Podcast appearances and mentions of Thomas Aquinas

Italian philosopher and theologian

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Latest podcast episodes about Thomas Aquinas

Restitutio
463 Scripture & Science 5: Reading Genesis One, Part 3 (Will Barlow)

Restitutio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 39:07


Today we are going to cover gap theories and John Walton's temple idea. Will Barlow explains how gap theories work, including the classic idea that there's a gap of billions of years between Genesis 1.1 and 1.2 as well as the modified version. After explaining the pros and cons for these views, he briefly explains John Walton's theory that Genesis 1 solely focuses on function not physical creation. Listen to this episode on Spotify or Apple Podcasts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJvy6Vm6ToE&feature=emb_imp_woyt See below for notes. —— Links —— We are doing follow-up discussions to these episodes on YouTube. Check them out! See other episodes in this Scripture and Science Class Check out Barlow's previous podcast episodes Learn more about and support the church Barlow and his team are starting in Louisville, KY, called Compass Christian Church Find more articles and audios by Barlow on his website: Study Driven Faith Check out the early Christian quotes about the Hebrew version of the Gospel of Matthew here Support Restitutio by donating here Designate Restitutio as your charity of choice for Amazon purchases Join our Restitutio Facebook Group and follow Sean Finnegan on Twitter @RestitutioSF Leave a voice message via SpeakPipe with questions or comments and we may play them out on the air Intro music: Good Vibes by MBB Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) Free Download / Stream: Music promoted by Audio Library. Who is Sean Finnegan?  Read his bio here —— Notes —— Gap Theory There are various versions of Gap Theory: • Standard - multiple options here • Modified (“Preparing the Garden”) Pros of Standard Gap Theory Here are some pros with the standard formulation of Gap Theory: • It takes the word “day” literally as a 24-hour period • It fits directly with scientific evidence for an old Earth • It looks to the text (both in Genesis 1 and remote texts) to reach conclusions Internal Evidence Genesis 1:2   The earth was [or became] without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. “Was” or “became”? • Generally, in Hebrew, the verb “was” is unnecessary when talking about simple existence Genesis 23:17   So the field of Ephron in Machpelah, which was to the east of Mamre, the field with the cave that was in it and all the trees that were in the field, throughout its whole area, was made over “Was” or “became”? • Some scholars suggest that the verb is needed for the past tense, but here is a counterexample: Genesis 41:12a   A young Hebrew was [not in Hebrew] there with us, a servant of the captain of the guard. • So, some scholars believe that when the verb “was” is there, it takes on a more specific meaning: “become” • In other words, the word “was” takes on a meaning denoting change, not simple existence How did God create? Genesis 1:2   The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. Compare with Jeremiah 4:23-26, Isaiah 34:11, Isaiah 45:18-19, among others Terms Used in Genesis • Genesis 1:5 “God called the light day” • Genesis 1:5 “God called the darkness night” • Genesis 1:8 “God called the expanse heaven” • Genesis 1:10 “God called the dry ground land” • Genesis 1:10 “God called the waters seas” Genesis 1:16   And God made the two great lights--the greater light to rule the day and the lesser light to rule the night--and the stars. The word “made” does not generally mean “create.” In this context, it can be understood as God working on His creation. Genesis 1:17   And God set them in the expanse of the heavens to give light on the earth, The word “set” can mean “appoint, designate, assign.” In this context, it can be understood as God providing a purpose for the stars, not the original creation. Is Gap Theory a recent invention? Detractors of Gap Theory say that it became popular after scientific evidence for an old Earth came in vogue around 200 years ago. • Jewish sources throughout time lend credence to the Gap interpretation • Ancient Christian sources, including Thomas Aquinas, mentioned the possibility of a gap Problems with Standard Gap Theory Here are some problems with the standard formulation of Gap Theory: • Gives Satan too much power • Grammatical concerns over “was” • There is no scientific evidence for a reconstituted heaven and Earth • Contextual concerns with Jeremiah 4 and Isaiah 34 • Genesis 1:28 says “fill,” not “replenish” Modified Gap Theory Modified Gap Theory holds that: • Genesis 1:1 refers to the beginning of creation • Genesis 1:2 focuses on God putting order into the wasteland, preparing the garden • Nothing in Genesis 1:2ff is talking about creation but rather about shaping the garden and the promised land Views Compatible with Either • The “God's Temple” interpretation — John Walton • Any non-literal interpretation that does not involve evolution Walton's “Temple” Interpretation Walton's view is based on 18 separate propositions. Proposition 1: Genesis 1 is ancient cosmology. “So if God aligned revelation with one particular science, it would have been unintelligible to people who lived prior to the time of that science, and it would be obsolete to those who live after that time…” “We gain nothing by bringing God's revelation into accordance with today's science. In contrast, it makes perfect sense that God communicated his revelation to his immediate audience in terms they understood.” (pg. 15) Giving an analogy from the ancient view of the liver, kidneys, and intestines: “Yet we must notice that when God wanted to talk to the Israelites about their intellect, emotions, and will, he did not revise their ideas of physiology and feel compelled to reveal the function of the brain. Instead, he adopted the language of the culture to communicate in terms they understood.” (pg. 16) Proposition 2: Ancient Cosmology is Function Oriented “Even staying in the realm of English usage we can see that we don't always use the verb create in material terms. When we create a committee, create a curriculum, create havoc or create a masterpiece, we are not involved in a material manufacturing process.” (pg. 23) “In this book I propose that people in the ancient world believed that something existed not by virtue of its material properties, but by virtue of its having a function in an ordered system.” (pg. 24) Walton believes that God's Temple is the heavens and the earth (Isaiah 66:1-2). Thus, the six-day creation account is not a scientific depiction of the creation of the Universe, but rather a description of God setting up his Temple and putting it in order. Parallels between Genesis 1 and other Temple accounts: • Seven day consecration of tabernacle in Exodus 39-40 • Seven-year construction of Solomon's Temple, followed by a seven-day dedication feast (1 Kings 6) • Description of Eden and the Temple have some similarities Bottom line: • Wants to interpret Genesis 1 in light of Ancient Near East culture and scientific understanding • Gives a context for the text that focuses on God's relationship with Israel, not with the creation of physical matter and space Problems with Walton's “Temple” View Here are some problems with the “Temple” view: • Atheists love to attack non-literal readings, since it shows that Jews and Christians can “pick and choose.” • There is no clear evidence that anyone has held this specific view at any point in Judeo-Christian history. • It leaves many questions unanswered, especially relating to science. How should we read Genesis 1? • Remember who the original audience was (coming out of slavery, coming out of idolatry) • Consider the text and the various options to interpret it • Consider the scientific evidence and how much weight you want to give it Resources • Young Earth Creationism (Answers in Genesis, Institute for Creation Research, The Genesis Flood by Morris and Whitcomb) • Day-Age (Hugh Ross, Gerald Schoeder) • Gap Theory (Arthur Custance, Jack Langford) • Temple (John Walton)

Mind Matters
The Nature of Mind, Body, and Soul

Mind Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022


How do the mind, the body, and the soul interact? After years of studying the brain, there are still many questions. Dr. Joshua Farris discusses free will, consciousness, and philosophy on this bingecast with Dr. Michael Egnor. Additional Resources Dr. Joshua Farris Dr. Michael Egnor Buy Dr. Joshua R. Farris' Book: The Soul of Theological Anthropology Cartesian Exploration What is… Source

Potluck Podcast
Commerce | First Presbyterian Day

Potluck Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 86:21


A very unusual Wednesday drop. Hurricane Ian is bearing down so things are pushed up. Commerce/Banks recap, Week 6 review, Week 7 preview, Thomas Aquinas talk, Opossums rustling around in the woods, strange tales from the Classic City, and Commerce/FPD to round it all out.

Ayn Rand Institute Live!
Tertullian and Thomas Aquinas by Robert Mayhew

Ayn Rand Institute Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 61:14


Tertullian (ca. 160–220) and Thomas Aquinas (13th century) both defended faith as a justification for their Christian beliefs, but whereas Tertullian proudly defended faith even when it clashed with reason, Aquinas argued that there was a harmony between faith and reason — that the two could never clash. In this lecture, Dr. Mayhew will examine the views of each in detail and briefly discuss the continuing influence of their conceptions of faith and reason in the 21st century.

Speaking of Jung: Interviews with Jungian Analysts
Episode 114: Aurora Consurgens

Speaking of Jung: Interviews with Jungian Analysts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 74:02


J. Gary Sparks is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who trained with Marie-Louise von Franz. He returns to us from Indianapolis to discuss Vol. 7 of von Franz's Collected Works – Aurora Consurgens: A Document Attributed to Thomas Aquinas on the Problem of Opposites in Alchemy – A Companion Work to C.G. Jung's Mysterium Coniunctionis

Theology Taco! Podcast
Ep. 36: Memes, Politics, and Christian Media

Theology Taco! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 179:19


This episode features a lengthy discussion on politics where Tim J shares his thoughts on Christian engagement in politics. We also discuss a meme that Tim T made which kicked off the topic in the first place. Finally, we discuss the subject of Christian entertainment and what we wish it would do better. P.S. The name of the medieval theologian Tim T had a brain fart about was Thomas Aquinas. Email: theologytaco@gmail.com YouTube Version: https://youtu.be/yg3KV-hQWIk

Intelligent Design the Future
BEHE COUNTERS THE BEST OBJECTIONS TO IRREDUCIBLE COMPLEXITY AND ID, PT. 3

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 26:28 Very Popular


On today's ID the Future biologist Michael Behe and Philosophy for the People host Pat Flynn conclude their conversation (posted by permission here) about some of the best objections to Behe's central case for intelligent design. One objection Behe and Flynn tackle in this episode: the idea of evolution overcoming the irreducible-complexity hurdle through co-option. That is, maybe the precursors to what would become one of today's molecular machines, such as the bacterial flagellum motor, co-opted simpler machines being used for other purposes, allowing evolution to build a bacterial flagellum motor one small step at a time over thousands or millions of generations, even though the completed bacterial flagellum ceases to function at all when just one of its many key parts Read More › Source

Your Superior Self
Creation Spirituality- Matthew Fox

Your Superior Self

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 53:57


Matthew Fox is a spiritual theologian, an Episcopal priest, and an activist for gender justice and eco-justice.  He has written 37 books that have been translated into other languages over 70 times. Among them are Original Blessing, The Coming of the Cosmic Christ, A Spirituality Named Compassion, The Reinvention of Work, The Hidden Spirituality of Men, Christian Mystics and The Pope's War. He has contributed much to the rediscovery of Hildegard of Bingen, Meister Eckhart and Thomas Aquinas as pre-modern mystics and prophets. Fox holds a doctorate in the history and theology of spirituality from the Institut Catholique de Paris. The founder of the University of Creation Spirituality in California, he conducts dozens of workshops each year and is a visiting scholar at the Academy for the Love of Learning. In joining the Episcopal church over 20 years ago, Fox has been working with young people to reinvent forms of worship by bringing elements of rave such as dance, dj, vj and more into the Western Liturgy.  The Cosmic Mass has been celebrated over 100 times and in dozens of cities in North America.  Fox is recipient of the Abbey Courage of Conscience Peace Award (other recipients being the Dali Lama, Mother Teresa, Ernesto Cardenal and Rosa Parks), the Ghandi King Ikeda Award, the Tikkun National Ethics Award and other awards.  His latest books are Naming the Unnameable: 89 Wonderful and Useful Names for God…Including the Unnameable God; Stations of the Cosmic Christ; and The Lotus & the Rose: A Conversation Between Tibetan Buddhism & Mystical Christianity. He is currently a visiting scholar at the Academy of the Love of Learning in Santa Fe, NM and resides in Vallejo, California

Will Wright Catholic
Can Faith and Reason Be Harmonized?

Will Wright Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 19:43


Are Faith and Reason at Odds?Materialist atheists view the world as being composed of matter, its movements, and modifications, and nothing else. Religious fundamentalists and literalists see the world in a monochromatic view based on the biblical texts (i.e. - seeing Genesis as a literal scientific explanation of the creation of the world). The former seem to embody “reason” and the latter embody “faith.” However, I hope to show that the materialist atheists are not using the gift of reason well nor are the biblical fundamentalists understanding the gift of faith. When held clearly, faith and reason are not opposed to one another. In fact, they are incapable of being at odds, when properly understood.ScientismI want to begin by looking at a prevalent error in popular society: scientism. Science is an incredibly powerful tool for exploring the world around us. In many ways, it is the tool for discovery given the most credibility by intellectuals in the modern world. This credibility is sometimes so strong that we are led to a sort of scientism in which science is the only tool for discovery worth utilizing, the only one which is trustworthy. Where does this notion come from?Philosophically, there are two prevailing theories which have taken over much of academia: naturalism and materialism. Naturalism is the philosophical belief that everything arises from natural properties and causes, and supernatural or spiritual explanations are to be excluded or discounted. There is an even harder stance than naturalism called materialism which holds to the doctrine that nothing exists except matter and its movements and modifications. In either case, the material and natural are all that are accounted for and the supernatural is disregarded at best and rejected at worst. Naturalism and materialism lead to the error of scientism, which is self-refuting. Put basically, scientism suggests that the only things of which we can be certain are those things which are subjected to the scientific method. The crippling problem with scientism is that the scientific method cannot be applied to the scientific method. Therefore, this worldview begins with an unverifiable premise. Again, science is an incredibly powerful tool for exploring the world around us and learning more about the composition, movement, and modification of matter. Though, science is unable to answer other important questions: What created the universe? Why is there something rather than nothing? What is the nature of being itself? What is personhood? All of these questions require different tools of discovery than science.Tools of DiscoveryBeyond science, what tools of discovery are at our disposal? First, we can begin with philosophy. Modern philosophy is remarkably convoluted and rife with scientism, un-based skepticism, and other rational landmines. But, the long patrimony of philosophy allows us to ask questions like: What is the nature of being (metaphysics)? How do we come to know things (epistemology)? What makes a thing good, virtuous, or valuable (axiology)? How do we know that conclusions follow from certain premises (logic)? These are fundamentally different questions than science could ever ask or answer, but how many of us would truly argue that these questions are unimportant? So far, all of these questions, while different from science (and along with science), would fall under the broader category of human reason.TheologyThe study of God and of the things of God is called Theology. As long as there have been human beings asking questions of consequence, there have been questions and statements of a theological nature. It is only recently in human history that naturalist and materialist sentiments have disregarded or rejected the supernatural. When thinking of how we could apply the tool of discovery of Theology, I am reminded of the words of Galadriel to Frodo in Tolkien's Fellowship of the Ring: “May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out.”In the Catholic patrimony, the realm of Theology arises from what God has revealed about Himself through Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition, but it also includes what is called natural philosophy. Many of the classic arguments for the existence of God come not from St. Augustine or St. Thomas Aquinas, but from Plato and Aristotle. More needed to be revealed to arrive at the truths expounded by Christianity, but Plato and Aristotle were able to apply human reason so keenly that they arrived at faith in God (as they understood Him). Are Faith and Reason Compatible?So, are these various tools for discovery actually compatible with one another? Ultimately, are faith and reason compatible? St. John Paul II put it this way:“Faith and reason are like two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth; and God has placed in the human heart a desire to know the truth—in a word, to know himself—so that, by knowing and loving God, men and women may also come to the fullness of truth about themselves (Fides et Ratio, 1).”Faith and reason are, therefore, both gifts that God has given to human persons to rise to the contemplation of Himself, who is Truth itself, and truth about ourselves. So, faith and reason are more than merely compatible; they are complementary. St. Thomas Aquinas rightly says that the light of reason and the light of faith both come from God, therefore there can be no contradiction between them. We need Faith because without it, we would be lost and without direction. We need Reason because without it, we would be lost to our emotions and blind whims.What is Reason?Reason is the God-given gift of rational thought. Beyond mere reaction, we can come to the knowledge of things, events, and persons through thought and observation. Like Faith, this second wing of the human spirit, leads us to know in order that we might act. We know and we love. We believe and we act.Lest we think that reason is somehow more rigorous than Faith. We must reject the notion that the only tool of reason is science. Science is an incredibly powerful tool to investigate the material world. What exists and how does it exist? Science, however, can never answer the question, for example: why do we exist at all? For these questions, we might use the tool of philosophy.Reason also prepares the way to faith. St. Clement of Alexandria said long ago that philosophy is a “stepping stone to faith (cf. FR 38).” At the same time, we must learn as Pope Benedict XVI taught that human reason alone is weak; it needs faith to elevate it. God's grace builds upon our nature. What is Faith?Faith means to trust in God. Faith is belief. What we believe, contained in the Creeds of the Church, for example, can be referred to as Faith. The entirety of the Catholic religion can be called the Faith. Faith is not believing in something irrationally. There is a great amount of evidence for God and the truth of the claims of Christianity.The Gospels are historically reliable. The Resurrection of Jesus Christ is well attested. And the last two thousand years establish how well founded the Faith of the Christian religion is. The Catholic Church is the Church of Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ is God. God exists. On these three levels of God, Christ, and the Church, we have Faith.The tenets of the Faith lead us to assent in belief to God and to trust Him. This intellectual way of coming to know God moves our free will towards love of Him. Of course, this requires trusting the Church, trusting the saints and holy writers of the past, and trusting in the testament of Tradition, written, or orally handed down to us. In this way, we are trusting what we ourselves have not seen personally, but it is certainly rational to trust such a firm witness.As St. John Paul II put it: “Men and women can accomplish no more important act in their lives than the act of faith; it is here that freedom reaches the certainty of truth and chooses to live in that truth (FR 13).”Truth is True, Regardless of FeelingsCertain things exist in a certain way and our feelings on the matter do not change that reality. There are certain things which are always true, always and in all places. We might refer to these as “principles.” The application of these principles can be many and varied, but the principles themselves might not change.When the Church teaches on a matter which pertains to Faith or Morals, the teachings can develop but they will never change. These truths point to the nature of God, of man, and of the created order. In all of these principles and applications, the truths do not change. However, they are discovered by means of either faith or reason. Because faith and reason both are at the service of the truth, they cannot contradict. If we believe that something is in error, then either our reason is faulty or our understanding of a teaching of the Faith is faulty. Reason can show that God exists and lays a foundation that makes faith credible. Therefore, reason is a common ground between believers and non-believers. Faith without reason is myth or superstition. Without reason, faith is only feelings and experience. If this happens, then universality of truth is lost.How to Know if We are in Error?How can we know if we are in error? Could the Holy Spirit point us in a direction which seems like a logically poor decision or lead us into error? The answer is no. The Holy Spirit is the third Person of the Holy Trinity. The Holy Spirit is God. God never wants to deceive us.If we have a strong indication that God is leading us in a certain direction, we must figure out why we think that. And, if we feel that logic dictates a different path, we must figure out why we think that. In other words, are we cooperating with the gifts of faith and reason properly?Investigating human reason, we look at arguments to ensure that they are valid. Does the conclusion necessarily follow from the premises? If the argument is sound, however, then the conclusion will be valid if the premises are true. It is possible that we have an improper understanding of something. This can affect us greatly because we might think that something is logical, but our arguments are bad or our premises are wrong.Investigating our understanding of the Faith, we must think with the mind of the Church. What does the Church teach on Faith and Morals? We must form our conscience well and learn as much as we can about Church teaching.Ideally, when we are investigating or discovering, we are aiming at the truth. As Pope Benedict XVI put it, “In the irresistible desire for truth, only a harmonious relationship between faith and reason is the right road that leads to God and to the person's complete fulfillment (Gen. Audience, Nov. 21, 2012).” He also thought there was a “fertile connection” between understanding and believing. Even the field of Theology which studies the things of God and God Himself is classically defined as “faith seeking understanding (fides quarens intellectum).”What to Do with a Supposed Contradiction?What, then, should we do with supposed contradictions? We must begin by remembering that God never wants to deceive us. He's not trying to trick us. If we come up against a supposed contradiction where reason seems to be saying one thing and faith is saying another, then necessarily our understanding is wrong as it regards either reason or faith. So, we must diligently investigate our premises and data points, pray, ask for guidance, or research the answer from someone who has wisdom and insight. What we cannot do is act in a way which seems truly illogical, and we cannot act against something we feel convicted by the Holy Spirit to do or not do.We Need to Live in the Truth and With LoveGod has given us the gifts of reason and faith to come to knowledge, love, and service of Him and of those placed around us. We must never lose sight of why we have these various tools of discovery. It is all about the love of God and neighbor. When we study science, we should do so out of a sense of wonder and awe at God's creation and His majesty. And any application of what we learn should be at the service of the common good of humanity. Likewise, when we use the tools of philosophy and theology, we must bear in mind that these are tools of discovery, not of innovation. The truth belongs to Jesus Christ. He alone is the Way, the Truth, and the Life. Our job is not to hijack reason or faith, but to harmonize the two wings and let God's grace draw our souls ever upward into His own blessed life. Thank you for reading Will Wright Catholic. This post is public so feel free to share it. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit willwrightcatholic.substack.com

The Thomistic Institute
Divine Simplicity and the Complexity of Creation | Fr. Thomas Joseph White, O.P.

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 59:02


This lecture was given on July 17, 2022 at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C. for the Fourth Annual Thomistic Philosophy and Natural Science Symposium: Complexity, Simplicity and Emergence. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Fr. Thomas Joseph White completed his bachelor's in religious studies from Brown University (1993) and his Master's (1995) and Doctorate (2002) in Theology at Oxford University. He entered the Order of Preachers in 2003. He completed his licentiate in Sacred Theology (2007) at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C. He professed final vows in 2007 and was ordained a priest in 2008. His research and teaching concentrate on Thomistic metaphysics, Christology and Roman Catholic-Reformed ecumenical dialogue. He was appointed an ordinary member of the Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas in 2011. White taught at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C from 2008-2018, and was the founder and Director of the Washington DC Thomistic Institute from 2009 until his departure for Rome in 2018. In 2015 White became co-editor of Nova et Vetera Journal, an American Catholic Theological journal. In 2018 he was assigned to teach at the Angelicum and function as the Director of the Angelicum Thomistic Institute. In June 2021, he was appointed rector of the Angelicum in Rome, and in June 2022 White was appointed president of the Academy of Catholic Theology, one of the principal societies of academic Catholic theology in the United States.

Expanding Horizons

Jennie's focus today is on "Peace" and our Sixth UUA Principle: "The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all". In the context of the war currently raging in Ukraine and its recent escalation, Jennie asks at the outset of her address today - "Is there such a thing as a Just War"? Jennie refers to the "Just War" criteria of 13th Century Roman Catholic Dominican priest, philosopher, theologian and jurist, St. Thomas Aquinas and to an article in Scientific American - Sept 1, 2018  by R. Brian Ferguson: " War Is Not Part of Human Nature", - the "hawks" arguing that we've become so addicted to war - so "numbed" to the destruction it brings - that war is hard-wired into us.  The "doves" challenge this view. Jennie offers pathways of hope - leading to peace, despite the challenges of climate change and global inequity. We begin that journey by looking into our own hearts! But there's a challenge: - it's also a path of Action. Listen on!

For College Catholics
79 Frodo and The Waybread of the Elves

For College Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 14:40


Can bread actually turn into real flesh at the words of a priest? Can wine actually turn into blood? Yes, it can… and it actually did! Today, I share some insights on what are the Eucharistic Miracles, and I speak particularly on the miracle of Lanciano and the miracle of Orvieto. And how St. Thomas Aquinas wrote his famous hymns in honor of the Eucharist.   - Here is a good article on the miracle of Lanciano: Eucharistic Miracle of Lanciano (therealpresence.org) - Here is a good article on the miracle of Bolsena-Orvieto: Eucharistic Miracle of Bolsena-Orvieto, Italy (therealpresence.org) ; - Regarding the Hymns written by St. Thomas Aquinas for the Feast of Corpus Christi, they are the following: Adoro te Devote; Lauda Sion Salvatorem (which is the Sequence for today's Mass); Sacris Solemniis (including its sixth stanza, the Panis Angelicus); Pange Lingua Gloriosi (including its last two stanzas, the Tantum Ergo); and Verbum Supernum (including its last two stanzas, the O Salutaris). - More info on this can be found in the Catechism of the Catholic Church #1322-1419 - Biblical quotations: John 5:52 and following (“Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood…”); Lk 22:14-20 (Last Supper); Mk 14:22-26; 1Cor 11:23-27. - Fr. Patrick Wainwright is a priest of Miles Christi, a Catholic Religious Order. - Visit the Miles Christi Religious Order website: https://www.mileschristi.org - This Podcast's Website: https://www.forcollegecatholics.org - To learn about the Spiritual Exercises (silent weekend retreat) preached by the Priests of Miles Christi, visit: https://www.mileschristi.org/spiritual-exercises/ - Recorded at our Family Center in South Lyon, Michigan. - Planning, recording, editing and publishing by Fr. Patrick Wainwright, MC. - Gear: Shure MV7 USB dynamic microphone. - Intro music from pond5.com

St. Thomas Aquinas Football Coach's Show
2022: Their Best On and Off the Field

St. Thomas Aquinas Football Coach's Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 23:58


St. Thomas Aquinas head football coach Roger Harriott talks about teaching his team the power of communicating with others.

Battle Ready with Father Dan Reehil
Battle Ready a Radio Maria Production - Episode 9/21/22 - The Mass: Reverence for the Eucharist

Battle Ready with Father Dan Reehil

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 28:26


Fr. Dan Reehil discusses the components of the Mass in respects to the Blessed Sacrament. How are we to receive our Lord? What does the Church say about it? How great saints like St. Thomas Aquinas and St. John Paul II felt about reception of the Eucharist. Stream live episodes of Battle Ready with Fr. Dan Reehil at https://radiomaria.us/ at 9:00 am cst or tune in on radio in Louisiana (580 AM Alexandria, 1360 AM New Iberia, 89.7 FM Natchitoches, 91.1 FM Lake Charles) in Ohio (1600 AM Springfield, 88.7 FM Anna, 103.3 Enon/Dayton) in Mississippi (88.1 FM D'Iberville/Biloxi) in Florida (91.9 Hammocks/Miami) in Pennsylvania (88.1 FM Hollidaysburg/Altoona) in Texas (1250 AM Port Arthur) in Wisconsin (91.3 FM Peshtigo) Radio Maria is a 100% listener supported radio station. If this broadcast has touched your life, please consider donating at https://rmusa.civi-go.net/donate

Theology Applied
THEOLOGY APPLIED - Cornelius Van Til Vs. Thomas Aquinas | Why Many Reject Postmil & Theonomy | with John White

Theology Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 73:43


"Why the talk lately about Thomas Aquinas? It's because Theonomy and Postmillennialism are rooted in the authority of the Bible to govern all of man's activities. Aquinas held a very different view that has deeply influenced western theological thought. The flashpoint? Put down Aquinas and learn about Cornelius Van Til." - John White

WeeklyTech Podcast
A conversation with Dr. Tyler Wittman and Dr. R.B. Jamieson on how to read the Bible accurately

WeeklyTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 48:02


In this episode, I am joined by Dr. Tyler Wittman and Dr. Bobby Jamieson to talk about their new book Biblical Reasoning and how to read the Bible accuratelyMeet Drs. Wittman and JamiesonDr. Wittman received an M.Div. in Christian Ministry and a Th.M in Systematic Theology from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and his Ph.D. in Divinity from the University of St. Andrews. He currently serves as Assistant Professor of Theology at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, and is the author of God and Creation in the Theology of Thomas Aquinas and Karl Barth which explores the nature of God's relation to creation.Dr. Jamieson received his M.Div and Th.M. from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and received his Ph.D. in New Testament from the University of Cambridge. He currently serves as an associate pastor at Capitol Hill Baptist Church in Washington D.C. and has authored several books including Sound Doctrine: How a Church Grows in the Love and Holiness of God and Going Public: Why Baptism Is Required for Church Membership among others.Resources:Biblical Reasoning: Christological and Trinitarian Rules for Exegesis by R.B. Jamieson and Tyler WittmanOn the Incarnation by AthanasiusOn God and Christ by St. Gregory of NazianzusThe Catechetical Lectures of Saint Cyril by Saint CyrilCommentary on the Gospel of John by St Thomas AquinasThe Digital Public Square is a production of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission and is produced and hosted by Jason Thacker.Production assistance is provided by Kadin Christian. Technical production provided by Owens Productions. It is edited and mixed by Mark Owens.

Liberty Law Talk
Aquinas's Common Good

Liberty Law Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


William McCormick discusses Thomas Aquinas, his intellectual influences, and the "hard work" of politics with James Patterson.

Sacred and Profane Love
Episode 52: The Hillbilly Thomists

Sacred and Profane Love

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 52:22


In this episode, I speak with my friends, Fr. Thomas Joseph White, OP and Fr. Jonah Teller, OP about the relationship between art, truth, and beauty, sacred and profane music, how music might be integral to religious life, and whether the banjo is beautiful. Long time listeners will remember Thomas Joseph from our very first episode on Flannery O'Connor, where we discuss what she meant by calling herself a "Hillbilly Thomist;" and since I consider myself something of a Hillbilly Thomist myself, I thought it would be fun to start off season five with a lighthearted conversation with two members of my favorite folk and bluegrass band, The Hillbilly Thomists. Fr. Thomas Joseph White is the Rector Magnificus of the Pontifical University of St. Thomas (Angelicum) in Rome. He is the author of various books and articles including Wisdom in the Face of Modernity: A Study in Thomistic Natural Theology (Sapientia Press, 2011), The Incarnate Lord, A Thomistic Study in Christology (The Catholic University of America Press, 2015) Exodus (Brazos Press, 2016), The Light of Christ: An Introduction to Catholicism (Catholic University Press, 2017), and The Trinity: On the Nature and Mystery of the One God (Catholic University Press, 2022). He is co-editor of the journal Nova et Vetera, a Distinguished Scholar of the McDonald Agape Foundation, and a member of the Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas. Fr. Jonah Teller, O.P., is a friar of the Dominican Province of Saint Joseph. He holds a licentiate in sacred theology from the Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C. At present, he lives in D.C. and works as Coordinator for Campus Outreach at the Thomistic Institute, an organization that exists to promote Catholic truth in our contemporary world by strengthening the intellectual formation of Christians at universities, in the Church, and in the wider public square. He is also the third-best guitarist in The Hillbilly Thomists

Sacred and Profane Love
Sacred and Profane Love Episode 52: The Hillbilly Thomists

Sacred and Profane Love

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 52:22


In this episode, I speak with my friends, Fr. Thomas Joseph White, OP and Fr. Jonah Teller, OP about the relationship between art, truth, and beauty, sacred and profane music, how music might be integral to religious life, and whether the banjo is beautiful. Long time listeners will remember Thomas Joseph from our very first episode on Flannery O'Connor, where we discuss what she meant by calling herself a "Hillbilly Thomist;" and since I consider myself something of a Hillbilly Thomist myself, I thought it would be fun to start off season five with a lighthearted conversation with two members of my favorite folk and bluegrass band, The Hillbilly Thomists. Fr. Thomas Joseph White is the Rector Magnificus of the Pontifical University of St. Thomas (Angelicum) in Rome. He is the author of various books and articles including Wisdom in the Face of Modernity: A Study in Thomistic Natural Theology (Sapientia Press, 2011), The Incarnate Lord, A Thomistic Study in Christology (The Catholic University of America Press, 2015) Exodus (Brazos Press, 2016), The Light of Christ: An Introduction to Catholicism (Catholic University Press, 2017), and The Trinity: On the Nature and Mystery of the One God (Catholic University Press, 2022). He is co-editor of the journal Nova et Vetera, a Distinguished Scholar of the McDonald Agape Foundation, and a member of the Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas. Fr. Jonah Teller, O.P., is a friar of the Dominican Province of Saint Joseph. He holds a licentiate in sacred theology from the Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C. At present, he lives in D.C. and works as Coordinator for Campus Outreach at the Thomistic Institute, an organization that exists to promote Catholic truth in our contemporary world by strengthening the intellectual formation of Christians at universities, in the Church, and in the wider public square. He is also the third-best guitarist in The Hillbilly Thomists.

The Catholic Man Show
God, His Church, and Marriage

The Catholic Man Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 69:02


A few weeks ago we spoke with Dcn. Garlick about the ways to read scripture: 1. Literal 2. Allegorical 3. Moral 4. Anagogical. We take that and St. Thomas Aquinas's homily and apply that to marriage! http://www.patreon.com/thecatholicmanshow (Become a Patron! Over 40 interviews, a course with Karlo Broussard, a 10 part series on the domestic church, a course on fitness and virtue by Pat Flynn, and free thank you gifts for supporting the show!) https://selectinternationaltours.com/catholicmanshow/ () WE ARE GOING TO IRELAND WITH FR. SEAN DONOVAN AND THERE ARE STILL A FEW SPOTS LEFT! JOIN US – https://selectinternationaltours.com/catholicmanshow/ (MORE DETAILS HERE). LIVING BEYOND SUNDAY: MAKING YOUR HOME A HOLY PLACE https://thecatholicmanshow.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Living-Beyond-Sunday_3D_FRONT.jpg ()Our new book is available for pre-order from Ascension Press! “I love this book. It provides wise counsel with beautiful simplicity. So, if you are looking to safeguard your family life from the wiles of the enemy and encourage your spouse and children to become the saints God is calling them to be, this is a book for you.” – Fr Gregory Pine Home life can be difficult and busy, and it's easy to get distracted from the point of it all: raising a family of saints. In https://ascensionpress.com/products/living-beyond-sunday-making-your-home-a-holy-place (Living Beyond Sunday: Making Your Home a Holy Place), two married couples share what has helped them make their homes a place of encounter with God–a place where saints are being made. About our drink: Matsui Peated Japanese Whisky About our gear: N/A About the Topic: What does marriage show us about God, His Church, our soul, and the institution of marriage? Let's discuss! https://exodus90.com/pray/?utm_source=catholicmanshow&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=holy-hour-2022&utm_content=tcms (“Any man who wants a solid faith-filled family should do Exodus 90.”) TIME CODES: If this is your first time listening to The Catholic Man Show, we do 3 things almost every episode:1.) Open, review, and enjoy a man beverage – Minutes 1-12.2.) Highlight a man gear – Minutes 12-24.3.) Have a manly conversation – Minutes 24-48If you haven't listened to The Catholic Man Show before, check out our previous episodes https://thecatholicmanshow.com/episodes/ (here). Subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5MhmMZZhEnrapVYUIkFHLg?view_as=subscriber ( YouTube channel) to watch past episodes. Want to help The Catholic Man Show? By giving us a rating on https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-catholic-man-show/id1128843873?mt=2 (iTunes, it helps others find the show.) Want to say up with The Catholic Man Show? Sign up for our mailing list: http://www.thecatholicmanshow.com/manly (Click Here) Looking for a prayer to pray with your wife? https://thecatholicmanshow.com/blog/looking-for-a-prayer-to-pray-with-your-wife-print-this-off-and-start-praying/ (Check this blog out.) Are you getting our emails? Sign up for our newsletter where we give you all bacon content – never spam.  http://thecatholicmanshow.com/manly/ (SIGN UP HERE:) https://thecatholicmanshow.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/tcms-email-ss.png ()

The Patrick Madrid Show
“5 Arguments For The Existence Of God” from St. Thomas Aquinas

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 18:30


Patrick walks the audience through St. Thomas Aquinas's “5 Arguments for the existence of God”. Showing that anyone who masters these proofs can speak intelligently and persuasively with an atheist about the existence of God.

Alpha and Omega Ministries
Road Trip Dividing Line from Ohio

Alpha and Omega Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 66:00


Covered a lot of ground today from the RV park outside Columbus, Ohio, including a look at the Son of Man in Mark 9, some preview of the upcoming debate with Peter van Kleeck, some discussion of cultural developments such as Illinois declaring open season on its own citizens, the emptiness of -conservatism- without a real world-view foundation, etc., and a quick note on MBTS becoming a center for the promotion of the thought and writings of Thomas Aquinas. Honestly don't think there will be any room to sneak in another program this week, sadly-

Midnight Carmelite
Season 5 Premiere: Interview with Dr. Larry Chapp of Gaudium et Spes 22 on the Universal Call to Holiness, Vocation, Evangelization and the Spiritual Life

Midnight Carmelite

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 84:59


An interview on the universal call to holiness, vocation, evangelization, in the light of Carmelite spirituality, the Catholic Worker movement, and saints such as St. Therese, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. John of the Cross, and St. Teresa Benedicta (Edith Stein) Please check out Dr. Chapp's work at Gaudium et Spes 22. If you find this episode valuable, please share it with others. If you want to leave a tip, please check out the tip jar. (https://checkout.luminoustradition.com/products/tip-jar/). Learn more at Luminous Tradition (https://luminoustradition.com/)

The Skeptical Pervert
Episode 12: Sex Work Through History Part 2

The Skeptical Pervert

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 30:57


Welcome, fans! After delays caused by a hard drive crash and COVID, we're back (at last!) with the second of the two-part look at sex work through history. In this episode, we chat about the Winchester Geese, a group of sex workers managed by the Bishop of Winchester, and muse about several historical sex worker philanthropists who seemed a lot more in tune with Christian charity than most Christians of the day. We also detour into the philosophies of St. Augustine and Thomas Aquinas and chat about official state-sanctioned brothels in France. Check it out!

The Shepherd's Voice
A Conversation with Dr. Michael Pakaluk

The Shepherd's Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 30:05


Archbishop Naumann dialogues with Dr. Michael Pakaluk about his life of faith and the importance of ethics. MICHAEL PAKALUK is a professor of ethics and social philosophy in the Busch School of Business at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and a member of the Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas. He earned his undergraduate and doctoral degrees at Harvard and studied as a Marshall Scholar at the University of Edinburgh. An expert in ancient philosophy, he has published widely on Aristotelian ethics and the philosophy of friendship and done groundbreaking work in business ethics. His previous books include Other Selves: Philosophers on Friendship, The Appalling Strangeness of the Mercy of God, and most recently The Memoirs of St. Peter: A New Translation of the Gospel according to Mark. He lives in Hyattsville, Maryland, with his wife, Catherine Pakaluk, a professor of economics, and their eight children.

HeightsCast: Forming Men Fully Alive
Leisure and Acedia: R.J. Snell on Contemplative Homes in a Frenetic Age

HeightsCast: Forming Men Fully Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 30:55


In many quarters of contemporary society, busy-ness has become a sort of cliche greeting. To the question “How are you?”, the response, “So busy,” is often automatic. To borrow the words of Dr. R.J. Snell, many of us are conspicuously busy; and we wear our busy-ness as a sort of badge of honor, rooting our worth in our work. In last week's episode, we talked with Dr. Snell about work and acedia. This week, we round out that episode with a discussion of what is ultimately the point of work, namely leisure. While we may often think of leisure as ordered toward work—we rest so that we may work more—Dr. Snell explains how the reverse is nearer the truth, not only etymologically but also metaphysically. Work is for the sake of leisure, as instrumental goods are for the sake of intrinsic goods. As you'll hear, if we take the Eucharistic feast seriously on Sunday, then the rest of our days will be caught up into that Eucharastic feast. Monday will be different, for though we may be just as busy as before, our activity will no longer be so frenetic. It may even take on the mysterious rhythm of a divine dance. 0:20 Relationship between leisure and acedia  0:35 Acedia as frenetic busy-ness  1:05 Total work and workaholism 1:44 School as leisure 2:30 Leisure is not an absence of activity   3:02 Sabbath work and goods for their own sake 5:04 Modern education and its discontents  5:52 Education as the feast 6:35 Mistake 1: Not respecting students as sovereign knowers 7:56 Mistake 2: Olympian vision of education 10:55 Overscheduling as a form of acedia 12:05 Conspicuous busy-ness 12:45 A culture of having and doing, rather than being 13:35 Sin as loving a lower good at the expense of a higher good 14:40 Sloth as a flattening of the Sabbath 14:56 Where do we begin? 15:40 Suggestions for the Sabbath 17:00 Sabbath overflowing into the work week 17:30 A Eucharistic life 18:25 Another sort of leisure 18:50 Leisure and contemplation in the work-a-day world 19:20 Living in and approving of the good 20:11 Dance as contemplation 21:53 Backyard sports as contemplation 23:50 A good question for conversation 24:10 What can we do to enjoy our time with each other more? 24:25 Catching the little foxes  Also on The Forum  Work and Acedia: R.J. Snell on Our Original Vocation with R.J. Snell OptimalWork series with Kevin Majeres  What Is the Difference between Free Time and Leisure? by Joe Bissex Additional Resources  Leisure: The Basis of Culture by Josef Pieper In Tune with the World by Josef Pieper Portsmouth Institute  Family, Leisure, and the Restoration of Culture by R.J. Snell Acedia and Its Discontents: Metaphysical Boredom in an Empire of Desire by R.J. Snell Summa Theologiae, II.2.35: Sloth by St. Thomas Aquinas 

The Wheel
Mary Hirschfeld - Thomas Aquinas and the Theology of Economy

The Wheel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 28:17


Student fellows converse with Professor Mary Hirschfeld about her book Aquinas and the Market: Toward a Humane Economy on the thought of Thomas Aquinas and how it relates to contemporary economic practice.

The Thomistic Institute
Off-Campus Conversations, Ep. 004: Prof. J. Budziszewski - Aquinas on Happiness

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 45:50


What does St. Thomas Aquinas say about happiness and ultimate purpose? How (and how not) can we be happy? Join Fr. Gregory Pine, O.P. of Aquinas 101, Godsplaining, and Pints with Aquinas for an off-campus conversation with Prof. J. Budziszewski about Aquinas' thoughts on happiness. Aquinas on Happiness w/ Fr. Gregory Pine and Prof. J. Budziszewski (Off-Campus Conversations) You can listen to one of Prof. Budziszewski's lectures on happiness here: https://soundcloud.com/thomisticinstitute/how-and-how-not-to-be-happy For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org About the speaker: J. Budziszewski (Ph.D. Yale, 1981) is a professor of government and philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. His main area of research is the natural moral law, and he is most well known for his work on moral self-deception, “the revenge of conscience,” what happens when we tell ourselves that we don't know what we really do know. However, he has written about all sorts of things such as moral character, family and sexuality, religion and public life, toleration and liberty, and the unraveling of our common culture. The most recent of his thirteen books are Commentary on Thomas Aquinas's Treatise on Law and Commentary on Thomas Aquinas's Virtue Ethics, both from Cambridge University Press, as well as On the Meaning of Sex, from Intercollegiate Studies Institute. His book for students, How to Stay Christian in College has sold several hundred thousand copies. He also maintains a personal website and blog, The Underground Thomist. Married for more than 45 years, Dr. Budziszewski has several children and a clutch of grandchildren.

Great Sacred Music
Thursday 1st September: Thomas Aquinas

Great Sacred Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 36:49


Led by Revd Dr Sam Wells with music performed by St Martin's Voices, directed by Andrew Earis and accompanied by Polina Sosnina. Tantum Ergo – Bruckner O salutaris hostia – Palestrina Serenity – MacMillan O sacrum convivium – Messiaen Panis Angelicus – Franck This season of Great Sacred Music has been supported by the Foundation of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London.

The Homeschooling Saints Podcast
Episode 127: Five Lessons from a Career in Teaching

The Homeschooling Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 47:36


Today's guest is a homeschooling mom with the training and experience to help us all level up our homeschool experience. Join us as Kimberly McCrann shares her Five Lessons from a Career in Teaching! Find Kimberly McCrann: www.coastalvillagegirl.com Learn more about “flex instrumentation” here: http://www.alfred.com/flexible-instrumentation-series/ The Abandonment Novena: https://www.catholicmom.com/articles/2015/09/23/novena-of-abandonment-dictated-by-jesus-to-give-an-anxious-soul-the-peace-and-joy-it-has-always-longed-for  Thank you to the following contributors who made this podcast possible: Our Sponsor HomeschoolConnections.com Homeschooling Saints Theme Music Composed by Taylor Kirkwood Intro voice Dave Palmer radio personality and author of St. Thomas Aquinas for Everyone Our host Lisa Mladinich

The Thomistic Institute
If We're Right, Are They Wrong? Catholic Claims on Truth | Prof. Paul Gondreau

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 84:36


This lecture was given on April 28, 2022 at the University of Arizona. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Paul Gondreau earned his doctorate in sacred theology from the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, writing under the renowned Thomist scholar Rev. Jean-Pierre Torrell, O.P. He is professor of theology at Providence College in Rhode Island, where he teaches/has taught courses on marriage, Christology, the theology of Thomas Aquinas, the Church, the Eucharist, the Sacraments, and the Catholic thought of J.R.R. Tolkien. He has a published manuscript on Christ's human passions in the theology of St. Thomas Aquinas and has published numerous essays in the area of Thomistic Christology, Thomistic anthropology, a Thomistic account of human sexuality, and a Thomistic theology of disability. His is associate editor of the theological journal Nova et Vetera, and has served as a consultant to the USCCB's committee on marriage and family.

Dr. Tom Curran Podcast
September 6 -Be a Magnificent Father! (or Mother) 4 Insights to Prepare for Marriage

Dr. Tom Curran Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 54:40


Dr. Tom Curran explores four Insights he wishes he'd been taught in preparation for marriage and family life. Tom explores insights from St. Thomas Aquinas on the virtue of magnificence and reveals the counseling he received in the confessional, an insight never spoken to him before!

Interior Integration for Catholics
Unlove of Self: How Trauma Predisposes You to Self-Hatred and Indifference

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 84:11


Summary:  In this episode, we review the many ways we fail to love ourselves, through self-hatred and through indifference toward ourselves.  We discuss the ways that unlove for self manifests itself, contrasting a lack of love with ordered self-love through the lens of Bernard Brady's five characteristics of love.  We discuss the impact of a lack of self-love on your body.  I then invite you into an experiential exercise to get to know a part of you that is not loving either another part of you or your body.   Lead-In “Mourn not the dead that in the cool earth lie--Dust unto dust--The calm, sweet earth that mothers all who dieAs all men must; Mourn not your captive comrades who must dwell--Too strong to strive--Within each steel-bound coffin of a cell,Buried alive; But rather mourn the apathetic throng--The cowed and the meek--Who see the world's great anguish and its wrongAnd dare not speak!”― Ralph Chaplin, Bars And Shadows Intro I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist and passionate Catholic and this is the Interior Integration for Catholics Podcasts, coming to you from the Souls and Hearts Studio in Indianapolis, Indiana.   This podcast is all about bringing you the best of psychology and human formation and harmonizing it with the perennial truths of the Catholic Faith.  In this Interior Integration for Catholics podcast, we take the most important human formation issues head on, without trepidation, without hesitation -- we don't mince words as we directly address with the most important concerns in the natural realm, the absolute central issues that we need to address with all of our energy and all of our resources.   We have been working through a series on trauma and well-being -- starting with episode 88.  In the last episode, episode 96, I Am a Rock: How Trauma Hardens us Against Being Loved -- we discussed the impact of trauma on us accepting love from others, including God.   In this episode, we're addressing how trauma sets us up to refuse to love ourselves.  Welcome to Episode 97 of Interior Integration for Catholics, titled "Unlove of Self:  How Trauma Predisposes You to Self-Hatred and Indifference"  It's released on September 5, 2022.   It is so good to be with you, thank you for listening in and for being together with me once again.  I'm glad we are here and that we are exploring the great unlove of self.   The great unlove for self -- like the uncola ads from 7-UP in the late 60s throughout the 70s and 80, even into the late 90s. What does unlove of self mean -- OK, I get it that it's refusing to love myself -- but what does that mean?   You might tell me that if I don't love myself, then I am hating myself.   All right.  Let's go with that.  Let's explore self-hatred and self-loathing  Define self-hatred Self-hatred is hatred directed toward oneself rather than toward others  Verywellmind.com article titled "Self-loathing" by Jodi Clarke, a licensed professional counselor  Self-loathing, or self-hatred, is extreme criticism of oneself. It may feel as though nothing you do is good enough or that you are unworthy or undeserving of good things in life. Self-hate can feel like having a person following you around, all day every day, criticizing you and pointing out every flaw, or shaming you for every mistake.   Brennan Manning  In my experience, self-hatred is the dominant malaise crippling Christians and stifling their growth in the Holy Spirit. Not sure I agree with that -- depends on the definitions.  Shame and the fear of shame overwhelming the self are such drivers of self hatred.   Angel Ploetner, Who Am I? Dissociative Identity Disorder Survivor “Shame plays a huge part in why you hate who you are.” Shame is so central  Check out episodes 37 to 49 of this podcast for a whole series on shame.    Eric Hoffer It is not love of self but hatred of self which is at the root of the troubles that afflict our world. Basil W. Maturin  We never get to love by hate, least of all by self-hatred.  Lori Deschene  “We can't hate ourselves into a version of ourselves we can love.” The primary way we hate ourselves -- for parts of you to hate other parts of you.  I am talking about intra-psychic hatred.  Hatred within you, for you, by you.   IFS description of the self Reference Episode 71: A New and Better Way of Understanding Myself and Others  Definition of Parts:  Parts are like separate, independently operating personalities within you, each with own unique prominent needs, roles in your life, emotions, body sensations, guiding beliefs and assumptions, typical thoughts, intentions, desires, attitudes, impulses, interpersonal style, and world view.  Each part also has a different attitude or position toward other parts of you and different beliefs and assumptions about your body.  Robert Falconer calls these parts insiders.   Like in the movie Inside Out.  Your parts have different roles within your self-system.   Your parts have a very narrow, limited vision when they are not in right relationship with your innermost self.  Each of your parts usually has a strong agenda, something that they trying to accomplish, some good that that part is seeking for you.    Polarizations  Examples of polarizations in the most recent weekly reflection -- The Counterfeits of Self-Giving from August 31,2022.  How parts get polarized around the idea of giving of self Compliant surrenderer vs. feisty protector  Self-sacrificer vs. rebel  Check that out.   Bessel van der Kolk, in his excellent book "The Body Keeps the Score" devotes all of chapter 17 to Internal Family Systems.  Very accessible book, I've recommended it before to many non-clinicians.  There's a reason it has been the top selling book on trauma for the last seven years running.  A book like that comes around once in a generation.  In 1992, It was Judith Herman's seminal book Trauma and Recovery.  23 years later, it was The Body Keeps the Score.   To examine Unlove, we are going to contrast unloving with loving.  Let's review the five general characteristics of love -- from Bernard Brady, his 2003 Christian Love: How Christians through the Ages have Understood Love.-- drawing heavily from the work of Christian phenomenologists.  I introduced his five characteristics of in Episode 94, The Primacy of Love and I expanded on them in Episode 95 Trauma's Devastating Impact on our Capacity to Love.  Love is affective, love is affirming, love is responsive, love is unitive, love is steadfast.  Those are the five characteristics of love that Bernard Brady distilled from his historical review of how Christians have seen love through the ages.  Love is affective, love is affirming, love is responsive, love is unitive, love is steadfast.  So let's break down what happens when one part of you is hating another part of you.   Love is affective -- love is emotional Love rejoices in the beloved -- Protestant Theologian R.H. Neibuhr writes in his 1977  By love, we mean at least these attitudes and actions: rejoicing in the presence of the beloved, gratitude, reverence, and loyalty toward him.  p.35   Many positive emotions are associated with love Delight, Bliss, Happiness  A sense of fulfillment  Warmth, appreciation   What does hatred or loathing for another part look like?  How do parts hate each other? Self hatred is also affective -- it's also emotional.  But in a very different way that ordered self-love is.   Disgust regarding the another part  Anger toward another part  Contempt for the body -- anger + disgust = contempt  Example:  Let's say there is a fearful part of you that is very frightened of public speaking – of making presentations in front of other people. And now, for your work, you are required to make an important presentation in front of your supervisors and more senior executives within your company. Another part of you, your perfectionistic part, has led you to rehearse your presentation, to the point where you almost have it memorized. Your last performance in front of your bedroom mirror was so good. But now, in front of your audience, your fearful part locks you up. You find yourself stuttering, stammering, and your inner critic is a railing in hatred against your fearful part. That inner critic is saying things like, "Why are you such a sniveling frightened little coward? It's just a simple presentation, dumb ass, we've practiced it over and over, we have it down.  Get yourself together, this is really important, and you are screwing it up and making us all look bad.  Who knows what will happen if we can't pull this off." The more intense your inner critic gets in its hateful attack on your fearful part, the more the fearful part freezes.  After the presentation ends, the inner critic continues to bash the fearful part, ruminating about how poor the presentation was.   Love is affirming Love says yes to the other at the same time as love says yes to oneself.  In parts thinking, there is a open-hearted yes to all the parts.  Not just some parts, not just the "acceptable" parts of us.  All part are welcome to the table.   In self-hatred, one or more parts attack the unloved part -- not just superficially, but they hating parts go after the identity of the unloved part the self-hating parts want to destroy the hated part, or at least banish the hated part from having a voice, from having a seat at the table  In our example, you can see how the inner critic is trying to get rid of the fearful part, trying to suppress that part with its fear.    From Jodi Clarke's Verywellmind.com article:  Typical self-hating thoughts may include:     "I knew we would fail."       "Why do I even try?"     "I'm a loser."     "No one wants to be around me."     "Look at me screwing up again."     "Can't I just be normal?"     "I hate myself." Richard Bach   The worst lies are the lies we tell ourselves. We live in denial of what we do, even what we think. We do this because we're afraid.  When other people affirm the person who is dominated by a self-hating part, the affirmation doesn't really sink in.  It doesn't work.  The person all caught up in self hatred can't hear the affirmation, can't take the affirmation in.  Richey Edwards  “People say to the mentally ill, ‘You know so many people think the world of you.' But when they don't like themselves they don't notice anything. They don't care about what people think of them. When you hate yourself, whatever people say it doesn't make sense. ‘Why do they like me? Why do they care about me?' Because you don't care about yourself at all.”   Love is responsive:  Love is an active response for the well-being of the other.  It's about participating in the promotion of the highest good for the other, potential for the other How can I help you to flourish?  How can I help you toward your highest good?   In self-hatred one or more parts tear down the hated part.  There is a response to the hated part, but it's not a positive one.   Rather than attuning to the hated part, the hating parts seek to silence it and suppress it without really getting to know the hated part.  Not interested in the hated part's experience -- why the hated part thinks, feels or assumes what it does.   In our example, the inner critic is responsive to the fear of the fearful part, but in hateful way -- seeing the fearful part as counterproductive and threatening the wellbeing of the whole person, and thus feels justified in the bullying, heavy-handed approach taken.   Love is unitive  Bernard Brady:  The fruit of love is unity.  Love unites.  It is in the very nature of love to bring together.  p. 279 Hatred divides.  It polarizes within.  The fearful part and the inner critic have no common ground because of the hatred.   Hatred fragments within.  It shatters the self.  Order self love helps to integrate all the parts, providing space for all parts to be seen, heard known, and loved. Love integrates parts, inviting them into a collaborative, cooperative relationship with the innermost self and with all the other parts.  We give this internal unity a special name -- interior integration.  That is what this podcast is all about.  Interior integration for Catholics.   Love is steadfast Steadfastness in self-love requires acceptance of all parts for there to be resilience.  Hatred contributes to the inner system of the self being brittle and fragile.     Hatred doesn't generally come from our innermost selves  Self:  The natural core of the person, the center of the person in the natural realm.  This is who we sense ourselves to be in our best moments, and when our self is free, and unblended with any of our parts, it governs our whole being as an active, compassionate leader.  Unharmed by trauma, by attachment injuries, by relational wounds, by negative life experiences.   Catholics don't believe in John Calvin's concept of total depravity, that we are sinful and morally corrupt through and through.  Catholics don't believe we are snow-covered dung heaps, like Martin Luther taught.  We are still ontologically good, still made in the image and likeness of God.   We want to be recollected, we want the self governing all of our parts Like the conductor -- leading the musicians in an orchestra Like the captain -- leading and governing all the sailors on a ship.   When we are recollected, in self, 8 C's Calm  Curiosity  Compassion  Confidence  Courage  Clarity  Connectedness  Creativity   We also have the capacity for kindness The only exception:  unless we've committed the unforgivable sin, blaspheming against the Holy Spirit  CCC 1864:  “There are no limits to the mercy of God, but anyone who deliberately refuses to accept his mercy by repenting, rejects the forgiveness of his sins and the salvation offered by the Holy Spirit. Such hardness of heart can lead to final impenitence and eternal loss” (No. 1864). Repudiating life, love, truth, mercy, forgiveness -- irrevocably, through hardness of heart.  That is possible, or Jesus would not have warned against it.  Walking dead.   What does self-hatred mean for our relationships with our body? We are body and soul composites.  We are embodied beings.   Bessel van der Kolk:  The Body Keeps the Score -- groundbreaking work summarizing how much trauma becomes embodied  Another way for you to hate yourself  -- or more specifically, for a part of you to hate your body.   Examples of actively hating the body  Active examples 4 Extreme cases -- starting with extreme cases -- Suicidal Acts, Body Dysmporphic Disorder, Body Integrity Identity Disorder, Self-Harm (aka Self-mutilation).   Suicidal acts -- I did a whole series on suicide in this Interior Integration for Catholics podcast.  Episodes 76-80 Suicidal part -- desperately seeking relief from intense pain and distress   Other Reason -- these are the core reasons. -- review them in episode 76 and got into how parts are active around suicide in episode 78 The Desperate Inner Experience of Suicidality  Attachment needs not met -- Episode 62 A felt sense of safety and protection, deep sense of security felt in the bones  Feeling seen and known heard and understood -- felt attunement  Felt comfort, reassurance  Feeling valued, delighted in, cherished by the attachment figure  Felt support for the best self   Integrity Needs not met All of the above.  Each one of us needs help to develop our sense of self, our identity  I exist  my existence is separate from others --  I exist in my own right, a separate personIs bounded, has boundaries  My identity is stable over time and across different situations -- there is a continuity  I can regulate myself -- I have some self-control.   Is integrated -- coherent interconnections inside between aspects of experience -- self-cohesion  Is active, with agency, can effectively function in the world  Is morally good -- ontologically or essentially good and thus has intrinsic value and worth, apart from others' opinions.   I can make sense of my experience and the world around me  Mission and Purpose in life  We also need to make good choices -- seek what is good, true and beautiful in life   Body dysmorphic disorder   Appearance preoccupations: The individual must be preoccupied with one or more nonexistent or slight defects or flaws in their physical appearance. Verbally abusing the body Body shaming yourself -- a part of you calling your body fat, ugly, physically unattractive, calling your body out on the perceived unattractive features -- my eyes are too far apart, my lips are too thin, my skin is too bumpy, and what about that zit that just appeared.   Repetitive behaviors: The individual must perform repetitive, compulsive behaviors in response to the appearance concerns.  Behaviors: mirror checking, excessive grooming, skin picking, reassurance seeking, or clothes changing.  mental acts such as a part of you comparing one's appearance with that of other people.   -- getting on tiktok and saying, that person's body is so gorgeous and I'm a just a pig.  Ruminating about what others have said about your body or what they might say about your body.  Sometimes it's all just in the realm of fantasy.   Differentiation from an eating disorder: Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) is a rare, infrequently studied and highly secretive condition in which there is a mismatch between the mental body image and the physical body. Subjects suffering from BIID have an intense desire to amputate a major limb or severe the spinal cord in order to become paralyzed or to become blind or deaf. Self-harm  or self-mutilation, sometimes called cutting Really not understood well by most people -- dismissed as something only a crazy person would do.   It's a symptom.   Forms include Cutting  Burning or branding, scalding with hot water  Picking at the skin, reopening wounds or severe scratching  Carving the skin  Trichotillomania   Head banging Hitting oneself Biting oneself Self-poisoning Self-starvation (deliberate) Getting into fights Reasons for Self Harm  The Punished Self, the Unknown Self, and the Harmed Self – Toward a More Nuanced Understanding of Self-Harm Among Adolescent Girls -- August 2021 Frontiers in Psychology Norwegian researcher Line Indrevoll Stänicke1 -- Qualitative Study of 19 adolescent girls  Superordinate themes “I deserve pain,”  “I don't want to feel anything,”  “I'm harmed, and no one cares.”  “I deserve pain,”  “I don't want to feel anything,”  “I'm harmed, and no one cares.”  8 Reasons for Self-harm Desire to release unbearable tension or providing relief from overwhelming emotions  At times [self-harm] also silenced the chaos in my head, briefly pausing the repetitive flashbacks and body memories."  Desire to regain control  Fighting depersonalization -- "Self-harm proved to me I was real, I was alive.  (mind.org.uk)   Numbness can feel like death -- need to feel anything at all.   Self-hatred  Feeling the need to self-punish "I hated my body and blamed it for what I'd been through, so felt it needed punishing. (mind.org.uk) Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia   “I wanted to kill the me underneath. That fact haunted my days and nights. When you realize you hate yourself so much, when you realize that you cannot stand who you are, and this deep spite has been the motivation behind your behavior for many years, your brain can't quite deal with it. It will try very hard to avoid that realization; it will try, in a last-ditch effort to keep your remaining parts alive, to remake the rest of you. This is, I believe, different from the suicidal wish of those who are in so much pain that death feels like relief, different from the suicide I would later attempt, trying to escape that pain. This is a wish to murder yourself; the connotation of kill is too mild. This is a belief that you deserve slow torture, violent death.”  Blaming your body for others' actions romantic partner breaking up with you -- not attractive enough  Being raped -- hating body because it attracted unwanted attention of the rapist.   To express pain, communicate or share the internal experience to others, to make visible what is felt within.   A way to distract from some worse experience, e.g. intrusive thoughts.   Association with others who self-harm -- peer group.   Five general characteristics of love from Bernard Brady -- looking at how they contrast with parts' hatred for the body.  Love is affective -- love is emotional Hatred regarding the body  Disgust regarding the body  Anger toward the body  Fear of the body  Contempt for the body -- anger + disgust = contempt  Fueled by envy of other people's bodies.   Love is affirming  Devaluing the body -- Body Shaming Seeing the body as evil   De-facto Manicheanism All matter are seen as evil -- including our bodies  St. Augustine adhered to Manicheanism for a while before his conversion, and then strongly refuted it.   Hatred of the body.   Love is responsive And love is responsive to the body's legitimate needs.   or ignored.  In self-hatred toward the body, those needs are condemned  Love is unitive Can be a kind of separation of the body from the self.  I am not my body.  This is not by body.   Love is steadfast   So that is self-hatred.  But self-hatred isn't actually the most common or important form of failing to love the self.   What is the most common and most important failure to love the self?  The great sin against the self, if you will? Indifference.  The opposite of love is not hate, it is indifference.  “The Beloved Ego: Foundations of the New Study of the Psyche” by prominent Austrian psychologist Wilhelm Stekel. The text was translated from German into English by Rosalie Gabler and published in 1921.  The quote was expanded and made famous by Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel in a 1986 US News and World Report article The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it's indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it's indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it's indifference.   Indifference is so, so common.  We can be so indifferent to ourselves and to others. ― David Mitchell  “The world's default mode is basic indifference. It'd like to care, but it's just got too much on at the moment.”  Aristotle “Tolerance and apathy are the last virtues of a dying society.”     W. Somerset Maugham British playwright, novelist, short story writer The tragedy of love is indifference Catholic philosopher Peter Kreeft wrote in his book Prayer for Beginners that Indifference is more truly the opposite of love than hate is, for we can both love and hate the same person at the same time, but we cannot both love and be indifferent to the same person at the same time What does indifference to the self mean to the parts The biggest form of unlove -- indifference.   Define indifference --  an absence of interest in or concern about emotional, social, spiritual, philosophical, virtual, or physical life.   and the world. not caring about oneself.  Disregarding oneself, Abandoning oneself, not caring about oneself. Wait a minute, Dr. Peter -- I thought that was what we Catholics were called to do.  Being dead or numb to oneself  Evil is the absence of good (privatio boni) -- privation theory of evil --  this idea was implicit in some of Plato's writings, but he never stated it implicitly   Plotinus further developed the idea And St. Augustine really refined it.  City of God:  For evil has no positive nature; but the loss of good has received the name “evil.” Examples of indifference to the parts  Lack of awareness Parts disconnected from the self or fused with the self have very partial vision      Lack of caring Make up some examples here.   Five general characteristics of love -- from Bernard Brady Love is affective, love is affirming, love is responsive, love is unitive, love is steadfast.   Love is affective -- love is emotional Apathy toward the parts.  Not caring about them, not interested.  Parts pursuing their own agendas inside with little regard for the wellbeing of others parts.   Trauma begins in terror but ends in apathy.”  ― Brian W. Becker ― Khang Kijarro Nguyen  “Apathy is as dangerous, invisible, and contagious as an asymptomatic virus carrier.” “Apathy is a silent killer.” ― Frank Sonnenberg,     Love is affirming “The stronger you cling to your armor of indifference, the more it strips you of your humanity.” ― Abhijit Naskar, No Foreigner Only Family    Love is responsive “there are people capable of eating popcorn at the movie of your agony”― StephanieR oberts, Rushes from the River Disappointment   Nina MacLaughlin, Wake, Siren: Ovid Resung  “His eyes they held the most dangerous thing, they held the top of the sins. Indifference. Indifference. A vacancy where human care should be."  “We may not choose apathy, but when we choose anything other than love and empathetic justice, we get apathy by default.”― Ken Wytsma,  Love is unitive Love is never fragmented; it's an inseparable whole which does not delight in bits and pieces. John A. Andrews  Love is steadfast Polarizations lead to tension inside and instability   What does indifference to the self mean to the body Bessel van der Kolk:  … traumatized people chronically feel unsafe inside their bodies: the past is alive in the form of annoying interior discomforts. Their bodies are constantly bombarded by visceral warning signs, and in an attempt to control these processes, the often become expert at ignoring their gut feelings in a numbing awareness of what is played out inside. They learn to hide from themselves.   Examples of indifference to the body  Lack of awareness Parts disconnected from the self or fused with the self have very partial vision   Less extreme, passive examples of indifference to the body -- we've all done at least some of these.   Problematic eating or drinking Too much caffeine (hooked on energy drinks or coffee)  Misuse of alcohol  Overeating  Too much sugar  Too much junk food  Eating to soothe oneself when upset, sometimes called emotional eating  Eating when bored  Skipping meals   Smoking Not exercising at all -- too little physical activity -- or too much exercise Poor ergonomics Overdoing the screen time -- 10 hours a day on the computer is hard on the eyes Low activity levels  9.3 hours of sitting per day, more than 7.7 hours of sleeping today Not going outside Allowing yourself to get really sunburned or dehydrated or exhausted Not using the bathroom when you need to Poor clothing choices -- not bundling up in winter -- the man in the hoodie when it's 15 degrees out in wintertime, woman wearing high heels when it's not a good choice,  Misuse of the smartphone -- using your smartphone in bed Poor sleep habits, going to bed too late Misuse of sex -- not caring for your body in sexual situations.   Not getting medical or dental care for your body that would be good and right ignoring a treatable condition  Ignoring symptoms   Poor hygiene Five general characteristics of love -- from Bernard Brady Love is affective, love is affirming, love is responsive, love is unitive, love is steadfast.   Love is affective -- love is emotional Indifference to the body.  Just not caring about the body, apathy toward the body.  Looking at only the utilitarian functionality of the body.  The body as a container or vessel for your mind or soul or psyche.     Love is affirming -- indifference to the body can mimic detachment or poverty Love is responsive -- Lack of awareness about the body.  Very disconnected.   La belle indifference:  The term “la belle indifference” is a French term, which translates to “beautiful ignorance.”[1] La belle indifference is defined as a paradoxical absence of psychological distress despite having a serious medical illness or symptoms related to a health condition. Not being interested in your body.  Love is unitive Not seeing your body is part of you, disconnecting from your body Love is steadfast 1 Cor 3:16-17.   Do you not know that you are God's temple and that God's Spirit dwells in you? If any one destroys God's temple, God will destroy him. For God's temple is holy, and that temple you are.   Experiential Exercise on Unlove -- the failure to love  Cautions difficult material -- how and why we don't love ourselves.   window of tolerance Upside -- Fight or flight, sympathetic activation  Downside -- Free response -- dorsal vagal activation, shutting down, numbing out,  don't have to do this exercise, can stop at any time, reground yourself  no steamrolling parts  Good to do this exercise when you have the time and space and privacy -- not while driving or engaging in other activities that would require you to divide your attention.   Options Take what is useful to you  Feel free to go your own direction if that seems what's best  Feel free to pause the audio and really settle in and do extended work inside if that seems best  Can have pens, pencils and paper to write down things that are helpful -- like a journal -- or to map out things, draw if that's helpful.  Can pause the recording at points where you would like to have more time to do your internal work.   A lot of gentleness with and for yourself.  Moment here for your to really care for yourself.   Luke 10:27 Love your neighbor as yourself -- we are supposed to love ourselves in an ordered way And that means loving the parts of ourself that are in need.  With care and compassion If you get distracted, that's ok, that's common.  You can just refocus, or if that's not possible, then focus in on that distraction -- get curious about why a part of you needs to distract you.   Body scan -- locating -- finding. -- Call that a trailhead Tension in muscles  Stomach pain or gastrointestinal distress  Headaches  Fatigue   Could be other trailheads Images or dreams that come back to mind  Memories, sounds, beliefs or assumptions   Focus in on that one sensation or inner experience that reflects some kind of distress or agitation about you not loving you.   That experience will lead you to a part -- we will call the part you are focusing on, your target part.  A part that is not loving some other part of you in some way Your target part Might be hating another part of you  Your target part Might just not be caring about another part of you.   Your target part Might be trying to suppress or silence that other part.   Listen in to what that experience, that body sensation or that impulse or desire or image or memory or belief. Really notice that target part.  How do you experience it?  Let's see if we can work with one part at a time.  You can do this reflection and guided exercise over again with multiple parts if you'd like.  But see if your parts inside can agree to let you work with one part.   We are going to ask that one part not to flood you with its intensity.  That's a safety thing.  We are asking that part not to overwhelm you with its distress.  We want to be separate but near, so that you as the self can have a relationship with that part.  If your target part fuses with you or blends with you, you can't have a relationship.  See if that part will agree not to overwhelm.  Just ask it.  See what the response is.  If it agrees, then  Really sense that part.  See that part or sense that part, however that part is becoming more apparent to you.  How old is that part?  Some parts of us are very, very young.  Even preverbal.   Really listen to what that target parts wants to share with you, what it wants you to know.   How is that target part trying to help you?  What is that target part's good intentions.   How are you feeling toward that part, toward that experience Compassion  Connection  Curiosity -- genuine interest  Calm   If feeling negative, can we get concerned protector parts to soften, to relax back so that you, as the self, can connect with your distressed target part?  If not, focus on the concerned protector part.  Really get interested about why that part is not ready to let you connect with your target part.  There's a reason.  Parts always have good intentions for us.   Let your target part tell you all about what its experiencing with the other part -- the unloved part.   Emotions Anxiety  Sorrow -- deep emotional pain  Anger  Numbness   Thinking -- assumptions, beliefs Really be open to these beliefs, asking protectors not to censor them if possible.  Concentration issues.   Behaviors -- why does the part do what it does? What does this conflict connect back to for your part -- when did the part feel the same way in your history?  Checking to see if there's a concerned protector part trying to speak for your target part -- like a spokespart who wants to interpret the parts experience.  See if that concerned protector part can soften and relax back and let the target part speak for itself.   How is that part doing now?  Changes in your body?   Can the part feel love from you?  xWhere are you with: Compassion  Connectedness  Curiosity  Calm   Winding up Can write down what you learned, what was helpful, what came to you -- giving your parts a voice on paper.   Can do this exercise again with a different part  Gratitude for all your parts -- all have good intentions are trying to help  This doesn't have to be the end of connecting with your target part -- doesn't have to be a one-off experience, can check in with that part again.  Action Plan Looking ahead: next episode, number 98 -- ordered self-love -- now that we've covered all the ways that we can fail to love ourselves, we will be learning what it means for us to be loving ourselves in an ordered way.   Fr. Jacques Philippe -- 2008 Book Called to Life:  This self-love is good and necessary, not egoism that refers everything to "me," but the grace to live in peace with one's self, consent to be what one is, with one's talents and limitations. Love of God, love of neighbor, and love of self grow together and sustain one another as they grow. If one is absent or neglected, the other to suffer. Like the legs of a tripod, all three are needed in order to stand in each leans on the others. St. Thomas Aquinas  -- bringing in some of the work of Dr. Mary Julian Ekman, Religious Sister of Mercy. Self-love is the ground of human action, where the conscious choice to love self transforms self- love into self-friendship.  Proper self-love (amor sui ordinatus) is indispensable for perfecting the human person by making the soul more like God, who knows and loves himself by his very essence.    This movement toward self-perfection is hindered by improper self-love (amor sui inordinatus)   St. Augustine will also help us, as we explore how disordered self-love regards the self as an end, but ordered self-love sees the self as a means to the proper end of love.   Promotions  Ann-Marie Klobe -- Ready for Love: An online retreat for single Catholic women over 35 who are ready to connect deeper with their Faith, the Saints, and find a Godly relationship.  The Ready for Love retreat airs October 3-17, 2022  So many single Catholics are operating from a place of disconnection, and my goal is to restore their trust in God's plan for their life, help them feel like they have a purpose in this world, and provide training on topics such as the Saints, forgiveness, beauty, and trusting in God.  Anne-Marie did an extended experiential exercise with me as part of this retreat.  She discovered and explored some hidden reasons that could be obstacles in romantic intimacy.  She did some beautiful work that she will share with the women who attend the retreat.   Anne Marie and I are also planning for me to do a 60-minute live Q&A for the Ready for Love retreat -- where the women on the retreat can bring their questions to me about the ways that they reject ourselves as persons, the ways in which they refuse to love themselves, what it would mean to be married, and about discovering their primary identity as a beloved daughter of God.   The website for the retreat was not quite up yet at recording time.   You can go to Anne Marie Klobe's website -- https://www.anne-marieklobe.com  I will be letting you know more about it and provide links in the weekly reflections that I email out on September 14 and 21-- if you haven't been getting the weekly email reflections, sign up for them, and have them delivered to your email inbox every Wednesday.  Go to Souls and Hearts.com and click  the box that says "Get Dr. Peter's weekly reflection in your email inbox each Wednesday. Those weekly reflections are deep dives that I write each week about critical human formation topics -- those weekly reflections are the written companions to this podcast.   The Resilient Catholics Community.  The RCC.  I am inviting you on an adventure of being loved and of loving.  That is what the Resilient Catholic Community is all about.  Check it out at soulsandhearts.com/RCC   The RCC is all about working through your human formation issues -- the ones that lead to all the unlove you have for yourself.  The self-hatred and the indifference to self, the failures to love yourself in an ordered way, so that you can love got with all of your being -- with your whole heart, your whole soul, your whole mind and all your strength, with every fiber of your being.   It's all about learning to be gentle but firm with yourself -- it's all about integration.  It's all about resilience.   All about restoration -- recovering from being dominated by shame, fear, anger, sadness, pessimism, whatever your struggle is in the depths of your human formation We do this work experientially -- so many experiential exercises -- so we work not just in your head, and not just in your soul, but also in your heart.   And we do the work step by step -- in a very clear program.   Check it out at soulsandhearts.com/rcc -- we open registration for new members every June and December.   I'm inviting you to join me and more than 100 other faithful Catholics on this pilgrimage to much better human formation.  Get on the waiting list for the cohort that begins in December 2022.  soulsandhearts.com/rcc Talk with me about it in conversation hours call my cell 317.567.9594 any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern time for conversation hours.    

CrossPolitic Studios
All Things G. K. Chesterton—Especially Distributism [The Pugcast]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 63:19


Today the Pugcast welcomes Dr. David Deavel on to the show to discuss G. K. Chesterton in all of his enormity. Perhaps best known among evangelicals for his book Orthodoxy, Chesterton also wrote detective fiction about a priest named, Father Brown, as well as longer works of fiction such as the remarkable, The Man Who Was Thursday, biographies about Francis of Assisi and Thomas Aquinas. He’s also known for a “Third Way” economic theory known as Distributism. Today’s show ranges over all the large legacy of this larger than life man. Enjoy! Support the Pugcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thetheologypugcast?fbclid=IwAR17UHhfzjphO52C_kkZfursA_C784t0ldFix0wyB4fd-YOJpmOQ3dyqGf8

HeightsCast: Forming Men Fully Alive
Work and Acedia: R.J. Snell on Our Original Vocation

HeightsCast: Forming Men Fully Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 44:01


A certain distinguished school leader, when asked when he would retire from his work, replied, “the day that I wake up and do not want to go to work.” A reply such as this perhaps strikes the modern ear as senseless. For many of us, work fills the greater portion of our daily lives, but do we feel ourselves thereby fulfilled? Especially today, we may often feel trapped in what seem like unspectacular sisyphean cycles. This week, R. J. Snell, editor-in-chief of Public Discourse and director of the Center on the University and Intellectual Life at the Witherspoon Institute in Princeton, New Jersey, talks to HeightsCast about the virtues of work and its opposing vice, acedia. Drawing on insights from his book, Acedia and Its Discontents, R. J. helps us think through how these concepts are realized in the context of family life and life on campus.  As we will hear, our everyday work is the ordinary means by which we participate not only in the perfection of God's creation but also in the perfection of our very selves. Our work is where the rubber meets the road; it is where mere aspiration is turned into actual reality. Ultimately, work is where heaven and earth merge. In realizing this often hidden truth, we may thereby discover that divine drama which is not a sisyphean cycle, but a spiral staircase.  Chapters  1:17 Work as a gift  2:22 Error of thinking that work is a result of the Fall 3:23 Garden of Eden as in a state of potency: Adam and Eve are called to fill it 5:30 Work as part of being made in the image of God 7:15 How work fulfills us 7:35 Husbandry of the self 8:25 God's rule through our own self rule: participated theonomy 10:08 Work as the primary way of exercising self-governance 12:50 Cultivating the soil: on the way to beauty 14:25 The friendly universe 15:50 Grace perfects nature 16:41 The three tests of good work 18:45 The integrity of work and the worker's integrity 19:30 Bright-eyed children 21:25 Work as furnishing God's house 24:03 Education as cooperating with Grace 26:07 Acedia: a hatred of reality 27:05 Judge Holden and the desire for radical self-autonomy 30:00 Desert Fathers on acedia and the refusal of God's friendship 31:00 Sloth as the vice of our age 31:36 Natural history as the counter to acedia and reductionism 35:03 The little foxes: recognizing acedia creeping in 35:55 What you are doing now is where God is calling you 37:40 The divine drama of the most mundane things 38:50 Sabbath and rest Also on The Forum OptimalWork series with Kevin Majeres Why We Need Exposure to Nature by Eric Heil What Is the Difference between Free Time and Leisure? by Joe Bissex Additional Resources Portsmouth Institute Family, Leisure, and the Restoration of Culture by R. J. Snell  Acedia and Its Discontents: Metaphysical Boredom in an Empire of Desire by R. J. Snell Summa Theologiae, II.2.35: Sloth by St. Thomas Aquinas

The Theology Pugcast
All Things G. K. Chesterton—Especially Distributism

The Theology Pugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 63:19


Today the Pugcast welcomes Dr. David Deavel on to the show to discuss G. K. Chesterton in all of his enormity. Perhaps best known among evangelicals for his book Orthodoxy, Chesterton also wrote detective fiction about a priest named, Father Brown, as well as longer works of fiction such as the remarkable, The Man Who Was Thursday, biographies about Francis of Assisi and Thomas Aquinas. He’s also known for a “Third Way” economic theory known as Distributism. Today’s show ranges over all the large legacy of this larger than life man. Enjoy! Support the Pugcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thetheologypugcast?fbclid=IwAR17UHhfzjphO52C_kkZfursA_C784t0ldFix0wyB4fd-YOJpmOQ3dyqGf8

The Sword & Staff
War Against The Rulers and Principalities

The Sword & Staff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 98:18


In this week's edition of the Sword and Staff, the boys get into a discussion about Spiritual Warfare. They shed light on the powers of the Kingdom of Darkness and the schemes of the enemy. They also talk about how Christians should think about Spiritual Warfare and how to war back. Sources Used and Recommended Reading and Listening: BibleProject Spiritual Beings Series - https://bit.ly/2Fz8l8E Summa Theologica On The Hierarchy of Angels by Thomas Aquinas - https://bit.ly/3Q9KFtU A Primer on Triperspectivalism by John Frame - https://bit.ly/2sjEvBS Trinitarian Discipleship by Chase Davis - https://amzn.to/3cypIv3 Join the Order on Patreon and get exclusive content: patreon.com/swordandstafforder Keep up with us on Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/swordandstafforder Instagram: @swordandstafforder Twitter: @swordandstaffwv Discord: https://discord.gg/772FXEqURK Website: swordandstaff.net

Fight Laugh Feast USA
All Things G. K. Chesterton—Especially Distributism [The Pugcast]

Fight Laugh Feast USA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 63:19


Today the Pugcast welcomes Dr. David Deavel on to the show to discuss G. K. Chesterton in all of his enormity. Perhaps best known among evangelicals for his book Orthodoxy, Chesterton also wrote detective fiction about a priest named, Father Brown, as well as longer works of fiction such as the remarkable, The Man Who Was Thursday, biographies about Francis of Assisi and Thomas Aquinas. He’s also known for a “Third Way” economic theory known as Distributism. Today’s show ranges over all the large legacy of this larger than life man. Enjoy! Support the Pugcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thetheologypugcast?fbclid=IwAR17UHhfzjphO52C_kkZfursA_C784t0ldFix0wyB4fd-YOJpmOQ3dyqGf8

Living the CALL
Father Ambrose Criste | Liturgical Creatures

Living the CALL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 56:59


This week on Living the Call, Deacon Charlie talks with Fr. Ambrose Criste , a Norbertine priest from St. Michael's Abbey in Orange County, California. Fr. Ambrose entered the monastery in 2000, made solemn profession in 2006, and was ordained a priest in 2008. He finished his priestly studies in Rome with pontifical degrees from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas and the Pontifical Gregorian University. He is the novice master, the director of formation, and the vocations director for his abbey.  Join Deacon Charlie and Father Ambrose in this episode, as they discuss living an authentic Catholic life through worship in liturgy, community life, and the use of technology…all while accompanying others on their journeys. Get in Touch! Visit:  The Given Institute - https://giveninstitute.com/ Support This Show! https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/weblink.aspx?name=E356519&id=2 

Intelligent Design the Future
Behe and Ramage: Evolution's Limits and the Fingerprints of Design

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 33:07 Very Popular


Today's ID the Future wraps up a debate over evolution and intelligent design between Lehigh University biologist Michael Behe and Benedictine College theologian Michael Ramage. Both Behe and Ramage are Catholic, and they carry on their conversation in the context of Catholic thinking about nature and creation, in particular the work of Thomas Aquinas and contemporary Thomist philosophers. Ramage seeks to integrate his Thomistic/personalist framework with modern evolutionary theory's commitment to macroevolution and common descent. Behe doesn't discount the possibility of common descent but lays out a case that any evolution beyond the level of genus (for instance, the separate families containing cats and dogs) cannot be achieved through mindless Darwinian mechanisms and, instead, would require the contributions of a Read More › Source

Called to Communion
2022-08-31 - What Does The Word "Mass" Mean?

Called to Communion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 51:00


What does the word "Mass" mean, do the sacraments save us?, what is the #truth and why is it important to live by it, why is St. Thomas Aquinas more important than John Calvin, and what is the Old Catholic #faith? #sacrament #Church #Catholicism #Thomasaquinas #OldCatholic #Mass #liturgy

The Blue-White Podcast: A Penn State Athletics Podcast
Recruiting Show: Jameial Lyons dominates in Week One | Penn State commit roundup

The Blue-White Podcast: A Penn State Athletics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 29:12


Penn State's committed players in the class of 2023 took the field last weekend. Blue White Illustrated's recruiting insider Ryan Snyder was at several games this weekend and recaps what he saw from several players, including four-star defensive end Jameial Lyons. He and host Greg Pickel discuss the essential players from the past weekend and how they performed.  First, the show starts off with a loss for Penn State in recruiting. Four-star linebacker Kaveion Keys committed to North Carolina on Monday. How firm is that commitment? Snyder gives what he knows about keys and how the Tarheels might not be the last stop for Keys on this journey.  Next, they break down the players that stood out for Penn State in the first week of the high school season. Snyder attended Roman Catholic's game against Wilson and gave his thoughts about four-star receiver Tyseer Denmark, a high-profile 2024 prospect, and Lyons, a four-star defensive end commit for Penn State this cycle.  He explains how much Lyons was asked to do during the game for Roman and then highlights his key plays. Next, they discuss other commits, including J'Ven Williams, quarterback Jaxon Smolik, and 2024 commit Cooper Cousins.  Pickel follows up with Snyder about two players he highlights to learn a bit more in Conrad Hussey and King Mack. The St. Thomas Aquinas teammates are high-profile targets for several other programs down south, so does Snyder think they'll stay committed to Penn State? He explains his thoughts on the matter.  Lastly, they look ahead to Thursday night's game against Purdue to get Snyder's thoughts on what he thinks will happen.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture
WOF 349: Understanding the Present Moment #4 (Michel Foucault)

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 33:23 Very Popular


Friends, today on the “Word on Fire Show,” we conclude our series of discussions called “Understanding the Present Moment.” Brandon Vogt and I have examined four massively influential figures who together help explain our present moment, how we arrived at where we are today. The ideologies undergirding much of the unrest in our culture stem from these four thinkers: Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Michel Foucault. Once we understand these figures and their key ideas, we will recognize them everywhere and be prepared to engage today's challenges. In today's fourth and final discussion, we focus on Michel Foucault, perhaps the least known of the four but maybe the one with the greatest direct impact on the way many in our culture think today. A listener asks, how do we understand God as bring if he's both Father and Son? Links Two new Thomas Aquinas books! – Thomas Aquinas: Spiritual Master by Bishop Barron and Thomas Aquinas: Selected Commentaries on the New Testament edited by Jason Paone Bishop Barron discussion with Lex Fridman (Youtube) The Holy Hour: Meditations for Eucharistic Adoration edited by Matthew Becklo NOTE: Do you like this podcast? Become a patron and get some great perks for helping, like free books, bonus content, and more. Word on Fire is a non-profit ministry that depends on the support of our listeners…like you! So be part of this mission, and join us today!

Intelligent Design the Future
Behe and Ramage Debate, Pt. 2: Evolution, ID, and Aquinas

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 39:08 Very Popular


Today's ID the Future continues the conversation between Catholic intelligent design biologist Michael Behe and Catholic theologian Matthew Ramage. Both agree that nature points to a cosmic designer, but Ramage says he prefers, on aesthetic grounds, the idea that the biological realm has the capacity, gifted by God, to evolve on its own without the need for intervention by God. Behe notes that people have different aesthetic predilections, but it's the scientist's job not to figure out how he would have preferred things to have happened in nature, but to discover how they actually did come about. Behe also says that while the sun, moon, and stars do move according to fixed natural laws, it doesn't follow from this that Read More › Source

The Theology Pugcast
All Things G. K. Chesterton—Especially Distributism

The Theology Pugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 63:24


Today the Pugcast welcomes Dr. David Deavel on to the show to discuss G. K. Chesterton in all of his enormity. Perhaps best known among evangelicals for his book Orthodoxy, Chesterton also wrote detective fiction about a priest named, Father Brown, as well as longer works of fiction such as the remarkable, The Man Who Was Thursday, biographies about Francis of Assisi and Thomas Aquinas. He's also known for a “Third Way” economic theory known as Distributism. Today's show ranges over all the large legacy of this larger than life man. Enjoy! Support the Pugcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thetheologypugcast?fbclid=IwAR17UHhfzjphO52C_kkZfursA_C784t0ldFix0wyB4fd-YOJpmOQ3dyqGf8