Podcasts about word of the day

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Culinary Word of the Day

For further reading, dive into Encyclopaedia Britannica's entry for “Boiling.”Hosted by Jenn de la Vega Research by Alicia BookVideos edited by Chris De PewKnife logo by pixel artist Rachelle ViolaLinksSuggest a wordSupport the show on Patreon!Captioned video versions on Youtube Share this show with your friends Follow CulinaryWoTD on Twitter

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 28, 2022 is: kerfuffle • ker-FUFF-ul • noun Kerfuffle is an informal word that means “a disturbance or fuss typically caused by a dispute or conflict.” // The reclassification of Pluto from a planet to a dwarf planet caused quite a kerfuffle among astronomy lovers. See the entry > Examples: “I wasn't the only one given a seat that had already been claimed. ... Thankfully the flight was half-empty. Once the seating kerfuffle subsided, I noticed something remarkable. I had an incredible amount of legroom ...” — Christopher Muther, The Boston Globe, 8 June 2022 Did you know? Fuffle is an old Scottish verb that means “to muss” or “to throw into disarray”—in other words, to (literally) ruffle someone's (figurative) feathers. The addition of car-, possibly from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning “wrong” or “awkward,” didn't change its meaning much. In the 19th century carfuffle, with its variant curfuffle, became a noun, which in the 20th century was embraced by a broader population of English speakers and standardized to kerfuffle, referring to a more figurative feather-ruffling. There is some kerfuffle among language historians over how the altered spelling came to be favored. One theory holds that it might have been influenced by onomatopoeic words like kerplunk that imitate the sound of a falling object hitting a surface.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 28, 2022 is: kerfuffle • ker-FUFF-ul • noun Kerfuffle is an informal word that means “a disturbance or fuss typically caused by a dispute or conflict.” // The reclassification of Pluto from a planet to a dwarf planet caused quite a kerfuffle among astronomy lovers. See the entry > Examples: “I wasn't the only one given a seat that had already been claimed. ... Thankfully the flight was half-empty. Once the seating kerfuffle subsided, I noticed something remarkable. I had an incredible amount of legroom ...” — Christopher Muther, The Boston Globe, 8 June 2022 Did you know? Fuffle is an old Scottish verb that means “to muss” or “to throw into disarray”—in other words, to (literally) ruffle someone's (figurative) feathers. The addition of car-, possibly from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning “wrong” or “awkward,” didn't change its meaning much. In the 19th century carfuffle, with its variant curfuffle, became a noun, which in the 20th century was embraced by a broader population of English speakers and standardized to kerfuffle, referring to a more figurative feather-ruffling. There is some kerfuffle among language historians over how the altered spelling came to be favored. One theory holds that it might have been influenced by onomatopoeic words like kerplunk that imitate the sound of a falling object hitting a surface.

Nate Shelman Show
Word of The Day: Confidence

Nate Shelman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 88:33


All of our headlines today involve the loss of confidence. News broke late last week that Boise Police Chief Ryan Lee has resigned after the Mayor called for his resignation. This also followed nine officer complaints and an investigation. What is your confidence in public safety? There was a poll released that says only 34% of Democrats want Biden as their 2024 presidential nominee. Democrats, who would you put your confidence in? Republicans, who do you want the Democrats to put their confidence in? Republicans, how confident are you ahead of midterms? What about looking forward towards 2024? Nate explores all of those questions as well as unpacks the differences in how sports fans handle loss of confidence versus political fans. (9/26/22)

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 27, 2022 is: fructify • FRUK-tuh-fye • verb Fructify means “to make fruitful or productive” or “to bear fruit or profit.” // Her parents are in a comfortable financial position, thanks to some investments that have recently begun to fructify. See the entry > Examples: “After two seasons.... [Pamela] Adlon stepped up, hiring a writers' room. And ‘Better Things' kept going, fructifying into a closely observed and deeply felt portrait of one woman's over-full life.” — Alexis Soloski, The New York Times, 26 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Fructify comes from Latin fructus, meaning “fruit.” When the word was first used in English, it literally referred to the actions of fruit-bearing plants. Later it was used to refer to the action of making something literally or figuratively fruitful, such as soil or labor, respectively. These days fructify is more frequently used to refer to the giving forth of something in profit from something else (such as dividends from an investment). Fructus also gave us the name of the sugar fructose, as well as usufruct, which refers to the legal right to enjoy the fruits or profits of something that belongs to someone else.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
sporadic

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 1:50 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 26, 2022 is: sporadic • spuh-RAD-ik • adjective Something described as sporadic occurs occasionally, irregularly, or randomly across time or space. // The team's regular meetings became sporadic over the summer months, when at some points up to half of its members were on vacation. See the entry > Examples: “Over the decades, what began as sporadic nods to Black campus experiences has grown into more: portrayals that are both authentic and that challenge stereotypes about H.B.C.U. college life.” — Audra D.S. Burch, The New York Times, 26 May 2022 Did you know? You never know where or when the occasion to use sporadic will pop up, but when it does, sporadic is the perfect choice to describe something that happens randomly or irregularly, often in scattered instances or isolated outbursts. The word comes from Medieval Latin sporadicus, which is itself derived from Greek sporadēn, meaning “here and there.” It is also related to the Greek verb speirein (“to sow”), the ancestor from which we get our word spore (the reproductive cell of a fungus, microorganism, or some plants), hinting at the seemingly scattered nature by which such cells spread and germinate.

ArtisanEnglish.jp - The Posts - The Podcast
Word of the Day: Brain drain

ArtisanEnglish.jp - The Posts - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 2:23


Thanks for visiting ArtisanEnglish.jp's The Posts – The Podcast today. These podcasts and posts are created to help our students and anyone who wants to access them to improve their English vocabulary. Brain drain: A brain drain is when many educated or skilled people leave one area or country to live and work in another for better pay and conditions. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/BrainDrain Try a multiple-choice English Vocabulary Quiz from ArtisanEnglish.jp. Visit ArtisanEnglish.jp and go to the Weekly Quizzes page. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/Quiz If you'd like to take a FREE TRIAL LESSON, please contact me, David, at https://www.artisanenglish.jp/contact/ https://links.artisanenglish.jp/TrialLesson I provide 100% error correction, fantastic discussion topics and detailed after-lesson written feedback. Below are three terms from today's episode that may have been new to you. Hustle and Bustle: a lot of action in a small place. The noise and action of cities attract people. There's always something new to do. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/HustleAndBustle The grass is always greener on the other side: a proverb commenting on human desire. We always want what others have, but we don't. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/TheGrassIsAlwaysGreener Strong suit: something at which you excel. We spend more time talking about weaknesses and not enough about strong suits. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/StrongSuit --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/artisanenglishjp/message

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
caucus

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 2:00 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 25, 2022 is: caucus • KAW-kus • noun A caucus is “a meeting of members of a political party for the purpose of choosing candidates for an election.” It also refers to “a group of people who meet to discuss a particular issue or to work together for a shared, usually political goal.” // Members of the caucus debated long and hard to come to a unified position on the issue. See the entry > Examples: “Doors open to committee members, candidates and their guests at 10 a.m. and the caucus is expected to begin at 11 a.m. ... At the caucus, each candidate will be allowed three minutes to speak to the committee members. They also will be allowed to invite someone to speak on their behalf in a two-minute introduction.” — Carley Lanich, South Bend (Indiana) Tribune, 18 Aug. 2022 Did you know? It's hard to pinpoint the exact origins of caucus, but some scholars think the word may have developed from an Algonquian term for a group of elders, leaders, or advisers. An early example of the word in use comes from John Adams, who in February of 1763 reported that the Boston “caucus club,” a group of politically active city elders, would soon meet and that, at the meetings, those present would “smoke tobacco till you [could not] see from one end of the garret to the other.” A similarly opaque smoke screen seems to cloud the history of caucus to this day.

ArtisanEnglish.jp - The Posts - The Podcast
Word of the Day: Strong suit

ArtisanEnglish.jp - The Posts - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 2:36


Thanks for visiting ArtisanEnglish.jp's The Posts – The Podcast today. These podcasts and posts are created to help our students and anyone who wants to access them to improve their English vocabulary. Strong suit: Your strong suit is something at which you excel. We spend more time talking about weaknesses and not enough about strong suits. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/StrongSuit Try a multiple-choice English Vocabulary Quiz from ArtisanEnglish.jp. Visit ArtisanEnglish.jp and go to the Weekly Quizzes page. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/Quiz If you'd like to take a FREE TRIAL LESSON, please contact me, David, at https://www.artisanenglish.jp/contact/ https://links.artisanenglish.jp/TrialLesson I provide 100% error correction, fantastic discussion topics and detailed after-lesson written feedback. Below are two terms from today's episode that may have been new to you. Imposter syndrome: a feeling of being inauthentic in your achievements and, therefore, not deserving the success or accolades you receive. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/ImposterSyndrome Power suit: an expertly fitted suit with bold colours that helps you exude confidence and competence. It was invented in the 1980s. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/PowerSuit --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/artisanenglishjp/message

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
anthropomorphic

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 1:44 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 24, 2022 is: anthropomorphic • an-thruh-puh-MOR-fik • adjective Anthropomorphic means “described or thought of as being like human beings in appearance, behavior, etc.” // The story chronicles the adventures of a group of anthropomorphic forest critters. See the entry > Examples: “Dream and his six siblings are the anthropomorphic personifications of universal concepts. Despite their cosmic importance, they also bicker and bond like a real family.” — Christian Holub, Entertainment Weekly, 26 July 2022 Did you know? As word lovers, we are endlessly fascinated by the uniqueness and complexity of human language. Many species use sounds and gestures to communicate with one another, but the ability to speak in full sentences, to share abstract ideas, and to write and tell stories is distinctly anthropic. Brilliant though dogs may be, they can't verbalize their hopes and dreams. That is, unless those dogs are anthropomorphic—a trait common in works of fiction. From chatty chiweenies to tangoing tapirs, depictions of anthropomorphic animals abound thanks to our creative superpowers.

ArtisanEnglish.jp - The Posts - The Podcast
Word of the Day: Power suit

ArtisanEnglish.jp - The Posts - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 2:35


Thanks for visiting ArtisanEnglish.jp's The Posts – The Podcast today. These podcasts and posts are created to help our students and anyone who wants to access them to improve their English vocabulary. Power suit: an expertly fitted suit with bold colours that helps you exude confidence and competence. It was invented in the 1980s. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/PowerSuit Try a multiple-choice English Vocabulary Quiz from ArtisanEnglish.jp. Visit ArtisanEnglish.jp and go to the Weekly Quizzes page. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/Quiz If you'd like to take a FREE TRIAL LESSON, please contact me, David, at https://www.artisanenglish.jp/contact/ https://links.artisanenglish.jp/TrialLesson I provide 100% error correction, fantastic discussion topics and detailed after-lesson written feedback. Below is another term from today's episode that may have been new to you. In its own right: to be recognized for unique or special qualities, not because someone/something has certain connections. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/InItsOwnRight --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/artisanenglishjp/message

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
misnomer

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 2:07 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 23, 2022 is: misnomer • miss-NOH-mer • noun Misnomer means “an incorrect name or designation.” It can also be used to refer to the act of wrongly naming or designating, as in “calling complicated and varied climatic changes ‘global warming' is something of a misnomer.” // Peanut is one of the most famous misnomers, because peanuts are legumes, not true nuts. See the entry > Examples: “The librarian of the Oregon Grotto, which is a bit of a misnomer because it's focused on southern Washington, is the official keeper of approximately 600 tightly protected cave maps that reveal the secret locations of every documented cave in the region.” — Kate Robertson, The Guardian (London), 29 Mar. 2022 Did you know? What's in a name? Well, in some cases, a name will contain an error, a misunderstanding, or a mislabeling. Historians have long noted that the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, Roman, nor an empire. The Battle of Bunker Hill was actually fought on Breed's Hill. And the Pennsylvania Dutch are in fact of German ancestry. For such cases, we have the term misnomer, which can refer both to the use of an incorrect or inappropriate designation (as in “it's a misnomer to call an orca a ‘killer whale'”) or to the designation itself. Regardless, there's no mistaking the source of misnomer: it comes from the Anglo-French verb mesnomer (“to misname”) and ultimately has its roots in nomen, the Latin word for “name.”

ArtisanEnglish.jp - The Posts - The Podcast
Word of the Day: Change things up

ArtisanEnglish.jp - The Posts - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 2:26


Thanks for visiting ArtisanEnglish.jp's The Posts – The Podcast today. These podcasts and posts are created to help our students and anyone who wants to access them to improve their English vocabulary. Change things up: When you change things up, you change yourself, your habits or something else to make an improvement. A positive outcome is desired. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/ChangeThingsUp Try a multiple-choice English Vocabulary Quiz from ArtisanEnglish.jp. Visit ArtisanEnglish.jp and go to the Weekly Quizzes page. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/Quiz If you'd like to take a FREE TRIAL LESSON, please contact me, David, at https://www.artisanenglish.jp/contact/ https://links.artisanenglish.jp/TrialLesson I provide 100% error correction, fantastic discussion topics and detailed after-lesson written feedback. Below are 5 terms from today's episode that may have been new to you. Adage: An adage is the same as a saying or proverb. They all mean an expression that most people believe expresses the truth. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/Adage A change is as good as a rest/holiday: changing your work location or to a new task is as beneficial or refreshing as a vacation or day off. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/AChangeIsAsGoodAsARest In a rut: Sometimes, you feel as if each day is just like the one before. Nothing new or exciting ever seems to happen. You are stuck in a rut. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/InARut In the middle of nowhere: A great place to find quiet is in the middle of nowhere, a place that is far away from all civilization, such as towns or cities. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/InTheMiddleOfNowhere If it ain't broke, don't fix it: you should not adopt newer tech when the old stuff still works. It's a conservative way of thinking. https://links.artisanenglish.jp/IfItAintBrokeDontFixIt --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/artisanenglishjp/message

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 23, 2022 is: misnomer • miss-NOH-mer • noun Misnomer means “an incorrect name or designation.” It can also be used to refer to the act of wrongly naming or designating, as in “calling complicated and varied climatic changes ‘global warming' is something of a misnomer.” // Peanut is one of the most famous misnomers, because peanuts are legumes, not true nuts. See the entry > Examples: “The librarian of the Oregon Grotto, which is a bit of a misnomer because it's focused on southern Washington, is the official keeper of approximately 600 tightly protected cave maps that reveal the secret locations of every documented cave in the region.” — Kate Robertson, The Guardian (London), 29 Mar. 2022 Did you know? What's in a name? Well, in some cases, a name will contain an error, a misunderstanding, or a mislabeling. Historians have long noted that the Holy Roman Empire was not holy, nor Roman, nor an empire. The Battle of Bunker Hill was actually fought on Breed's Hill. And the Pennsylvania Dutch are in fact of German ancestry. For such cases, we have the term misnomer, which can refer both to the use of an incorrect or inappropriate designation (as in “it's a misnomer to call an orca a ‘killer whale'”) or to the designation itself. Regardless, there's no mistaking the source of misnomer: it comes from the Anglo-French verb mesnomer (“to misname”) and ultimately has its roots in nomen, the Latin word for “name.”

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 22, 2022 is: defer • dih-FER • verb Defer means “to choose to do (something) at a later time.” // She deferred her master's program for a year so that she could travel the world. See the entry > Examples: “... lack of access to regular mortgage lending forces our clients to turn to predatory alternative lending and rent-to-own schemes or defer making needed repairs to their aging homes.” — Rachel Labush and Michael Froehlich, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 29 Aug. 2022 Did you know? There are two distinct words spelled defer in English, each with its own history and meaning. The defer having to do with allowing someone else to decide or choose something, or with agreeing to follow someone else's decision, tradition, etc., (as in “He deferred to his parents' wishes”) comes from the Latin verb dēferre, meaning “to bring down, convey, transfer, submit.” The defer synonymous with delay comes from Latin differre, which itself has several meanings, including two that resound in its English descendant: “to postpone” and “to delay.” Another meaning of differre is “to be unlike or distinct,” which makes apparent another of its descendants: differ, meaning “to be different.”

Talking with Trojans
Episode 6… Word of the Day- Happiness

Talking with Trojans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 6:57


Listeners and students pitch in to tell us what makes them happy and what happy is to them.

ASL Word of the Day
AWOD 1288: ASL Word of the Day – Wind

ASL Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022


Subscribe to receive your ASL Word of the Day from Sign Baby Sign. Want to learn more? Visit our website at ASLTeachingResources.com ASL Sign Club for Children and Adult ASL Course. Become a member today to access hundreds of ASL Resources. Connect with us: http://YouTube.com/SignBabySign http://Instagram.com/asl_SignBabySign http://Facebook.com/SignBabySign https://aslteachingresources.com/memberships Welcome to ASL Teaching Resources, the one-stop place for ASL teaching resources and learning sign language. We specialize in providing teachers with the necessary tools to be successful whether they know sign or not. Our Mission To provide ready-to-use sign language based worksheets, flashcards, and videos to make it easier to teach and communicate with deaf, hearing and special needs students. Our Promise To cut your research and prep time down to just minutes.

children wind asl word of the day asl teaching resources sign baby sign
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
perspicacious

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 1:54 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 21, 2022 is: perspicacious • per-spuh-KAY-shus • adjective Perspicacious is a formal word that means “possessing acute mental vision or discernment.” Someone who is perspicacious has a keen ability to notice and understand things that are difficult or not obvious. // She considers herself a perspicacious judge of character. See the entry > Examples: “Some of the film's performances are merely peculiar and others merely apt, but [actor Don] Cheadle is thrilling, with coiled strength and a perspicacious gaze that seems to realize ideas in motion.” — Richard Brody, The New Yorker, 1 July 2021 Did you know? Some perspective on perspicacious: the word combines the Latin perspicac- (from perspicax meaning “clear-sighted,” which in turn comes from perspicere, “to see through”) with the common English adjective suffix -ious. The result is a somewhat uncommon word used to describe someone (such as a reader or observer) or something (such as an essay or analysis) displaying the perception and understanding of subtleties others tend to miss, such as the distinctions between the words perspicacious, shrewd, sagacious, and astute—something our synonym chooser can help with.

Daily Mental fit bit with Aditi Surana
264. When was the last time you experienced Sobremesa?

Daily Mental fit bit with Aditi Surana

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 4:31


Have you experinced this special feeling while eating a meal? There's a word in Spanish that describes a feeling especially when it comes to food and that is the foreign word of the week. 

Culinary Word of the Day
017 Food Thermometer

Culinary Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 4:12


For further reading, check out “Different Types of Kitchen Thermometers and Their Uses” by Danilo Alfaro on The Kitchn.Hosted by Jenn de la Vega Research by Alicia BookVideos edited by Chris De PewKnife logo by pixel artist Rachelle ViolaLinksSuggest a wordSupport the show on Patreon!Captioned video versions on Youtube Share this show with your friends Follow CulinaryWoTD on Twitter

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
verdigris

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 1:50 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 20, 2022 is: verdigris • VER-duh-greess • noun Verdigris is a green or bluish deposit, usually of copper carbonates, that forms on copper, brass, or bronze surfaces. // We removed the verdigris from Grandma's old copper jewelry by first soaking it in lemon juice, then gently polishing it with a soft rag. See the entry > Examples: “There's a standard shower room, but also—drum roll—an outside bath, which is private thanks to a wooden fence, so you can concentrate on the canopy of tree branches shimmering and rustling overhead. This tub is made of copper, all dappled with verdigris and it rumbles loudly as it slowly fills up.” — Gaby Soutar, The Scotsman (Edinburgh, Scotland), 13 July 2022 Did you know? “Green of Greece”—that is the literal translation of vert de Grece, the Anglo-French phrase from which we get the modern word verdigris. A coating of verdigris forms naturally on copper and copper alloys such as brass and bronze when those metals are exposed to air. (It can also be produced artificially.) Like cinnabar, fuchsia, and amaranth before it, however, verdigris is also seeing increased use as a color name that can be applied to anything suggestive of its particular hue. For more colorful history you might enjoy this article before testing your knowledge with a quiz.

Dot to Dot: A daily 5min Echo demo from Alexa
DTD2060 Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day podcast and Kids Word of the Day

Dot to Dot: A daily 5min Echo demo from Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 6:32


Two worthy, wordy skills today. BTW, are you doing Wordle every day? You are? Excellent stuff! --- Feedback, comments, demos pleas to ✉️ thedottodotpodcast@gmail.com

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
haywire

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 2:08 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 19, 2022 is: haywire • HAY-wyre • adverb or adjective Haywire means “being out of order or having gone wrong” or “emotionally or mentally upset or out of control.” It is often used in the phrase “go haywire.” // The company's emailing system went haywire and sent out multiple copies of the advertisement to its subscribers. See the entry > Examples: “Something, I suspect, is going haywire in the frying process, an interaction that leads to those off-putting aromas. Is the oil not hot enough, thereby clinging to the [French toast] sticks and leaving behind the flavors of whatever was fried in it previously? Were they fried too long?” — Tim Carman, The Washington Post, 17 Aug. 2022 Did you know? The noun haywire refers to a type of wire once used in baling hay and sometimes for makeshift repairs. This hurried and temporary use of haywire gave rise to the adjective (and sometimes adverb) haywire. When the adjective was first used in the early 20th century, it was primarily found in the phrase “haywire outfit,” which originally denoted a poorly equipped group of loggers, and then anything that was flimsy or patched together. This led to a “hastily patched-up” sense, which in turn gave us the now-common meaning, “being out of order or having gone wrong.” The “crazy” sense of haywire may have been suggested by the tendency of the relatively weak and rust-prone wire to fail at inopportune times, or to get tangled around legs, or possibly to the disorderly appearance of the temporary repair jobs for which it was used.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
exponent

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 2:06 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 18, 2022 is: exponent • ik-SPOH-nunt • noun Exponent refers to “someone who supports a particular cause or belief” as well as “someone who is known for a particular method or style.” // He was a leading exponent of animal rights. See the entry > Examples: “Onscreen, [Tom] Cruise is unmistakably our biggest movie star, as the New York Times reporter Nicole Sperling recently explained—the last true exponent of a century-old studio system that has been steadily eroded by the rising forces of franchise filmmaking and streaming.” — Calum Marsh, The New York Times, 5 July 2022 Did you know? You probably won't be surprised to learn that exponent and proponent have a lot in common. While the two share visual similarities and closely related definitions, they also have a common ancestor: the Latin ponere, meaning “to put.” Exponent comes from exponere, meaning “to explain, expound, or set forth,” while proponent comes from proponere, meaning “to expose to view, bring to one's attention, propose.” Today, proponent usually refers to someone who argues in favor of something. Exponent can also refer to someone who is an advocate, but it tends to refer especially to someone who stands out as a shining representative of something. In addition, it has kept its earlier meaning of “one who expounds,” as well as its mathematical symbol meaning.

ASL Word of the Day
AWOD 1196: ASL Word of the Day – Find

ASL Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022


Subscribe to receive your ASL Word of the Day from Sign Baby Sign. Want to learn more? Visit our website at ASLTeachingResources.com ASL Sign Club for Children and Adult ASL Course. Become a member today to access hundreds of ASL Resources. Connect with us: http://YouTube.com/SignBabySign http://Instagram.com/asl_SignBabySign http://Facebook.com/SignBabySign https://aslteachingresources.com/memberships Welcome to ASL Teaching Resources, the one-stop place for ASL teaching resources and learning sign language. We specialize in providing teachers with the necessary tools to be successful whether they know sign or not. Our Mission To provide ready-to-use sign language based worksheets, flashcards, and videos to make it easier to teach and communicate with deaf, hearing and special needs students. Our Promise To cut your research and prep time down to just minutes.

children asl word of the day asl teaching resources sign baby sign
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
laconic

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 1:52 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 17, 2022 is: laconic • luh-KAH-nik • adjective Someone described as laconic uses few words in speech or writing. The word often also implies brevity to the point of seeming rude, indifferent, or mysterious. // Her bubbly and loquacious personality was a humorous yet complementary contrast to her girlfriend's more laconic demeanor. See the entry > Examples: “The genius of ‘Wall-E' lies in its ability to inspire empathy with a pair of robots that can speak only a few words. It helps that Wall-E and Eve are both extremely cute, as robots go; if the trash cube robot didn't have those giant, sad basset hound eyes, we wouldn't have cared if he found love. But the cutest and most laconic robot of ‘Wall-E' is the Axiom's custodian, M-O.” — Michael Baumann, The Ringer, 13 June 2022 Did you know? We'll keep it brief. Laconia was an ancient country in southern Greece. Its capital city was Sparta, and the Spartans were famous for their terseness of speech. Laconic comes to us by way of Latin from Greek Lakōnikos, meaning “native of Laconia.” In current use, laconic means “terse” or “concise to the point of seeming rude or mysterious,” and thus recalls the Spartans' taciturnity.

ASL Word of the Day
AWOD 1214: ASL Word of the Day – Electricity

ASL Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022


Subscribe to receive your ASL Word of the Day from Sign Baby Sign. Want to learn more? Visit our website at ASLTeachingResources.com ASL Sign Club for Children and Adult ASL Course. Become a member today to access hundreds of ASL Resources. Connect with us: http://YouTube.com/SignBabySign http://Instagram.com/asl_SignBabySign http://Facebook.com/SignBabySign https://aslteachingresources.com/memberships Welcome to ASL Teaching Resources, the one-stop place for ASL teaching resources and learning sign language. We specialize in providing teachers with the necessary tools to be successful whether they know sign or not. Our Mission To provide ready-to-use sign language based worksheets, flashcards, and videos to make it easier to teach and communicate with deaf, hearing and special needs students. Our Promise To cut your research and prep time down to just minutes.

children electricity asl word of the day asl teaching resources sign baby sign
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
coalesce

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 1:33 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 16, 2022 is: coalesce • koh-uh-LESS • verb Coalesce means “to come together to form one group or mass” or “to join forces.” // The club's community service projects provide students with a common goal to coalesce around. // The ice masses coalesced into a glacier over time. See the entry > Examples: “This is European soccer—or, at least, an idealized version of it: clubs that represent something greater than themselves, offering communities narratives to coalesce around.” — Tom McTague, The Atlantic, 28 May 2022 Did you know? The meaning of many English words equals the sum of their parts, and coalesce is a fitting example. The word unites the prefix co- (“together”) and the Latin verb alescere, meaning “to grow.” Coalesce is one of a number of English verbs (along with mix, commingle, merge, and amalgamate) that refer to the act of combining parts into a whole. In particular, coalesce usually implies the merging of similar parts to form a cohesive unit, such as a political ideology, a fan-following, or (perish the thought) a Portuguese man-of-war, the body of which includes three types of zooids.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
rancid

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 1:55 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 15, 2022 is: rancid • RAN-sid • adjective Rancid means “having an unpleasant smell or taste,” and is often used to describe food that is no longer fresh. It is also used to describe something (such as an encounter) that is offensive or distasteful. // A quick sniff is typically all that's needed to determine if vegetable oil is rancid. See the entry > Examples: “At a basic level, ghee is a type of clarified butter believed to have originated in India as a way to preserve butter from going rancid in the hot climate. Churned cream or butter is simmered slowly until the moisture evaporates and any browned milk solids are removed, resulting in a sumptuously rich, fragrant and nutty fat.” — Aysha Imtiaz, BBC, 27 July 2022 Did you know? Rancid and putrid and fetid—oh my! While all three words are used to describe unpleasant smells and tastes, each also traces its roots to a “stinky” Latin word: rancid can be traced back to the Latin rancēre; the root of putrid shares an ancestor with putēre; and fetid comes from foetēre—all verbs meaning “to stink.” Not long after entering the language in the early 17th century, rancid also developed a second, figurative sense which is used for non-gustatory and non-olfactory offenses, as in “rancid hypocrisy.”

Trapped In A World
Trapped In A World: 19 Howard The Duck Vol 1 #28 & 29

Trapped In A World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 68:42


Knol & Russell tackle issues 28 & 29 from Vol 1 of Howard The Duck “Cooking With Gas” & “Help Stamp Out Ducks”, the later being Steve Gerber's “last issue”. A bikini clad assassin, clumsy bus driver & one wacked out, paranoid General all see a shirk about seeing a talking duck. Then Howard gets wrapped into a money making scheme & ends up headed back to Cleveland… again. All that and Duck News! The Word Of The Day from you know who and feedback from listeners.

The 4D Podcast Network
Trapped In A World: 19 Howard The Duck Vol 1 #28 & 29

The 4D Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 68:42


Knol & Russell tackle issues 28 & 29 from Vol 1 of Howard The Duck “Cooking With Gas” & “Help Stamp Out Ducks”, the later being Steve Gerber's “last issue”. A bikini clad assassin, clumsy bus driver & one wacked out, paranoid General all see a shirk about seeing a talking duck. Then Howard gets wrapped into a money making scheme & ends up headed back to Cleveland… again. All that and Duck News! The Word Of The Day from you know who and feedback from listeners.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
broadside

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 2:01 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 14, 2022 is: broadside • BRAWD-syde • noun The word broadside most often refers to a very strong and harsh spoken or written attack, but it has other meanings as well, among them “an attack by a ship in which all the guns on one side of the ship are fired together.” // Although the freshman representative knew her decision was bound to be unpopular, she was taken aback by the broadside leveled at her by her hometown newspaper's editorial page. See the entry > Examples: “Mr. Taruskin had a no-holds-barred approach to intellectual combat. ... Following a 1991 broadside by Mr. Taruskin contending that Sergei Prokofiev had composed Stalinist propaganda, one biographer complained of his ‘sneering antipathy.'” — William Robin, The New York Times, 1 July 2022 Did you know? Nautical language is both fascinating and fun, what with its jibbooms and spirketing, its scuppers and poop decks. As these four terms demonstrate, not all ship-related words sail over to landlubber vocabulary, but broadside is one that has. It originally referred to the side of a ship above the water, then later to the guns arrayed along that side. The further use of broadside to refer to the firing of all those guns at once eventually led to the figurative “volley of abuse” sense—a strongly worded attack intended to shiver one's timbers. The printing-related uses of broadside, referring originally to sheets of paper, and then to matter printed on such paper, arose independently.

Culinary Word of the Day
002 Esculentè: Pinch, Maillard Reaction & Sauté

Culinary Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 46:29


In this edition, Jenn and Alicia discuss naming this podcast as well as the words pinch, Maillard Reaction, and sauté. Esculentè is a behind-the-scenes conversation podcast hosted by Jenn de la Vega and research producer Alicia Book. For every three culinary words, Jenn and Alicia discuss material from the cutting room floor in a series of bonus episodes. They answer listener questions and dive deep into the words as well as the humanity behind them.Hosted by Jenn de la Vega and Alicia Book.Knife logo by pixel artist Rachelle ViolaLinksVibrant India by Chitra Agrawal (affiliate link)Suggest a wordSupport the show on Patreon!Captioned video versions on Youtube Share this show with your friends Follow CulinaryWoTD on Twitter

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
titivate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 1:29 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 13, 2022 is: titivate • TIH-tuh-vayt • verb Titivate means "to make (someone or something) neater or more attractive," and is a synonym of spruce up. // Her morning routine includes a few minutes spent titivating in front of the mirror. See the entry > Examples: "From the US seafood seasoning Old Bay ... to lapsang souchong salt, there are numerous ways to titivate chips." — Tony Naylor, The Guardian (London), 22 Jan. 2022 Did you know? Titivate is a fancy way of saying spruce up, smarten up, or spiff up; all mean "to make a person or thing neater or more attractive." Titivate often refers to making small additions or alterations in attire ("titivate the costume with sequins and other accessories"), but it can also be used figuratively, as in "titivating the script for Broadway." The origins of titivate are uncertain, but it may have been formed by combining tidy and renovate. Spiffy, if true.

Life Tech & Sundry Podcast
#92 LTS - Word Of The Day Is Flux

Life Tech & Sundry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 118:21


All thoughts expressed are our own. Thank you, and now, enjoy. Stay Frosty. Links: NOTES ---------- [ https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yMTtAxv8kHD_2QFnnz8AEI1t1LLKL3Y-/view?usp=drivesdk ] IG ---------- [ https://bit.ly/IG-LTS ] LTS Email & Inquiries ---------- [ lifetechsundry@gmail.com ] LTS Twitter ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSTweets ] Share the love ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSBacking ] OR Ko-fi ---------- [ https://ko-fi.com/lifetechsundry ] Youtube Channels: Podcast Background Music ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSPlaylist ] YT Chillhop Radio ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSFavoriteBeats ] Food Affairs ---------- [ https://bit.ly/FoodAffairsYT ] Life Tech & Sundry ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSonYT ] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ltspodcast/message

ASL Word of the Day
AWOD 1291: ASL Word of the Day -Travel

ASL Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Subscribe to receive your ASL Word of the Day from Sign Baby Sign. Want to learn more? Visit our website at ASLTeachingResources.com ASL Sign Club for Children and Adult ASL Course. Become a member today to access hundreds of ASL Resources. Connect with us: http://YouTube.com/SignBabySign http://Instagram.com/asl_SignBabySign http://Facebook.com/SignBabySign https://aslteachingresources.com/memberships Welcome to ASL Teaching Resources, the one-stop place for ASL teaching resources and learning sign language. We specialize in providing teachers with the necessary tools to be successful whether they know sign or not. Our Mission To provide ready-to-use sign language based worksheets, flashcards, and videos to make it easier to teach and communicate with deaf, hearing and special needs students. Our Promise To cut your research and prep time down to just minutes.

children travel asl word of the day asl teaching resources sign baby sign
At Home With Sally
Wisdom: The Word of the Day - Episode 705

At Home With Sally

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 36:03 Very Popular


All of us need wisdom every day. Jesus tells us to worship him with our minds — to love Him with our minds. The ability to think biblically is no small matter in a world that shouts to us with values that are worldly, pumping out lies about life, family, and morality, in thousands of ways every day.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
invective

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 1:51 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 12, 2022 is: invective • in-VEK-tiv • noun Invective means "insulting or abusive language." It can also refer to an abusive expression or speech. // Her opening campaign speech was, to the shock of everyone present, filled with invective that contrasted sharply with the expectations of those in attendance. See the entry > Examples: There's a racial aspect [to Taylor Jenkins Reid's novel Carrie Soto is Back] too: the powerfully built, Latina Carrie is judged very differently to the supermodel blondes on tour. Reid includes mocked-up newspaper articles and transcripts of TV shows to illustrate the misogynistic invective that plagues her—and which, unfortunately, is far from historic.” — Marianka Swain, The Telegraph (London), 20 Aug. 2022 Did you know? Invective originated in the 15th century as an adjective meaning "of, relating to, or characterized by insult or abuse," but by the early 16th century, it was functioning as a noun referring to a harsh verbal attack, and within a few decades, to abusive language as a whole. Invective is similar to verbal abuse, but in addition to being a more formal term than abuse, invective tends to suggest not only anger and vehemence but also rhetorical skill. It sometimes also implies public denunciation, as in "blistering political invective."

ASL Word of the Day
AWOD 1293: ASL Word of the Day – Rain

ASL Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022


Subscribe to receive your ASL Word of the Day from Sign Baby Sign. Want to learn more? Visit our website at ASLTeachingResources.com ASL Sign Club for Children and Adult ASL Course. Become a member today to access hundreds of ASL Resources. Connect with us: http://YouTube.com/SignBabySign http://Instagram.com/asl_SignBabySign http://Facebook.com/SignBabySign https://aslteachingresources.com/memberships Welcome to ASL Teaching Resources, the one-stop place for ASL teaching resources and learning sign language. We specialize in providing teachers with the necessary tools to be successful whether they know sign or not. Our Mission To provide ready-to-use sign language based worksheets, flashcards, and videos to make it easier to teach and communicate with deaf, hearing and special needs students. Our Promise To cut your research and prep time down to just minutes.

children rain asl word of the day asl teaching resources sign baby sign
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
substantive

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 2:22 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 11, 2022 is: substantive • SUB-stun-tiv • adjective Substantive means “important, real, or meaningful.” It can also be used to describe something, such as an argument, that is supported by facts or logic. // My friendship with my pen pal was one of the most substantive of my childhood, despite the thousands of miles between us. See the entry > Examples: “Box of Rain adopts a long view of the Deadhead scene, from its mid-'80s heyday before the hit ‘Touch of Grey' ended the halcyon days of the band's below-the-radar status, to the post-Garcia era that continues today. That span defines the film's goal, which is to explain how a scene often dismissed as nothing more than rock 'n' roll hedonism actually offered participants something far more substantive, positive and life-affirming.” — Nicholas G. Meriwether, SFGate.com, 10 May 2022 Did you know? Substantive and substantial are quite a pair: the two have multiple similar meanings, can both ultimately be traced back to the same Latin root (the verb substare, whose figurative meaning is best understood as “to stand firm” or “to hold out”), and both made their first appearance in English sometime in the 14th century. But though they can be used interchangeably in some contexts (one can make “substantive progress” or “substantial progress,” for example), we usually use substantial to describe things that are large in size, scope, or extent (e.g., “a substantial amount,” “substantial increase”), while substantive is more likely to be used as a synonym of significant, real, or important. Substantive change, for example, is change that makes a fundamental difference, regardless of its size. Substantive also functions in grammar-related contexts describing or referring to nouns and noun phrases.

ASL Word of the Day
AWOD 1294: ASL Word of the Day – Make

ASL Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


Subscribe to receive your ASL Word of the Day from Sign Baby Sign. Want to learn more? Visit our website at ASLTeachingResources.com ASL Sign Club for Children and Adult ASL Course. Become a member today to access hundreds of ASL Resources. Connect with us: http://YouTube.com/SignBabySign http://Instagram.com/asl_SignBabySign http://Facebook.com/SignBabySign https://aslteachingresources.com/memberships Welcome to ASL Teaching Resources, the one-stop place for ASL teaching resources and learning sign language. We specialize in providing teachers with the necessary tools to be successful whether they know sign or not. Our Mission To provide ready-to-use sign language based worksheets, flashcards, and videos to make it easier to teach and communicate with deaf, hearing and special needs students. Our Promise To cut your research and prep time down to just minutes.

children asl word of the day asl teaching resources sign baby sign
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
obliterate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 2:02 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 10, 2022 is: obliterate • uh-BLIT-uh-rayt • verb Obliterate most often means “to remove from existence; to destroy utterly all trace, indication, or significance of.” // The tide eventually obliterated all evidence of our sandcastles. See the entry > Examples: “In June, for the first time in her career, Taylor took a summer break of three weeks to jump on a motorcycle and ride across the country. Publicly, she posted footage of food and the road. Privately, she sought conversation and connection that would obliterate her bubble.” — Matt Pearl, ABC Action News (Tampa Bay, Florida), 14 July 2022 Did you know? Obliterate has been preserved in our language for centuries, and that's not nothing! The earliest evidence in our files traces obliterate back to the mid-16th century as a word for removing something from memory. Soon after, English speakers began to use it for the specific act of blotting out or obscuring anything written, and eventually its meaning was generalized to removing anything from existence. In the meantime, physicians began using obliterate for the surgical act of filling or closing up a vessel, cavity, or passage with tissue, which would then cause the bodily part to collapse or disappear. Today obliterate thrives in the English lexicon with the various senses it has acquired over the years, including its final stamp on the language: “to cancel (something, especially a postage stamp).”

ASL Word of the Day
AWOD 1304: ASL Word of the Day – Hurricane

ASL Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022


Subscribe to receive your ASL Word of the Day from Sign Baby Sign. Want to learn more? Visit our website at ASLTeachingResources.com ASL Sign Club for Children and Adult ASL Course. Become a member today to access hundreds of ASL Resources. Connect with us: http://YouTube.com/SignBabySign http://Instagram.com/asl_SignBabySign http://Facebook.com/SignBabySign https://aslteachingresources.com/memberships Welcome to ASL Teaching Resources, the one-stop place for ASL teaching resources and learning sign language. We specialize in providing teachers with the necessary tools to be successful whether they know sign or not. Our Mission To provide ready-to-use sign language based worksheets, flashcards, and videos to make it easier to teach and communicate with deaf, hearing and special needs students. Our Promise To cut your research and prep time down to just minutes.

children hurricanes asl word of the day asl teaching resources sign baby sign
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
facsimile

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 1:54 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 9, 2022 is: facsimile • fak-SIM-uh-lee • noun A facsimile is an exact copy of something. The word is also used to refer to a system of transmitting and reproducing graphic matter, such as printed text or photos. // The forged painting was an impressive facsimile of the original. See the entry > Examples: “Walls are now decorated with posters and murals of facsimiles of old newspapers that tell the tales of the team's big moments.” — Carlos Monarrez, The Detroit Free Press, 29 July 2022 Did you know? The facsimile machine (or fax machine) has long been an office staple, but its name is much, much older. Fac simile is a Latin phrase meaning “make alike.” English speakers began using facsimile to mean “an exact copy” in the late 1600s. In this sense, a facsimile might be a handwritten or hand-drawn copy, or even a copy of a painting or statue. (Today, we also use the phrase “a reasonable facsimile” for a copy that is fairly close but not exact.) In the 1800s, people developed facsimile technology that could reproduce printed material via telegraph. Now, of course, we use telephone lines or wireless technology, and we usually call the resulting facsimile a fax.

Jim Breuer's Breuniverse
Jim Breuer's Breuniverse | Ep.44 - The Word of the Day is Extreme

Jim Breuer's Breuniverse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 56:29


This week we talk about Biden's speech in Philadelphia, Kathy Griffin's outrageous tweet, and the word 'extreme'. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ASL Word of the Day
AWOD 1306: ASL Word of the Day – Exersize

ASL Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022


Subscribe to receive your ASL Word of the Day from Sign Baby Sign. Want to learn more? Visit our website at ASLTeachingResources.com ASL Sign Club for Children and Adult ASL Course. Become a member today to access hundreds of ASL Resources. Connect with us: http://YouTube.com/SignBabySign http://Instagram.com/asl_SignBabySign http://Facebook.com/SignBabySign https://aslteachingresources.com/memberships Welcome to ASL Teaching Resources, the one-stop place for ASL teaching resources and learning sign language. We specialize in providing teachers with the necessary tools to be successful whether they know sign or not. Our Mission To provide ready-to-use sign language based worksheets, flashcards, and videos to make it easier to teach and communicate with deaf, hearing and special needs students. Our Promise To cut your research and prep time down to just minutes.

children asl word of the day asl teaching resources sign baby sign
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
mawkish

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 2:01 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 8, 2022 is: mawkish • MAW-kish • adjective Mawkish means “exaggeratedly or childishly emotional,” and is often used to describe works of art, music, or literature that a critic finds cloying. // Although Olivia was embarrassed by the mawkish poetry that filled her old high school diaries, she couldn't bring herself to throw them away. See the entry > Examples: “It doesn't (or shouldn't) matter that ‘This Is Us' is a network show in a sea of cable and streaming contenders or that [Mandy] Moore has a pop music and schmaltzy YA movie past. ... One of this season's most poignant moments avoided a mawkish mood because of Moore's ability to hold our teary gaze through song.” — Emma Fraser, The Daily Beast, 23 May 2022 Did you know? Mawkish really opens up a can of worms—or maggots, as it were: the word wriggled out from Middle English mawke, meaning “maggot.” Its earliest sense, used in the late 17th century but now obsolete, was synonymous with squeamish (understandable!) but not long after that mawkish was used to describe an unpleasant, nauseating, often sickeningly sweet flavor. It's no surprise that a figurative sense of mawkish, used to describe things that are full of “sickly sweet” sentimentality, arose almost concurrently, one of several food texture- and taste-related words favored by critics to show disdain for art they deem overly emotive, including gooey, saccharine, mushy, and schmaltzy.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
conciliate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 2:14 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 7, 2022 is: conciliate • kun-SILL-ee-ayt • verb Conciliate is a formal word applied in situations in which anger or disagreement presents a need for resolution. It can mean "to make compatible; to reconcile," "to appease or win over," or "to become or try to become friendly or agreeable." // The company's attempts to conciliate the workers without meeting their core demands has not been a successful strategy. See the entry > Examples: "Oklahoma City established a human rights commission Tuesday for the first time in more than a quarter century. The new nine-member commission ... will be charged with investigating and addressing employment, housing and public accommodations discrimination complaints. ... An investigation can either lead to dismissal of the complaint or an attempt by the commission to conciliate between the complainant and the accused party." — Jana Hayes, The Oklahoman, 19 July 2022 Did you know? Now here's a people pleaser. The immediate source of conciliate is a form of the Latin verb conciliare, meaning "to assemble, unite, win over," and when conciliate was first used in the 16th century, the idea of winning over was key; it was used to mean "to gain something, such as goodwill or favor, by pleasing acts." Today, conciliate is mostly used in contexts where appease or reconcile is a more common choice, as in "a refusal to conciliate the dictator," and "efforts to conciliate the views of those on opposing sides." Like the word council, conciliate ultimately traces back to the Latin word concilium, meaning "assembly, council."

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
panache

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 2:22 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 6, 2022 is: panache • puh-NAHSH • noun Today, when we say that someone has panache, we are saying that they have energy, spirit, and style. Originally, the word referred to an ornamental tuft or plume of feathers, and especially one affixed to a helmet. // Ever the showman, he not only caught the ball, he made a diving catch and caught it with panache. See the entry > Examples: “Down home and upbeat, the Bloomfield Bluegrass Band is an all-Sonoma County ensemble of veteran performers whose primary musical obsession is the traditional bluegrass repertoire played with verve, panache, polish and pluck.” — The Argus-Courier (Petaluma, California), 28 July 2022 Did you know? Few literary characters can match the panache of French poet and soldier Cyrano de Bergerac, from Edmond Rostand's 1897 play of the same name. In his dying moments, Cyrano declares that the one thing left to him is his panache, and that assertion at once demonstrates the meaning of the word and draws upon its history. In both French and English, panache (which traces back to Late Latin pinnaculum, “small wing”) originally referred to a showy, feathery plume on a hat or helmet; our familiar figurative sense debuted in the first English translation of Rostand's play, which made the literal plume a metaphor for Cyrano's unflagging verve even in death. In a 1903 speech Rostand himself described panache: “A little frivolous perhaps, most certainly a little theatrical, panache is nothing but a grace which is so difficult to retain in the face of death, a grace which demands so much strength that, all the same, it is a grace … which I wish for all of us.”

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
assiduous

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 1:53 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 5, 2022 is: assiduous • uh-SIJ-uh-wus • adjective Assiduous is a formal word that means “showing great care, attention, and effort.” // Thanks to the assiduous efforts of the local land trust over many years, a substantial amount of whip-poor-will habitat is now protected from economic development. See the entry > Examples: “No entombed Egyptian pharaoh has had the stunning and star-studded afterlife of King Tut…. It's all due to a stroke of good luck. Which would include an amazing dearth of tomb-pillaging, an intrepid archeologist and his team, plus meticulous documentation from National Geographic. Also, an assiduous PR campaign for various touring exhibits celebrating the life and possessions of the ‘boy king.'” — Jim Sullivan, WBUR.org (Boston, Massachusetts), 13 July 2022 Did you know? While assiduous means “showing great care, attention, and effort,” and in some situations may be an appropriate substitute for careful, it's got a bit more oomph than careful in that it suggests a dogged or tireless persistence. If you are assiduous in your efforts (or work, research, analysis, training, preparations, etc.) for example, it's implied that you're in it for the long haul, or that you have the ability to “sit with” a task or challenge for a considerable amount of time. This makes sense given that assiduous comes from the Latin verb assidēre, meaning “to sit beside.”