Podcasts about Yiddish

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High German—derived language used by Ashkenazi Jews

  • 758PODCASTS
  • 2,137EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
Yiddish

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Best podcasts about Yiddish

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Latest podcast episodes about Yiddish

New Books in Jewish Studies
Annegret Oehme, "The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations" (Brill, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:20


This volume explores a core medieval myth, the tale of an Arthurian knight called Wigalois, and the ways it connects the Yiddish-speaking Jews and the German-speaking non-Jews of the Holy Roman Empire. The German Wigalois / Viduvilt adaptations grow from a multistage process: a German text adapted into Yiddish adapted into German, creating adaptations actively shaped by a minority culture within a majority culture. The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations (Brill, 2021) examines five key moments in the Wigalois / Viduvilt tradition that highlight transitions between narratological and meta-narratological patterns and audiences of different religious-cultural or lingual background. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Annegret Oehme, "The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations" (Brill, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:20


This volume explores a core medieval myth, the tale of an Arthurian knight called Wigalois, and the ways it connects the Yiddish-speaking Jews and the German-speaking non-Jews of the Holy Roman Empire. The German Wigalois / Viduvilt adaptations grow from a multistage process: a German text adapted into Yiddish adapted into German, creating adaptations actively shaped by a minority culture within a majority culture. The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations (Brill, 2021) examines five key moments in the Wigalois / Viduvilt tradition that highlight transitions between narratological and meta-narratological patterns and audiences of different religious-cultural or lingual background. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Annegret Oehme, "The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations" (Brill, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:20


This volume explores a core medieval myth, the tale of an Arthurian knight called Wigalois, and the ways it connects the Yiddish-speaking Jews and the German-speaking non-Jews of the Holy Roman Empire. The German Wigalois / Viduvilt adaptations grow from a multistage process: a German text adapted into Yiddish adapted into German, creating adaptations actively shaped by a minority culture within a majority culture. The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations (Brill, 2021) examines five key moments in the Wigalois / Viduvilt tradition that highlight transitions between narratological and meta-narratological patterns and audiences of different religious-cultural or lingual background. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in German Studies
Annegret Oehme, "The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations" (Brill, 2021)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:20


This volume explores a core medieval myth, the tale of an Arthurian knight called Wigalois, and the ways it connects the Yiddish-speaking Jews and the German-speaking non-Jews of the Holy Roman Empire. The German Wigalois / Viduvilt adaptations grow from a multistage process: a German text adapted into Yiddish adapted into German, creating adaptations actively shaped by a minority culture within a majority culture. The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations (Brill, 2021) examines five key moments in the Wigalois / Viduvilt tradition that highlight transitions between narratological and meta-narratological patterns and audiences of different religious-cultural or lingual background. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in Literary Studies
Annegret Oehme, "The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations" (Brill, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:20


This volume explores a core medieval myth, the tale of an Arthurian knight called Wigalois, and the ways it connects the Yiddish-speaking Jews and the German-speaking non-Jews of the Holy Roman Empire. The German Wigalois / Viduvilt adaptations grow from a multistage process: a German text adapted into Yiddish adapted into German, creating adaptations actively shaped by a minority culture within a majority culture. The Knight Without Boundaries: Yiddish and German Arthurian Wigalois Adaptations (Brill, 2021) examines five key moments in the Wigalois / Viduvilt tradition that highlight transitions between narratological and meta-narratological patterns and audiences of different religious-cultural or lingual background. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

JOWMA (Jewish Orthodox Women's Medical Association) Podcast
Playful Parenting with Gelly Asovski, LCSW-R, RPT-S

JOWMA (Jewish Orthodox Women's Medical Association) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 49:08


Gelly Asovski, LCSW-R RPT-S is a mother, grandmother and Yiddish speaking Child and Family Therapist practicing in Monsey, NY for the past 20 years. She s a Registered Play Therapy Supervisor and EMDR Consultant, bringing the best of cutting edge therapy to the frum community. In addition to her private practice, Asovski runs her parenting program, Playful Parenting, both as a 6 week heimishe telecourse and as an online yearlong program.She enjoys being a grandmother and loves reading, learning, traveling and having fun time with family and friends. Find out more about her work at parentingwithgelly.com. 

Vaybertaytsh
Episode 60: Etl Niborski | עטל ניבאָרסקי

Vaybertaytsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


I'm so pumped about this conversation with Etl Niborski, recorded in Tel Aviv this past summer. Etl is a 19-year-old left-wing activist and a native Yiddish speaker who recently completed her national service working in a school in Jaffa for at-risk youth. We talked all about what it's like to be an Israeli at the end of high school — all of the complicated decisions one has to make about joining the military or finding a way not to — how her Yiddishist background impacts her political thinking, what it was like to be a Yiddish-speaking, non-Hasidic kid on the streets of Jerusalem, and about her current Yiddish activities and projects.For more from The White Screen's album Sex, Drugs, and Palestine, click here.To see our most recent merch, click here.

Game Changers
He is not laughing.

Game Changers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 7:23


It's been awhile and just wanted to share what is going on in case you are not a listener of the Speaklifepodcast.com where I have been providing weekly updates.   I don't believe God is  laughing at your plans.  Which in opposition to the old Yiddish proverb that Men makes plans and God laughs.   In spite of what is going on in my life, I am leaning into what Moses said. “Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom.” Psalm 90:12   As we learn to number our days, we can prepare for the days ahead by committing them into God's hands and appointing them for the fulfilling of His purposes. Teaching us to not just sit and wait passively as to what the days will bring but praying for the days that haven't happened yet.   I also believe what God told Jeremiah, “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” Thanking you for being a part of my extended family.  https://gofund.me/a098f55b   

Unsung Science
Who Makes the Fake Languages for Hollywood?

Unsung Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 35:36


The first time you heard “Star Trek” characters speak Klingon, or the “Game of Thrones” characters speaking Dothraki and High Valyrian, you might have assumed that the actors were just speaking a few words of gibberish, created by some screenwriter to sound authentic. But these are complete languages, with vocabulary, syntax, grammar, and even made-up histories. There's only one person on the planet whose full-time job is creating them—and these days, he's swamped with requests. No doubt about it: Conlangs (constructed languages) are the new special effect. Me nem nesa!Guests: David Peterson, author/linguist/full-time language maker. Mark Okrand, author/linguist/creator of Klingon. Angela Carpenter, linguistics professor at Wellesley College.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast
Jordan Kutzik, David Forman: Dos Kluge Shnayderl/The Clever Little Tailor

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 61:28


David Forman and Jordan Kutzik are interviewed about the recently published children's book The Clever Little Tailor/דאָס קלוגע שנײַדערל. The book was written by Solomon (Shloyme) Simon and originally published in the 1930's. This new edition of the book features a translation into English side by side with the Yiddish original. David Forman, the author's grandson, did the English translation. Jordan Kutzik, who is also chairman of the Yugntruf - Youth for Yiddish organization, led the project to publish this book. For additional info on the book, visit: https://yiddishchildrensbooks.com/products/the-clever-little-tailor-by-solomon-simon The interview is conducted by Sholem Beinfeld, a regular contributor to The Yiddish Voice, co-Editor in Chief of the Comprehensive Yiddish-English Dictionary, and Professor of History, Emeritus, Washington University, St. Louis. Music: Intro/outro instrumental music: DEM HELFANDS TANTS, an instrumental track from the CD Jeff Warschauer: The Singing Waltz

NC F&B Podcast
Feed The Kids With The Produce Project

NC F&B Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:43


is an "ELI" (Extremely Large Individual) but not just in stature, Mike is large in personality and altruistic endeavors. It's very important to listen to this episode in order to understand: How Mike combats food insecurity Why Felicia Trujillo's nickname is Hotfooted Henrietta  Who's right in Max and Matt's battle over the best way to What the heck is a Rambutan? And some Yiddish words…     Support our Sponsors: The official Vodka of the NC F&B Podcast: , all the taste without the bite! Drink !  Think Differently About Dessert Use promo code 'NCFB' at checkout! The NC F&B Podcast is Produced and Engineered by Max Trujillo of Trujillo Media For booking or questions about the show, contact:  or  

Study Chassidus with Rabbi Yoel Kahn
What Is Chassidus? Part 2

Study Chassidus with Rabbi Yoel Kahn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 60:38


This class is the second installment in a lecture series by Rabbi Yoel Kahn on the Lubavitcher Rebbe's "Kuntres Inyana Shel Toras Hachassidus" or "On the Essence of Chassidus," an original discourse delivered on the 19th of Kislev 5726 (Dec 13, 1965). Rabbi Kahn gave this class in Yiddish to the senior students at the Central Chabad Lubavitch Yeshiva at 770 Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn, and it covers Seif Zayin through Yud Gimmel.

Study Chassidus with Rabbi Yoel Kahn

This class is the first installment in a lecture series by Rabbi Yoel Kahn on the Lubavitcher Rebbe's "Kuntres Inyana Shel Toras Hachassidus" or "On the Essence of Chassidus," an original discourse delivered on the 19th of Kislev 5726 (Dec 13, 1965). Rabbi Kahn gave this class in Yiddish to the senior students at the Central Chabad Lubavitch Yeshiva at 770 Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn, and it covers Seif Alef through Zayin.

Heart and Soul
Lipa Schmelzer: The Jewish Lady Gaga

Heart and Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 27:31


Lipa Schmeltzer is a bright star in the world of Jewish music; only his music sounds nothing like traditional Jewish music! In fact, he has been nicknamed, the ‘Jewish Lady Gaga'! Growing up in New York, in an ultra-conservative Hasidic community, Lipa was always different. At school, he was taught all subjects in Yiddish, and when he found it hard to concentrate his teachers called him the 'dumb kid' and told him he would never amount to anything. He had a dream of being a singer, but when he started writing and performing his own songs, his father and rabbi told him to stop and concentrate on studying the Bible. Lipa agreed and publicly apologised to the community for the modern music he had been creating - but it was not long until he started again. Lipa's music and performance style represented a split in his community: the younger Hasidic Jewish who loved the modern Jewish beats and wanted him to perform at their weddings and children's bar mitzvahs, and then the older more reserved Jewish who thought it was disrespectful and would lead people away from holy scripture and on a path to hell. Today Lipa lives in both worlds, creating modern Jewish music while trying to stay true to his roots. But it is not always easy, as Colm Flynn found out when he went to New York to visit Lipa. (Photo: Lipa Schmeltzer)

Manifesto!
Episode 38: My Quarrel with Authentic Reactionaries

Manifesto!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 104:10


Jake and Phil are joined by Joseph Keegin to discuss Nicolás Gómez Dávila‘s “The Authentic Reactionary,” and Chaim Grade's classic of Yiddish literature: “My Quarrel with Hersh Rasseyner” The Manifesto: Nicolás Gómez Dávila‘s “The Authentic Reactionary” https://isi.org/modern-age/the-authentic-reactionary/ The Art: Chaim Grade's “My Quarrel with Hersh Rasseyner” https://mosaicmagazine.com/response/arts-culture/2020/12/my-quarrel-with-hersh-rasseyner/

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast
Episode 0312: When I Grow Up: The Lost Autobiographies of Six Yiddish Teenagers

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 28:46


This week we visit with cartoonist Ken Krimstein to talk about his new graphic novel, based on six of hundreds of newly discovered, never-before-published essays by Eastern European Jewish teens written on the brink of World War II, and found in 2017 hidden in a Lithuanian church cellar. Episode 312 November 11, 2021 Yiddish Book Center Amherst, MA

MFA Writers
Rerelease: Special Episode! Cady Vishniac — MFA Applications

MFA Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 82:07


As we approach the first application deadlines of this MFA cycle, enjoy this rerelease to help you tackle questions such as: Should I get an MFA? What should I consider when applying? How can I strengthen my application? In this special episode, Jared is joined by Cady Vishniac, Editor-in-Chief of The Workshop and MFA graduate from The Ohio State University. Together, they address MFA applicants' most common questions and concerns, like crafting a solid statement of purpose and finding a program that accommodates student parents. Cady Vishniac attended The Ohio State University as the first MFA student to be awarded a Distinguished University Fellowship. Her stories have been published in Joyland, Glimmer Train, and New England Review, winning the contests at Ninth Letter, Greensboro Review, Mid-American Review, New Millennium Writings, Lascaux Review, American Literary Review, New Letters, and Salamander, as well as the anthology prize in New Stories from the Midwest. Her most recent publications are two stories in Tikkun and a Yiddish translation in Los Angeles Review. She has been writing for The Workshop since 2015 and became its Editor-in-Chief in 2020. MFA Writers is hosted by Jared McCormack and produced by Jared McCormack and Hanamori Skoblow. New episodes are released every two weeks. You can find more MFA Writers at MFAwriters.com. BE PART OF THE SHOW — Leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts, Podchaser, or Podcast Addict. — Submit an episode request. If there's a program you'd like to learn more about, contact us and we'll do our very best to find a guest who can speak to their experience. STAY CONNECTED Twitter: @MFAwriterspod Instagram: @MFAwriterspodcast Facebook: MFA Writers Email: mfawriterspodcast@gmail.com

College Commons
Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress

College Commons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 29:14


Understanding bible translations as a key to Jewish history. Leonard J. Greenspoon holds the Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization at Creighton University, where he is also Professor of Theology and of Classical & Near Eastern Studies. Greenspoon is the editor of the 32-volume (and counting) Studies in Jewish Civilization series. He has also written five other books, in addition to his most recent one on Jewish Bible translations. Additionally, he has served on translation committees for five versions. In 2018, Greenspoon was the recipient of a Festschrift: Found in Translation: Essays on Jewish Bible Translation in Honor of Leonard J. Greenspoon. At the 2019 annual meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature, he was the featured scholar honored in a section titled “Wisdom of the Ages.” For 2020, Greenspoon was named researcher of the year at Creighton. Examining a wide range of translations over twenty-four centuries, "Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress delves into the historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious contexts of versions in eleven languages: Arabic, Aramaic, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. Greenspoon profiles many Jewish translators—among them Buber, Hirsch, Kaplan, Leeser, Luzzatto, Mendelssohn, Orlinsky, and Saadiah Gaon—framing their aspirations within the Jewish and larger milieus in which they worked. He differentiates their principles, styles, and techniques—for example, their choice to emphasize either literal reflections of the Hebrew or distinctive elements of the vernacular language—and their underlying rationales. As he highlights distinctive features of Jewish Bible translations, he offers new insights regarding their shared characteristics and their limits. Additionally, he shows how profoundly Jewish translators and interpreters influenced the style and diction of the King James Bible.

Dash Arts Podcast
Songs for Babyn Yar: The Making Of

Dash Arts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 81:59


80 years ago this autumn, Nazi occupying forces murdered more than 33,000 Jews in the ravine of Babyn Yar in the suburbs of Kyiv, Ukraine, over just two days. In the following two years of Nazi occupation, Babyn Yar became the site of over 100,000 deaths.This month, Dash Arts marks this anniversary by premiering a new music theatre production, Songs for Babyn Yar, in London and Ukraine with a work-in-progress sharing in Berlin. This performance sees three Ukrainian musicians explore the legacy of these massacres, drawing on survivors' testimonies, traditional Yiddish and Ukrainian folk songs, poetry and storytelling, and asking how we can move forward.This podcast episode reveals the story of the making of the show, its vision and the creative journey we have experienced as we explore how to commemorate atrocity through the medium of performance. Featuring interviews with the show's director Josephine Burton; musicians Yuriy Gurzhy, Svetlana Kundish and Mariana Sadovska; and Dr Uilleam Blacker, Associate Professor of Comparative Russian and East European Culture at UCL.Music creditsSongs featured: Mipney Ma and Rabbi Yuriy's Dance from Songs for Babyn YarAll the music was created and recorded in the rehearsal room with Yuriy Gurzhy, Svetlana Kundish and Mariana Sadovska for Dash ArtsIntro music: Fakiiritanssi by Marouf Majidi See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WellSprings Congregation
10-31-2021 God Laughs - "Their Promises" - PDF

WellSprings Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Ken beings by telling a story from when he was three years old, and he made a funny comment about an older person. Our message series is called "God Laughs," based on the Yiddish saying "We plan, God laughs," and there is nothing more disruptive to our plans than death. He shares thoughts about a book called "No Cure For Being Human," written by a woman who discovered she had stage 4 cancer at age 35; and a story about a quote he saw on in a hospital chapel.

WellSprings Congregation
10-31-2021 God Laughs - "Their Promises" - Audio

WellSprings Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 15:52


Ken beings by telling a story from when he was three years old, and he made a funny comment about an older person. Our message series is called "God Laughs," based on the Yiddish saying "We plan, God laughs," and there is nothing more disruptive to our plans than death. He shares thoughts about a book called "No Cure For Being Human," written by a woman who discovered she had stage 4 cancer at age 35; and a story about a quote he saw on in a hospital chapel.

Something Rhymes with Purple

This week we're full of chutzpah as we schmooze our way through the fabulous words that Yiddish has given to the English language. While our resident mensches don't pretend to be mavens, they swell with kvelling as they revel in this rich and unique vocabulary covering everything from they smutty schmucks to the new Purple favourite ‘firgun'. Elsewhere Susie explains what ‘relexicalisation' is, there's a discussion on political correctness, and as always, three brilliant words to take into your week and a brand new poem to learn by heart. If you have a linguistic query or a tale from the table we'd love to hear it at purple@somethinelse.com. A Somethin' Else production. To buy SRWP mugs and more head to.... https://kontraband.shop/collections/something-rhymes-with-purple If you would like to sign up to Apple Subs please follow this link https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/something-rhymes-with-purple/id1456772823 and make sure that you are running the most up-to-date IOS on your computer/device otherwise it won't work. If you would like to see Gyles and Susie LIVE and in person on our Something Rhymes With Purple UK Tour then please go to https://www.tiltedco.com/somethingrhymeswithpurple for tickets and more information. Susie's Trio: Fipple - the mouthpiece of a wind instrument Flews - the pendulous lateral parts of a dog's upper lip Fugacious - transient or fleeting Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast
Episode 0310: The Great Dictionary of the Yiddish Language

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 26:03


Alex Weiser and Ben Kaplan sit down with The Shmooze to talk about their forthcoming collaboration, "The Great Dictionary of the Yiddish Language." The new full-length opera is based on the true story of Yiddish linguist Yudel Mark, who in 1950s postwar New York City set out to write the world's first fully comprehensive Yiddish dictionary—an effort of linguistic preservation, and a memorial to the dead. The opera invites audiences to consider the extent to which a language and a culture can be saved, the nature of grief, and the power of language itself to transform and shape us into who we are. Episode 310 October 28, 2021 Yiddish Book Center Amherst, MA

The Q & A with Rabbi Breitowitz Podcast
Q&A- Rabbanut Kashrus, Geirim & Mamzerim

The Q & A with Rabbi Breitowitz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 101:29


00:00 What is the Rav's opinion on the Rabbanut (for kashrus)? 4:51 Where does 1/60 come from in kashrus, olam haba etc.? 7:11 What is tznius for men? 13:15 Simchas Torah seems to be a holiday that developed naturally. It is a separate holiday?  18:00 Someone starting to take on mitzvos from scratch, should he start with deoreisa first, or would the Rambam disagree? 22:28 For one in Shidduchim, should he look at photos? 26:07 Is there a problem speaking Lashon haKodesh while involved in divrei chol? 35:20 How is birchas hamazon different among different groups. How can people add to it? 39:24 Why did HaShem create such vastness in the universe? 44:45 If a website shop gives a discount for the 1st order, can one always just make a new account? 48:05 Does the Torah say anything about math existing before physicality? 49:55 Kiddish levana doesn't seem so Jewish.  53:47 the 19th bracha of shemoneh esrei was added late, but even Avraham and Bruria prayer for sinners 58:00 Is there evidence amoraim didn't know pesukim? 59:50 There is a Gemara that the world exists in the merit of 36 tzadikim. Can we know who these are? 1:01:12 Sifrei kabala are often not revealed until many centuries after they were written. How can we accept these? 1:07:32 How can a mamzer be held accountable for the sins of his parents? 1:11:42 Is there any way to understand the achievements of Rashi? 1:14:06 Why can a Ger marry a mamzer if one has the same status as a born-Jew? 1:18:40 If a kohen marries a divorcée, is the child a mamzer? 1:19:10 In the 6 zchiros it makes point of Miriam's tzaras when leaving Mitzrayim. Why not in bamidbar, where they were? 1:22:00 What does it mean for the chiuv of chiuv es habrios? 1:23:36 We still wash hands in the morning, but not feet. Why not? 1:25:00 When we speak on the lowering of generations, what is the floor? 1:27:04 There's a machloches on the source of Ashrei, and csav ashures was used before anyway. 1:30:30 If a Christian missionary marries someone or is mesader gittin, what happens now? 1:33:20 According to the Rambam, are events of Tanakh metaphor? 1:33:45 We see great relation genetically, linguistically etc. with Canaanim. How can this be? 1:35:13 Why do malachim in Tanakh want to give over his name? 1:36:20 Of diasporic languages, why is Yiddish more developed than Ladino? 1:39:15 Chanoch was taken by Hashem and became a malach. What happened? Comments? Feedback? Would you like to sponsor an episode? A series? We'd love to hear from you : podcasts@ohr.edu https://podcasts.ohr.edu/ Visit us @ ohr.edu !   Produced by:

Arcade Attack Retro Gaming Podcast
Sound Test Vol. 4 - Halloween Special!

Arcade Attack Retro Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 65:15


He's only gone and done another one! Our Keith's on a roll! Halloween/horror themed goodness for you this week, from Master System and NES old skool classics to CD-quality (yes, I used that term) PS2 and PS3 modern-day classics. Listen and enjoy the surprises or scroll below to see the credits. Happy Halloween! Or whatever folk usually say this time of year, I dunno. Master of Darkness – 1993 – Yoko Wada, Takashi Horiguchi Clock Tower – 1996 – Kouji Niikura Castlevania: Rondo of Blood – 1993 – Akira Souji, Keizo Nakamura, Tomoko Sano, Mikio Saito Sweet Home – 1989 – Junko Tamiya Splatterhouse 2 – 1992 – Eiko Kaneda Resident Evil – 1996 – Makoto Tomozawa, Koichi Hiroki, Masami Ueda Silent Hill – 1999 – Akira Yamaoka Silent Hill 2 – 2001 – Akira Yamaoka The Last of Us – 2013 – Gustavo Santaolalla Bioshock – 2007 – Garry Schyman Bei Mir Bist Du Schön – 1937 – performed by The Andrews Sisters. English Music and Lyrics by Sammy Cahn and Saul Chaplin (original Yiddish version by Jacob Jacobs and Sholom Secunda) System Shock 2 – 1999 – Josh Randall, Ramin Djawadi, Eric Brosius  Like what we do? Please consider supporting us on Patreon: www.patreon.com/arcadeattack Fancy discussing this podcast? Fancy suggesting a topic of conversation? Please tweet us @arcadeattackUK or catch us on facebook.com/arcadeattackUK All copyrighted material contained within this podcast is the property of their respective rights owners and their use here is protected under ‘fair use' for the purposes of comment or critique.

New Books in Intellectual History
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in German Studies
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books Network
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Music
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

New Books in History
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Biblical Studies
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books in Biblical Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biblical-studies

New Books in Dance
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in European Studies
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Jewish Studies
Caroline A. Kita, "Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater" (Indiana UP, 2019)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:15


During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. By looking at the works of Jewish composers and writers who contributed to a lively and robust biblical theatre in fin de siècle Vienna, Caroline A. Kita's Jewish Difference and the Arts in Vienna: Composing Compassion in Music and Biblical Theater (Indiana UP, 2019) shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community. By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

Because We Love Making Movies

Today we welcome back one of my favorite guests, Film Editor BRETT BACHMAN. Last time he was on we spoke about his entire career including MANDY & PIG! But today is a special Halloween episode, and I wanted to do a deep dive into a film he edited…called THE VIGIL…it's a masterful folk-horror tale — written & directed by Keith Thomas , photographed by Zach Kuperstein with amazing performances by Dave Davis & the late, great Lynn Cohen.  It's a wonderfully unique movie and if you love horror movies like I do, please go check it out. We talk about how Brett approached cutting scenes in Yiddish when he didn't speak it, how he worked with Keith Thomas to build tension and dread, and how horror should always be about people and emotions if it's going to work. It's a great conversation about the joys and pains of making a film and how every single movie is a custom job and a life experience unto itself. Dig it! RECOMMENDED VIEWING: The Vigil, Jaws, Don't Look Now, The Exorcist, Rosemary's Baby, and oh, the movie that pulled Brett kicking and screaming into the genre: Drag me to Hell. #filmmaking #podcast #podcasting #filmpodcast#hollywood #cinema #movies#horror#thevigil#keiththomas#firestarter#zachkuperstein#folkhorror#filmediting Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marriage and Martinis
189. Nachas, Mazel, and Mishpocheh

Marriage and Martinis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 69:55


In this episode (Yiddish for "proud," "congrats," and "family or friends who are like family"), Adam and Danielle discuss the big milestone of their son becoming a Bar Mitzvah, and all the components that go into planning a big celebration like this. The two go into detail all about how religion impacted their upbringing, and which traditions and practices they hope to continue, and which they have decided don't hold much meaning for them. Plus, how being a part of the "sandwich generation" is tricky due to the pressure of older generations to uphold parts of religion that might not be as relevant for today's world. Plus, have these parties and celebrations gotten out of hand concerning the cost, time, and effort that go into planning? No matter what religion (or lack thereof) you practice(d), this episode is definitely extremely relatable and offers a lot of insight into how partners can come together to figure out how to blend two different experiences into one successful lifestyle.To have these meaningful conversations:marriageandmartinis.com/dnq promo code "mnmpodcast" for 20% offDanielle and Adam's party planner (not a sponsored ad, she's just awesome)https://www.360creativeapproach.comhttps://www.instagram.com/360creativeapproach/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jews You Should Know
Episode 165 - The Novelist and "People Love Dead Jews" Author

Jews You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 84:09


Author Dara Horn urges us to examine the reasons behind our fascination with Jewish deaths as representative of the worst of humanity's ills, and our lack of regard for Jewish lives as they unfold in the present. In her book, “People Love Dead Jews: Reports from a Haunted Present,” Dara draws on her own family's experiences — trying to explain Shakespeare's Shylock to a curious 10-year-old, her outrage when swastikas are drawn on desks at her children's New Jersey school, the profound and essential perspective offered by traditional religious practice, prayer, and study — to assert the vitality, complexity, and depth of this life in the face of anti-Semitism, which, far from being deterred by the mantra "Never forget," is on the rise. Dara studied Yiddish and Hebrew for her doctorate in comparative literature at Harvard University. She has taught these subjects at Sarah Lawrence College and Yeshiva University, as well as at Harvard, where she held the Gerald Weinstock Visiting Professorship in Jewish Studies. She has given hundreds of talks to audiences across North America, Israel, and Australia.   Timestamps: 00:00 Introduction 3:30 Dara's origins and early upbringing 5:38 Talking about Judaism from early childhood to college 11:39 Discussing some modern Hebrew writers and literature 24:55 Dara's story of becoming a writer and her first published works 39:53 How Dara turned to fiction after college and wrote her first novel 42:54 Brief synopsis of Dara's novels 49:03 Talking about “People Love Dead Jews,” and how it came to be 56:16 Problems with representations of Judaism and museum exhibitions about the Holocaust 1:10:00 How the book has been received and how it changed Dara 1:19:50 Introducing Dara's podcast, "Adventures with Dead Jews"   Connect with Dara Horn: Website: https://www.darahorn.com/ Podcast: Adventures with Dead Jews – search on any podcast platform Connect with Ari: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jewsyoushouldknow Twitter: https://twitter.com/JewsUShouldKnow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Rabbi.K Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ari-koretzky-18b12217/

SBS Hebrew - אס בי אס בעברית
SBS Yiddish report with Alex Dafner: State Memorial Service by NSW for Eddie Jaku Z"L and more news

SBS Hebrew - אס בי אס בעברית

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 10:31


SBS Yiddish report with Alex Dafner: State Memorial Service by NSW for Eddie Jaku Z"L and more news

Judaism Unbound
Episode 297: The Power of "Should" - Ginna Green, Lynn Harris

Judaism Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 52:35


Ginna Green and Lynn Harris, co-hosts of A Bintel Brief -- another podcast in the ever-growing Jewish pod-o-sphere -- join Dan and Lex for a conversation about A Bintel Brief. In their discussion, they explore the evolution of A Bintel Brief from (over 100 years ago) a written advice column in Yiddish to an oral podcast, released via the internet. They also consider the value of one of the scariest words, in Jewish communities and in our broader society -- "should."If you're enjoying Judaism Unbound, please help us keep things going with a one-time or monthly tax-deductible donation. Support Judaism Unbound by clicking here!To access shownotes for this episode, click here.

Adventures with Dead Jews

Dara gets us in the Halloween spirit with a reading of “The Dead Town” by Yiddish writer I.L. Peretz. (Translated by Helen Frank and Hillel Halkin, abridged and adapted by Dara Horn.)

Unorthodox
Spooky Schmoozing: Ep.291

Unorthodox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 67:52


This week on Unorthodox, former guest Gavriel Savit joins us for a spooktacular Halloween episode. We talk about the Jewishness of Dune, William Shatner's mission to the moon, why some religious Jews don't celebrate Halloween, and more. Our Jewish guest is actor, author, and substance abuse counselor Stacey Nelkin, who starred in the 1982 film Halloween III: Season of the Witch. She joins us to reminisce about the critically panned cult classic. Our Gentile of the week is Carrie Harris, a fiction writer whose work features monsters, mayhem, and murder. She tells us why horror writing flourishes in uncertain times, and reads a passage from her new young adult book, Elder God Dance Squad, which she describes as ‘Stranger Things meets Bring It On.' Dara Horn, author of the new book People Love Dead Jews, and host of the podcast “Adventures with Dead Jews,” gets us in the holiday spirit with a reading of “The Dead Town” by Yiddish writer I.L. Peretz. (Translated by Helen Frank and Hillel Halkin, abridged and adapted by Dara Horn.) Listen to Liel on a special crossover episode of “People of the Pod,” discussing “How the Jews Went Right in Britain.” It's the first installment of “21st Century Europe and the Jews,” a four-part collaboration between Tablet and American Jewish Committee. Listen to the episode here, and learn more about the series here. It's that time of the year! Please support Unorthodox and the other Tablet shows you know and love by visiting bit.ly/givetounorthodox. Send comments and questions to unorthodox@tabletmag.com, or leave us a voicemail at (914) 570-4869. You can also record a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more. Join our Facebook group, and follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram. Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt. Want to book us for a live show? Email producer Josh Kross at jkross@tabletmag.com. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Sponsors: Rothy's shoes are stylish and sustainable, and now they're available for men too! Get $20 off your first purchase at rothys.com/UNORTHODOX Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Behind the Bima
Special Guest - Professor Ruth Wisse

Behind the Bima

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 57:38


Professor Ruth Wisse is the Martin Peretz Professor of Yiddish Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature at Harvard University emeritus. She is a noted scholar of Yiddish literature and of Jewish history and culture.00:00 - Intro18:34 - Interview Begins Connect with Rabbi Efrem Goldberg: Website: https://rabbiefremgoldberg.org/Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/efrem.goldbergTwitter: http://twitter.com/rabbigoldbergRabbi Efrem Goldberg is the Senior Rabbi of the Boca Raton Synagogue (BRS), a rapidly-growing congregation of over 800 families and over 1,000 children in Boca Raton, Florida. BRS is the largest Orthodox Synagogue in the Southeast United States. Rabbi Goldberg's warm and welcoming personality has helped attract people of diverse backgrounds and ages to feel part of the BRS community, reinforcing the BRS credo of 'Valuing Diversity and Celebrating Unity. Rabbi Philip Moskowitz serves as Associate Rabbi at Boca Raton Synagogue (BRS). His warm personality and dynamic, positive spirit make people of all backgrounds and ages feel a part of the BRS community. Rabbi Moskowitz officiates at life cycle events, provides pastoral counseling, and serves as halachic advisor and close confidante to hundreds of members. Beyond the engaging and relevant Shabbat morning sermons, delivered to multiple, diverse minyanim, and the numerous regular classes and shiurim in the Shul, Rabbi Moskowitz regularly teaches Torah in private homes, local day schools, and the community at large. Rabbi Josh Broide is the Director of the Deborah & Larry D. Silver Center for Jewish Engagement (CJE), a Division of the Jewish Federation of South Palm Beach County. He is also the Founder and Director of the Boca Raton Jewish Experience (BRJE), a rapidly growing outreach and engagement program in Boca Raton, Florida. In addition he also works as the Outreach Rabbi at Boca Raton Synagogue (BRS), one of the largest Modern Orthodox Synagogues in North America.

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast
Episode 0309: Yiddishtown: East End Jewish Life in Yiddish Sketch and Story

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:43


This week "The Shmooze" goes transatlantic for a conversation with London-based Vivi Lachs, a social and cultural historian, Yiddishist, and postdoc research fellow at Queen Mary University of London. The author of several books including "White Chapel Noise," Vivi translated the newly released "London Yiddishtown: East End Jewish Life in Yiddish Sketch and Story, 1930–1950," a collection of previously untranslated short stories and sketches by Katie Brown, A. M. Kaizer, and I. A. Lisky. Episode 309 October 21, 2021 Yiddish Book Center Amherst, MA

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 18, 2021 is: zaftig • ZAHF-tig • adjective Zaftig means "having a full, rounded figure"—in other words, "pleasingly plump." // Portraits of zaftig models are exhibited in the artist's collection. See the entry > Examples: "The photography exhibition revels in depictions of Coney Island, including Lisette Model's widely-reproduced 1939-40 portrait of a zaftig woman  … laughing as waves lap at her feet…." — Steven Litt, The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 29 Aug. 2021 Did you know? Zaftig is one of a number of Yiddish-derived words that entered the English language during the mid-1800s to the early 1900s. It comes from Yiddish zaftik, which means "juicy" or "succulent" and itself derives from zaft, meaning "juice" or "sap."

A Bintel Brief
A Bintel Brief Live!

A Bintel Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:09


Starting in 1906, the editors of the Forward answered reader questions in a column called “A Bintel Brief,” Yiddish for “a bundle of letters.” Now, we're bringing Bintel into a new era. Welcome to “A Bintel Brief,” the Jewish advice podcast. In this bonus episode, Ginna and Lynn chat live, with help from the Forward's Editor-in-Chief, Jodi Rudoren, and archivist, Chana Pollack.Send your dilemmas about Jewish-American life, identity, culture, politics or your personal hopes and dreams to bintel@forward.com, or leave a voicemail at (201) 540-9728.Subscribe to the podcast to ensure you don't miss an episode. And sign up for our Bintel newsletter to hear more from our hosts about making the show.Follow the Forward on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Vaybertaytsh
Episode 59: ?דער ייִדישער פּאָדקאַסט – װוּהין | The Yiddish Podcast Today

Vaybertaytsh

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


In this episode, Sosye and Meyer Dovid from the long-running Yiddish radio show Dos Yidishe Kol chat all things Yiddish, podcasting, and — you guessed it — Yiddish podcasting. It was a pleasure to get to know Meyer Dovid better, and to learn a bit about his radio show's trajectory. You can see a concise version of our conversation in Yiddish and in English translation at In geveb: A Journal of Yiddish Studies. Thank you to In geveb's blog team for proposing this idea and collaborating with both of our shows on this episode!

Playing On Air: A Theater Podcast
THE BURIAL SOCIETY by Susan Sandler (Re-Release)

Playing On Air: A Theater Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 16:20


Husband-wife team Anne Meara and Jerry Stiller play former Yiddish theater stars who steal the show at a memorial service in the THE BURIAL SOCIETY, a comic play by Susan Sandler. Also featuring George Morfogen* (“Oz”) and David Margulies (Ghostbusters). Directed by Playing on Air Producing Artistic Director Claudia Catania. Playing on Air is honored to share the work of this all-star cast, the members of whom have passed away since BURIAL SOCIETY's recording in 2011.

Whiskey Ginger w/ Andrew Santino

Santino sits down with Rick Glassman to take edibles, chat about which actually came first, chicken or the egg and we tell old Yiddish jokes and get goofy as we always do.  COME SEE ME ON TOUR!!! https://www.andrewsantino.com ORDER SOME MERCH!!! https://www.andrewsantinostore.com Join our Patreon : https://www.patreon.com/whiskeygingerpodcast SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! CANVA PRO - Design like a pro for you and your business team Get a 45 day extended trial!!! https://www.canva.me/whiskey  SQUARESPACE - Help design your website today with amazing templates and the help of professionals https://squarespace.com/whiskey Use promo code WHISKEY for 10% off! HELLO FRESH Americas number one meal kit!!! Get delicious food sent to your front door ready to be cooked by you! https://www.hellofresh.com/14whiskey Get up to 14 free meals! Follow Santino on Insta and Twitter: https://www.instagram.com/cheetosantino/  https://twitter.com/CheetoSantino Whiskey Ginger Insta and Twitter: https://www.instagram.com/whiskeygingerpodcast/ & https://twitter.com/whiskeyginger_ Whiskey Ginger Clips: http://www.youtube.com/c/WhiskeyGingerPodcastClips

A Bintel Brief
Episode 10: "Heartbroken Bubbe"

A Bintel Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:01


Starting in 1906, the editors of the Forward answered reader questions in a column called “A Bintel Brief,” Yiddish for “a bundle of letters.” Now, we're bringing Bintel into a new era. Welcome to “A Bintel Brief,” the Jewish advice podcast. This week, in the tenth and final episode of the season, the hosts advise a grandmother struggling to form a relationship to her new granddaughter, who will be raised in an interfaith family. Ginna and Lynn are joined once again by Tema Smith of 18Doors and Sharon Goldtzvik of Uprise.Send your dilemmas about Jewish-American life, identity, culture, politics or your personal hopes and dreams to bintel@forward.com, or leave a voicemail at (201) 540-9728.Subscribe to the podcast to ensure you don't miss an episode. And sign up for our Bintel newsletter to hear more from our hosts about making the show.Follow the Forward on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hyperbole: The Best Podcast Ever
The Best Cachoink Ever

Hyperbole: The Best Podcast Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 41:15


In this episode: overdue accolades, Tiger King Unleashed, sleuthing in Aruba, a brush with reality fame, very clever marketing, disappointing whipped cream, Real Housewives news, cheerleaders, bald faces lies, Matt Goetz + Dilbert, an absurd disappearance, soaking, Delta does not play, important beverage news, Today and all the days in Yiddish, a terrible broadway show, no hormones(!), baby goat Danielle, Amy's cachoink, and local turkey drama