Podcasts about Yiddish

High German—derived language used by Ashkenazi Jews

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The MeatEater Podcast
Ep. 391: Border Patrol

The MeatEater Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 153:37


Steven Rinella talks to Richard Fortunato, Charles Trost II, James Searl, Janis Putelis, Phil Taylor, and Corinne Schneider. Topics discussed: Pistol packing bagpipe players; the U.S. Border Patrol's role in public land and critter management; Jani's daughter's incredible turkey gobbling skills; the time when Steve and Jani got pulled over by Border Patrol; wild horses; establishing base truth; darting eyes and deception; templing; HR concerns; speaking Yiddish on The MeatEater Podcast; picking up your poop with your bare hands under threat; the Makushi story about the disappearance and reappearance of the white-lipped peccary population; why pronghorns and dogs smell like Fritos; operating between ports of entry; what you can't bring back from Canada; when do you know that you've crossed the border?; making a meaningful entry; the Tick Riders; big ass blimps; monitoring critters with Border Patrol surveillance cameras; skilled at tracking; carrying diamonds across the Boundary Waters; wildlife smuggling; the pronghorn roundup; and more. Connect with Steve and MeatEater Steve on Instagram and Twitter MeatEater on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube Shop MeatEater Merch See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast
Gennady Estraikh on the War in Ukraine

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 59:40


Second interview with Gennady Estraikh discussing the war in Ukraine. (Our first interview aired in March, 2022.) Estraikh, who was born in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, is a professor at NYU who specializes in Jewish intellectual history, Yiddish language and literature, and Soviet Jewish history. He has written numerous books, academic papers, and journal and newspaper articles in English, Russian, Ukrainian, and Yiddish, notably for the Yiddish Forverts. He served as managing editor of the famed Yiddish literary journal Sovetish Heymland from 1988 to 1991. His books include Yiddish Culture in Ukraine (Kyiv: Dukh i Litera, 2016, in Ukrainian) and Transatlantic Russian Jewishness: Ideological Voyages of the Yiddish Daily Forverts in the First Half of the Twentieth Century (Academic Studies Press, 2020). The interview took place over Zoom on Wednesday, November 23, 2022. In honor of our upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, we present Interview with the Turkey, a radio monologue recorded and first aired in the 1990's, by Boston's late, great Yiddish radio host Ben Gailing. Music: Psoy Korolenko: Yoshke fun Ades Mandy Patinkin: Take Me out to the Ball Game and God Bless America Intro instrumental music: DEM HELFANDS TANTS, an instrumental track from the CD Jeff Warschauer: The Singing Waltz Air date: November 23, 2022

The Re-Education with Eli Lake
Ep. 54: What Israel Owes Ukraine

The Re-Education with Eli Lake

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 68:15


In this episode, Eli examines the difference between what Israel's leaders must do to survive and what Ukraine needs from the civilized world. He also talks with Harvard University emeritus professor of Yiddish literature, Ruth Wisse about her extraordinary essay in Commentary from May 2022 about the rise of Ukraine's Jewish president. https://www.commentary.org/articles/ruth-wisse/zelensky-jewish-hero/   Questions? Comments? Email us at Eli@nebulouspodcasts.com

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast
Gennady Estraikh on the War in Ukraine, 2nd Interview

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 59:40


Our second interview with Gennady Estraikh (first interview aired in March, 2022) discussing the war in Ukraine. Estraikh, who was born in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, is a professor at NYU who specializes in Jewish intellectual history, Yiddish language and literature, and Soviet Jewish history. He has written numerous books, academic papers, and journal and newspaper articles in English, Russian, Ukrainian, and Yiddish, notably for the Yiddish Forverts. He served as managing editor of the famed Yiddish literary journal Sovetish Heymland from 1988 to 1991. His books include Yiddish Culture in Ukraine (Kyiv: Dukh i Litera, 2016, in Ukrainian) and Transatlantic Russian Jewishness: Ideological Voyages of the Yiddish Daily Forverts in the First Half of the Twentieth Century (Academic Studies Press, 2020). The interview took place over Zoom on Wednesday, November 23, 2022. In honor of the Thanksgiving holiday we present Interview with the Turkey, a monologue by Boston's late, great Yiddish radio host Ben Gailing, originally aired on his show Der Freylekher Kabtsen in the 1980's. Thanks to Hankus Netsky, Ben's producer and co-host, for supplying this recording. Music: Loyko: Yoshke fun Ades Mandy Patinkin: Take Me out to the Ball Game and God Bless America Intro instrumental music: DEM HELFANDS TANTS, an instrumental track from the CD Jeff Warschauer: The Singing Waltz Air date: November 23, 2022

The Bowery Boys: New York City History
#399 The Changing Lower East Side: A View From Seward Park

The Bowery Boys: New York City History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 83:12


To wrap up our 15th anniversary celebration -- and to set up our big 400th episode -- we take a fond look at one corner of New York City which taught us to love local history.Perhaps you know this area for Seward Park, the first municipal playground in the United States, or for Straus Square, named for Nathan Straus, philanthropist and co-owner (with his brother Isidor) of Macy's Department Store. Today, trendy artists and influencers instead spend their weekends in Dimes Square, just one block (and seemingly one world) away.In the 19th century, as Rutgers Square, this area became a small portion of a large German immigrant community called Kleindeutschland. In an inconceivable historical moment, a statue was almost raised here -- to William 'Boss' Tweed, leader of Tammany Hall.By the late 19th century, this place was the center for American Jewish culture, and East Broadway became Yiddish publishers row, hosting newspapers and magazines from a host of perspectives. In the 20th century, thanks to a mid-century housing boom (fueled partially by the labor unions firmly rooted to this place), some also called it Cooperative Village, with hundreds of old, deteriorating tenements replaced with new high rises.It's a neighborhood that means so much to so many -- and we hope you learn to love it all yourself, no matter what you call it. PLUS: We're join by staff members of the Forward, celebrating its 125th year of publication. Forward archivist Chana Pollack joins us along with Ginna Green and Lynn Harris, hosts of the the newspaper column-turned-podcast version A Bintel Brief.

The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)
Eretz Yisroel Trip (10) Shmooze by Reb Meilich Bidderman שליט״א (Yiddish)

The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 76:54


The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)
Eretz Yisroel Trip (13) Shmooze by R' Gamliel Rabinovitch שליט״א (Yiddish)

The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 6:18


Gruesome Magazine - Horror Movie Reviews and Interviews
BLOOD RELATIVES (2022, SHUDDER) A Heartfelt Exploration of Fatherhood...as a Vampire

Gruesome Magazine - Horror Movie Reviews and Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 30:29


The Grue-Crew review BLOOD RELATIVES (2022, SHUDDER) on Gruesome Magazine episode 381. Jeff Mohr from Decades of Horror: The Classic Era, Crystal Cleveland, the Livin6Dead6irl from Decades of Horror: 1980s, award-winning filmmaker Christopher G. Moore, and Doc Rotten share their thoughts about this week's frightening addition to streaming horror films. Warning: possible spoilers after the initial impressions! BLOOD RELATIVES (2022, SHUDDER) Francis, a 115-year-old Yiddish vampire, still looks 35. He's been roaming American backroads in his beat-up muscle car for decades, keeping to himself, and liking it that way. One day, a teenage kid, Jane, shows up. She says she's his daughter, and she's got the fangs to prove it. They go on the road, deciding whether to sink their teeth into family life. Available streaming on SHUDDER beginning November 22, 2022 Written and Directed by: Noah Segan Stars: Noah Segan, Victoria Moroles, Akasha Villalobos, C.L. Simpson, Ammie Masterson, Tracie Thoms, Jon Proudstar, Josh Ruben FOLLOW: Gruesome Magazine Website http://gruesomemagazine.com YouTube Channel (Subscribe Today!) https://youtube.com/c/gruesomemagazine Instagram https://www.instagram.com/gruesomemagazine/ Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/HorrorNewsRadioOfficial/ Doc, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DocRottenHNR Crystal, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/living6dead6irl Crystal, Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/livin6dead6irl/ Jeff, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeffmohr9 Dave, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drehershouseofhorrors

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 21, 2022 is: temerity • tuh-MAIR-uh-tee • noun Temerity is a formal word that means "unreasonable or foolhardy contempt of danger or opposition"; it is a synonym of both rashness and recklessness. Temerity can also refer to a rash or reckless act. // The line between boldness and temerity is sometimes only evident after the consequences have become clear. // The previous night's temerity had landed the students in detention. See the entry > Examples: "As Jackson sauntered during the ensuing break in play, his chin up defiantly and jaw clenched, James did a double-take at the apparent temerity, his next-play focus transforming into disapproval." — Houston Mitchell, The Los Angeles Times, 4 Mar. 2022 Did you know? When you're feeling saucy, there's no shortage of words in the English language you can use to describe the particular flavor of your metaphorical sauce, from audacity and effrontery to the Yiddish-derived fan favorite chutzpah. If we may be so bold, let us also suggest temerity: it comes from the Latin temere, meaning “recklessly” or “haphazardly,” and is good for suggesting boldness even in the face of danger or likely punishment. Temerity is a formal word, rarely used in casual writing or conversation, but provided you have the cheek to flout this convention, you may be thinking “what have I got to lose?”

For Reading Out Loud
I. L. Peretz, Bontsha the Silent

For Reading Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 29:18


I. L. Peretz was one of the great Yiddish storytellers. Here is one of his most famous tales.

Hyperbole: The Best Podcast Ever
The Best Bun Cozy Ever

Hyperbole: The Best Podcast Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 38:24


In this episode: mahjong idiosyncrasies, hyperbolic airports, wonderful whales, election fouls, rigatoni with peas, a handmaid's glare, unacceptable sky club behavior, slow talking, a brand new segment!, just wondering where those prairie dress ladies are going, hackneyed sayings, Today in Yiddish, boy bites snake, pumpkin water weight, a Texas interloper, NASA getting shiz done, #RHOSLC, Radio Andy News, #RHOBH, #BuyingBeverlyHills, slippers as shoes, an Ian-less quiz, Thanksgiving fun facts, and local albinism drama  

Fresh Air
Behind Yiddish 'Fiddler On The Roof'

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 44:52


We'll talk about the Yiddish language production of Fiddler on the Roof that's just returned to off Broadway. Our guests will be Joel Grey, who directed it, and Steven Skybell who stars as Tevye. And we'll hear songs from the Yiddish cast recording.Also, Justin Chang reviews She Said, a new film about the New York Times reporters who broke the Harvey Weinstein story.

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast
Rokhl Zicherman, Tsirl Kuznitz

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 62:31


Prof. Cecile (Tsirl) Kuznitz talks about the upcoming "Schaechter Conference", which she is chairing, sponsored by the League for Yiddish, JTS, and Columbia University. Info: League for Yiddish Rokhl Zicherman, a survivor of Auschwitz who grew up in Tybava, a small village in the Carpathian Mountains which was in Czechoslovakia before WWII, part of Hungary during the war, and is now in Ukraine, discusses her early life as well as deportation and survival in Auschwitz. She now lives in Los Angeles with her husband, also a Holocaust survivor. Music: Intro instrumental music: DEM HELFANDS TANTS, an instrumental track from the CD Jeff Warschauer: The Singing Waltz Outro instrumental music: Itzhak Perlman, Dov Seltzer, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra: Afn Veg Shteyt A Boym

The Swap Society Podcast with Nicole Robertson
Slow Fashion Meets Jewish Culture with Bubuleh Founder Jordan Star

The Swap Society Podcast with Nicole Robertson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 57:40


Bubuleh is a sustainable and ethical clothing brand that is inspired by Jewish culture. In this episode, Bubuleh Founder and CEO Jordan Star talks about his grandparents' influence on launching his brand (“bubbeleh” is a Yiddish term of endearment that means sweetheart), his focus on evergreen styles instead of seasonal trends, and the importance of using only high quality, vegan materials that are made to last. Jordan also shares the steps he takes in his personal life to live more sustainably, raves about his favorite vintage jacket, and talks about antisemitism and how 18% of all Bubuleh sales for the rest of the year will be donated to the ADL.  For show notes visit: https://www.swapsociety.co/pages/podcast

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast
Episode 0341: The Remarkable Backstory of Chana Blankshteyn's Fear and Other Stories

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 25:28


Anita Norich visits with "The Shmooze" to talk about her translation of Chana Blankshteyn's "Fear and Other Stories." Yiddish writer Chana Blankshteyn (~1860–1939) was a woman who may be almost entirely forgotten now but was widely admired during her long and productive life. The mere existence of these stories is itself a remarkable feat as the collection was published in July 1939, just before the Nazis invaded Poland and two weeks before Blankshteyn's death. Episode 341 November 16, 2022 Amherst, MA

Judaism Unbound
Bonus Episode: The Dybbukast, Season 3 Episode 1 - Years Have Sped By

Judaism Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 32:32


This bonus episode of Judaism Unbound is presented in partnership with Theatre Dybbuk. Once a month, their podcast -- called The Dybbukast -- releases a new episode, and we are proud to feature their third season's first episode as a bonus episode here on Judaism Unbound's feed. In each episode, they bring poems, plays, and other creative texts from throughout history to life, all while revealing their relationships to issues still present today. Subscribe to The Dybbukast on Apple Podcasts, or anywhere else that podcasts are found.In this episode, presented in collaboration with the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life, we investigate the life and work of the poet Chaya Rochel Andres, who emigrated as a young woman from Poland to Dallas, Texas, where she spent most of her adult life. Her story serves as an entry point for us to explore some of the social, political, and cultural dynamics of Jewish life in the South. Throughout the episode, a variety of poems from Chaya Rochel's body of work are intercut with information about the circumstances of her life, the time in which she lived, and the organization with which she was involved, the Arbeter Ring, which many people now know as the Workers Circle.Scholarship from the Institute of Southern Jewish Life includes expertise from Dr. Josh Parshall, Director of History, who discusses Chaya Rochel's work and its connections to the Yiddish speaking world, as well as Jewish life in Eastern Europe and the South, and Nora Katz, Director of Heritage and Interpretation, who speaks about how Chaya Rochel's story intersects with the Jewish history of migration to and within the Southern United States. Also featured in the episode is an interview with Chaya Rochel from 1981, courtesy of the Dallas Jewish Historical Society, in which she shared about her writing and her personal history.

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast
Episode 0340: Women in Yiddish

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 25:57


Editor Mindl Cohen sits down with "The Shmooze" to talk about the soon-to-be-released "2022 Pakn Treger Digital Translation Issue." This year's anthology includes fourteen newly translated stories, poems, and memoirs about women's experiences. In conversation we learn about some of the Yiddish writers whose work appears in this collection and about the translators who are bringing these works to English readers. Episode 340 November 15, 2022 Amherst, MA

Cincinnati Edition
What's driving renewed interest in Yiddish? A scholar and translator of Yiddish literature weigh in

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 24:56


Yiddish was considered a dying language for decades after two-thirds of European Jews were killed during the Holocaust. Now there's renewed interest in the language.

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast
Episode 0339: A Trilingual (Yiddish, Ukrainian, English) Volume of Two Works of Children's Poetry

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 18:12


Jordan Finkin and Jessica Kirzane visit with "The Shmooze" to talk about their latest project, a trilingual (Yiddish, Ukrainian, English) volume of two works of children's poetry. The poems in the volume were originally composed in Ukrainian by Yuriy Budiak, and shortly thereafter translated by Yoysef Ravin (who was later killed in Stalin's purges) and republished in Yiddish. Episode 339 November 13, 2022 Amherst, MA

The Dybbukast
Years Have Sped By

The Dybbukast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 31:51


In this episode, presented in collaboration with the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life, we investigate the life and work of the poet Chaya Rochel Andres, who emigrated as a young woman in 1921 from Poland to Dallas, Texas, where she spent most of her adult life. Her story serves as an entry point for us to explore some of the social, political, and cultural dynamics of Jewish life in the South.Throughout the episode, a variety of poems from Chaya Rochel's body of work are intercut with information about the circumstances of her life, the time in which she lived, and the organization with which she was involved, the Arbeter Ring, which many people now know as the Workers Circle.Scholarship from the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life includes expertise from Dr. Josh Parshall, Director of History, who discusses Chaya Rochel's work and its connections to the Yiddish speaking world, as well as Jewish life in Eastern Europe and the South, and Nora Katz, Director of Heritage and Interpretation, who speaks about how Chaya Rochel's story intersects with the Jewish history of migration to and within the Southern United States. Also featured in the episode is an interview with Chaya Rochel from 1981, courtesy of the Dallas Jewish Historical Society, in which she shared about her writing and her personal history.This episode is made possible in part by a grant from the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs.

I Could Never Do That
86 Raymond "The Noodnick" - Mastering Lucid Living

I Could Never Do That

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 69:30


Well, if there was ever an “I Could Never,” this one might be it. My guest today, Raymond (@the Noodnick) is a master of what is known as artistic calisthenics - which is basically some crazy combination of pure strength, gymnastics, core work, and cirque du Soleil all done with the grace of a ballet dancer. He literally defies gravity and anyone that specializes in something called “The Human Flagpole” is superman in my book. .  What I dig about Raymond is that he is an open book — both on his training and techniques, but also about his life philosophies. You know when you're having a wonderful dream and time means nothing? Well, through his training and art form, Raymond wants to, as he says, “Live Lucidly" - when hours feel like minutes because you're so in the flow of love.  That's certainly something we can all aspire to. He calls himself “The Noodnick” because it's a play on the Yiddish word for “Boring pest,” but believe me, he's anything but boring.  Follow Raymond on Instagram @thenoodnick Follow Raymond on TikTok @thenoodnick "I Could Never Do That" Website - https://www.podpage.com/icouldneverdothat/  "I Could Never Do That" Instagram - @icouldneverdothat Support the Podcast through BuyMeACoffee.com - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/CarrieBarrett  Theme Music: Your Love by Atch -License: Creative Commons License - Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)    

Awakin Call
Iya Affo -- Reculturing, Re-Membering, and Relearning for Collective Healing

Awakin Call

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022


“You are the cumulative expression of all your ancestors.” When Iya Affo meets someone, she instinctively looks for the best in that person, a seed in them that can be nurtured. To nurture others is a high calling for Iya, whose deepest identity is as Mother and Healer. Her African name, Wekenon, means Mother of the Universe, and her title, Iya, signifies Holy Mother. Both were bestowed on her in a traditional ceremony on the soil of her ancestral home in the Benin Republic of West Africa. Iya's passion is to cultivate intergenerational healing by connecting intuitive ancestral practices with modern neurobiology. A culturalist and historical trauma specialist certified in the western tradition, as well as a certified Adverse Childhood Experiences Trainer, she is a descendant of a long line of traditional healers from West Africa, a Chief in the Village of Ouidah, and a High Priestess in the Yoruba tradition. Iya’s search for her individual and cultural identity formed in her childhood while growing up in New York. She was deeply drawn to the rituals observed among her Jewish friends and neighbors – from their ceremonies and traditions, their holidays, to the Yiddish language spoken in their homes. She began to wonder why her Black community had such a different trajectory; why was the history of the Holocaust widely known, but not the stories of enslavement of her ancestors? She sensed that a connection to one’s history and to ancestral land would help communities be resilient and overcome adversity. Setting off to travel alone in her late teens, Iya visited more than 30 countries to understand other cultures. She has proceeded to live abroad in five countries and experienced different spiritual environments – from China, where she practiced Buddhist meditation in a Shaolin Temple; to Myanmar, India, where she stayed at a Hindu ashram; to the Navajo Nation and the Gila River Indian Community, where she engaged in service; and briefly to France. Significant immersion in her ancestral village of Ouidah, Benin Republic, also commenced then and deepened over nearly three decades. Iya relearned how to live as an indigenous woman and now practices the Yoruba tradition in her day-to-day life among the egalitarian, indigenous people of Arizona. “Relentlessly, I pursued the truth about our enslavement,” she has said. “I received my birthright of ritual, ceremony and initiation. My greatest gift has been relearning how to live as an indigenous woman, in egalitarian society, as a wife and mother.” Iya’s early travels led to studies of trauma and epigenetics, which inform her current work. Decades-long research shows that trauma persists in the human psyche and body from one generation to the next, up to 14 generations, via physical DNA. Living in Africa helped her understand the neurobiological dysregulation that is prevalent in the United States for BIPOC (Black Indigenous People of Color) communities. She came to realize that Western treatments – such as talk therapy or medication – are counter-productive or damaging for healing trauma in BIPOC individuals. Alternative healing practices – rituals, drumming, martial arts, and guided meditation – provide more sustaining solutions. Iya carefully says, “In communities where people have been traumatized, the best way for us to heal moving forward is to become self-healing communities. We must be healing ourselves.” Epigenetics also shows that benevolence and positive childhood experiences can be passed through generations. This knowledge gives new motivation for parents, teachers, and caregivers to practice self-regulating behaviors that foster healing, safety, and consistency, and most importantly, love. She hopes to facilitate reculturing and the subsequent healing of indigenous people all over the world. “If we, as a people, are to return to grace, we must go back to the soul of the [African] Continent,” she says. “Only in Her soil will we take root in ancestral land, fertilized by ritual, tradition, spirit and identity. Then we will blossom into a harvest of productive, happy, peaceful and evolved African people.” Through teaching about the importance of culture and neurobiology, Iya advocates for the harmonization of Traditional Medicine and Western Medicine to facilitate holistic healing. She recently stepped down from being an executive board member on the Arizona ACEs Consortium, but continues to serve as the Chair of the Historical Trauma committee. She is an Adjunct Faculty member at the Arizona Trauma Institute/Trauma Institute International, and the founder of Phoenix Rising to Resilience virtual community on the ACEs Connection platform.  Please join us in conversation with this grounded ‘Mother of the Universe’ as we explore healing intergenerational collective, historical trauma.

EWA Radio
Investigating Hasidic Schools in New York

EWA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 30:08


Some Hasidic Jewish boys in New York were denied basic education in reading, math and social studies, a New York Times investigation found. These students also received harsh physical punishments and experienced textbook censorship in Hasidic boys' schools.   Brian Rosenthal* and Eliza Shapiro of The New York Times spent more than a year investigating these religious schools. They read thousands of documents (Many translated from Yiddish), interviewed almost 300 people, and analyzed millions of rows of data about Hasidic schools. Their dogged reporting found that these boys are not simply falling behind. “They are suffering from levels of educational deprivation not seen anywhere else in New York. Only nine schools in the state had less than 1% of students testing at grade level in 2019, all of them were Hasidic boys' schools.” Rosenthal talks about the work that went into the piece, “In Hasidic Enclaves, Failing Private Schools, Flush With Public Money.” He also shares what he thinks about when covering communities he's not a part of, how he deals with criticism and why he's not done with this story.  * EWA members may remember Rosenthal as the 2017 recipient of the Hechinger Grand Prize for Distinguished Education Reporting for “Denied: How Texas Keeps Tens of Thousands of Children Out of Special Education.” Rosenthal wrote the piece when he was at the Houston Chronicle.

The Borscht Belt Tattler
Avi Hoffman | Y I Love Jewish

The Borscht Belt Tattler

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 48:53


Episode 68 with our favorite Bronx Boychik, Avi Hoffman, an internationally known actor, who specializes in Jewish culture and Yiddish theater. His long-running “Too Jewish” trilogy has been seen by millions on PBS and in venues around the world. He has produced and presented shows throughout North America, Europe and Israel. International Festivals include Romania, Poland, New York, Toronto, Montreal, Tel-Aviv and other European cities and countries. He was recently awarded Congressional recognition, was invited to the Vatican to meet Pope Francis and was inducted into the Bronx Jewish Hall of Fame for his lifetime work advancing Jewish culture, Yiddishkayt and Holocaust awareness through the charity he founded the Yiddishkayt Initiative, Inc. (YILoveJewish.org).Enjoy our conversation and learn about Avi's connection to the Borscht Belt, his roots to the Yiddish theatre and how Y I LOVE JEWISH is providing opportunities for the Jewish community to LEARN more about their cultural heritage and the rich and wonderful world of Yiddishkayt.  Support the showFollow The Borscht Belt Tattler on socials! Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Use of Blech or Hotplate on Shabbat

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 7:06 Very Popular


The Gemara in Shabbat states that the Hachamim instituted a gezeira prohibiting leaving food cooking before Shabbat on the fire during Shabbat. The Hachamim were concerned that since people are hungry and want their food cooked faster, they are likely to unwittingly stoke the coals when they see them starting to dwindle. Stoking coals would violate the Torah prohibition of cooking or burning. To overcome this problem, the Hachamim said that one has to create a reminder for himself before Shabbat so that he shouldn't come to stoke to coals. One type of reminder is to perform ketima- to take ashes and to spread them over the coals, covering the open flame. Cooking in Modern Times- Today, we generally do not cook with coals. Some Rabbis, therefore, argued that the gezeira does not apply to leaving food on our gas flames, because there are no coals to stoke. However, the Panim Meirot explained, if gas stoves would have existed in the time of Hazal, they would have included it in the gezeira. Using the knobs to turn up the gas is the equivalent of stoking the coals. Therefore, he ruled that the flame of our gas stovetops are not considered katum or garuf. How, then, can we leave food on open stovetops going into Shabbat. Hacham Rav Ovadia a"h says: If one places a metal sheet, called a blech in Yiddish, over the stovetop, it is considered katum. Just like the spreading of ashes over the fire serve as a reminder because it is not the normal way to cook, so too, putting a blech over the fire serves as a reminder not to adjust the flame. Hacham Rav Ovadia a"h says that using a blech makes the stovetop kosher to place on it any type of food before Shabbat. This is also the opinion of the Kaf HaChaim (commentary to the Shulhan Aruch, by Rabbi Yaakov Haim Sofer (1870-1939), Rav Moshe HaLevy and many other Hachamim. Use of Shabbat Hotplate- Hacham Rav Ovadia a"h rules that an electric hotplate, a plata Shabbat, is even better than a blech. Since it doesn't have buttons or knobs, there is no way that one might inadvertently adjust the heat on Shabbat. Although Hacham Ovadia Hedaya (1890-1969), one of the leading Sephardic authorities of 20th-century Israel) initially disagreed, he later retracted and said the custom is to permit the use the electric Shabbat plate (Yaskil Avdi 7). This is also the opinion of Rav Moshe Feinstein (1895-1986, Posek in the United States) in the Igrot Moshe. He takes the argument one step further and says the original gezeira would not apply to turning the gas higher. Hazal were only concerned about stoking the existing coals, not about bringing additional wood to the fire. Increasing the gas is analogous to adding new wood and would therefore never have been prohibited. He concludes that it is clearly permitted to put a blech on top of the stovetop. Although the Chazon Ish and the Shevet HaLEvy did not approve of it, Rav Ovadia a"h rejects their proof in his first volume of Chazon Ovadia. Using a blech or a Shabbat hotplate is the recommended practice for the Jewish home. By doing so one avoids many complicated halachic issues as to which types of foods at which stages of cooking can or cannot be left on an open flame. This preferred way enables the Jewish woman to prepare for Shabbat without worry and concern. Summary: It is permissible to keep food on the fire on Shabbat by using a blech or an electric Shabbat hotplate. Doing so solves many Halachic problems that would otherwise arise.

Smart Funny Tortured
Jeffrey Gurian on Comedy, Fate and Dentistry

Smart Funny Tortured

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 44:53


Paul sits down with Jeffrey Gurian to talk about being one of the most beloved people in the world of comedy, self-limiting beliefs and picking the right outfit before the ambulance arrives.People often refer to him as a “Renaissance Man”, because he's involved in so many things. But he's really a Mensch. A wonderful Yiddish term that defines a person as someone who can be relied upon to act with honor and integrity. Who is kind and considerate; admired within the small circle who know them well. Well, that small circle includes people like Jimmy Fallon, Chelsea Handler, Chris Rock, Amy Schumer and so many more. I have personally witnessed the biggest stars in comedy stopping in their tracks to hug and chat with Jeffrey while the craziness of a red carpet swirls around them.He was a former Cosmetic Dentist and Clinical Professor at New York University where he taught and lectured for 12 years. He is an author with eight books: three on comedy, five on motivation and happiness. He's the host of Comedy Matters TV, a YouTube channel sporting millions of views along with being a regular on Sirius XM's Bennington Show.Above all, he is a survivor. Of both a widow maker heart attack and the deadly New York City 2020 Covid wave that almost took him out. He has battled his own demons which only seem to make him more empathetic, quirky and generous. He was there when I was battling mine and stood by when others didn't. I will never forget that. He is one of kindest and most interesting people I have ever met and now you get that pleasure as well.Follow Jeffrey Gurian on Instagram: @jeffreygurianFollow Jeffrey Gurian on Twitter: @JeffreyGurianVisit Comedy Matters TV 

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast
Jessica Kirzane

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 69:06


Jessica Kirzane discusses her recent recent translations from Yiddish into English. She is perhaps best known for her translations of the late Yiddish writer Miriam Karpilove: Diary of a Lonely Girl, or the Battle Against Free Love (Syracuse University Press, 2020) and Judith: A Tale of Love and Woe (Farlag Press, 2022). Kirzane is a professor at the University of Chicago, teaching Yiddish language and literature. And she is the Editor-in-Chief of In geveb: A Journal of Yiddish Studies. For further information see her website: jessicakirzane.com The interview took place over Zoom on October 6, 2022, and was led by Sholem Beinfeld, regular contributor to The Yiddish Voice, co-Editor in Chief of the Comprehensive Yiddish-English Dictionary, and Professor of History, Emeritus, Washington University in St. Louis. Music: Intro instrumental music: DEM HELFANDS TANTS, an instrumental track from the CD Jeff Warschauer: The Singing Waltz Outro instrumental music: Itzhak Perlman, Dov Seltzer, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra: Afn Veg Shteyt A Boym Air Date: October 26, 2022

The Jew and Gentile Podcast
Jonah is farblunget, Patty our #1 fan, and wokeness is ruining society (Episode #57)

The Jew and Gentile Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 57:54


Welcome to the Jew and Gentile Podcast.   From the Scriptures:   Jonah 1   FOI Equip Classes: Thank God for Israel w/ Daryl Hedding Teacher: Daryl Hedding Wednesday, November 2, 2022 7:30PM ET https://www.foiequip.org   Zionism Teacher: Paul Pierce November 10 & 17 7:30 PM ET https://www.foiequip.org   FOI Equip Guest Lecture with David Brog Teacher: David Brog December 1   7:30 PM ET  https://www.foiequip.org Get a free one-year trial subscription to Israel My Glory https://israelmyglory.org/subscribe/   Get Involved with Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry https://www.foi.org/outreach From the news surrounding Israel and the Jewish People: Israel appoints settler as army chief in occupied West Bank (Al Jazeera) https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/10/24/israel-appoints-settler-as-army-chief-in-occupied-west-bank   Committee approves appointment of Herzi Halevi as chief of staff (JPost) https://m.jpost.com/breaking-news/article-719939/amp   Former Levi's exec says 'woke capitalism' has taken over corporate boardrooms https://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/former-levis-exec-woke-capitalism-taken-over-corporate-boardrooms.amp Yiddish Word(s) of the Day Farblunget or farblondjet (פארבלאנדזשעט, pronounced farb-LAWN-jet) is a Yiddish adjective that aptly describes the state of aimless wandering, or being hopelessly lost and unsure where to turn next.  

The Times of Israel Podcasts
'Stranger Things' music editor discusses journey from Russia to Hollywood

The Times of Israel Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 35:16


This week's Times Will Tell introduces Lena Glikson, the Russian-born, Jewish music editor who was part of the 2022 Emmy-winning editing team for Netflix's hit series, "Stranger Things." Lena speaks about her work in Season 4's scene featuring Kate Bush's "Running Up That Hill," editing the music to picture and helping slingshot the 80s song into a viral hit. She talks about her journey from Russia to the US a decade ago, the distance from her family and friends, and experiencing the onset of Putin's war against Ukraine from afar. She also examines the development of her own Jewish identity as a teenager, discovering and exploring her Jewish roots and facing a turning tide of anti-Semitism in her native land as she left for the US. Glikson talks about Israel, her hopes to work on Israeli films and productions, and her efforts to study Hebrew as part of her own personal journey. The following transcript has been very lightly edited. The Times of Israel: Lena, welcome. We're so happy to have you here with us. Lena Glikson: Thank you, Jessica, for having me. It's such a pleasure to be a part of your podcast. I think we're going to have to start with Stranger Things. Tell us when and how you joined the Stranger Things music crew and a little about development of music for this show. So, season four of Stranger Things is my first season on the show. I've been working as a music editor in Hollywood for the past six years at this point. Receiving this email from David Claude, the music editor for all the seasons of the show, was kind of surprising. And I couldn't even believe it because I actually was a big fan of the show and I watched all these seasons and I was one of the people googling the release date for season four. I literally saw that and thought it was a junk email. That's funny. And, yeah, it was real. And apparently the Duffer brothers were looking for the second music editor because the episodes in season four are so long, many different processes were happening in parallel. So while one episode was dubbed, meaning the sound for the episode was mixed, the Duffer brothers were already cutting and working on the following episode. So poor David, the music editor, would have to be in two places simultaneously. And the Duffer Brothers needed someone who would be actually working with them in the cutting room every single day. And that person was me. And it was just an amazing experience. I was spending a lot of time with the Duffer Brothers and we were working very closely on the music, both the score and the source pieces. And of course, “Running Up That Hill” was one of the songs that we worked closely on and it was just amazing. And they gave me so much creative freedom and just things to experiment with. And they trust me to a point where they can just bring up a few pieces from the previous seasons and tell me, can you cut this one over here or is that one over there? I kind of had to take pre-existing piece of music and then place it in a new scene and actually make it work in that context, which is always a very, very fun thing to do. And the entire crew is just so lovely and amazing. And the vibes you're getting from the show, it's so interesting because these positive, friendly vibes, they actually live in the cutting room, which is a very unique thing, I think, even from my experience. Talk to us a little bit about how the music gets chosen. What is it like to work as part of the music editing team and to make the decisions about various songs? Many of the songs are already scripted. At some point it becomes about licensing. How much money do we have to spend on the music and where can we save a bit if we can pick certain alternatives for some of the songs? But when it comes to big songs, I think most of them are kind of predetermined and it's a combination of director's work and showrunner's work. And we also have our amazing music supervisor, Nora Felder, who helps us providing alternatives for certain songs. And also she does all the licensing for the show. And in terms of picking and choosing songs, basically if we need some options, then Nora would come up with a number of different songs and I would be the person cutting them into the scene. Basically, and showing them to the Duffer Brothers because obviously all the songs are different tempo, different length. And my job, just as a music editor in general, is to make a particular piece of music work syncwise and dramatically within a certain scene and make it all very musical so that it develops beautifully and works with a picture. And then sometimes we're just narrowing down the choice to two or three different pieces and then go from there. I'd like to dig in a little bit to Running Up That Hill from Kate Bush. We're going to listen for a moment to a snapshot of the scene in season four in which Max, played by Sadie Sink, is able to overcome the powerful curse, spoiler alert for those who have not gotten to season four yet. And she's able to overcome the curse by hearing her favorite song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bV0RAcuG2Ao It becomes such an indelible moment in the season. I know that that was supposed to be a very, very big moment. And when I saw the song for the very first time, it was instructed and told that, okay, so this is the scene, this is our feature song. Please be super careful about cutting it. Make sure that it all works. And the way it works, really, in the movie world, is that the songs and the music is being cut to picture, and very rarely it works vice versa. So the song always has to be adjusted in one way or the other. And to be honest, there are so many different stories about how the song was picked for the series. One of them is that it was scripted. The other one is that the director of that particular episode, Sean Levy, brought it in. But the way it was originally cut, it was cut by Dean Zimmerman, our picture editor. And it was just a very kind of rough shape of the song. And my job was basically just making it work within the scene and making it develop in a certain way. And we actually even had to adjust the picture a little bit to kind of make the song shine, which happens very, very rarely. It just tells you about how important this song was for the episode and for the season. And for me personally, the other interesting experience was cutting the same song in episode nine during this big epic montage where it's not just the main version of the song, but it's the remix by the artist Totem. And that one was fun because originally in that scene, we were supposed to have the score and then the Duffer brothers just brought it in and said, oh, we have this cool version of the Kate Bush song and it's a remix and let's try cutting it in. And basically I had all the separate instruments and elements for the remix. So just assembling such an epic version of that song for that scene was amazing. And when the Duffer brothers saw it, they really loved it and it was just such a happy moment for me when they actually fell in love with something that I did and I was the first person who kind of tried doing it. So it was very, very cool. And that sequence actually also lives on YouTube, I believe, as a separate video, because, again, it's a very rare thing, I think, when a song and the sequence, the video sequence, they live together and you can actually watch them separately from the episode, which kind of shows that people also like that one and were interested and it was cool reading the comments on YouTube. Let's turn to you now. You trained in piano and voice and did a lot of classical music training, and then made your way to sound editing. Was that always your goal? Well, as a child, my dream was actually to become a professional singer. And I think I started playing piano mostly because I wanted to be a singer and there was no official way of studying voice back in Russia. And I was always doing the two things in parallel and also because there was nowhere to study jazz vocals or pop vocals when it came to choosing like a career path when I was still living back in Russia. It's surprising and it's a bit weird, but out of all the options that I had, I picked classical music theory. And I think partially it's because my parents are programmers. And there was something about that, just like the specific way my brain works and kind of the logical component to the artistic component. And just that particular major appealed to me simply because it was a combination of both. But my goal was still to become a singer. So that's how I discovered Berklee College of Music in Boston. How many years ago did you come from Russia to the US? Ten years ago. Ten years ago? So not that long. Yeah, but that's still the third of my life. Okay, so most of your education was in Russia, and where in Russia did you live? Voronezh. It's a city really, really close to Ukraine. It's pretty much on the border with Ukraine. I was also considering a Rimon School of Music in Israel and kind of choosing between the two in a way, but also kind of thinking that maybe after a couple of years at Rimon, I would probably be able to go to Berklee. But the thing was that I didn't speak Hebrew, and I thought that that was kind of a bigger issue. I spoke English, so that was one of the main reasons why I actually went to Berklee, just to be able to absorb as much knowledge as I could. Well, what I realized at Berklee was that my dream of becoming a singer was a lovely dream, but I just had way too much classical background to kind of forget about that and only concentrate on performance. And because Berklee has to offer a number of very unique majors, and one of those was film scoring, I felt like that would be an amazing way of combining my more technical and logical side with a very, very creative, orchestral writing and just kind of using all my knowledge, basically. And that's why I came to Los Angeles, because with such a degree, this is kind of the number one place. And because music editing was one of the classes that we had to take as film scoring students, I considered it as one of the options for myself. And the first internship that I found was with the music editor, Nick South. And I already had kind of all the knowledge about creating a score for movies and how it all works and who is involved and had the basic technical skills. But I needed those specific skills for music editing. And my mentor, Nick, taught me pretty much everything he knew and he was just amazing in terms of explaining not only the technicalities, but also the political side of the job because that's another very, very important side of it. What is the political side? A music editor is a person who lives between all the parties involved in creating the music. And we act as some sort of a bridge between the director and the composer and the studio. Our job is to save the composer from being fired or save the movie from all the music being thrown away. And it has a lot to do with just understanding people, feeling the room, making sure you are protecting everyone that needs to be protected, making sure that we stay on schedule, communicating with a movie studio, communicating with the director. And sometimes the composer, let's say, sends me a piece of score. And I know that the director is in a really, really bad mood and I know that I can show that piece of score to the director at the moment. So I need to figure out a way to find the best time to do that. And it's a lot of figuring out what you can say, what you cannot say, how to save this person, how to protect that person, and problem-solving, troubleshooting and just resolving conflicts. I imagine there is a sense of satisfaction from what you do now, even though it is a long road from where you began. Is there? For sure. Of course. I kind of miss the performance element a bit because I just don't have the time to do that anymore. But I feel like there are no skills that are completely abandoned and unused because in one way or the other, even my singing skills, because I often work in musicals and, for instance, now I work on a remake of The Color Purple and there are many, many songs in that movie. So just having that background, knowing about vocal position, knowing about just how to use your voice helps me a lot as a music editor when I'm working on musicals, and of course, all my classical background helps me with the editing bit of it. And yes, it's been a very interesting journey, and I probably could never imagine working in Hollywood and doing what I do when I was little and when I was dreaming of being on stage and performing, but it's still very exciting. There's been a lot of upheaval in the last months, with the war in Ukraine. Where has that put you in terms of your own personal life and what you're thinking about both in terms of career and home? For me, what happened on February 24 when Russia attacked Ukraine was a personal tragedy in a way. I do not have family in Ukraine, but just the fact that the city where I was born is so close to the border with Ukraine and you know, especially in my town, it's actually very hard to say, oh, this person is 100% Russian and that person is 27% Ukrainian. It's all very, very mixed. And I have many friends from Ukraine, and I thought, okay, so now the Russians are going to actually see what happened and what our government is like. But that did not happen. And that made me feel devastated, to be honest. Like the whole world started crashing and burning. And when I was living in Russia. I was kind of suffering a bit with my identity because I was born with my Dad's Jewish last name, which is Glikson. But when I turned three years old, my mom changed her last name and my last name to her maiden name, which sounds way more Slavic. And that's actually still the last name that I have in my passport. Mostly because swastikas were all over the city and antisemitism was kind of flourishing. So I was growing up with this idea that I was Jewish, but I kind of had to hide that from everyone, living in a pretty conservative society where the Russian Orthodox Church is still kind of a big thing, and all the kids in my class were wearing crosses, and kids would ask me, so have you ever been baptized? And I've never been baptized. And it just felt very uncomfortable. And I had this feeling that, okay, I need to hide my identity. And when I became a teenager, that was already in the late 2000s, the climate in the society started changing a bit, and the Jewish community in my hometown started having different activities and celebrating high holidays. So it started to feel like it's not as dangerous as it used to be to be Jewish and to be kind of open about it, but it was still very difficult because we had so many decades of that part of who we are kind of being hidden. And the generation of my grandparents was the first generation who started experiencing that and started hiding their Jewish identity because they couldn't really celebrate any high holidays. That's why the generation of my parents grew up completely Soviet as opposed to having their ethnicities kind of cherished and respected. And when I started feeling more Jewish, that's when I started discovering more things about my Jewish heritage and learning more about the Holocaust, because that's an important part of my family history. My grandfather, he left Poland in 1939, and his family was exterminated in one of the first extermination camps in Poland. So for me, that was this generational trauma that was living very, very deep inside. And for many years, I was reading a lot about it, was reading a lot about the Holocaust, trying to understand that. Circling back to February 24, just from my personal experience, knowing so much about the war, knowing so much about what happened with the Jews and even living in Russia. It's not just me. I have my personal story with the Jewish heritage in the background. But going through the Second World War for all the Russian families was also devastating. And everyone has ancestors who died in the Second World War and served in the army. And it's this huge tragedy, and people all of a sudden were manipulating into saying that, okay, we have such a great past, and we won over the Nazis in 1945, and now we're going to do the same thing again. And for me, the two dots, they don't connect. The Nazis they were fighting against in 1941 to 1945 are not the same Nazis they're fighting against today. And the fact that it was so easy for the society to believe this huge, huge, huge lie just made me feel like I don't feel connected to the place where I was born anymore. Your parents are there? Yes. My dad passed away a couple of years ago, but my mom still lives there. And for me, it's very difficult because, you know, even during the pandemic, it was very, very hard for me to travel just because I'm not a US citizen. I'm here on a work visa. And Russia has a horrible relationship with the United States, so getting a visa in Russia is impossible. All the other countries in the world would only issue visas to their own citizens. And when my dad passed away, I wasn't even able to go back home for his funeral. And just I always feel stuck between all these different factors. And again, like this war in Ukraine, there are so many things that I don't support that have something to do with the politics, of course, and with the government and I can't be associating myself with that place anymore. And because I have so many ties to my Jewish heritage and I've always been thinking about becoming a part of Israel because again, it's a very important part of who I am and my identity. And only when I came to the United States, I felt like, okay, I can finally be more open about being Jewish. When I was at Berklee, most of my recitals were actually me singing Jewish music and Ashkenazi music. Wow. And I would never be able to do that in Russia. And for me, this was an incredible opportunity, just exploring who I am, exploring the music, and I feel very, very connected with that music. You've had a lot of different journeys, this professional journey and a very personal, familial and individual journey. Where does that put you personally and professionally? Right now, I'm kind of at this place with my career where everything keeps changing and I keep seeing different opportunities and everything keeps developing so, so fast. Of course, long term, I would love to work on an Israeli movie as well. I think language is a very big thing, and I am learning Hebrew right now, even though I'm not in Israel. But I do feel like it's a very important thing and it's something that, again, brings me back to my roots and connects me to my ancestors, even though my grandparents, they spoke Yiddish. But still I feel like it's just an important part of who I am. And as soon as my Hebrew basically turns into something that I can use professionally, then it would be much, much easier and more convenient for me and the filmmakers to work on, let's say, Israeli movie. And I know that there are many Israelis working in Hollywood, and I would love to get to know them and potentially collaborate on a project that would actually be amazing. Right now, the world is just changing so fast, and every day something new happens and I'm trying to kind of protect myself, protect my family where I can, and just basically watching the world change every single second. So I hope that very, very soon we'll come to a point where things will stabilize and hopefully the war in Ukraine will stop as soon as possible. And I will be able to kind of take a breather and just absorb everything that's going on and plan accordingly. Right now, everything feels like chaos. Yes. It's hard to avoid that feeling these days. Let's turn back to the beginning of the conversation a little bit and tell us a little bit about your musical dreams. Finding that balance between work that's very, very crazy and very intense and art. Before the war in Ukraine, I also used to write music for a local theater in my hometown, which was an amazing way of just self-expression and artistry. And I do miss that. I don't think it's possible to do the same thing, keep doing it. And especially, again, considering everything else that's going on in the world at the moment, it's just unsafe for both parties, me and the theater I used to work with, to collaborate. But doing something like that and finding the time for it is definitely an amazing thing. And I was also recording songs for those theater productions. And this is kind of the dream job in a way, where you don't have to do it for the money. You can just do it for the sake of artistic pleasure, basically. And, you know, in terms of the movies, of course I can work even on bigger shows. And yes, I definitely have certain topics. Like, for instance, Schindler's List is one of my favorite movies and working with, let's say, Steven Spielberg or working on a movie about Holocaust. Because as I already mentioned, it's a very, very, very important part of my identity. And it's a very unique type of music and type of score that a movie like that requires. And maybe not necessarily even editing the music for a movie like that, maybe writing music for a movie like that, that would definitely be a big dream for me. Lena Glikson, we hope that you get to fulfill these dreams. And final question, next season of Stranger Things, are you working on it yet? Have my fingers crossed! Times Will Tell podcasts are available for download on iTunes, TuneIn, Pocket Casts, Stitcher, PlayerFM or wherever you ghttps://vimeo.com/751681395et your podcasts. IMAGE: Lena Glikson, music editor for "Stranger Things" (Courtesy)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Off-Ramp with John Rabe
RIP Jules Bass, 87. Was his "Santa Claus is Comin' to Town" a Hanukkah TV special hiding in plain sight?

Off-Ramp with John Rabe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 7:39


Today, we dig into the Off-Ramp archives to pay tribute to a man named Jules Bass, who was a part of our childhood. Bass died Tuesday at the age of 87. With his partner, the late  Arthur Rankin, Jr., Bass produced some of the most beloved children's Christmas TV specials: "The Little Drummer Boy," "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," "Frosty the Snowman," and one more that maybe isn't really a Christmas special at all.  In 2012, Off-Ramp's RH Greene argued cogently that "Santa Claus is Comin' to Town" was a Jewish origin story for Santa ... essentially a Hanukkah special. The clues are all there in plain sight: The villains are cartoon Nazis who burn toys instead of books. Santa is a foundling, like Moses, raised by Tante Kringle -- the Yiddish word for "aunt." And Santa is a freedom fighter, whose ragged band make an Exodus to their own promised land in the cold desert.   Support for this podcast comes from Gordon and Dona Crawford, who believe that quality journalism makes Los Angeles a better place to live; and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people. Off-Ramp theme music by Fesliyan Studios.

Curtis Sliwa
Check Ya' Yiddish | 10-25-2022

Curtis Sliwa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 40:14


Today on the Curtis Sliwa Show: a New York politician is trying to extend past his native tongue, the city under the city is seeing huge surges in random acts of violence, and a rap icon loses his shoe deal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Stoop Kidz! Podcast
69A It Girl/69B Deconstructing Arnold

Stoop Kidz! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 52:01


Fashion designer Johnny Stitches discovers Helga's hidden talent for the runway and makes her the new “It Girl”. The more she leans into her prickly persona, the more the crowd loves it. But she's not a fan of having her ‘natural' meanness, nastiness, and insensitivity co-opted by everyone in town, so she starts looking for an out. Arnold is separated from his own essential self (a nosy, do-gooder fount of advice) in “Deconstructing Arnold,” when his friends implore him to stop being such a kibitzer (that's Yiddish for ‘big, fat buttinski'). It's not long before several moments of crisis have them yearning for his avuncular advice, but Helga steps in to fill the gap – and her suggestions turn P.S. 118 a bit of an amoral bedlam. If you like Stoop Kidz!, tell a friend about our show and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts! Tell them they can also find us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/stoopkidzpod and on Instagram at www.instagram.com/stoopkidzpod/. We get a lot of really nice messages from our great listeners, and we'd love to see yours among them, so get in touch! All Stoop Kidz show art is created by our own Emily Csuy (https://www.instagram.com/emilycsuy/). Intro music: “Hey Arnold! Theme” by Jim Lang. Intermission music: “The A Game” by Jim Lang. Outro music from Episode 69B Deconstructing Arnold by Jim Lang.

Conservatish with Peter Feliciano
Ep. 238 - Is Ye Antisemitic?

Conservatish with Peter Feliciano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 53:59


Jews, you KNOW I love you... but we gotta talk.   I pick apart some deep, heavy, gut-level shit in this episode (the best solo episode I've ever done).   It is NOT for the squeamish, but it IS for the emotionally mature... and you CAN handle it.   Much love and mazel tov.

The Shining Wizards Network
Inconclusive Breakdown 427: How to say Yeezy in Yiddish

The Shining Wizards Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022


On this week's show: Chris for Sunder the Sky fills in, #WW3 & more. No Top 10 because I'm lazy.

Inconclusive Breakdown
Episode 427: How to say Yeezy in Yiddish

Inconclusive Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 114:14


On this week's show:  Chris for Sunder the Sky fills in, #WW3  & more. No Top 10 because I'm lazy. Email: inconclusivebreakdown@gmail.com  Website: http://www.shiningwizardsnetwork.com/episodes/category/episodes/ib/  Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/InconclusiveBreakdown/  Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/664583636912171/  https://lbry.tv/@InconclusiveBreakdown:8 https://www.bitchute.com/channel/inconclusive-breakdown/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/InconclusivePod Telegram: https://t.me/incbreak

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea
Is “Gamification” making fools of all of us?

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 35:27


Yiddish author and playwright Sholem Aleichem; the man whose stories formed the basis for 1964 musical Fiddler on the Roof once proposed that “life is a dream for the wise but a game for the fool”. So, is modern technology and more specifically “Gamification” making fools of all of us? Adrian Hon - CEO of Six to Start and author of You've Been Played: How Corporations, Governments, and Schools Use Games to Control Us All joined Jonathan on the show to discuss.

The Jerusalem Post Podcast
Modi on Sukkot, comedy and Israel

The Jerusalem Post Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 43:19


The Jerusalem Post Podcast with Yaakov Katz and Lahav Harkov. Stand-up comedian Modi talks to Lahav and Yaakov about his career, his upbringing in Israel and New York and how he learned Yiddish. Yaakov and Lahav also talk about the maritime border deal with Lebanon and the continued Palestinian terror wave. Our podcast is available on Google Play, Apple Podcasts and Spotify.

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast
Borodulin, Teitelbaum, Succos Simchas Torah

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 63:29


אַ גוטן מועד Happy Succos! For Chol Hamoed Succos, we present two very special guests: Rabbi Yitzchok-Boruch Teitelbaum of Monroe, NY, the Pshischer Rebbe, a descendant of several Polish Chassidic masters including the Yid Hakodesh of Peshischa, gives a shiur for Succos and also shares a nigun he composed himself. Kolya Borodulin, director of Yiddish classes at Arbeter Ring, talks about the latest Yiddish classes, with registration open now for classes starting October 19, 2022, as well as as some other things he's knowledgable about, such as his home town, Birobidzhan. We also share, for the last time this season, greetings from our friends and sponsors: Holocaust survivor Tania Lefman, on behalf of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors (AAJHS) of Greater Boston. Gitl Schaechter-Viswanath, on behalf of the League for Yiddish - די ייִדיש-ליגע Eli Dovek ז"ל, proprietor of Israel Book Shop (from 2009) Sholem Beinfeld, cohost of the Yiddish Voice and co-chief editor of Comprehensive Yiddish-English Dictionary Leye Shporer-Leavitt, cohost of the Yiddish Voice, Yiddish teacher and translator Music: Itzhak Perlman/The Klezmatics: Simkhes Toyre Time Ben Zion Shenker: Sisu V'Simchu Suki Berry, et al: A Sukele Mordechai Hershman: Af Bri, Fun Geshem Kayn Gelt Iz Nishto Moyshe Ganchoff: Geshem Intro instrumental music: DEM HELFANDS TANTS, an instrumental track from the CD Jeff Warschauer: The Singing Waltz Air date: October 12, 2022

SBS Hebrew - אס בי אס בעברית
SBS Yiddish report, 16.10.2022 Neo Nazi activities in Sydney & Melbourne

SBS Hebrew - אס בי אס בעברית

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 11:14


SBS Yiddish report, 16.10.2022 Neo Nazi activities in Sydney & Melbourne, with Alex Dafner

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
A Yiddish revival is underway at this prestigious Chinese university

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022


Yiddish once thrived among European Jews. Now, it's considered an endangered language. But over the past few years, there's been growth in interest in the language, including in China, where students at one of the country's most prestigious universities are now learning it.

Hyperbole: The Best Podcast Ever
The Best Yeet Ever

Hyperbole: The Best Podcast Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 39:08


In this episode: important twins news, maceration vs mastication, hydrangea, grouchy guests, lost coats, hot baths, foot love, Today in Yiddish, yeeting, shrinkflation, elderly Spaniards, a hopeful pumpkin, terrible dryer sheets, pineapple swingers, extremely loyal employees, #RHOBH mean girls, waiting for a year for absolutely nothing, glizzies, local park drama, Queen Elizabeth, and the Best Quiz Show Ever. 

The Dream Stream
Dream Stream_ 109; G-d is one

The Dream Stream

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 25:17


Dream workers Yiskah Koock and Ellen Ronis discuss Judaism, tribalism, community, prayer. We explore belonging, oneness, Yiddish permeated culture, mysticism and more

A Bintel Brief
[Rerun] Season 2, Episode 4: Grumpy Gifter

A Bintel Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 34:23


For the High Holidays, we're revisiting some of our favorite episodes of "A Bintel Brief."Starting in 1906, the editors of the Forward answered reader questions in a column called “A Bintel Brief,” Yiddish for “a bundle of letters.” Now, we're bringing Bintel into a new era. Welcome to Season 2 of “A Bintel Brief,” the Jewish advice podcast. In “Grumpy Gifter,” a listener writes with a quintessentially mid-30s vexation: she can no longer tolerate the endless gifts required of her by the litany of weddings and babies. Bintel responds with wisdom, humor, and tasteful advice.

A Bintel Brief
[Rerun] S2, Episode 2: Heartbroken Bubbe, Part 2

A Bintel Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 26:03


For the High Holidays, we're revisiting some of our favorite episodes of "A Bintel Brief."Starting in 1906, the editors of the Forward answered reader questions in a column called “A Bintel Brief,” Yiddish for “a bundle of letters.” Now, we're bringing Bintel into a new era. Welcome to Season 2 of “A Bintel Brief,” the Jewish advice podcast. In this episode, Ginna and Lynn read and react to listener responses to one of our most popular episodes from last season, “Heartbroken Bubbe.” Recurring guest Chana Pollack drops by with some wisdom from the archive, and “Heartbroken Bubbe” herself comments on her experience trying to help foment a sense of Jewish identity in a beloved grandchild of mixed-faith parents. 

Bookreporter Talks To
Lynda Cohen Loigman: The Matchmaker's Gift

Bookreporter Talks To

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 57:49


Lynda Cohen Loigman joins Carol Fitzgerald to talk about her new historical novel, THE MATCHMAKER'S GIFT. Lynda was writing something else when Lynda's daughter brought her roommate home when their college classes shut down during the pandemic. The three of them ended up watching “Indian Matchmaking” on Netflix, and the roommate piped up and said that her grandmother had been a matchmaker. This sparked an idea for Lynda. Suddenly she found herself casting the book that she was writing aside to tell the story of a Jewish matchmaker who had been born in 1910, along with that of the matchmaker's granddaughter, a divorce lawyer in 1994. THE MATCHMAKER'S GIFT is laced with lots of historical details about matchmaking and Rabbinical courts, and is peppered with Yiddish expressions. Lynda talks about how she nails her storytelling --- and shares wonderful details about how she approached her research. Books mentioned in this interview: THE MATCHMAKER'S GIFT by Lynda Cohen Loigman: https://www.bookreporter.com/reviews/the-matchmakers-gift More Bookreporter Talks To: Bonnie Garmus: https://youtu.be/SR2ApTICYKc Jennifer Hillier: https://youtu.be/Z4B8o7LKcsg Katie Runde: https://youtu.be/GQHnE1NmXks Meg Mitchell Moore: https://youtu.be/xS_qePvq2Xg Tom Perrotta: https://youtu.be/1WTvmf5mB3o Julie Clark: https://youtu.be/V_hvOAJO7ME Check out our "Bookaccino Live" Book Group events! Lisa Scottoline: https://youtu.be/-SCBGFZeoaM Lisa See: https://youtu.be/SdfiOwpBJ2s Sign up for the weekly Bookreporter.com newsletter here: https://tbrnetwork.com/newsletters/ FOLLOW US Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bookreporter Website: https://www.bookreporter.com Photography Credit: Greg Fitzgerald Audio Produced by Jordan Redd Productions

A Bintel Brief
[Rerun] S2, Episode 1: D for Denial

A Bintel Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 37:04


For the High Holidays, we're revisiting some of our favorite episodes of "A Bintel Brief."Starting in 1906, the editors of the Forward answered reader questions in a column called “A Bintel Brief,” Yiddish for “a bundle of letters.” Now, we're bringing Bintel into a new era. Welcome to Season 2 of “A Bintel Brief,” the Jewish advice podcast. In this episode, Ginna and Lynn advise a listener who believes a close friend might be a Holocaust denier. They are joined by recurring guest Chana Pollack, who offers wisdom from Bintel's past via a letter from the archive, and Boaz Dvir, Founder and Director of the Holocaust Education Initiative. 

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast
Dovid Braun on Yiddish Education at YIVO and Generally

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 59:32


Feature interview: Rabbi Dovid Braun, academic director of Yivo Institute's Uriel Weinreich Summer Program in Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture, discusses the ZumerProgram, Yiddish courses at YIVO, and Yiddish education generally, including the topic of "Chassidic Yiddish". Happy New Year! אַ גמר טובֿ! אַ גוט יאָר Greetings from our friends and sponsors Holocaust survivor Tania Lefman, on behalf of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors (AAJHS) of Greater Boston. Gitl Schaechter-Viswanath, on behalf of the League for Yiddish - די ייִדיש-ליגע Eli Dovek ז"ל, proprietor of Israel Book Shop (from 2009) Sholem Beinfeld, cohost of the Yiddish Voice and co-chief editor of Comprehensive Yiddish-English Dictionary Leye Shporer-Leavitt, cohost of the Yiddish Voice, Yiddish teacher and translator Music: Sholom Katz: Zochreinu L'Chaim Leibele Waldman: Der Nyer Yohr Moishe Oysher: Hayom Horas Olam (for Rosh Hashona after shofar blown) Mordechai Herschman: Al Chet Joseph Feldman: Der Nayer Yor Benjamin Siegel: A Din Toyre Mit Got (a/k/a Kaddish of Rabbi Levi-Yitzchok of Berditchev) Intro instrumental music: DEM HELFANDS TANTS, an instrumental track from the CD Jeff Warschauer: The Singing Waltz Air date: September 28, 2022

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2356: College Yiddish vs Living Hebrew

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 3:51


Episode: 2356 Hebrew and Yiddish struggle for ascendancy after WW-II.  Today, scholar Richard Armstrong considers the world of language textbooks.

Judaism Unbound
Episode 345: When Jewish Meets Jewitch - Ketzirah Lesser

Judaism Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 62:47 Very Popular


Ketzirah Lesser is an ordained kohenet (Jewish priestess) who creates "magickal judaica, art, and ceremonies inspired by Jewish history and traditions." Her creations range from amulets and shrines, to Haggadot (guidebooks to the Passover seder), to AI art based on Yiddish folklore. If you're reading all this and thinking..."Wait, I thought amulets and shrines were considered idolatrous" or "I'm confused, why is 'magickal' spelled with a 'k'," then this episode is for you! Lesser joins Dan and Lex for a conversation about why Judaism should absolutely be full of magic(k)al experiences -- and how one can most effectively facilitate sacred Jewish witchcraft.To access full shownotes for this episode, click here. If you're enjoying Judaism Unbound, please help us keep things going with a one-time or monthly tax-deductible donation. Support Judaism Unbound by clicking here! You can also buy Judaism Unbound merch (hoodies! stickers! mugs! So much more!) by heading to www.JudaismUnbound.com/store.

A Bintel Brief
S2, Episode 10: The Ghost of Blackface Past

A Bintel Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 37:01


Starting in 1906, the editors of the Forward answered reader questions in a column called “A Bintel Brief,” Yiddish for “a bundle of letters.” Now, we're bringing Bintel into a new era. Welcome to Season 2 of “A Bintel Brief,” the Jewish advice podcast. In the season finale, “The Ghost of Blackface Past,” an executive wants to know what to do after discovering a photo of one of his employees in blackface — from 40 years ago. Bintel responds with wisdom, humor, and tasteful advice.