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Collection of words and their meanings

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  • 3,626EPISODES
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  • May 26, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Dictionary

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Latest podcast episodes about Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 26, 2022 is: fetter • FET-er • noun A fetter is a chain or shackle for the feet. Fetter is also used figuratively to refer to something that confines or restrains someone in some way. // John keeps his smartphone with him when he goes hiking, but Linda leaves hers at home, preferring to free herself temporarily of the fetters of technology. See the entry > Examples: "The Alaska Constitution was written by a months-long gathering of 55 elected men and women in Fairbanks during the winter of 1955-1956. … They wanted a legislature free of the fetters that hobbled the older state governments—restraints that had prompted a nationwide outcry for constitutional reform in the years prior to the Alaska Constitutional Convention." — Gordon Harrison, The Fairbanks (Alaska) Daily News-Miner, 24 Apr. 2022 Did you know? While now used as a more general term for something that confines or restrains, fetter was originally applied specifically to a chain or shackle for the feet. Not surprisingly, the word's Old English ancestor, feter, is etymologically shackled to fōt, the Old English ancestor of foot. Fetter is also used as a verb with meanings that correspond to the noun's meanings: a prisoner can be fettered literally, and a person can feel fettered by obligations or responsibilities.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 25, 2022 is: benevolent • buh-NEV-uh-lunt • adjective Benevolent means "kind and generous," or less commonly, "organized for the purpose of doing good." // The event's reception was courtesy of a benevolent anonymous donor. // They belong to several benevolent societies and charitable organizations. See the entry > Examples: "I want to thank the benevolent stranger who found my keys and reunited me with them after seven months." — Curt Vazquez, letter in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 16 May 2022 Did you know? One who is benevolent genuinely wishes other people well, a meaning reflected clearly in the word's Latin roots: benevolent comes from bene, meaning "good," and velle, meaning "to wish." Other descendants of velle in English include volition, which refers to the power to make one's own choices or decisions, and voluntary, as well as the rare velleity, meaning either "the lowest degree of volition" or "a slight wish or tendency." A more familiar velle descendant stands directly opposed to benevolent: malevolent describes someone or something having or showing a desire to cause harm to another person.

The Whole Therapist
Therapists Make Mistakes: Exploring Shame and Compassion

The Whole Therapist

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 38:52


Abby and Kellee explore making mistakes in the therapy room, and the shame that becomes very alive and present for therapists. They share their own stories of mistakes with clients, the shame they felt, and ways they have learned to regulated through these moments. They also include an audio clip from a professor at a local university who shares his own mistake as an intern therapist and the shame that followed. Abby and Kellee use an IPNB lens to offer compassion to themselves and all therapists regarding the responses to clients that turn into mistakes. Topics Touched on:Bonnie Badenoch: https://www.nurturingtheheart.comTimothy Wienecke: https://empoweredchangece.com/contact-me/The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Obscure-Sorrows-John-Koenig/dp/1501153641Practicing Mindfulness: https://www.amazon.com/Practicing-Mindfulness-Essential-Meditations-Everyday/dp/1641521716Richard Powers: http://www.richardpowers.net Follow us: https://www.instagram.com/the_whole_therapist/https://www.facebook.com/TWTPodcasters/Visit our website:https://wholetherapistinstitute.com Email us: wholetherapistinstitute@gmail.com 

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 24, 2022 is: dander • DAN-der • noun Dander is a synonym of dandruff and is also used to refer to anger or temper, especially in the phrase "get someone's dander up." // Some people are allergic to pet dander. // The customer's disrespectful attitude got the waitstaff's dander up. See the entry > Examples: "Unlike traditional vacuum cleaners made to handle a wider range of different messes, these next-level vacuums for pet hair are engineered to sweep away all of the stubborn pet fur…, allowing you to quickly de-fuzz your stuff and keep dander under control." — Korin Miller, The Daily Beast, 8 Apr. 2022 Did you know? How did dander acquire its "temper" sense? There are several theories, though the evidence is inconclusive. It has been proposed that the meaning comes from the image of an angry person tearing out their hair by the fistful, scattering dandruff in the process. Some think it comes from a West Indian word dander, which refers to a kind of ferment and suggests "rising" anger (in English, ferment can mean "a state of unrest or excitement"). Others have suggested that the "anger" sense comes from the Dutch phrase op donderen, meaning "to burst into a sudden rage."

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 24, 2022 is: dander • DAN-der • noun Dander is a synonym of dandruff and is also used to refer to anger or temper, especially in the phrase "get someone's dander up." // Some people are allergic to pet dander. // The customer's disrespectful attitude got the waitstaff's dander up. See the entry > Examples: "Unlike traditional vacuum cleaners made to handle a wider range of different messes, these next-level vacuums for pet hair are engineered to sweep away all of the stubborn pet fur…, allowing you to quickly de-fuzz your stuff and keep dander under control." — Korin Miller, The Daily Beast, 8 Apr. 2022 Did you know? How did dander acquire its "temper" sense? There are several theories, though the evidence is inconclusive. It has been proposed that the meaning comes from the image of an angry person tearing out their hair by the fistful, scattering dandruff in the process. Some think it comes from a West Indian word dander, which refers to a kind of ferment and suggests "rising" anger (in English, ferment can mean "a state of unrest or excitement"). Others have suggested that the "anger" sense comes from the Dutch phrase op donderen, meaning "to burst into a sudden rage."

Poem Talk
Trance of Language: A discussion of “Sleeping with the Dictionary” & “Dim Lady” from Sleeping with the Dictionary by Harryette Mullen

Poem Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 51:50


Hosted by Al Filreis and featuring Maxe Crandall, Larissa Lai, and Julia Bloch.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 23, 2022 is: mercurial • mer-KYUR-ee-ul • adjective Mercurial means "changing often" or "characterized by rapid and unpredictable changeableness of mood." It can also mean "having qualities of eloquence, ingenuity, or thievishness attributed to the god Mercury or to the influence of the planet Mercury." // The boss has a mercurial temperament when at jobsites but she was relaxed and happy at the company picnic. // The iconic brand has somehow always managed to maintain its esteemed position in the mercurial fashion world. See the entry > Examples: "But Cabrera was the definition of mercurial. He might be yelling at the top of his lungs, playfully arguing with a teammate, then quickly turn sullen when approached by a reporter." — Carlos Monarrez, The Detroit Free Press, 26 Apr. 2022 Did you know? The Roman god Mercury was the messenger and herald of the gods and also the god of merchants and thieves (his counterpart in Greek mythology is Hermes). He was noted for his eloquence, swiftness, and cunning, and the Romans named what appeared to them to be the fastest-moving planet in his honor. Mercurial comes from the Latin adjective mercurialis, meaning "of or relating to Mercury."

The History of the Americans
Champlain Invades New York, Again

The History of the Americans

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 36:19


Samuel de Champlain returns to New France in 1615, and leads an alliance of Huron and Algonquin tribes into western New York State to attack Onondaga, the heavily fortified heart of Iroquois territory on the site of today's Syracuse. Along the way Champlain goes fishing on Lake Huron and Lake Ontario, and we learn that he was not the first European to do. The battle itself is dramatic. The French and their allies build a huge siege tower that requires two hundred men to move in position. But not all ends well. Champlain is injured, and endures unbelievable pain in the retreat to Huronia. The outcome is a matter of some historical controversy. Twitter: @TheHistoryOfTh2 Facebook: The History of the Americans Podcast Selected references for this episode David Hackett Fischer, Champlain's Dream Étienne Brûlé (Wikipedia) Étienne Brûlé (Dictionary of Canadian Biography) Susquehannock (Wikipedia) Casablanca ("There are certain sections of New York...") The Fifth Column Podcast Map of Champlain's route through Huronia and into Iroquoia: Map of Champlain's route in 1615, from Champlain's Dream

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 22, 2022 is: galumph • guh-LUMF • verb Galumph means "to move with a clumsy heavy tread." // After long days at his landscaping job, their teenage son galumphs into the house and flings himself onto the couch, sighing heavily. See the entry > Examples: "One moment he'd be pitter-pattering…; the next he'd be whirling and galumphing about the stage." — Jeffrey Gantz, The Boston Globe, 8 Feb. 2022 Did you know? Bump, thump, thud. There's no doubt about it—when someone or something galumphs onto the scene, ears take notice. Galumph first lumbered onto the English scene in 1872 when Lewis Carroll used the word to describe the actions of the vanquisher of the Jabberwock in Through the Looking Glass: "He left it dead, and with its head / He went galumphing back." Carroll likely constructed the word by splicing gallop and triumphant (galumph did in its earliest uses convey a sense of exultant bounding). Other 19th-century writers must have liked the sound of galumph, because they began plying it in their own prose, and it has been clumping around our language ever since.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 21, 2022 is: paradox • PAIR-uh-dahks • noun Paradox refers to a statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true. It can also refer to something or someone having seemingly contradictory qualities or phases. // The statement "less is more" is a common paradox. // It is a paradox that computers need time-consuming updates so often since they are meant to save people time. See the entry > Examples: "Demand for semiconductors has never been higher…. Yet chip stocks are one of the worst-performing sectors in the U.S. market this year. That paradox reflects the cliff that investors see looming for the economy and the stock market...." — Subrat Patnaik and Jeran Wittenstein, Bloomberg, 12 Apr. 2022 Did you know? The ancient Greeks were well aware that a paradox can take us outside our usual way of thinking. They combined the prefix para- ("beyond" or "outside of") with the verb dokein ("to think"), forming paradoxos, an adjective meaning "contrary to expectation." Latin speakers used that word as the basis for a noun paradoxum, which English speakers borrowed during the 1500s to create paradox.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 20, 2022 is: ad hoc • AD-HOCK • adjective Ad hoc means "concerned with a particular end or purpose" or "formed or used for specific or immediate problems or needs." // An ad hoc committee was formed to investigate the matter. // There was an unexpected change of plans and ad hoc solutions had to be made. See the entry > Examples: "The council voted unanimously last fall to establish an ad hoc advisory strategic planning board tasked with writing a new long-range plan for the town." — Jodie Wagner, The Palm Beach (Florida) Daily News, 12 Apr. 2022 Did you know? In Latin ad hoc literally means "for this," and in English it describes anything that can be thought of as existing "for this purpose only." For example, an ad hoc committee is generally authorized to look into a single matter of limited scope, not to pursue any issue of interest. Ad hoc can also be used as an adverb meaning "for the particular end or case at hand without consideration of wider application," as in "decisions were made ad hoc."

The Jayme & Grayson Podcast
What word would you like eliminated from the dictionary? HR 2

The Jayme & Grayson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:52


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 19, 2022 is: kibosh • KYE-bosh • noun Kibosh refers to something that serves as a check or stop. It is usually used in the phrase "put the kibosh on." // The rain put the kibosh on the Fourth of July fireworks display. See the entry > Examples: "The state Senate last week put the kibosh on up to $60 million more in aid for school districts." — Kevin Landrigan, The (Manchester) New Hampshire Sunday News, 24 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Evidence of kibosh dates the word to only a few years before Charles Dickens used it in an 1836 sketch, but despite kibosh being relatively young in English its source is elusive. Claims were once made that it was Yiddish, despite the absence of a plausible Yiddish source. Another hypothesis pointed to Irish caidhp bhais, literally, "coif (or cap) of death," explained as headgear a judge put on when pronouncing a death sentence, or as a covering pulled over the face of a corpse when a coffin was closed. But evidence for any metaphorical use of this phrase in Irish is lacking, and kibosh is not recorded in English as spoken in Ireland until decades after Dickens' use. More recent source theories include a heraldic term for an animal's head when born with only its face fully showing, and an Arabic word meaning “whip, lash,” but as the note at our etymology explains, no theory has sufficient evidence to back it.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 18, 2022 is: indoctrinate • in-DAHK-truh-nayt • verb Indoctrinate means "to teach (someone) to fully accept the ideas, opinions, and beliefs of a particular group and to not consider other ideas, opinions, and beliefs." // The goal of the professor is to teach politics, rather than to indoctrinate students with a narrow set of political beliefs. See the entry > Examples: "Moreover, in a pluralistic society, parents from varied backgrounds want to know their children can receive a public education without being indoctrinated into a faith not their own." — David Callaway, The Parsons (Kansas) Sun, 26 Dec. 2020 Did you know? Indoctrinate means "brainwash" to many people, but its meaning isn't always so negative. When the verb first appeared in English in the 17th century, it simply meant "to teach"—a meaning linked closely to its source, the Latin verb docēre, which also means "to teach." (Other offspring of docēre include docile, doctor, document, and, of course, doctrine). By the 19th century, indoctrinate was being used in the sense of teaching someone to fully accept only the ideas, opinions, and beliefs of a particular group.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 17, 2022 is: nonpareil • nahn-puh-REL • adjective Nonpareil means "having no equal." // The singer's stunning performance was nonpareil. See the entry > Examples: "A multitasker nonpareil, he is a musician, actor, director, author, artist, poet, playwright and composer, not to mention a self-styled pierogi-making king…." — Bill Brownstein, The Gazette (Montreal, Canada), 5 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Trace nonpareil back to its Middle French origins and you'll find that it comes from a term meaning "not equal." Pareil itself comes from a Latin par, which means "equal," and non- is a common prefix meaning "not." In addition to its adjectival use, nonpareil also functions as a noun describing an individual of unequaled excellence ("the nonpareil of cellists"), and as the name of a chocolate candy disk covered with small sugar pellets. A full exploration of the word's history, and its current functions in French, can be found here.

Spanish Answers
Episode 71: Contronyms in Spanish, What They Are and 7 Fun Examples!

Spanish Answers

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 15:46


Have you ever laughed at the fact that, in English, there are so many words that contradict themselves? For instance, if Paul rents a room, is he the one paying the landlord, or is he himself the landlord? Or how you can have clothes that will wear for a long time, but then eventually the wear on them begins to show? Or one of my current favorites, how you can be cheerfully sanguine (confidently optimistic) while your neighbor is a sanguine (bloodthirsty) lunatic? These types of words are called contronyms, and of course Spanish has them, too! So let's dive in, and afterwards we'll talk about the official holidays of Guatemala. Remember, learning a language is a lifelong journey.¡Aprovéchalo, Disfrútalo y Compártelo!SHOW NOTES:© 2022 by Language Answers, LLCBlog for Episode 71Intro and Closing Music by Master_Service from FiverrCultural Tip Transition Music edited from song by JuliusH from PixabayResource LinksEpisode Content  "19 autoantónimos: palabras que significan una cosa y la contraria" by Jaime Rubio Hancock for El País on August 28, 2016 "Autoantónimos: palabras que significan una cosa y la contraria" by Translation-Traducción.com on October 13, 2016 "8 palabras en español que son sus propios opuestos" by Greelane.com on June 4, 2019 "75 Contronyms (Words with Contradictory Meanings)" by Mark Nichol for Daily Writing Tips “Contronym.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster. Accessed 5 May. 2022. I also used the RAE's online dictionary, wordreference.com, and Ingles.com's online dictionary to double-check words and structures.  Blog image by Yakup Ipek from Pixabay Cultural Tip "National Holidays in Guatemala in 2022" by OfficeHolidays.com. See the individual holiday links for more information.   "Federal Republic Of Central America" by John Misachi for World Atlas on June 30, 2020 Episode 67: Spanish's Diacritical Marks

Arroe Collins
Stream Thinking Study The Event

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 4:00


As we grow, how far do we reach? Mentally we're learning by way of being present. My lawn wouldn't grow so I planted trees and it became a forest. Never realizing how the future umbrella above would affect and infect the soil. Dictionary.com define growth as a means of undergoing a natural development. Through age and maturity we start to realize the importance of the struggles caused by dreams and personal expectations. In the community there's unpredictable growth. The next step is choice. How do you turn it into a seed?

Arroe Collins
Stream Thinking Study The Event

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 4:00


As we grow, how far do we reach? Mentally we're learning by way of being present. My lawn wouldn't grow so I planted trees and it became a forest. Never realizing how the future umbrella above would affect and infect the soil. Dictionary.com define growth as a means of undergoing a natural development. Through age and maturity we start to realize the importance of the struggles caused by dreams and personal expectations. In the community there's unpredictable growth. The next step is choice. How do you turn it into a seed?

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 16, 2022 is: epithet • EP-uh-thet • noun An epithet is "a characterizing word or phrase that accompanies, or occurs in place of, the name of a person or thing" or "a disparaging or abusive word or phrase." // Richard the First is frequently referred to by the epithet "Lionheart." // The school's policy makes it clear that derogatory epithets will not be tolerated. See the entry > Examples: "Seeing the [Combat Veterans motorcycle club] holding American Flags … brings back a lot of patriotic emotions. WWII vets are part of what has been referred to as 'The Greatest Generation.' I wonder what the epithet will be for our current generation." — Stephen Rowland, The Daily Herald (Columbia, Tennessee), 23 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Nowadays, epithet is usually used negatively, with the meaning "a disparaging word or phrase," but it wasn't always that way. Epithet comes from Greek epitithenai, meaning "to put on" or "to add." In its oldest sense, epithet is simply a descriptive word or phrase, especially one joined by fixed association to the name of someone or something, as in "Ivan the Great" or the Homeric phrase "wine-dark sea."

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 15, 2022 is: hark back • HAHRK-BAK • verb Hark back means "to turn back to an earlier topic or circumstance" or "to go back to something as an origin or source." // The sisters' stories hark back to the good old days of their youth. // The diner's interior harks back to the 1950s. See the entry > Examples: "This can be a fun pastime that harks back to childhood…. Simply collect a range of leaves on a woodland walk, then place a piece of paper over them and rub a crayon across the page. The imprint of the leaf, with all its intricate veins, will show through, allowing you to appreciate all its details that might usually pass you by." — Rebecca Thair, Happiful, 24 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Hark, a very old word meaning "to listen," was used as a cry in hunting. The master of the hunt might cry "Hark! Forward!" or "Hark! Back!" The cries became set phrases, both as nouns and verbs. Thus, a "hark back" was a retracing of a route by dogs and hunters, and to "hark back" was to turn back along the path. From its use in hunting, the verb soon acquired its current figurative meanings. The variants hearken and harken (also very old words meaning “to listen”) are also used, with and without back, as synonyms of hark back.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 14, 2022 is: verdant • VER-dunt • adjective Verdant means "green in tint or color," "green with growing plants," or "unripe in experience or judgment." // The golf course is noted for its tricky hazards and lush, verdant borders along its fairways. See the entry > Examples: "Vermont is famous for its verdant summer landscapes and postcard-worthy fall colors. But it's the Green Mountain State's winter landscape that truly sparks my photographic eye." — Caleb Kenna, The New York Times, 26 Mar. 2022 Did you know? English speakers have been using verdant as a ripe synonym of green since at least the 16th century, and as a descriptive term for inexperienced or naïve people since the 19th century. (By contrast, the more experienced green has colored our language since well before the 12th century, and was first applied to inexperienced people in the 16th century.) Verdant comes from the Old French word for "green," vert, which itself is from Latin virēre, meaning "to show green growth" or "to be green." Today, vert is used in English as a word for green forest vegetation and the heraldic color green. A related word is virescent, meaning "beginning to be green."

Crackers and Grape Juice
Episode 355 : Dr. Jeannine Brown - Paul, Jesus, and the Gospel as Narrative

Crackers and Grape Juice

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 61:17


Our guest this week is Dr. Jeannine Brown who's got a new commentary out on Paul's most popular epistle, Philippians! Dr. Brown joins us to talk about Paul, Jesus, and a narrative understanding of the New Testament. Check it out, I think it was a fun conversation. The letter to the Philippians illuminates a warm relationship between the apostle Paul and the Philippian believers. Despite difficult situations being experienced on both sides, Paul finds ample reason to celebrate what God in Christ has done and is doing in the believers' lives. Jeannine K. Brown's commentary on Philippians explores the themes of this epistle and how its message is still relevant to Christians in the twenty-first century. Brown shows how motifs of joy, contentment, and unity abound as Paul reminds the Philippians of the supreme value of knowing Jesus the Messiah, and she highlights their significance for shaping the contemporary church toward living more deeply in its identity in Christ. This Tyndale New Testament commentary examines the text section-by-section―exploring the context in which it was written, providing thoughtful commentary on the letter to the Philippians, and then unpacking its theology. It will leave you with a thorough understanding of the content and structure of Paul's writing, as well as its meaning and continued relevance. The Tyndale New Testament Commentaries are ideal resources for students and teachers of theology, as well as for preachers and individual Christians looking to delve deeper into the riches of Scripture. Insightful and comprehensive, Jeannine K. Brown's commentary on Philippians is a brilliant introduction that will give you a renewed appreciation for this rich Pauline epistle and a greater knowledge of why it is important to the Christian faith.Jeannine K. Brown is professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her books include Scripture as Communication, The Gospels as Stories, and biblical commentaries on the Gospel of Matthew. She is also a coeditor of the second edition of The Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels.

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson

678: Seed Saving Myths. A Chat with an Expert on Seeds. In This Podcast: This is the April 2022 Seed Saving Class with Bill McDorman discussing seed saving myths.  A myth is an idea or story that is believed by many people but that is not true, according to Webster's Dictionary. Seed saving myths are plentiful and often are motivated by large corporations to increase seed sales and profits. You can't save seeds to hybrids. You need lots of chemical inputs to grow successful seed crops. Seed saving is hard and should not be attempted by amateurs. You need a lot of space to save seeds. In this Seed Chat, Bill and guest host Janis Norton debunk these myths and others. They will help you understand the origins of these stories and how they have become part of our general narrative.  At least ten times a year we have a live Seed Saving Class.  Join the class! Register anytime for the next event.Register Here for the Seed Saving Class with Live Q&A Bill McDorman is Executive Director of Rocky Mountain Seed Alliance, Ketchum, Idaho. He got his start in the bio-regional seed movement while in college in 1979 when he helped start Garden City Seeds. In 1984, Bill started Seeds Trust/High Altitude Gardens, a mail order seed company he ran successfully until it sold in 2013. Visit www.urbanfarm.org/seeds22apr for the show notes on this bonus episode, and access to our full podcast library!

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 13, 2022 is: turpitude • TER-puh-tood • noun Turpitude refers to inherent lack of integrity or morality, or to an evil or immoral act. It is frequently used in legal contexts in the phrase "moral turpitude." // Crimes such as theft and perjury may involve moral turpitude. See the entry > Examples: "Moral turpitude is defined at the local level, but common crimes include murder, … robbery, burglary, drugged driving, drunk driving with a suspended license, voluntary manslaughter…." — David J. Bier, The Cato Institute, 30 Nov. 2021 Did you know? Turpitude comes from Latin turpis, meaning "vile" or "base." The word is often heard in the phrase "moral turpitude," an expression used in law to designate an act or behavior that gravely violates the sentiment or accepted standard of the community. A criminal offense that involves moral turpitude is considered wrong or evil by moral standards, in addition to being the violation of a statute.

Brian Wallenberg Show
SCOTUS Leak

Brian Wallenberg Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 55:50


On this program: The rumor that the Supreme Court may be overturning Roe Vs. Wade has gotten out from a leaked letter. Joe Manchin says inflation in America is #1 issue for votes, not Roe vs. Wade. Chip Roy calls out the Secretary of Homeland Security over the border crisis. A Californian man threatened the Webster Dictionary Company over their defininition of a woman. Charlie Kirk crushes a left is on the notion of "White Provilege." Eric Swalwell falsely claims Republicans want to outlaw interracial marriages. Also on the program; A Michigan car owner gets sued, because an auto shop has an accident. A vegan in Australia is suing their neighbors for having a BBQ. An 100 year old man broke the World REcord for longest time at one job. -Thank you for listening!-

Diceology
Last Week in Gaming with Judd (Edit)

Diceology

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 31:45


My guest today is a gamer I admire for his style of DMing and asking players questions. He has the uncanny ability for generating gameable premises. He is the author of the Dictionary of Mu, a favorite sword and sorcery setting of mine. He's the host of the Daydreaming About Dragons podcast and my current Friday morning GM for Trophy Gold. Judd Karlman Blog: githyankidiaspora.comPodcast: https://anchor.fm/daydreaming-about-dragons Twitch.tv/ActualPlayTrophy Gold Worlds of Dungeons Dungeons & Dragons Hutt Cartel | Cartel RPG Canva Stars without Number RPG Support the show

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 12, 2022 is: bloviate • BLOH-vee-ayt • verb Bloviate means "to speak or write verbosely and windily." // The columnist tends to bloviate on topics about which he is not particularly knowledgeable. See the entry > Examples: "The excerpt itself relates to … a perpetual clock that ticked off precise measures of time, to keep orators in the Roman Senate from bloviating past their allotted speaking period." — Caitlin Lovinger, The New York Times, 10 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Warren G. Harding is often linked to bloviate, but to him the word wasn't insulting; it simply meant "to spend time idly." Harding used the word often in that "hanging around" sense, but during his tenure as the 29th U.S. President (1921-23), he became associated with the "verbose" sense of bloviate, perhaps because his speeches tended to the long-winded side. Although he is sometimes credited with having coined the word, it's more likely that Harding picked it up from local slang while hanging around with his boyhood buddies in Ohio in the late 1800s. The term probably derives from a combination of the word blow plus the suffix -ate.

Weird Studies
Episode 122: Spirals and Crooked Lines: On the Star Card in the Tarot

Weird Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 80:52


The Star is one of the most iconic of the major trumps of the traditional tarot deck. It is also one of the most ambiguous. A woman is shown emptying two urns of water onto the parched ground. She is flanked by nascent plant life. Shining above her are those nocturnal luminaries whose "eternal silence" so frightened the philosopher Blaise Pascal at the dawn of modernity. Are the stars pointing the way to a brighter future, or are they stars of ill omen, warning us of what lies ahead? And what does that little bird in the background signify? In this episode, Phil and JF try to get to the bottom of the starry heavens, only to find out that starry heavens have no bottom. Click here (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/illuminated-brew-works-weird-studies-beer-launch-and-live-show-tickets-337365287657) to purchase tickets to the Weird Studies beer launch at Illuminated Brew Works in Chicago on May 23. Buy the Weird Studies soundtrack (https://pierre-yvesmartel.bandcamp.com/album/weird-studies-music-from-the-podcast-vol-1) Support us on Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/weirdstudies) Find us on Discord (https://discord.com/invite/Jw22CHfGwp) Get the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau (https://cottonbureau.com/products/can-o-content#/13435958/tee-men-standard-tee-vintage-black-tri-blend-s)! Get your Weird Studies merchandise (https://www.redbubble.com/people/Weird-Studies/shop?asc=u) (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop (https://bookshop.org/shop/weirdstudies) REFERENCES Our Known Friend (Valentin Tomberg), Meditations on the Tarot (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9781585421619) Alejandro Jodorowsky, The Way of the Tarot (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9781594772634) Pink Floyd, “Astronomy Domine” Aleister Crowley, The Book of Thoth (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9780877282686) Aleister Crowley, The Book of the Law (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9781723783777) Heimarmene (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heimarmene), Greek goddess of fate Weird Studies, Episode 121 on Mandy (https://www.weirdstudies.com/121) Ursula K. Le Guin, A Wizard of Earthsea (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9780547773742) Samuel Delaney, Dahlgren (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9780375706684) J R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9780358439196) Juan Eduardo Cirlot, A Dictionary of Symbols (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9781681371979) Weird Studies, Episode 103 on the Tower (https://www.weirdstudies.com/103) Weird Studies, [Episode 114 on the Wheel of Fortune] Joni Mitchell, “Ladies of the Canyon”

Spirits
283: Ever After & Cinderella (Myth Movie Night with Jane Solomon)

Spirits

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:02


Was Drew Barrymore's “Ever After” the best version of the Cinderella story? We're joined by lexicographer Jane Solomon to determine if this 90s body glitter filled movie truly embodies this fairy tale!    Content Warning: This episode contains conversations about or mentions of sexual innuendo, heart attack, death, slavery, violence, gore, murder, abuse, and child abandonment.    Guest Jane Solomon is a lexicographer and emoji expert based in Oakland, California. She spends her days working on various projects related to words and emoji. She's currently the Senior Emoji Lexicographer at Emojipedia. She serves on the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee and the Word Panel of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Jane is the author of the children's book The Dictionary of Difficult Words. She has a twin sister who is also a lexicographer. Find her on Twitter at @janesolomon.    Housekeeping - Recommendation: This week, Julia recommends Gearbreakers by Zoe Hana Mikuta.  - Books: Check out our previous book recommendations, guests' books, and more at spiritspodcast.com/books - Call to Action: Check out Join the Party, a collaborative storytelling and roleplaying podcast co-hosted in part by Julia and Amanda. Search for Join the Party in your podcast app, or go to jointhepartypod.com.   Sponsors - Calm is the #1 app to help you reduce your anxiety and stress and help you sleep better. Get 40% off a Calm Premium subscription at calm.com/spirits. - Brooklinen delivers luxury bed sheets, pillows, comforters, & blankets straight to your door. Go to Brooklinen.com right now and use promo code “spirits” to get $25 off when you spend $100 or more, PLUS free shipping. - BetterHelp is a secure online counseling service. Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/spirits   Find Us Online If you like Spirits, help us grow by spreading the word! Follow us @SpiritsPodcast on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Goodreads. You can support us on Patreon (http://patreon.com/spiritspodcast) to unlock bonus Your Urban Legends episodes, director's commentaries, custom recipe cards, and so much more. We also have lists of our book recommendations and previous guests' books at http://spiritspodcast.com/books. Transcripts are available at http://spiritspodcast.com/episodes. To buy merch, hear us on other podcasts, contact us, find our mailing address, or download our press kit, head on over to http://spiritspodcast.com.   About Us Spirits was created by Julia Schifini, Amanda McLoughlin and Eric Schneider. We are founding members of Multitude, an independent podcast collective and production studio. Our music is "Danger Storm" by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 11, 2022 is: ramshackle • RAM-shak-ul • adjective Ramshackle means "in a very bad condition and needing to be repaired" or "carelessly or loosely constructed." // The company was contracted to demolish the ramshackle apartments. // The reviewer of the book said it had a ramshackle plot that was confusing and unbelievable. See the entry > Examples: "Near the Otara town centre in South Auckland, there's a large block of land overgrown with trees and brush and dotted with ramshackle houses and farm sheds." — Tony Wall, The Press (Christchurch, New Zealand), 20 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Ramshackle has nothing to do with rams, nor the act of being rammed, nor shackles. The word is an alteration of ransackled, an obsolete form of the verb ransack, meaning "to search through or plunder." (Ransack comes from Old Norse words meaning "house" and "seek.") A home that has been ransacked has had its contents thrown into disarray, and that image may be what inspired people to start using ramshackle in the first half of the 19th century to describe something that is poorly constructed or in a state of near collapse. Ramshackle in modern use can also be figurative, as in "a ramshackle excuse for the error."

The Public Square - Two Minute Daily
The Definition of Disinformation

The Public Square - Two Minute Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:01


Is the word "disinformation" in the original Webster's Dictionary? Tune in today to hear more on The Public Square®. Topic: Politics The Public Square® with hosts Dave Zanotti and Wayne Shepherd thepublicsquare.com Air Date: Wednesday, May 11, 2022

IEA Conversations
The myth of the 'Post-War Consensus'

IEA Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 32:47


The post-war consensus. This is something that many of us take for granted as first, having existed and secondly, what drove the statism of pre-Thatcherite governments. However, Dr Steve Davies, IEA Head of Education, thinks otherwise. In this fascinating lecture, Steve describes the history of free market conservatism before Thatcher. Dr Steve Davies is the Head of Education at the IEA. Previously he was program officer at the Institute for Humane Studies (IHS) at George Mason University in Virginia. He joined IHS from the UK where he was Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and Economic History at Manchester Metropolitan University. He has also been a Visiting Scholar at the Social Philosophy and Policy Center at Bowling Green State University, Ohio. A historian, he graduated from St Andrews University in Scotland in 1976 and gained his PhD from the same institution in 1984. He has authored several books, including Empiricism and History (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003) and was co-editor with Nigel Ashford of The Dictionary of Conservative and Libertarian Thought (Routledge, 1991).   This lecture originally featured as a video on the IEA's YouTube Channel. Watch here.   FOLLOW US: TWITTER - https://twitter.com/iealondon  INSTAGRAM - https://www.instagram.com/ieauk/  FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/ieauk  WEBSITE - https://iea.org.uk/ 

Pass the Salt Live
Coach Dave LIVE | 5-10-2022 | CULTURE CORRUPTION – AUDIO ONLY

Pass the Salt Live

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 30:26


Links from Today’s Show: Tucker: This is about attacking Christianity : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chyEm9lw-Gc Matthew 28: 19-20 : https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=matthew+28%3A19-20&version=KJV The Left Hopes to Destroy Christianity by Changing It:https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/09/the_left_hopes_to_destroy_christianity_by_changing_it.html Websters- Proclaim: https://webstersdictionary1828.com/Dictionary/Proclaim protest: https://webstersdictionary1828.com/Dictionary/protest   Dave Daubenmire, […]

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 10, 2022 is: conclave • KAHN-klayv • noun A conclave can be a private meeting, a secret assembly, or a general gathering. // A conclave of regional leaders of the international organization is meeting in June. See the entry > Examples: "Until Franklin Roosevelt invited King George VI and the Queen Mother for a visit in 1939, no reigning British ruler had ever set foot on American soil. With the clouds of war on the horizon, their conclave was a key element in bolstering the relationship between the two nations." — Jonathan L. Stolz, The Virginia Gazette, 24 Jan. 2022 Did you know? Conclave comes from a Latin word meaning "room that can be locked up" (from the Latin com-, "together," and clavis, "key"). The English conclave formerly had the same meaning, but that use is now obsolete. Today, conclave refers not to the locked rooms but to the private meetings and secret assemblies that occur within them. The meaning of conclave has also expanded to include gatherings that are not necessarily secret or private but simply involve people with shared interests.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 9, 2022 is: orientate • OR-ee-un-tayt • verb Orientate means "to set in a definite position," "to acquaint with an existing situation or environment," or "to direct toward the interests of a particular group." // The spot of the planting of the tree is intended to orientate it to get full sun. // The first stage of the video game allows players to orientate themselves in the virtual world and become accustomed to the game controls. // The program is intended to orientate students toward a career in medicine. See the entry > Examples: "Everything is walkable…. We were not far from the main Skanderbeg Square, so it was easy to orientate ourselves." — Suzanne Moore, The Daily Telegraph (London), 9 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Orientate is a synonym of orient. Both can mean "to cause to face toward the east." The proper noun Orient refers to "the East." The verbs, however, have broader meanings that relate to setting or determining direction or position, either literally or figuratively. Orientate tends to be used more often in British English than it is in American English.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 9, 2022 is: orientate • OR-ee-un-tayt • verb Orientate means "to set in a definite position," "to acquaint with an existing situation or environment," or "to direct toward the interests of a particular group." // The spot of the planting of the tree is intended to orientate it to get full sun. // The first stage of the video game allows players to orientate themselves in the virtual world and become accustomed to the game controls. // The program is intended to orientate students toward a career in medicine. See the entry > Examples: "Everything is walkable…. We were not far from the main Skanderbeg Square, so it was easy to orientate ourselves." — Suzanne Moore, The Daily Telegraph (London), 9 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Orientate is a synonym of orient. Both can mean "to cause to face toward the east." The proper noun Orient refers to "the East." The verbs, however, have broader meanings that relate to setting or determining direction or position, either literally or figuratively. Orientate tends to be used more often in British English than it is in American English.

Ancient History Expanded
40 - Sparta - Part 4

Ancient History Expanded

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 50:25


Get ready for a much longer episode than normal today! We're going to talk about the expansion of Sparta, the various wars they took part in, their arguments with Athens, and finally the end of the Persian War. Throughout the series we'll discuss the history, the legends, and what made Sparta so memorable to the world. Help us support Convoy of Hope:-https://convoyofhope.org/response-updates/convoy-reaching-out-to-help-in-ukrainian-crisis/?gclid=CjwKCAjw9e6SBhB2EiwA5myr9gNeDlhI1njz6J3-M2-3g8d6G0XxsUg1cZo-4VadP2s1PWhYBrRXzRoCuZ4QAvD_BwESupport the show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ancienthistoryexpandedFollow this podcast on Instagram for updates and pictures of these ancient sites and stories: https://www.instagram.com/ancienthistorypodcast/Business  Inquiries: ancienthistorypod@gmail.comCurrent info and up to date information on COVID-19: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.htmlhttps://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/index.htmlhttps://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccinesBooks and Articles used  for Research are as  follows:-"Aspects of Greek history 750–323 BC: a source-based approach" by  T. Buckley-"A History of Sparta 950-192 B.C." by W.G. Forrest-"Agesilaos and the Crisis of Sparta" by Paul Cartledge-"The Dictionary of Classical Mythology" by Pierre Grimal-"Sparta and Lakonia: A Regional History 1300 to 362 BC" by Paul Cartledge-"Spartan Reflections" by Paul Cartledge-"Hellenistic and Roman Sparta" by Paul Cartledge-"The Greek and Persian Wars, 499–386 BC" by Philip de Souza-"The Greco-Persian Wars" by Peter Green

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 8, 2022 is: darling • DAHR-ling • noun A darling is "a dearly loved person" or "a person who is a favorite." // The youngest child is the grandparents' little darling. // The actor is a darling of the entertainment industry in both film and music. See the entry > Examples: "President Tyler met Juliana and David Gardiner later that year during a social occasion. Their daughter Julia became the undisputed darling of the capital." — The News Leader (Clermont, Florida), 30 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Darling comes from Old English dēorling, which was formed by attaching the Old English suffix -ling ("one associated with or marked by a specified quality") with the adjective dēore, the ancestor of our adjective dear ("regarded very affectionately or fondly," "highly valued or esteemed," "beloved").

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 8, 2022 is: darling • DAHR-ling • noun A darling is "a dearly loved person" or "a person who is a favorite." // The youngest child is the grandparents' little darling. // The actor is a darling of the entertainment industry in both film and music. See the entry > Examples: "President Tyler met Juliana and David Gardiner later that year during a social occasion. Their daughter Julia became the undisputed darling of the capital." — The News Leader (Clermont, Florida), 30 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Darling comes from Old English dēorling, which was formed by attaching the Old English suffix -ling ("one associated with or marked by a specified quality") with the adjective dēore, the ancestor of our adjective dear ("regarded very affectionately or fondly," "highly valued or esteemed," "beloved").

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 7, 2022 is: sagacious • suh-GAY-shus • adjective Sagacious means "having or showing an ability to understand difficult ideas and situations and to make good decisions." It implies being wise or discerning. // Student reviews paint the writing professor as a sagacious mentor and a compassionate teacher. See the entry > Examples: "If depression crept in, she would phone her sagacious dad for advice…." — Tom Lanham, Spin, 8 Sept. 2021 Did you know? You might expect the root of sagacious to be sage, which, as an adjective, means "wise" or, as a noun, "a wise person." Despite similarities of spelling, sound, and sense, the two words are not closely related. Sagacious comes from sagire, a Latin verb meaning "to perceive keenly." Etymologists believe that sage comes from a different Latin verb, sapere, which means "to taste," "to have good taste," or "to be wise."

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 6, 2022 is: mollify • MAH-luh-fye • verb Mollify means "to soothe in temper or disposition" or "to reduce in intensity." // The company attempted to mollify its employees by offering them more flexible work schedules. // The explanation was intended to mollify the manager's anger. See the entry > Examples: "And a lot of fans who had vowed never to return were apparently mollified since attendance returned to pre-strike levels within a year. Will fans forgive this time? Maybe. But MLB was losing ground before the lockout." — Jeffery G. Hanna, The Roanoke (Virginia) Times, 23 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Mollify, like its synonyms pacify, appease, and placate, means "to ease the anger or disturbance of." But mollify is particularly well-suited for referring to an act of soothing hurt feelings or anger; it comes from the Latin mollis, meaning "soft."

Renegade Talk Radio
Episode 4000: Talk on the Street with Laura Marie

Renegade Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 18:02


Mayorkas needs to be impeached. Democrat Seth Moulton said 'We are at war with Russia". Disinformation, chaos all created by globalist, communist.  Dictionary before 2009 and today definition of "Fascism" has changed, lied to teach woke indoctrinated kids conservatives are equivalent to Nazi's when in fact it's a lie. Visit my website at www.talkthestreet.com

The FrogPants Studios Ultra Feed!
TMS 2285: Asterods Deloxe

The FrogPants Studios Ultra Feed!

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 113:00


He's Science Disco Ball Jesus! Red on air fraggle. The Frogpants of Vegas. I bet the Dictionary of Sarcasm is SOOOOOO useful. Extra Virgin Arcade Machine. Cinco del Miracle Whip. Roach Clip posers. First, let me take a selfie. The Vuh-Jays. You REALLY Have That Hat?!? I PROMISE I Wasn't Fixated On The Nipples! The Plaza's Soul, Face, and All Other Parts. He's Averagely Tall! Unruly Scotsmen with Amy. Tab Management with Wendi and more on this episode of The Morning Stream.

The Morning Stream
TMS 2285: Asterods Deloxe

The Morning Stream

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 113:00


He's Science Disco Ball Jesus! Red on air fraggle. The Frogpants of Vegas. I bet the Dictionary of Sarcasm is SOOOOOO useful. Extra Virgin Arcade Machine. Cinco del Miracle Whip. Roach Clip posers. First, let me take a selfie. The Vuh-Jays. You REALLY Have That Hat?!? I PROMISE I Wasn't Fixated On The Nipples! The Plaza's Soul, Face, and All Other Parts. He's Averagely Tall! Unruly Scotsmen with Amy. Tab Management with Wendi and more on this episode of The Morning Stream.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 5, 2022 is: fractious • FRAK-shus • adjective Fractious means "troublesome," "unruly," "quarrelsome," or "irritable." // The political party is more organized and coherent and less fractious. See the entry > Examples: "The game became fractious, heavy tackles flying in, players squaring up to each other. The hostility spread." — Luke Edwards, The Daily Telegraph (London), 4 Apr. 2022 Did you know? The Latin verb frangere means "to break or shatter" and is related to a few common words, which is evident in their meanings. Dishes that are fragile break easily. A person whose health is easily broken might be described as frail. A fraction is one of the many pieces into which a whole can be broken. But fraction also once meant "disharmony" or "discord"—that is, a "rupture in relations." From this noun sense came the adjective fractious.

Radically Loved with Rosie Acosta
Episode 445. How To Find Happiness On Your Own Terms

Radically Loved with Rosie Acosta

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 34:03


This week on #WisdomWednesdays, Rosie and Tessa talk about defining happiness on our own terms. Comparing ourselves to others is at the root of dissatisfaction and unhappiness. Learning to break free from limiting narratives allows us to be honest with what we really want in our lives. Other people do not define our happiness.This episode is brought to you by: GEMRight now get 30% OFF your first order! Head over www.dailygem.co/loved First PersonStart improving your brain health and cognition with First Person! Get fifteen percent off your first order by going to getfirstperson.comUse promo code:loved Vegamour Get 20% Off your first order! Visit www.vegamour.com/loved and use the promo code: LOVED Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: 1.Learn what keeps you from being happy. 2.Find out how to break free from expectations and timelines to find true happiness. 3.Discover the power of visualization to attract happiness in your life. Episode Highlights[2:29] How Comparison Kills Happiness[04:24] Integrity in Social Media[10:55] Learn Self-Recognition for Happiness[15:02] How to Attract Happiness[23:09] Free Your[27:42] How to Practice Visualizationself from a TimelineResources:●Connect with Tessa Tovar:○Website: https://tessatovar.com/ ○Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tessamarietovar/ ○LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tessa-tovar-baa27613/○Twitter: https://twitter.com/altyogagirl ○Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/outside-the-studio/id1483077110 ●Radically Loved is now part of the iHeartMedia Podcasts: https://www.iheartmedia.com/podcasts. ●The Art of Happiness at Work by Dalai Lama and Howard Cutler: https://www.amazon.com/Art-Happiness-at-Work/dp/1594480540 ●Vegamour: https://vegamour.com/ ●The Devil's Dictionary by Steven Kotler: https://www.amazon.com/Devils-Dictionary-Steven-Kotler/dp/1250202094 ●Order Rosie's book, You are Radically Loved: https://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Radically-Loved-Self-Love/ ●Join the book club! We're holding monthly sessions starting May 6, 2022. Register here: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_W0yIMSuMQ3OantjvutrCQQ ●Have a specific topic in mind? Email us at info@radicallyloved.com! Don't forget to add the subject Wisdom Wednesday topic!●Create a daily meditation ritual in just seven days! Download BUILD YOUR DAILY MEDITATION RITUAL and other freebies at https://www.radicallyloved.com/free-stuff!●FREE Action Guide! Apply the lessons you learn from this episode as you listen! Sign up at https://www.radicallyloved.com/episode-show-notes, and I'll send it right away!●Stay updated!○Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rosieacosta/○Twitter: https:twitter.com/rosieacosta○Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/radicallylovedrosie○TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@itsrosieacosta

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 4, 2022 is: abeyance • uh-BAY-unss • noun Abeyance means "a state of temporary inactivity." The word itself is commonly preceded by the preposition in. // The misdemeanor charges are in abeyance while the suspect is being prosecuted for the felony. See the entry > Examples: "The consensus of analysts is that the crisis may be in abeyance for the moment, but is far from over." — Fred Weir, The Christian Science Monitor, 13 Dec. 2021 Did you know? Abeyance comes from Old French baer, meaning "to have the mouth wide open," which was joined with the prefix a- to form abaer, a verb meaning "to open wide," and, in later Anglo-French usage, "to expect or await." There followed Anglo-French abeyance, which referred to a state of expectation—specifically, a person's expectation of inheriting a title or property. The word, in English, was then applied for the expectation to the property itself: a property or title "in abeyance" is in temporary limbo, waiting to be claimed by a rightful heir or owner.

Sleepy
201 – The Dictionary

Sleepy

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 51:52


Zzz. . . Drift off to this snoozy reading of the Dictionary, starting with the letter "L" zzzz Sleepy is proudly sponsored by BetterHelp – Get 10% off your first month by visiting www.betterhelp.com/sleepy

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 3, 2022 is: schmooze • SHMOOZ • verb Schmooze means "to chat in a friendly and persuasive manner especially so as to gain favor, business, or connections." // The event gives an opportunity for local business owners to network and schmooze. See the entry > Examples: "Officials encourage participation with their open public speaking portion before the formal city council meeting. I often show up early to schmooze with officials, constituents, reporters, and gadflies." — Jonathan L. Wharton, CT News Junkie (Hartford, Connecticut), 9 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Schmooze (also spelled shmooze) comes from Yiddish schmues, meaning "talk," which itself is from Hebrew shěmu'ōth, "news" or "rumor." Although originally used to indicate simply talking in an informal and warm manner, the word now commonly suggests discussion for the purposes of gaining something.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 2, 2022 is: piggyback • PIG-ee-bak • verb The verb piggyback means "to set up or cause to function in conjunction with something larger, more important, or already in existence or operation" or "to function or be carried on or as if on the back of another." // The legislation is being piggybacked on another bill.  // The relief pitcher piggybacked off the starter and won the ballgame. See the entry > Examples: "The wildlife structures are being piggybacked on a nearly $1 billion project to widen I-90 from four lanes to six, straighten curves, reduce avalanche hazards and generally improve driving conditions on one of the nation's busiest mountain highways." — Sandi Doughton, The Seattle Times, 8 June 2015 Did you know? Piggyback was first used in the 16th century as an adverb, meaning "up on the back and shoulders" (as in "the child was carried piggyback"). It comes from a phrase of unknown origin, a pick pack. There is also the less-common adverb pickaback. The verb piggyback didn't piggyback on the adverb until the 19th century.