manifestations of what it is to be a human being. Chapter 10 is devoted to the relation of science and political philosophy.   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

The Wisdom Of
The Top Philosophy Quotes of All Time!

The Wisdom Of

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 24:46


In this episode we discuss Protagoras' famous statement, "Man is the measure of all things" and Marx's, "Religion is the opium of the masses"! 

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 41. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 18 - Chapter 9B

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 43:13


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. To possess the virtues and to act according to them was to fulfill human potentiality--to be happy according to the proportion and the possibilities given to a human being.   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 40. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 17 - Chapter 9

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 52:02


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Chapter 9 is a consideration of Aristotle's understanding of virtue and vice, basically it is  a guide through Aristotle's Ethics, where in hapiness, the four moral virtues, the minor virtues, pleasure, and the notions of choice and reasons are considered in the context of human action.   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

95bFM
Plato's Retreat 25 June 2022

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022


On this edition of Plato's Rob gains a secret admirer, Kris bungles his intro, and Aneeka is stricken with (and then cured of) the dreaded hiccups. Music is also played, with one listener describing it as a "fun show".

The Hartmann Report
HAVE YOU NOTICED THAT AMERICA HAS GOTTEN MEANER?

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 56:36


The media continues to largely ignore those frequent moments when fascist-infiltrated police — the only group within our society who are legally authorized to use violence without consequence — overlook or overtly encourage the violence that breaks out when Americans dare stand up to fascist militias. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Classical Et Cetera
Classical Math, Plato, and Mathematics Education CETC: 121 | Tom Sculthorpe, Dan Sheffler, Paul Schaeffer

Classical Et Cetera

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 44:07


In today's episode of Classical Et Cetera, we're talking math. Specifically the history, origins, reform and philosophy of classical mathematics. Why is mathematics so important to our understanding of the world? And is math a fundamental part of classical education. Aristotle and Plato seem to think so, and so do we. In our show today, Shane sits down with Dan, Paul, and Memoria Press newcomer, Tom Sculthorpe to talk the origins of math from Plato to Descartes, how math learning has changed in the classical world, and what conversations about math are important to classicists today. You might be asking, "Should I learn math?" And we say absolutely. Join us today for our show! 

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 39. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 16 - Chapter 8

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 70:30


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Chapter 8 is a consideration of the relation between the philosophic notion of happiness and the revelational notion of salvation. Happiness can be understood in a practical or political sense and in a theoretic sense. But both senses leave us perplexed even in their fullness. Salvation is directed to each individual in his particular circumstances of life.   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Corriendo a NY
Entrevista pendiente en plato frio

Corriendo a NY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 4:09


En el sextigentésimo segundo episodio, os sirvo una pequeña venganza por aquel podcast que grabé con la voz tomada.Para cualquier sugerencia, comentario, etc… podéis poneros en contacto por los medios habituales: Email: davidisasi@mac.comTwitter: @macsatineEmail: godespow@gmail.comTwitter: @GodespowEmail: carlos@sahuquillo.esTwitter: @csahuquiEmail: davidrodriguezgallego@gmail.comTwitter: @_bilitoEmail: laura.reto21k@gmail.comTwitter: @reto21kWeb: https://emilcar.fm/corriendoanyTwitter: @corriendoanyInstagram: corriendoanyTelegram: https://t.me/corriendoany

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 38. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 15 - Chapter 7B

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 45:27


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. "Political authority is not merely an abstract principal or form.  Political authority and hence political life are not merely philosophically justified, but religiously grounded.  Neither of these foundations contradicts the other but in fact they are directly related as complete to incomplete." For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

The New Thinkery
Interview: Dr. Paul Diduch on Technological Moderation

The New Thinkery

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 79:09


This week, the guys are joined by one of Alex's colleagues: Dr. Paul Diduch. The group discuss whether unfettered technological progress is in fact "progress" and what we, especially in the modern age, ought to think about before we call technology an absolute good for humans and our souls.  They focus on some texts from Plato, Aristotle, and Bacon.

Truth in History
Are You Dead or Alive After Death?

Truth in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 57:34


Christian doctrine teaches that when a person dies, their soul either goes to heaven or hell. It has its roots in ancient Greek philosophers such as Plato mixed with Hellenistic culture and then blended with ancient Judaism. Is it pagan or is it Christian? We want to explore that subject today. For hundreds of years, the Church taught that the soul of man would have to be alive in order to go to a place called Purgatory. The Bible tells us that when God created Adam, he did not give him a soul. When God breathes into Adam, he became a living soul. He became a person. Adam's body, made out of the dust of the ground was there, but it was dead. So, what is your spirit? The spirit or the breath of life is that which God breathed into a person at conception. We have been taught for so long that as soon as a person dies, their soul goes immediately. If they're an unbeliever goes immediately to hell, or if they're a Christian, their souls go immediately to heaven. The pagan concept that has come into Christian doctrine is that your soul also is a spirit. And it has given rise to a lot of these modern-day prophets and prophets that go to heaven, sometimes weekly. An angel leading them around from mansion to mansion and taking them up on a big hill. Truth in History with Charles A. Jennings Website: http://truthinhistory.org Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/truth-in-history Apple Podcast: http://bit.ly/tih-apple Google Podcast: http://bit.ly/tih-android Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/74dydvrAwgPkrlKX1ADC3b?si=192cf13d0785407c Twitter: https://twitter.com/truthinhistory7

Quotomania
Quotomania 263: Arthur Schopenhauer

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 1:32


Arthur Schopenhauer, (born Feb. 22, 1788, Danzig, Prussia—died Sept. 21, 1860, Frankfurt am Main), German philosopher. His father was a banker and his mother a novelist. He studied in several fields before earning his doctorate in philosophy. He regarded the Upanishads, together with the works of Plato and Immanuel Kant, as the foundation of his philosophical system, a metaphysical doctrine of the will developed in reaction to the idealism of G.W.F. Hegel. His magnum opus, The World as Will and Representation (1819), consists of two comprehensive series of reflections on the theory of knowledge and the philosophy of nature, aesthetics, and ethics. By turning away from spirit and reason to the powers of intuition, creativity, and the irrational, he influenced (partly via Friedrich Nietzsche) the ideas and methods of vitalism, life philosophy, existentialism, and anthropology. His other works include On the Will in Nature (1836), The Two Main Problems of Ethics(1841), and Parerga and Paralipomena (1851). An unhappy and solitary man, his works earned him the sobriquet “the philosopher of pessimism.”From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Arthur-Schopenhauer. For more information about Arthur Schopenhauer:“Arthur Schopenhauer”: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/schopenhauer/Essays and Aphorisms: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/261121/essays-and-aphorisms-by-arthur-schopenhauer-translated-with-an-introduction-by-r-j-hollingdale/“PHILOSOPHY - Schopenhauer”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0zmfNx7OM4

London Real
The truth about Atlantis - Graham Hancock

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 4:56


Watch the Full Episode for FREE:  https://londonreal.tv/graham-hancock-magicians-of-the-gods/  

Our Lady Of Lourdes Podcast
Dads: What Is Your Word | Corpus Christi Sunday | Fr. Brian Larkin | 6.21.2022

Our Lady Of Lourdes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 19:54


Readings for Corpus Christi Sunday https://bible.usccb.org/bible/readings/061922.cfm Dads: What Is Your Word? | Fr. Brian's Homily | Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ | 06.19.2022 "Today, the Eucharist calls us as men to something incredibly profound."—Fr. Brian Larkin "In the history of religions and philosophy, the general movement of religious people and deep thinkers is to move away from the flesh."—Fr. Brian Larkin "According to Plato, the body was a prison for the soul, so death was never a sad thing."—Fr. Brian Larkin "Either death is a state of nothingness and utter consciousness, or, as men say, there is a change and migration of the soul from this world to another. Now if death be of such a nature, I say that to die is to gain; for eternity is then only a single night."—Plato https://www.azquotes.com/quote/671403 "For spiritual people, death is also freedom, because it allows us to ascend to the heavenly realms."—Fr. Brian Larkin "Today's culture is hedonistic. Our culture revels in sensuality, and almost worships the body."—Fr. Brian Larkin “Today we celebrate the true presence of the body and blood of Christ in the Eucharist. God breaks the dichotomy. The flesh is healed and purified, and even united to God. The fact that we have a feast day that celebrates a body would have struck ancient people in a very strange way.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “The normal thing for us is that we want to escape the flesh and become spiritual people.” —Fr. Brian Larkin “Et verbum caro factum est.”—And the word became flesh (The writing on the mural above the sanctuary in the church) “I am a family man. I traded in my mustang for a mini van This is not what I was headed for when I began”—Song, Andrew Peterson https://genius.com/Andrew-peterson-family-man-lyrics Luke 9: https://bible.usccb.org/bible/luke/9 “Jesus's miracle today is in anticipation of the Last Supper. These are the same words Jesus will use in Luke 22 where Jesus gives us his flesh and blood.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “Jesus provides ordinary bread that will point to the Eucharist, which is supernatural and mystical.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “All you men: There is a natural level where God brings us to live for others, but that is meant to point you even deeper. Just like today's miraculous multiplication points to the very flesh and blood of Christ, natural fatherhood is meant to point us to the supernatural love of God.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “Natural fatherhood is meant to transform you into something supernatural.”—Fr. Brian Larkin "In the Eucharist, the flesh becomes a word. Today, when you come forward to receive the flesh and blood of Christ, I hope you hear a word—the word of the Cross. And I pray that you hear that word.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “As often as you eat this bread and drink the chalice, you proclaim the Lord's death until he comes.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “The Eucharist is the crucifixion of Christ. And the Cross of Jesus, ironically and powerfully, the moment the word is silenced, that moment is the most powerful word he ever spoke.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “This is my body, which is for you.” “What happens is God calls you into your vocation, and you begin to feel like you are losing your life…and I hope you do.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “The purpose of your life, gentlemen, is to be able to say to the people you love: ‘This is my life—this is my body, which is for you.' This is the logic of the gospel.”—Fr. Brian Larkin “Dads, your life is called to be a word. And your wife and your children—the day you die—they should be able to look at you and say, ‘His life was a word.'” —Fr. Brian Larkin "What is your word?"—Fr. Brian Larkin “Father God, thank you for your word. Dads, what's your word? What's your word to your kids? There's the small, everyday things that are important, but underneath that, are you teaching your family that they are loved, that God is real, that there is wisdom in Jesus Christ? This is our calling.”—Fr. Brian Larkin

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 37. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 14 - Chapter 7A

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 49:51


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Chapter 7 looks at the deaths of Socrates and Christ as key events that bring  reason and revelation together in the light of political philosophy. The remarkable parallels of these two trials is occasion for seeing how politics is both limited and transcended by philosophy and revelation." For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Young Heretics
Ep. 110: The Cave

Young Heretics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 70:03


Plato's cave is one of the most famous metaphors ever. But what does it really mean? At long last, this Young Heretics series on the Republic has gotten us far enough to understand what Plato is saying about Athenian society—and our own—in book 7. Plus: how do you find your purpose in life? BIG ANNOUNCEMENT: Pre-order your copy of Spencer Klavan's new book, "How to Save the West: Ancient Wisdom for 5 Modern Crises" today: https://www.amazon.com/How-Save-West-Ancient-Wisdom/dp/1684513456 -- Public Goods is the one stop shop for sustainable, high quality everyday essentials made from clean ingredients. Receive $15 off your first Public Goods order at https://publicgoods.com/HERETICS. -- Truebill is the new app that helps you identify and stop paying for subscriptions you don't need, want, or simply forgot about. Save thousands of dollars a year: https://truebill.com/heretics. -- Bambee is an HR platform built for small businesses. Automate the most important HR practices and get your own dedicated HR Manager. Get your FREE HR audit right now at https://bambee.com/heretics. -- Diversify your savings and get up to $1,500 of free silver today with American Hartford Gold: text HERETICS to 6-5-5-3-2. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Living 4D with Paul Chek
EP 194 — Jonathan Bluestein: Investigating Deception

Living 4D with Paul Chek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 150:51


Is our civilization heading to a time of neo-feudalism, an age of faceless, invisible kings?Martial arts headmaster, teacher, author and lawyer Jonathan Bluestein shares his insights into the world at large, why we shouldn't be afraid of civil disobedience and reads a passage from his book, Exceptional Ideas About Humanity, in this historical Living 4D conversation.Learn more about Jonathan at Blue Jade Martial Arts and on Facebook and YouTube.Show NotesNeo-feudalism: The age of the invisible kings. (4:36)Is World War 3 happening now? (18:14)The societal blueprint for the class system was written centuries ago by Plato. (25:47)A downward drift in consistently teaching outdated things throughout the generations for no good reason. (33:41)Defining the middle class by looking above and below. (41:03)Is modern Western civilization really a continuation of a foundation laid by the Greeks and Romans? (54:01)Different flavors of veganism. (1:01:54)Replacing the spiritual. (1:14:22)“At the end of the day, we've got to work on fixing one thing, then go from there.” (1:30:39)A koan. (1:44:54)Jonathan reads The Hole. (1:53:11)Why The Hole is relevant for our current time. (2:09:32)Jonathan's action items. (2:14:25)ResourcesProsperism: Limited Capital, Boundless Plenty, Research of Martial Arts and The Martial Arts Teacher by Jonathan BluesteinThe Republic by PlatoThe Decline of the West by Oswald SpenglerThe Erotic and The Holy by Marc GafniThus Spoke Zarathustra by Friedrich NietzschePlato's The Republic as read on YouTubeMaslow's Hierarchy of Needs More show notes and resources for this episode are available on our website.Thanks to our awesome sponsors: CHEK Institute/IMS 1 Online, Paleovalley (save 15 percent on your purchase by using the code chek15 at checkout), BiOptimizers (save an extra 10 percent on your purchase by using the code PAUL10 at checkout), Cymbiotika (save 15 percent on your purchase by using the code CHEK15 at checkout), Organifi (save 20 percent on your purchase by using the code CHEK20 at checkout) and Airestech (save 15 percent on any purchase you make by using the code CHEK15 at checkout).We may earn commissions from qualifying purchases using affiliate links.

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 36. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 13 - Chapter 6B

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 33:26


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. "Death limits politics not merely because the polity must articulate the reasons for which the taking of life is permitted or necessary, but because the polity must remember those who have died in the defense of the common and continuing life." For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

EconTalk
Roosevelt Montás on Rescuing Socrates

EconTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 80:23


How do books change our lives? Educator and author Roosevelt Montás of Columbia University talks about his book Rescuing Socrates with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Drawing on his own educational and life journey, Montás shows how great books don't just teach us stuff--they get inside us and make us who we are.

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 35. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 12 - Chapter 6A

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 42:50


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Chapter 6 is on death and political philosophy deals with the relation of the memory of the city, of its heros and villans, and of the efforts to explain and evaluate the meaning of death in political life. For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Trung Phan — On Smart Threads and Dumb Memes (EP.109)

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 81:14


Infinite Loops Podcast Notes Key Takeaways “I kind of look at Twitter as performance art, I find people who are very literal have a very hard time. The magic happens when you're smart, funny, and entertaining.”– Jim O'ShaughnessyJim believes that Trung is the ‘posterchild' for the Twitter success equationThere are few things with greater asymmetric returns than creating on the internetThe upside potential is so much greater than the downside riskThe ability to build your own audience on your own terms is killing gatekeepers everywhereAdvice to young creators: continue reading for details on these bullet points:Leverage optionality, leave doors openJust start, you don't have to know exactly where you're goingLearn how to shamelessly build an audienceAlways sprinkle in humorNobody is thinking about you the way you think about yourselfPeople are almost always thinking about what they're going to say next rather than listening to you“People don't have ideas. Ideas have people.”– Trung Phan quoting Carl JungThis is the greatest explanation for memesWorldly point of views can be entirely opposite to that of the United States, but completely valid given life contextIf you have the opportunity to travel—DO IT!Continue reading to see some examples of Trung Phan's awesome Twitted threads, highlights include:How Steve Jobs leveraged Pablo PicassoThat time Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos had dinnerWhy Ted Lasso is so likableAnd more!Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgTrung T. Phan is a creator in the tech, business, and media space. His Twitter threads are full of knowledge and humor, and he also co-hosts the “Not Investment Advice” podcast. Follow Trung on Twitter at https://twitter.com/TrungTPhan and subscribe to his newsletter at https://trungtphan.com/subscribe/ Show Notes: Trung's Vietnamese origins Humor in your talent stack Asymmetric returns of creating content online The power of memes Getting a CFA Going back to writing movie scripts Succeeding in the creator economy How to acquire people's attention Creating content on LinkedIn and Facebook The importance of traveling Donald Trump's popularity in SE Asia History is not black or white Steve Jobs with the Picasso How a Microsoft guy catalyzed the iPad Musk's space meeting with Bezos Not letting complacency set in Putting historical dates into perspective Structuring speech to persuade Jim not dissing Plato Making Ted Lasso likable in 157 seconds And MORE! Books Mentioned: The Status Game; by Will Storr The Beginning of Infinity; by David Deutsch Virus of the Mind; by Richard Brodie The Republic; Plato

Catholic Thinkers
Political Phillosophy by Fr. Schall: 34. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 11 - Chapter 5

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 61:30


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. Chapter 5 is on Hell in political philosophy. What are the punishments civil and eternal for crimes and sins? The teaching on hell, originally brought up in Plato's Republic, has to do with the significance of human actions and the worth of human life. For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Insight Hour with Joseph Goldstein
Ep. 126 – Essential Buddhism Part 3: Plato's Cave & The Four Ultimate Realities

Insight Hour with Joseph Goldstein

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 74:25


The Insight Hour podcast's "Essential Buddhism" series returns with lessons we can learn from the parable of Plato's Cave and the Buddhist teachings on the Four Ultimate Realities.This podcast is brought to you by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/insighthourContinuing a series of vintage lectures stemming from the infamous Naropa Institute Summer Sessions, this Dharma Talk from July 23rd, 1974 has Joseph Goldstein using the parable of Plato's Cave to help illuminate the Four Ultimate Realities outlined in Buddhism.This dharma talk from Joseph was originally published on Dharma Seed Catch the first part of this series: Essential Buddhism Part 1: Developing Our Field of AwarenessSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rational Black Thought
Rational Black Thought Episode #89 June 18, 2022 - Better be unborn than untaught, for ignorance is the root of misfortune…Plato

Rational Black Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 106:34


What's on my mind: There is no reason to listen to ignorant liars:https://eari.uv.es/index.php/Metode/article/view/10005/11896News:Jan 6th committee's public hearings:https://www.cbsnews.com/news/jan-6-committee-hearings-day-3-pence-trump-eastman-luttig/He's Back a racists' grand return:https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/paul-lepage-maine-governor/Herschel Walker is a lying piece of shit, duh!https://www.cnn.com/2022/06/15/politics/herschel-walker-son-georgia-republican/index.htmlRepublicans building an ‘army' to fight made up voter fraud:https://onlysky.media/aherrold/combat-voter-fraud-republicans-destabilize-democracy/MAGA Pastor Makes Triumphant Return Home, Gets Arrested Immediately:https://www.thedailybeast.com/canadas-maga-pastor-artur-pawlowski-arrested-at-calgary-airport-after-us-misinformation-tourThis shit is for us: A history lesson, what we can learn from the life of Hubert Harrison:https://www.thenation.com/article/society/hubert-harrison-jeffrey-perry/Bible Study with Atheist Mike: Did politics ruin religion or did religion ruin politics:https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2022/06/evangelical-church-pastors-political-radicalization/629631/Closing: Carl Bean, singer of gay pride hit ‘I Was Born This Way', dies at 77: 

Catholic Thinkers
Political Philosophy by Fr. Schall: 33. At the Limits of Political Philosophy Part 10 - Chapter 4B

Catholic Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 44:06


This course was recorded in 2015 in an informal setting by Fr. Schall himself. "The power to declare but not make evil to be good is at the very root of political power and no doubt one of its principal dangers."   For over 35 years, Fr. James Schall taught Political Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he was legendary among generations of students.  If you want an experience of what those students enjoyed, this course is the place to begin.  Fr. Schall starts with Aristotle's Ethics and Politics and then, with wisdom and wit, guides his listeners through the thought of the great Roman statesman Cicero, the French Catholic philosopher Yves Simon, the Old and New Testaments, the political thought of St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas on Law, Machiavelli, politics in the plays of Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and finally, Plato's masterwork, the Republic.  It is a historical and intellectual tour de force in 60 lectures.  What generations of students had to pay thousands of dollars in tuition to hear, you can now have in recorded lectures to listen to over and over again.  In preserving the lectures of Fr. Schall, we at the Catholic International University feel that we are fulfilling the mission set by our founder Ralph McInerny:  to make the best Catholic lectures available as widely as possible to the public. Please don't miss this opportunity to engage in one of the greatest intellectual journeys you'll ever take with one of this generation's wisest guides. catholicthinkers.org  

Founders
#252 Socrates: A Man for Our Times

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 35:42


What I learned from reading Socrates: A Man for Our Times by Paul Johnson.Listen to every full episode for $10 a month or $99 a year. The key ideas you'll learn pays for the subscription cost thousands of times over.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey."I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested, so my poor wallet suffers.”"I can't get enough of your podcast. You add a new layer to the books I've already read and make connections to ones I haven't, but now must read."“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 260 full length episodes.You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 260 full length episodes.