Podcasts about Old English

Earliest historical form of English

  • 460PODCASTS
  • 769EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 23, 2023LATEST
Old English

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Old English

Latest podcast episodes about Old English

Word of the Day

Allay is a verb that means to diminish or put to rest. The Old English word Alegan (al uh GAN) means ‘to lay down or aside.' This is the basis for our word of the day. Here's an example: In an effort to allay my daughter's disgust of Brussels sprouts, I ate several of them myself. Unfortunately, the upset stomach I had afterwards, didn't do much to put aside her dislike of the vegetable.

Anglo-Saxon England
King Alfred, before He was Great

Anglo-Saxon England

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 30:30


It's probably no exaggeration to say the Alfred the Great is one of the most, if not the most, famous Anglo-Saxon of them all. The only British monarch given the epithet ‘the Great', the traditional account of his life is one of a scholar forced into the role of a war leader who defied the odds to save and unite not just his people, but all the English. Indeed, Alfred is usually cast as the man who saved England, without whom all of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms would have fallen to Scandinavian invasion. However, it is not just for his military successes that Alfred is remembered. He was also celebrated as a wise king who cared deeply for law, religion, and learning. The revival of Latin and Old English learning that is called by scholars the ‘Alfredian Renaissance' is usually attributed to Alfred's vision of a just and pious English nation which he sought to realise by gathering to himself the learned man of Britain, Ireland, and the Continent. It is important to be wary, though, of mythmaking and the ‘great man' interpretation of history. While Alfred was without question a great leader, we must take a step back and look at his life with dispassionate eyes so that we can cut through the layers of legend to reach the core of the man who saved England. Credits –  Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQfdqIyqJ4g&list=LL&index=5&ab_channel=Hr%C5%8D%C3%B0mundW%C5%8Ddening Social Media -  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/anglosaxonengland Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Anglo-Saxon-England-Podcast-110529958048053 Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglandAnglo Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anglosaxonenglandpodcast/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzyGUvYZCstptNQeWTwfQuA  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Corona Diaries
Chapter 141. Sounds that nearly weren't made

The Corona Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 62:57


For the purposes of reference this week (you may need to read back after you have listened).Staithes - Staithes is a seaside village in the borough of Scarborough in North Yorkshire, England. The name Staithes derives from Old English and means 'landing-place'. Staithes has numerous narrow streets and passageways; one of these, Dog Loup, with a width of just 18 inches (45.7 cm), is claimed to be the narrowest alley in the world.Old Jacks Boat - The CBeebies series Old Jack's Boat, starring Bernard Cribbins, is set in and filmed in Staithes, with Old Jack's house located at 4 Cowbar Bank in the town. The first two series each had two stories written by Russell T Davies, with whom Bernard Cribbins had previously worked on Doctor Who.Bernard Cribbins - Bernard Joseph Cribbins OBE was an English actor and singer whose career spanned over seven decades. His on-screen roles Albert Perks in The Railway Children, pretentious hotel guest Mr Hutchinson in the Fawlty Towers episode "The Hotel Inspectors", Alfred Mott in Doctor Who and as the narrator of The Wombles. He wasn't however in The Plank or A Hard Day's Night, which proves we haven't got a clue what we are banging on about. Well, bugger me!Love'n'wikipediah TCD Merch StoreBecome Purple and support the showThe Invisible Man Volume 1: 1991-1997The Invisible Man Volume2: 1998-2014FacebookInstagramWebsite

Word of the Day

Slough is a noun that refers to a swamp. The origin of our word of the day is unknown, but it appears to be from Old English. In addition to being a synonym of swamp, slough is often used to refer to a situation characterized by lack of progress or activity. Here's an example: The city council seems to always be in one kind of slough or other. In the twelve years I've been covering them, I don't remember ever seeing any kind of progress.

The Not Old - Better Show
#685 Chaucer's The Wife Of Bath - Marion Turner

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 27:39


The Wife Of Bath - Marion Turner THE NOT OLD BETTER SHOW, SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES INTERVIEW SERIES Welcome to The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates  Author Interview series on radio and podcast.  I'm Paul Vogelzang, and today's show is part of our Smithsonian Associates author interview series, and we have an excellent program about Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the Wife of Bath. As a matter of fact, we're listening to the Smithsonian Folkways recording of Chaucer's Wife of Bath poem, which has been described by many scholars, including our guest today, as "some of the finest poetry produced in the English language prior to Shakespeare." Thank you so much for listening. As I say, we've got a great guest today, who, after reading her new book, I've been looking forward to for a while and whom I'll introduce in just a moment…But, quickly, if you missed any episodes, last week was our 684th episode, when I spoke with Smithsonian Associate, Katie Hickman about her new book, “Brave Hearted: The Women of the American West.”  Two weeks ago I spoke with Mo Nard, pickleball pro, National Champion, about her new book Pickleball for Dummies.  Wonderful holiday and New Year's relevant shows…If you missed those shows, along with any others, you can go back and check them out with my entire back catalog of shows, all free for you there on our website, NotOld-Better.com…and if you leave a review, we will read it at the end of each show…leave reviews on Apple Podcasts for us. I mentioned we are listening to the Smithsonian Folkways recording of Chaucer's Wife of Bath poem, read by Old English poet Charles W. Dunn, Scottish scholar and author. Today our guest is Smithsonian Associate Marion Turner.  Marion Turner will be appearing via Zoom at Smithsonian Associates coming up and the title of her presentation is ‘The Wife of Bath.' Please check out our show notes for more information about Marion Turner's Smithsonian Associates presentation.  But we have Marion Turner today.  Marion Turner will share with us an entertaining and enlightening talk.  Marion Turner is a professor of English literature at the University of Oxford; Marion Turner will tell us the fascinating story of the origin of Chaucer's favorite character, how she related to contemporary real women, and how she has been represented since the 14th century, both in literature, from Falstaff and Molly Bloom to real social movements, such as #MeToo, why the poem is still so important, including to many who, like me support Black Lives Matter. That of course is our guest today, Marion Turner, reading from her new book, The Wife of Bath: A Biography.  Please join me i welcoming to The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates Interview Series on radio and podcast, Smithsonian Associate Marion Turner. My thanks to author and Smithsonian Associate Marion Turner, and her new book, ‘The Wife of Bath: A Biography.” Thanks, Marion, for reading today.  Marion Turner will be appearing at Smithsonian Associates coming up, so please check out our show notes today for more details about Marion Turner at Smithsonian Associates.  My thanks to the Smithsonian team for all they do to support the show.  My thanks to you, my wonderful Not Old Better Show audience on radio and podcast…please be well and be safe, which I'm mentioning in every show because I want to bring attention to the issue of assault rifles, which aren't safe, in anyone's hands but the military and law enforcement.  Assault rifles are killing our children and grandchildren in the very places they learn: schools!  Please, let's work together to eliminate assault rifles, and let's do better.  Let's talk about Better…the Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast, Smithsonian Associates Author Interview series… FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES, PLEASE CLICK HERE: https://smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/tickets/wife-of-bath

英语每日一听 | 每天少于5分钟
第1687期:How the Romans influenced English

英语每日一听 | 每天少于5分钟

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 2:45


The Romans lived in Britain between 43AD and 410AD but their legacy is still felt today and not just in physical ruins. The Romans left us language, including some common English words.罗马人在公元 43 年到 410 年间居住在英国,但他们的遗产今天仍然可以感受到,而不仅仅是物质上的废墟。罗马人给我们留下了语言,包括一些常用的英语单词。During the Roman Empire, Latin, an ancient language, was spoken in many parts of Britain. While the Romans wrote in classical Latin, they conversed in vulgar Latin – colloquial, everyday language that was used between soldiers and in trade. Because of trade, words that stuck often relate to food and drink, such as ‘wine', which came from the Latin ‘vinum'. Others relate to dwellings such as ‘kitchen', derived from the verb ‘cook', and ‘wall', which originally referred to a stake or post outside a fort.↳在罗马帝国时期,不列颠的许多地方都使用拉丁语这种古老的语言。罗马人用古典拉丁语写作时,他们用粗俗的拉丁语交谈——口语化的日常语言,在士兵之间和贸易中使用。由于贸易,卡住的词通常与食物和饮料有关,例如“葡萄酒”,它来自拉丁语“vinum”。其他与住宅有关,例如“厨房”源自动词“厨师”和“墙”,最初指的是堡垒外的木桩或柱子。Settlements and roads in Roman times were extensive. The word ‘street', used generally as well as being used for specific names of streets, originally came from ‘strata' which meant paved road. On a similar note, academic research from the field of linguistics indicates many well-known place names in the UK owe their origin to Latin. For example, the Romans used ‘castrum' to refer to a city, which developed into the common place ending -chester, -caster or -cester. Consider Manchester. It is a former Roman fort which was known as Mamuciam. Other places with Roman derivations include Lancaster and Leicester.罗马时代的定居点和道路十分广阔。 “街道”这个词,一般使用以及用于街道的特定名称,最初来自“strata”,意思是铺砌的道路。同样,语言学领域的学术研究表明,英国许多著名的地名都起源于拉丁语。例如,罗马人用“castrum”来指代一个城市,后来发展成以-chester、-caster 或-cester 结尾的常见地方。想想曼彻斯特。它是一座前罗马堡垒,被称为 Mamuciam。其他源自罗马的地方包括兰开斯特和莱斯特。A significant impact on English which came from the Romans is the use of the Roman alphabet. Manuscripts of Old English texts have shown a version not unalike written English today. Differences include some letters however, such as two symbols called ‘ash' and ‘eth'. Nowadays you are more likely to see these symbols in a guide to pronunciation.罗马人对英语的重大影响是使用罗马字母表。古英语文本的手稿显示的版本与今天的书面英语并无不同。但是,差异包括一些字母,例如称为“ash”和“eth”的两个符号。如今,您更有可能在发音指南中看到这些符号。So, even though 1,600 years have passed, the Romans live on.因此,即使 1600 年过去了,罗马人仍然存在。词汇表legacy 遗产ruins 遗址Empire 帝国ancient 古老的converse 和…交谈vulgar 通俗的colloquial 口语的,非正式的trade 买卖,贸易stuck 保留下来wine 红酒dwellings 房屋stake 桩子fort 堡垒settlements 定居点extensive 广阔的,覆盖范围广的paved 铺砌的owe their origin 起源于former 早前的derivations 衍生物,起源alphabet 字母表manuscript 手写本

Old Books With Grace
Dayspring: Advent 2022

Old Books With Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 18:49


Today, Grace concludes the Advent series with some very, very old poetry. Poetry, in fact, that you're already familiar with. You likely sing a form of it, or listen to it each year. Grace dives into Old English and Middle English translations of the Great O Antiphons, better known to us today as the foundation of the wonderful Advent hymn, O Come, O Come, Emmanuel. Let's look for the Dayspring, the Dawn, the Sun of Justice on this darkest day of the year.

The Dean Blundell Show
7/11 Is Now Serving Booze, Vancouver Has 6 Inches & Winnipeg Sucks Ass

The Dean Blundell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 98:53


It's happening it Canada. Everything! Winnipeg is taking it in the mouth as former NHLrs line up to slag Canada's second worst place to live. Matt Cundill joins us from Winnipeg to discuss the good or bad in Winnipeg. Vancouver got 6 inches of snow yesterday, and HOLY FUCK, they can't handle it. For a city that sees snow every year, they forget what it's like and have a collective seizure locking it all down. Ontario just opened up "In-store dining at 7-11," so people can order a nice bottle of Old English or Crest with their Taquitos and 4-day-old hot dogs. Makes sense.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
gainsay

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 1:46 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 20, 2022 is: gainsay • gayn-SAY • verb Gainsay is a formal word that means “to deny or disagree with something,” or “to show or say that (something) is not true.” // Although the defendant initially denied involvement in the incident, there was no gainsaying the evidence that the prosecutor presented at the trial. See the entry > Examples: “Nineteen Eighty-Four has not just sold tens of millions of copies—it has infiltrated the consciousness of countless people who have never read it. ... No work of literary fiction from the past century approaches its cultural ubiquity while retaining its weight. Dissenting voices ... have argued that Nineteen Eighty-Four is actually a bad novel, with thin characters, humdrum prose and an implausible plot, but even they couldn't gainsay its importance.” — Dorian Lynskey, The Guardian, 19 May 2019 Did you know? You might have trouble figuring out the meaning of gainsay if you're thinking of our modern word gain plus say. It should help to know that the gain part comes to us from the Old English word gēan-, meaning “against” or “in opposition to.” In Middle English, gēan- was joined to seyen (“to say”) to form gein-seyen, which led to the modern word gainsay. So when you see gainsay, think “to say against”—that is, “to deny” or “to contradict.”

Gone Medieval
Battle of Maldon

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 29:15


Dr. Cat Jarman finds out more about a fragment of Old English poetry that depicts one of the defining conflicts of 10th century England - the Battle of Maldon. Its 325 lines immortalise the bloody defence by Earl Byrhtnoth and the Anglo-Saxons against the Vikings which took place on the banks of the River Blackwater in Essex in the year 991. Cat talks to Dr. Mark Atherton - author of The Battle of Maldon: War and Peace in Tenth-Century England - who describes the circumstances of the battle and examines how and why the poem encouraged readers to relive the experience for themselves.This episode was edited and produced by Rob Weinberg.We've also been nominated for Best History Podcast and the Listener's Choice Award at the Signal Awards! We need your help though - it would mean so much to the whole Gone Medieval team if you followed this link to sign up and vote. Thank you!If you're enjoying this podcast and are looking for more fascinating Medieval content then subscribe to our Medieval Monday newsletter here >If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android > or Apple store > Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Word of the Day
Froward

Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 0:37


Froward is an adjective that means contrary or difficult to deal with. Derived from an Old English word that means ‘leading away from,' froward is the kind of word that is never used as a compliment. Here's an example: As a kid, I had a tendency to be froward. While the other kids could be herded to the lunchroom, I was contrary enough to demand a trip to a four star restaurant for lunch.

The Classic English Literature Podcast
Encountering the Divine: Medieval Dream Vision Poetry

The Classic English Literature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 30:50


For us moderns, dreams are personal and interior, bubbling up from the deep chasms of experience, neurochemistry, and cultural symbolism.  But for the medievals, dreams were exterior: penetrative, intrusive -- they came from the outside, from beyond.  They perhaps were messages from God Himself.  On today's episode, we look at two poems about dream visions: the Old English "Dream of the Rood" and (a quick tour of) William Langland's Middle English "The Vision of Piers Plowman."Support the showPlease like, subscribe, and rate the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, or wherever you listen. Thank you!If you enjoy the show, please consider supporting it with a small donation. Click the "Support the Show" button. So grateful!Theme Music: "Rejoice" by G.F. Handel, perf. The Advent Chamber Orchestra

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 8, 2022 is: vandalize • VAN-duh-lyze • verb Vandalize means “to deliberately damage or destroy public or private property.” // The impulse of many graffiti artists is not to vandalize infrastructure but to beautify city environments that are often monotone and nondescript. See the entry > Examples: “Absurd 911 calls are regular fodder for online jokes or clickbait articles. A Google search brings up real, ridiculous situations that prompted emergency calls, such as, ‘a man called saying someone had vandalized his snowman' or ‘a stolen TV remote.'” — Brittaney Kiefer, Adweek, 23 May 2022 Did you know? At one point in Frodo's journey in The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien depicts an ancient statue overlooking a crossroads: “Its head was gone, and in its place was set in mockery a round rough-hewn stone, rudely painted … in the likeness of a grinning face with one large red eye in the midst of its forehead.” The statue had been vandalized by orcs, but the roots of vandalize have more in common with the name of a Tolkien hero. Vandalize comes from the noun vandal, which was originally capitalized and referred to a member of a Germanic people who lived south of the Baltic Sea and sacked Rome in the year 455 CE. This sacking is what likely led to the use of the lower-case vandal for someone who damages or destroys property. The Late Latin word for such a Vandal was Vandalī, a word probably borrowed from a Germanic verb meaning “wend, turn” that also gave rise to the Old English Ēarendel, the name of a mythological figure that inspired Tolkien's creation of Eärendil, a mariner who wends his way across the sky of Middle Earth carrying the morning star.

Word of the Day

Quell is a verb that means to put an end to something. Our word of the day comes from the Old English word cwellan (KWELL an) which means ‘to kill.' Its linguistic offspring quell was absorbed into English in the 13th century with a less lethal definition. It simply means to stop or end something. When I heard that racket coming from the living room, my immediate impulse was to scream for somebody to quell it. I soon realized I was demanding that people turn off the latest album by my favorite band.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 2, 2022 is: gloaming • GLOH-ming • noun Gloaming is a literary term synonymous with twilight and dusk, the darker part of twilight. It's used most commonly in the noun phrase the gloaming. // Across the field, fireflies twinkled in the gloaming. See the entry > Examples: “There were sourdough waffles to start the day and tuna sandwiches for lunch, a few hours of everyone reading novels in separate corners before a long solitary walk in the gloaming, accompanied by gloved waves across generally empty streets.” — Sam Sifton, The New York Times, 30 Mar. 2020 Did you know? If The Gloaming were a Stephen King thriller, the climax would undoubtedly take place at the crepuscular hour. But despite its ties to darkness, the origins of gloaming are less than shadowy. Originally used in Scottish dialects of English, the word traces back to the Old English glōm, meaning “twilight,” which shares an ancestor with the Old English glōwan, meaning “to glow.” In the early 1800s, English speakers looked to Scotland again and borrowed the now-archaic verb gloam, meaning “to become dusk” or “to grow dark.”

Anglo-Saxon England
Bonus Episode Unlocked: Anglo-Saxon Poetics

Anglo-Saxon England

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 17:33


What is Old English poetry? How does it work? In this unlocked bonus episode I walk you through the ways that Anglo-Saxon poets created their work and how this distinctively English art form worked. For more of these cultural bonus episodes go to the shows Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/anglosaxonengland Credits –  Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQfdqIyqJ4g&list=LL&index=5&ab_channel=Hr%C5%8D%C3%B0mundW%C5%8Ddening Social Media -  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/anglosaxonengland Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Anglo-Saxon-England-Podcast-110529958048053 Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglandAnglo Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anglosaxonenglandpodcast/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzyGUvYZCstptNQeWTwfQuA  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Word of the Day

Behest is a noun that refers to an authoritative order. Coming from Old English, our word of the day is related to the German word for ‘command.' Here's an example: At the behest of our bank manager, we worked a few extra late hours this week. I'm no big fan of working extra hours, but when your boss makes an authoritative order, you follow it.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 28, 2022 is: wheedle • WEE-dul • verb Wheedle means "to use soft words or flattery," usually for the purpose of persuading someone to do something or to give you something. It is often used disapprovingly, and is frequently followed by the word into, as in "wheedle one's way into favor." // The sales clerk tried to wheedle us into spending more money than we wanted. // We managed to wheedle the juicy details about her date out of her. See the entry > Examples: "In the book [Françoise Gilot] recalls a moment when Claude, a small boy, pleaded to be allowed into her studio. Loitering just outside her door, he wheedled, 'I love you, Mama.' No luck. He liked her painting, he told her, adding after a time, 'It's better than Papa's.' At that, she weakened and welcomed him inside." — Ruth La Ferla, The New York Times, 19 Jan. 2022 Did you know? Wheedle has been a part of the English lexicon since the mid-17th century, though no one is quite sure how it wheedled its way in. (It has been suggested that the term may have come from the Old English word wǽdlian, which meant "to beg," but this is far from certain.) Be careful not to confuse wheedle with the similar-sounding weasel. While both words are applied in situations in which someone is trying to persuade another person, weasel is especially apt in cases in which the persuader is being clever or dishonest in their efforts, while wheedle always specifically involves soft words and flattery.

Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness
Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness - Ep 114

Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 83:18


Sorry for the late posting but I was stuffed from Thanksgiving and just woke up from tryptophan coma. Let’s begin: Assalamualaikum to our new listener country of Bangladesh! Ep 114 brings us a DBG/NNS combo from November 25th and maybe 26th, 1993. I’ve titled it: A Turkey Sandwich of Thanksgiving Wishes. Players: Joe from Revere Rod the Security Guard from the front desk at WBZ Scott in his car from Wayland Anne from the Catskills area of NY Greg ‘Doug, Jeff’ Ebben producing and playing in studio And the affable Jack Harte in Traffic Bdays: Amy Grant JFK Jr Ricardo Montalbán Joe DiMaggio Bucky Dent John Larroquette Kathryn Crosby And Christina Applegate We now move to NNS time! Callers with tons of Happy Thanksgiving wishes and other praise! Carolyn in NC Mike in Boston Mike from Kingston Jerry in Natick Katie in beeyooteefull Cape Breton, Canada The one and only, Generosa! Peggy Lavera in Charlottesville, VA Jim from Manchester, NH Bill from Jaffrey, NH May in Boston Steve who wanted to thank Norm personally for something Norm helped him with back in February. I will let him tell the story so you just hang in there for it. Pete in Roslindale We close with a commercial for The Secret Garden at the Colonial Theater and then Norm teases SMQ and signs off. Other leftovers: Mixing metaphors and Old English sayings and speaking in dead languages Bad Math Through the entire game, Anne, unintentionally, does a great Gabby Hayes impression. Rod reveals that he has been tutoring Mike Epstein on bdays! Sipping Does Scott get hauled off to the ol’ Gray Bar Hotel? Is his one phone call used to return the DBG? Scratchy tapes Anne gives us some fantastic inside baseball observations. Norm likes his floozies young. Yula Grunes(Runes? Rooms? Grooms?) and Donald Lowzahn were married today on top of a wedding cake float at the Detroit Thanksgiving Day Parade. And cooking a special dinner for your pet? Ep 114, A Turkey Sandwich of Thanksgiving Wishes, begins to baste your ears in wonderfulness…now.

Raging Romantics
#54 The Spectrum of Witchy Romance Books

Raging Romantics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 61:31


Content warning: witch hunts and why women in the past were accused of being witches, misogyny, the clash between the Christian and non-Christian societies, toxic masculinity, and effects of the 2016 American Presidential election.Timestamps to skip if you don't want to listen to politics after sitting through thanksgiving dinner: 40:18 - 46:54.Hey there witches, let's talk witchy romance books, witchy history, the linguistics of witchcraft and the sociopolitical influence of witches today! Aka yes, we're talking about witches. We'll talk about where the word "witch" comes from, discuss the 1612 Pendle and Lancashire witch trials, look at witchcraft and the 2016 election, and why we think witchy romances are so popular!Questions/comments/concerns? Email us at ragingromantics@nopl.org!Raging Romantics booklistBooks we mention:Grace Year by Kim LiggetRed Queen series by Victoria AveyardDread Nation by Justina IrelandWilder Girls by Rory PowerIf We Were Villains by M.L. RioBabel by R.F. KuangAtlas Six by Olivie BlakeLegendborn by Tracy DeonnGame of Thrones by George R.R. MartinGrishaverse (Shadow and Bone series) by Leigh BardugoHouse of the dragon (for the book version read Fire and Blood by GRRM)Rings of Power (not a book but you can read The Silmarillion by Tolkien)The Women's War by Jenna GlassOnce and Future Witches by Alix HarrowCirce by Madeleine MillerCrescent City series by Sarah J. MaasThe Crucible (play) by Arthur J. MillerMalleus Maleficarium read free online"Demonology" (Daemonologie) by James VI (read free online)Bromance Book Club by Lyssa Kay AdamsRed, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuistonDemon Slayers/Biker Witches series by Angie FoxBabes on Brooms by Vicki Lewis ThompsonPractical Magic series by Alice HoffmanYear One series by Nora RobertsLittle Shop of Found Things by Paula BrackstonWitch of Willow Hall by Hester FoxBlacksmith Queen by G.A. AikenCackle by Rachel HarrisonWitch Please by Anne AguirreEx Hex by Erin SterlingPayback's A Witch by Lana HarperA Letter to Three Witches by Elizabeth BassNot the Witch You Wed by April AsherLeague of Gentlewomen Witches by India HoltonGo Hex Yourself by Jessica ClareSmall Town, Big Magic by Hazel BeckEpisodes to listen to:#21 Into the Unknown with Paranormal Romance#32 To Shun or Not To Shun Amish Romance NovelsSources:"European Witch-Hunting (A Brief History)" (Nitschke, 2022)"Pendle Witches" (wikipedia)"The Pendle Witches" (Castelow, n.d.)"Witch" (Online Etymology Dictionary)"Witchcraft" (ibid.)"Old English—an overview" (OED online)"Anna Göldi" (wikipedia)"Blake Morrison: under the witches' spell" (Morrison, 2012)The Lancashire Witches : a chronicle of sorcery and death on Pendle Hill (Almond, 2012)"Lancaster Castle" (Wikipedia)The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster (Thomas Potts, 1613)"'Broad City' 's Excellent, Witchy Answer to the Trump Effect" (St. Felix, 2017)"Labeling and oppression: Witchcraft in Medieval Europe" (Campbell, 1978)"Is Exodus 22:18 a Command for Christians to Kill Witches?" (Goble, 2010)"Queen Elizabeth I and government" (bbc.co.uk, n.d.)"Queen Elizabeth I and Catholics" (elizabethi.org, n.d.)"Trends in YA since the 2016 election and what they say about current society" (Jensen, 2019)"This Exhibit About Witch Hunting Is Not About Donald Trump (But It's Still Politically Spellbinding)" (Keats, 2020)"This Halloween, witches are casting spells to defeat Trump and #WitchTheVote in the U.S. election" (Keller and Mulvey, 2020)"How the 2016 Election Led to Lyssa Kay Adams's Bromance Book Club" (Reading Women, 2020)"Impact of Witch-Hunting on Feminism and Legitimacy of Donald Trump's Politics" (Chadha and Narang, 2021)

The Historic Preservationist
103. Old English Mirrors

The Historic Preservationist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 14:58


Discovering the early origins of mirrors produced in Europe prior 1700.

Raging Romantics
#54 The Spectrum of Witchy Romance Books

Raging Romantics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 61:31


Content warning: witch hunts and why women in the past were accused of being witches, misogyny, the clash between the Christian and non-Christian societies, toxic masculinity, and effects of the 2016 American Presidential election.Timestamps to skip if you don't want to listen to politics after sitting through thanksgiving dinner: 40:18 - 46:54.Hey there witches, let's talk witchy romance books, witchy history, the linguistics of witchcraft and the sociopolitical influence of witches today! Aka yes, we're talking about witches. We'll talk about where the word "witch" comes from, discuss the 1612 Pendle and Lancashire witch trials, look at witchcraft and the 2016 election, and why we think witchy romances are so popular!Questions/comments/concerns? Email us at ragingromantics@nopl.org!Raging Romantics booklistBooks we mention:Grace Year by Kim LiggetRed Queen series by Victoria AveyardDread Nation by Justina IrelandWilder Girls by Rory PowerIf We Were Villains by M.L. RioBabel by R.F. KuangAtlas Six by Olivie BlakeLegendborn by Tracy DeonnGame of Thrones by George R.R. MartinGrishaverse (Shadow and Bone series) by Leigh BardugoHouse of the dragon (for the book version read Fire and Blood by GRRM)Rings of Power (not a book but you can read The Silmarillion by Tolkien)The Women's War by Jenna GlassOnce and Future Witches by Alix HarrowCirce by Madeleine MillerCrescent City series by Sarah J. MaasThe Crucible (play) by Arthur J. MillerMalleus Maleficarium read free online"Demonology" (Daemonologie) by James VI (read free online)Bromance Book Club by Lyssa Kay AdamsRed, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuistonDemon Slayers/Biker Witches series by Angie FoxBabes on Brooms by Vicki Lewis ThompsonPractical Magic series by Alice HoffmanYear One series by Nora RobertsLittle Shop of Found Things by Paula BrackstonWitch of Willow Hall by Hester FoxBlacksmith Queen by G.A. AikenCackle by Rachel HarrisonWitch Please by Anne AguirreEx Hex by Erin SterlingPayback's A Witch by Lana HarperA Letter to Three Witches by Elizabeth BassNot the Witch You Wed by April AsherLeague of Gentlewomen Witches by India HoltonGo Hex Yourself by Jessica ClareSmall Town, Big Magic by Hazel BeckEpisodes to listen to:#21 Into the Unknown with Paranormal Romance#32 To Shun or Not To Shun Amish Romance NovelsSources:"European Witch-Hunting (A Brief History)" (Nitschke, 2022)"Pendle Witches" (wikipedia)"The Pendle Witches" (Castelow, n.d.)"Witch" (Online Etymology Dictionary)"Witchcraft" (ibid.)"Old English—an overview" (OED online)"Anna Göldi" (wikipedia)"Blake Morrison: under the witches' spell" (Morrison, 2012)The Lancashire Witches : a chronicle of sorcery and death on Pendle Hill (Almond, 2012)"Lancaster Castle" (Wikipedia)The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster (Thomas Potts, 1613)"'Broad City' 's Excellent, Witchy Answer to the Trump Effect" (St. Felix, 2017)"Labeling and oppression: Witchcraft in Medieval Europe" (Campbell, 1978)"Is Exodus 22:18 a Command for Christians to Kill Witches?" (Goble, 2010)"Queen Elizabeth I and government" (bbc.co.uk, n.d.)"Queen Elizabeth I and Catholics" (elizabethi.org, n.d.)"Trends in YA since the 2016 election and what they say about current society" (Jensen, 2019)"This Exhibit About Witch Hunting Is Not About Donald Trump (But It's Still Politically Spellbinding)" (Keats, 2020)"This Halloween, witches are casting spells to defeat Trump and #WitchTheVote in the U.S. election" (Keller and Mulvey, 2020)"How the 2016 Election Led to Lyssa Kay Adams's Bromance Book Club" (Reading Women, 2020)"Impact of Witch-Hunting on Feminism and Legitimacy of Donald Trump's Politics" (Chadha and Narang, 2021)

New Books in Popular Culture
Carolyne Larrington, "All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 78:46


“All men must die”: or “Valar Morghulis,” as the traditional Essos greeting is rendered in High Valyrian. And die they do – in prodigious numbers; in imaginatively varied and gruesome ways; and often in terror within the viciously unpredictable world that is HBO's sensational evocation of Game of Thrones. As acclaimed medievalist Professor Carolyne Larrington writes in All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones (Bloomsbury, 2021), the stories George R.R. Martin brings to life are epic in scope and in imaginative breadth, telling of the dramatic rise and fall of nations, the brutal sweeping away of old orders, and the advent of new autarchs in the eternal quest for dominion. Yet, as her book reveals, many potent and intimate narratives of love and passion can be found within these grand landscapes of heroism, honour, and death. They focus on strong relationships between women and family, as well as among the anti-heroes, the “cripples, bastards and broken things.” In this vital follow-up to her book, Winter Is Coming (also published by Bloomsbury), Larrington explores themes of power, blood-kin, lust, and sex in order to draw entirely fresh meanings out of the show of the century. Carolyne Larringon is Professor of Medieval Literature at University of Oxford, UK. She completed her DPhil in Old English and Old Norse at Oxford and now teaches Old and Middle English literature as well as English and Old Norse-Icelandic languages. Previous publications include books on Norse mythology and literature and another book on the series called Winter Is Coming: The Medieval World of Game of Thrones. Also, Professor Larrington has been awarded the Order of the Falcon by the President of Iceland for her services to Icelandic literature. Carrie Lynn Evans is currently a PhD student of English Literature with Université Laval in Quebec. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books in Medieval History
Carolyne Larrington, "All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Medieval History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 78:46


“All men must die”: or “Valar Morghulis,” as the traditional Essos greeting is rendered in High Valyrian. And die they do – in prodigious numbers; in imaginatively varied and gruesome ways; and often in terror within the viciously unpredictable world that is HBO's sensational evocation of Game of Thrones. As acclaimed medievalist Professor Carolyne Larrington writes in All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones (Bloomsbury, 2021), the stories George R.R. Martin brings to life are epic in scope and in imaginative breadth, telling of the dramatic rise and fall of nations, the brutal sweeping away of old orders, and the advent of new autarchs in the eternal quest for dominion. Yet, as her book reveals, many potent and intimate narratives of love and passion can be found within these grand landscapes of heroism, honour, and death. They focus on strong relationships between women and family, as well as among the anti-heroes, the “cripples, bastards and broken things.” In this vital follow-up to her book, Winter Is Coming (also published by Bloomsbury), Larrington explores themes of power, blood-kin, lust, and sex in order to draw entirely fresh meanings out of the show of the century. Carolyne Larringon is Professor of Medieval Literature at University of Oxford, UK. She completed her DPhil in Old English and Old Norse at Oxford and now teaches Old and Middle English literature as well as English and Old Norse-Icelandic languages. Previous publications include books on Norse mythology and literature and another book on the series called Winter Is Coming: The Medieval World of Game of Thrones. Also, Professor Larrington has been awarded the Order of the Falcon by the President of Iceland for her services to Icelandic literature. Carrie Lynn Evans is currently a PhD student of English Literature with Université Laval in Quebec. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Carolyne Larrington, "All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 78:46


“All men must die”: or “Valar Morghulis,” as the traditional Essos greeting is rendered in High Valyrian. And die they do – in prodigious numbers; in imaginatively varied and gruesome ways; and often in terror within the viciously unpredictable world that is HBO's sensational evocation of Game of Thrones. As acclaimed medievalist Professor Carolyne Larrington writes in All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones (Bloomsbury, 2021), the stories George R.R. Martin brings to life are epic in scope and in imaginative breadth, telling of the dramatic rise and fall of nations, the brutal sweeping away of old orders, and the advent of new autarchs in the eternal quest for dominion. Yet, as her book reveals, many potent and intimate narratives of love and passion can be found within these grand landscapes of heroism, honour, and death. They focus on strong relationships between women and family, as well as among the anti-heroes, the “cripples, bastards and broken things.” In this vital follow-up to her book, Winter Is Coming (also published by Bloomsbury), Larrington explores themes of power, blood-kin, lust, and sex in order to draw entirely fresh meanings out of the show of the century. Carolyne Larringon is Professor of Medieval Literature at University of Oxford, UK. She completed her DPhil in Old English and Old Norse at Oxford and now teaches Old and Middle English literature as well as English and Old Norse-Icelandic languages. Previous publications include books on Norse mythology and literature and another book on the series called Winter Is Coming: The Medieval World of Game of Thrones. Also, Professor Larrington has been awarded the Order of the Falcon by the President of Iceland for her services to Icelandic literature. Carrie Lynn Evans is currently a PhD student of English Literature with Université Laval in Quebec. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Film
Carolyne Larrington, "All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 78:46


“All men must die”: or “Valar Morghulis,” as the traditional Essos greeting is rendered in High Valyrian. And die they do – in prodigious numbers; in imaginatively varied and gruesome ways; and often in terror within the viciously unpredictable world that is HBO's sensational evocation of Game of Thrones. As acclaimed medievalist Professor Carolyne Larrington writes in All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones (Bloomsbury, 2021), the stories George R.R. Martin brings to life are epic in scope and in imaginative breadth, telling of the dramatic rise and fall of nations, the brutal sweeping away of old orders, and the advent of new autarchs in the eternal quest for dominion. Yet, as her book reveals, many potent and intimate narratives of love and passion can be found within these grand landscapes of heroism, honour, and death. They focus on strong relationships between women and family, as well as among the anti-heroes, the “cripples, bastards and broken things.” In this vital follow-up to her book, Winter Is Coming (also published by Bloomsbury), Larrington explores themes of power, blood-kin, lust, and sex in order to draw entirely fresh meanings out of the show of the century. Carolyne Larringon is Professor of Medieval Literature at University of Oxford, UK. She completed her DPhil in Old English and Old Norse at Oxford and now teaches Old and Middle English literature as well as English and Old Norse-Icelandic languages. Previous publications include books on Norse mythology and literature and another book on the series called Winter Is Coming: The Medieval World of Game of Thrones. Also, Professor Larrington has been awarded the Order of the Falcon by the President of Iceland for her services to Icelandic literature. Carrie Lynn Evans is currently a PhD student of English Literature with Université Laval in Quebec. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in Literary Studies
Carolyne Larrington, "All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 78:46


“All men must die”: or “Valar Morghulis,” as the traditional Essos greeting is rendered in High Valyrian. And die they do – in prodigious numbers; in imaginatively varied and gruesome ways; and often in terror within the viciously unpredictable world that is HBO's sensational evocation of Game of Thrones. As acclaimed medievalist Professor Carolyne Larrington writes in All Men Must Die: Power and Passion in Game of Thrones (Bloomsbury, 2021), the stories George R.R. Martin brings to life are epic in scope and in imaginative breadth, telling of the dramatic rise and fall of nations, the brutal sweeping away of old orders, and the advent of new autarchs in the eternal quest for dominion. Yet, as her book reveals, many potent and intimate narratives of love and passion can be found within these grand landscapes of heroism, honour, and death. They focus on strong relationships between women and family, as well as among the anti-heroes, the “cripples, bastards and broken things.” In this vital follow-up to her book, Winter Is Coming (also published by Bloomsbury), Larrington explores themes of power, blood-kin, lust, and sex in order to draw entirely fresh meanings out of the show of the century. Carolyne Larringon is Professor of Medieval Literature at University of Oxford, UK. She completed her DPhil in Old English and Old Norse at Oxford and now teaches Old and Middle English literature as well as English and Old Norse-Icelandic languages. Previous publications include books on Norse mythology and literature and another book on the series called Winter Is Coming: The Medieval World of Game of Thrones. Also, Professor Larrington has been awarded the Order of the Falcon by the President of Iceland for her services to Icelandic literature. Carrie Lynn Evans is currently a PhD student of English Literature with Université Laval in Quebec. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 16, 2022 is: hummock • HUM-uk • noun A hummock is a small round hill or mound. // He stood in awe, admiring the thick forest, and beyond that, the grassy hummocks he had traversed to reach the top of the mountain. See the entry > Examples: “...Yellowlegs nest on the ground, often at the base of a small tree or mossy hummock, so I watched my feet carefully. The nest is a small cup in the moss, typically lined with little dead leaves, lichens, and sedges.” — Mary F. Wilson, The Juneau (Alaska) Empire, 14 June 2022 Did you know? Having trouble telling a hummock from a hammock from a hillock? Not to worry: all three words refer to a small hill or earthen mound. Hummock, in fact, is an alteration of hammock; this 16th century pair share an ancestor with the Middle Low German words hummel (“small height”) and hump (“bump”), the latter of which is also a distant relative of our English word hump. As for the 14th-century vintage hillock, a version of the suffix -ock has been attached to nouns to designate a small one of whatever since the days of Old English. Note that the hilly hammock mentioned here is not related to the hammock offering a swaying repose between supports. That hammock comes from the Spanish hamaca, and ultimately from Taino, a language spoken by the original inhabitants of the Greater Antilles and the Bahamas.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 11, 2022 is: doughty • DOW-tee • adjective Doughty means “brave, strong, and determined.” // The family sent gifts to the doughty firefighters for saving their cat. See the entry > Examples: “[Rafael] Nadal was forced into five gruelling sets by Denis Shapovalov, but the 20-time Grand Slam champion ultimately showed the greater desire to outlast his doughty opponent and sealed his place in his 36th major semi-final in four hours and 10 minutes.” — Dan Quarrell, Eurosport, 25 Jan. 2022 Did you know? There's no doubt that doughty has persevered in the English language—it's traceable all the way back to the Old English word dohtig—but how to pronounce it? One might assume that doughty should be pronounced DAW-tee, paralleling similarly spelled words like bought and sought, or perhaps with a long o, as in dough. But the vowel sound in doughty is the same as in doubt, and in fact, over the centuries, doughty's spelling was sometimes confused with that of the now obsolete word doubty (“full of doubt”), which could be the reason we have the pronunciation we use today. The homophonous dowdy (“having a dull or uninteresting appearance”) can also be a source of confusion; an easy way to remember the difference is that you can't spell doughty without the letters in tough (“physically and emotionally strong”).

Paint The Town Podcast
Episode 199 - Skill Rock

Paint The Town Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 61:50


Skill Rock is a legendary graffiti writer from Los Angeles, CA and co-founder of the UTI graffiti crew. Topics: Hip Hop Roots, Parties at Beaumont, UTI, STP, Old English, Gang Styles, and other calligraphy styles, Snap, Bus Writing, Tag Banging, + More.

Anglo-Saxon England
Bonus Sample: Anglo-Saxon Christianity (Part 1)

Anglo-Saxon England

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 5:04


This week, I begin a two part wrap up of our look at the major themes of Old English literature by looking at the form of Christianity that came to be practiced in England across the Anglo-Saxon period. This and the next episode are actually recordings of two chapters from my PhD thesis which aimed to provide an overview of the theology and practices of the Church in late tenth-century England, so it is specifically focused on that period, but places its insights into a larger context of the sources for these beliefs and practices. https://www.patreon.com/posts/anglo-saxon-part-74136473?utm_medium=clipboard_copy&utm_source=copyLink&utm_campaign=postshare_creator Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 1, 2022 is: sallow • SAL-oh • adjective Sallow means "of a grayish greenish yellow color," and often suggests sickliness. // She returned from her sick leave still looking a bit sallow. See the entry > Examples: "As a member of the 101st Airborne Division, Guy Whidden was among the first American paratroopers to head for Normandy in the early hours of June 6, 1944. The day before, he'd posed for a picture with a few of the other paratroopers. Sixty years later, he flashed the same impish grin, though his hair was white and his skin a little sallow." — Tamela Baker, The Herald-Mail (Hagerstown, Maryland), 25 Sept. 2022 Did you know? In Oscar Wilde's 1891 novel A Picture of Dorian Gray, Dorian's unscrupulous friend Lord Henry Wotton impresses upon the young Dorian what the process of aging will do, saying "Time is jealous of you, and wars against your lilies and your roses. You will become sallow, and hollow-cheeked, and dull-eyed." Literature of the 19th century abounds with sallow people—Charles Dickens applied the word to characters in no fewer than 12 novels—but the word had been in use with the same meaning for centuries before that literary heyday. Its synonymous Old English forbear is salu, which shares an ancestor with an Old High German word meaning "murky" as well as with a Russian word meaning "yellowish gray."

Trivia With Budds
10 Trivia Questions on HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Trivia With Budds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 11:28


Happiest Halloween to you and your families! I hope you have a great day throwing back handfuls of candy corn and sipping that warm apple cider. Thanks for playing trivia with BOO-ds! WANT TO CELEBRATE A LOVED ONE'S BIRTHDAY, ACHIEVEMENTS, OR GENERAL AMAZINGNESS? Customize an episode of the podcast just for them! You pick the topic or provide the questions and any kind words you want to shout out and I'll make sure it gets recorded on the day of your choice for $25. Venmo @Ryan-Budds to lock in your date!  And, try a brand new BUDDSTAGRAM! It's like Cameo but for trivia lovers. I'll record a five minute video with five trivia questions on a topic your friend, family members, or co-worker loves and send them the video for any occasion. Venmo @Ryan-Budds $25 with your requests anytime! Grab new prints of my Pop Culture Puzzles Vol. 1 book for $10 and free shipping! ⬇️ ⬇️ ⬇️  Trivia books, shirts, & more! Fact of the Day: The word "witch" comes from an Old English word meaning "wise woman".  THE FIRST TRIVIA QUESTION STARTS AT 02:52 Theme song by www.soundcloud.com/Frawsty Bed Music: The following music was used for this media project: Music: Spooky Halloween 2 by Frank Schroeter Free download: https://filmmusic.io/song/9999-spooky-halloween-2 License (CC BY 4.0): https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Artist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frank.schroeter.52 PLAY TRIVIA WITH BUDDS live on FB Live (and sometimes Zoom!) A full hour interactive show streams often nightly at 7pm PST. See lineup of shows and topics at www.TriviaWithBudds.com under the events section towards the bottom of the homepage. Watch the shows at www.Facebook.com/ryanbudds or www.Facebook.com/TriviaWithBudds  http://TriviaWithBudds.comhttp://Facebook.com/TriviaWithBudds http://Twitter.com/ryanbudds http://Instagram.com/ryanbudds Book a party, corporate event, or fundraiser anytime by emailing ryanbudds@gmail.com or use the contact form here: https://www.triviawithbudds.com/contact SUPPORT THE SHOW: www.Patreon.com/TriviaWithBudds Send me your questions and I'll read them/answer them on the show. Also send me any topics you'd like me to cover on future episodes, anytime! Cheers.  SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL MY PATREON SUBSCRIBERS INCLUDING:  Veronica Baker, Greg Bristow, Brenda and Mo Martinez, Matt Frost, Dillon Enderby, Manny Cortez, Joe Finnie, Jen Wojnar, John Burke, Simon Time, Albert Thomas, Alexandra Pepin, Myles Bagby, Patrick Leahy, Vernon Heagy, Brian Salyer, Casey OConnor, Christy Shipley, Cody Roslund, Dan Papallo, Jim Fields, John Mihaljevic, Loree O'Sullivan, Kimberly Brown, Matt Pawlik, Megan Donnelly, Robert Casey, Sabrina Gianonni, Sara Zimmerman, Wreck My Podcast, Brendan Peterson, Feana Nevel, Jenna Leatherman, Madeleine Garvey, Mark and Sarah Haas, Alexander Calder, Paul McLaughlin, Shaun Delacruz, Barry Reed, Clayton Polizzi, Edward Witt, Jenni Yetter, Joe Jermolowicz, Kyle Henderickson, Luke Mckay, Pamela Yoshimura,  Paul Doronila, Rich Hyjack, Ricky Carney, Russ Friedewald, Tracy Oldaker, Willy Powell, Victoria Black, David Snow, Leslie Gerhardt, Rebecca Meredith, Jeff Foust, Richard Lefdal Timothy Heavner, Michael Redman, Michele Lindemann, Ben Stitzel, Shiana Zita, and Josh Gregovich, Jen and Nic Capano, Gerritt Perkins, Chris Arneson, Trenton Sullivan, Jacob LoMaglio, Erin Burgess, Torie Prothro, Donald Fuller, Kristy, Pate Hogan, Scott Briller, Sam K, Jon Handel, John Taylor, Dean Bratton, Mark Zarate, Laura Palmer, Scott Holmes, James Brown, Andrea Fultz, Nikki Long, Jenny Santomauro, and Denise Leonard! YOU GUYS ROCK! 

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 30, 2022 is: scour • SKOW-er • verb Scour means “to search (something) carefully and thoroughly.” Scouring is usually associated with moving quickly. // We retraced our steps and scoured the hiking trail for the missing wedding ring. See the entry > Examples: “Many business owners don't realize that they need to check if their brand name is available before setting it in stone. There are plenty of online tools that will scour the web to find websites and social media profiles that match a brand name you're thinking about.” — Syed Balkhi, Forbes, 22 July 2022 Did you know? It doesn't require much scouring of our website to see that there are two distinct scour verbs in English. One has meanings relating to cleaning and washing away; that scour, which dates back to at least the early 14th century, probably comes from the Late Latin excurare, meaning “to clean off.” (A related noun scour refers to the action of this type of scouring, or to places that have been scoured, as by running water.) The other verb scour appeared a century earlier, and may come from the Old Norse skūr, meaning “shower.” (Skūr is also distantly related to the Old English scūr, the ancestor of our English word shower.) Many different things can be scoured, such as an area (as in “scoured the woods in search of the lost dog”) or publications (as in “scouring magazine and newspaper articles”).

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Beowulf

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 30:49


Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough takes a look at the latest research shaping our understanding of the great Anglo-Saxon poem, Beowulf. She'll be finding out about the insights that digital approaches are bringing to the tale of gold-hoarding dragons, sword-wielding heroes and murderous fenland beasties. We discover what video games and grammar have to tell us about Old English literature. Andrew Burn Andrew Burn is Professor of English, Media and Drama at University College London's Institute of Education. He is director of ReMap a research centre that focuses on media arts, creative practice and play and games. He has published work on many aspects of the media, including young people's production of digital animation, film and computer games. Details about his work on Beowulf can be found at: https://gtr.ukri.org/projects?ref=AH%2FM010201%2F1. Further information about his research can be found at: https://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/browse/profile?upi=ANBUR40 and www.andrewburn.org. Roxanne Taylor is a research student at the University of Manchester where she is completing her PhD. She is working on an Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project on argument structure and genitive modification in Old English noun phrases. Details about her work can be found here: https://gtr.ukri.org/projects?ref=studentship-2297524#/tabOverview Beowulf Remixed is on Radio 3 on Sunday 30th October and is available on BBC Sounds for the following 28 days. This podcast was made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI. Producer: Ruth Watts

Spark My Interest
178. You Up?

Spark My Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 33:45


Debra, Diana, and Jesi talk about the mysterious disappearance of the Jamison Family, an extreme case of double road rage, and a modern language that sounds most like Old English.Tell us what sparks your interest on twitter (@interest_spark), facebook, instagram, and TikTok! (@sparkmyinterestpodcast) Send a crazy story or interesting article to sparkmyinterestpodcast@gmail.com or leave us a voicemail through our website sparkmyinterestpodcast.com and we might just share it on the show! https://allthatsinteresting.com/jamison-familyhttps://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamison_family_deathshttps://www.huffpost.com/entry/frank-gilliard-allison-william-joseph-hale-florida-road-rage_n_6346dc4fe4b03e8038cf9410https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/what-is-frisianhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frisian_languageshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frisianshttps://youtu.be/cZY7iF4Wc9I

Latin in Layman’s - A Rhetoric Revolution
Etymologizing Mathematical Terms - From Trigonometry to Geometry to Sine/Cosine/Tangent

Latin in Layman’s - A Rhetoric Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 21:14


Trigonometry from Modern Latin trigonometria (Barthelemi Pitiscus, 1595), from Greek trigonon "triangle" from tri- "three"+ gōnia "angle, corner" + metron "a measure." "branch of mathematics that deals with relations between sides and angles of triangles," Geometry - “a measuring of the earth” from combining form of gē (gaia) "earth, land" + -metria "a measuring of" Geometry is, with arithmetic, one of the oldest branches of mathematics. It is concerned with properties of space such as the distance, shape, size, and relative position of figures. Parallel from para- "beside" + allēl "each other." in geometry, of lines, "lying in the same plane but never meeting in either direction." As a noun from 1550s, "a line parallel to another line." Meanings "a comparison made by placing things side by side" and "thing equal to or resembling another in all particulars" are from 1590s. Parallel bars as gymnastics apparatus is recorded from 1868. Perpendicular - "at right angles to the horizon," from per "thoroughly" (see per) + pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). Percent - “by/through a hundred” from Modern Latin per centum "by the hundred" Angle - directly from Latin angulus "an angle, a corner," a diminutive form from PIE root *ang-/*ank- "to bend" (source also of Greek ankylos "bent, crooked," Latin ang(u)ere "to compress in a bend, fold, strangle;" Old Church Slavonic aglu "corner;" Lithuanian anka "loop;" Sanskrit ankah "hook, bent," angam "limb;" Old English ancleo "ankle;" Acute - from Latin acutus "sharp, pointed," figuratively "shrill, penetrating; intelligent, cunning," past participle of acuere "to sharpen" (literal and figurative) It was also used of humors (early 15c.). The meaning "ending in a sharp point" is from 1560s; the sense of "sharp or penetrating in intellect" is from 1580s. i.e. acute injury, acute inflammation, acute pancreatitis Obtuse from Latin obtusus "blunted, dull," also used figuratively, past participle of obtundere "to beat against, make dull," from ob "in front of; against" + tundere "to beat," from PIE *(s)tud-e- "to beat, strike, push, thrust," from root *(s)teu- "to push, stick, knock, beat" In geometry, in reference to a plane angle greater than a right angle." Calculus - from Latin calculus "reckoning, account," originally "pebble used as a reckoning counter," diminutive of calx (genitive calcis) "limestone." In medicine, the word also has been used to refer generally to "concretion occurring accidentally in the animal body," such as dental plaque; dental calculus. Sine - from Latin sinus "fold in a garment, bend, curve, bosom." Cosine “with the fold” “with” + “bend, curve” Tangent - "meeting at a point without intersecting," from Latin tangentem (nominative tangens), present participle of tangere "to touch." Addition - "action of adding numbers." from Latin additionem (nominative additio) "an adding to, addition," noun of action from past-participle stem of addere "add to, join, attach" “The action of” + “joining” --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/liam-connerly/support

Crisco, Dez & Ryan After Hours Podcast
Secrets: What do you hate most about your relationship?!

Crisco, Dez & Ryan After Hours Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 5:01


What'd you hate most about your relationship?? "The hellfire snoring! Also, we have 2 Old English bulldogs that sleep on our floor... just let that sit with ya... SO. MUCH.SNORING!" "I hate that we met too late in life and we're not able to have our own children." "My boyfriend sleep walks. I've heard him snoring in the bathroom sitting on the toilet. He even pee'd on my kitchen floor once. Other than that he's the nicest guy in the world!"

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
writhe

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 2:12 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 19, 2022 is: writhe • RYTHE • verb Writhe means “to twist.” The word is often used when the body or a bodily part is twisting, and especially when it is twisting in pain. // After suffering an injury during the game, he lay on the football field, writhing in pain. See the entry > Examples: “These recently-introduced earthworms go by many nicknames: Asian jumping worms, crazy worms, wood eels, Alabama jumpers or snake worms. Native to eastern Asia and first found in Wisconsin in 2013, jumping worms may wriggle like snakes and writhe violently when touched, launching themselves into the air. Like some lizards, they can shed their tails to escape predators.” — Alison Mitchell, The New Jersey Conservation Foundation (njconservation.org), 1 Sep. 2022 Did you know? Writhe wound its way to us from the Old English verb wrīthan, meaning “to twist,” and that ancestral meaning lives on in the word's current uses, most of which have to do with twists of one kind or another. Among the oldest of these uses is the meaning “to twist into coils or folds,” but in modern use writhing is more often about the physical contortions of one suffering from debilitating pain or attempting to remove oneself from a tight grasp (as, say, a snake from a hawk's talons). The word is also not infrequently applied to the twisting bodies of dancers. The closest relation of writhe in modern English lacks any of the painful connotations often present in writhe: wreath comes from Old English writha, which shares an ancestor with wrīthan.

National Day Calendar
October 16, 2022 - National Sports Day | National Dictionary Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 3:30


Welcome to October 16, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate healthy competition and a nerd with a cause.  Organized sports were introduced to the world at the first Olympic Games in Ancient Greece. The first events were based on training for war and hunting—races, wrestling, jumping, and javelin throwing. This also became a way for people to hash out differences without hurting one another with weapons. Sports are cathartic and bring people together. Athletes scream and yell and try to beat their opponents, but when the game is over, they congratulate one another with a hand shake. On National Sports Day, celebrate the spirit of friendly competition! Noah Webster is best known for publishing A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language in 1806. He believed that the English spelling rules were unnecessarily complicated, and this led him to compile the American English ones. Today we take this for granted today until we run across words such as color with an extra u or center with an re ending. This task took 27 years to complete and required Webster to learn twenty six languages, including Old English, German, Greek, Latin, Italian, Spanish, French, Hebrew, Arabic, and Sanskrit. He also added American words such as skunk and squash that did not appear in British dictionaries. On National Dictionary Day we celebrate the spirit of a rebel with a wordy cause. I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Anglo-Saxon England
Bonus Sample: Anglo-Saxon Wisdom

Anglo-Saxon England

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 4:23


The Anglo-Saxons prised wisdom. It permeated every aspect of their culture and they created an elaborate literature of wisdom meant to convey both profound truths and practical knowledge. In this bonus episode we take an overview of Old English wisdom literature; its characteristics and subjects, and we also talk a bit about gnomes. Learn more at Patreon for $3 a month: https://www.patreon.com/posts/anglo-saxon-72879399?utm_medium=clipboard_copy&utm_source=copyLink&utm_campaign=postshare_creator Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Humanists
The First English Conversation, feat. Dr. Colin Gorrie | Episode XXXII

New Humanists

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 71:49


Ælfric's Colloquy is a dialogue between a teacher and his students, written both in Old English and Latin, designed to teach Latin to Anglo-Saxon schoolboys. It is also the earliest record of a (relatively) realistic English-language conversation. In celebration of the Ancient Language Institute's new Old English program, Dr. Colin Gorrie joins Jonathan and Ryan to walk through the Colloquy and to talk about language learning, education, and literacy in medieval England.Ælfric's Colloquy (Old English): https://www.kul.pl/files/165/history%20of%20english/texts2009/aelfriccolloquy-translation.pdfColloquium Ælfrici (Latine): https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/12358426/colloquium-aelfrici-1-nos-pueri-rogamus-te-magister-ut-doceas-nos-Ælfric's Colloquy (modern English translation): https://www.kentarchaeology.ac/authors/016.pdfDavid Sedaris's "Me Talk Pretty One Day": https://www.esquire.com/lifestyle/a1419/talk-pretty-0399/Eleanor Dickey's Learn Latin from the Romans: https://bookshop.org/a/25626/9781316506196C. P. Wormald's "The Uses of Literacy in Anglo-Saxon England and Its Neighbours": https://www.jstor.org/stable/3679189Watch an Old English Beginner Lesson with Dr. Gorrie: https://youtu.be/YwECgGWCwisOld English at the Ancient Language Institute: https://ancientlanguage.com/old-english/New Humanists is brought to you by the Ancient Language Institute: https://ancientlanguage.com/Links may have referral codes, which earn us a commission at no additional cost to you. We encourage you, when possible, to use Bookshop.org for your book purchases, an online bookstore which supports local bookstores.Music: Save Us Now by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com

First Things Podcast
Our Forgotten Language

First Things Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 32:12 Very Popular


On this episode, Hana Videen joins Mark Bauerlein to discuss her new book, "The Wordhord: Daily Life in Old English."

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
First Things: Our Forgotten Language

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022


On this episode, Hana Videen joins Mark Bauerlein to discuss her new book, “The Wordhord: Daily Life in Old English.”

Old Books With Grace
The Beauty of Old English with Eleanor Parker

Old Books With Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 39:25


Dr. Eleanor Parker joins Grace to discuss the beauty of Old English and her delightful new book on the Anglo-Saxon calendar year, Winters in the World: A Journey Through the Anglo-Saxon Year.  Eleanor Parker is Lecturer in Medieval English Literature at Brasenose College, Oxford. She is the author of Dragon Lords: The History and Legends of Viking England (2018), Conquered: The Last Children of Anglo-Saxon England (2022), and Winters in the World: A Journey Through the Anglo-Saxon Year (2022). She has also written for History Today and is the creator of the Clerk of Oxford blog.

Midnight Train Podcast
Our History of Swear Words. (Sorry, Mom)

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 124:37


Sign up for our Patreon for bonuses and more! www.themidnightrainpodcast.com    Do you happen to swear? Is it something you happen to do when you stub your pinky toe on the coffee table? What about when you've just finished dinner and you pull that glorious lasagna out of the oven, burn yourself and then drop your Italian masterpiece on the floor, in turn burning yourself once again? Odds are that if you're listening to this show, you have a rather colorful vernacular and aren't offended by those that share in your “darker” linguistic abilities. Those dramatic and often harsh, yet exceedingly hilarious words, have a pretty amazing history. Were they written in manuscripts by monks? Or, did we find them used by regular people and found in prose like the names of places, personal names, and animal names? Well, could they tell us more about our medieval past other than just that sex, torture, plagues and incest was all the rage? Let's find out!   Fuck   Let's start with our favorite word. Let's all say it together, kids. “Fuck!” This most versatile yet often considered one of the worst of the “bad words” doesn't seem to have been around in the English language prior to the fifteenth century and may have arrived later from the German or th Dutch. Leave it to those beautiful Germans to introduce us to such a colorful word. In fact, the Oxford English Dictionary says it wasn't actually used until 1500. However, the name of a specific place may have been used even earlier.   Many early instances of fuck were said to actually have been used to mean “to strike” rather than being anything to do with fornicating. The more common Middle English word for sex was ”swive”, which has developed into the Modern English word swivel, as in: go swivel on it. Some of the earliest instances of fuck, seen to mean “hitting” or “striking,” such as Simon Fuckebotere (from in 1290), who was more than likely in the milk industry, hitting butter, or Henry Fuckebeggar (1286/7) who may have, hit the poor.   The earliest examples of the word fuck in the English language appeared in the names of places. The first of these is said to be found near Sherwood in 1287: Ric Wyndfuk and Ric Wyndfuck de Wodehous. These both feature a kestrel known as the Windfucker which, we must assume, went in the wind. The next definite example comes from Bristol 1373 in Fockynggroue, which may have been named for a grove where couples went for “some quiet alone time.”   However, Somewhere among the indictment rolls of the county court of Chester (1310/11), studied by Dr. Paul Booth of Keele University (Staffordshire), a man whose Christian name was Roger is mentioned three times. His less Christian last name is also recorded. The name being mentioned repetitively pretty much means it did not result from a spelling mistake but rather it's the real thing. Meaning, the man's full name was Roger Fuckebythenavele. Not only does his second name move back the earliest use of fuck in its modern sense by quite a few decades; it also verifies that it is, in fact, a Middle English word. But of course, there are those fuckers that will undoubtedly debate it's fucking origin.   The stem *fukkō-, with its characteristic double consonant, is easy to explain as a Germanic iterative verb – one of a large family of similar forms. They originated as combinations of various Indo-European roots with *-nah₂-, a suffix indicating repeated action. The formation is not, strictly speaking, Proto-Indo-European; the suffix owes its existence to the reanalysis of an older morphological structure (reanalysis happens when people fail to analyze an inherited structure in the same way as their predecessors). Still, verbs of this kind are older than Proto-Germanic.   *fukkō- apparently meant to ‘strike repeatedly, beat' (like, say, “dashing” the cream with a plunger in a traditional butter churn). Note also windfucker and fuckwind – old, obsolete words for ‘kestrel'.   A number of words in other Germanic languages may also be related to fuck. One of them is Old Icelandic fjúka ‘to be tossed or driven by the wind' < *feuka-; cf. also fjúk ‘drifting snowstorm' (or, as one might put it in present-day English, a fucking blizzard). These words fit a recurrent morphological pattern observed by Kroonen (2012): Germanic iteratives with a voiceless geminate produced by Kluge's Law often give rise to “de-iterativised” verbs in which the double stop is simplified if the full vocalism or the root (here, *eu rather than *u) is restored. Kluge's law had a noticeable effect on Proto-Germanic morphology. Because of its dependence on ablaut and accent, it operated in some parts of declension and conjugation, but not in others, giving rise to alternations of short and long consonants in both nominal and verbal paradigms.   If the verb is really native (“Anglo-Saxon”), one would expect Old English *fuccian (3sg. *fuccaþ, pl. *fucciaþ, 1/3sg. preterite *fuccode, etc.). If these forms already had “impolite” connotations in Old English, their absence from the Old English literary corpus is understandable. We may be absolutely sure that *feortan (1/3 sg. pret. *feart, pret. pl. *furton, p.p. *forten) existed in Old English, since fart exists today (attested since about 1300, just like the word fuck) and has an impeccable Indo-European etymology, with cognates in several branches. Still, not a single one of these reconstructed Old English verb forms is actually documented (all we have is the scantily attested verbal noun feorting ‘fart(ing)').   One has to remember that written records give us a strongly distorted picture of how people really spoke in the past. If you look at the frequency of fuck, fucking and fucker in written English over the last 200 years, you may get the impression that these words disappeared from English completely ca. 1820 and magically reappeared 140 years later. Even the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary pretended they didn't exist. The volume that should have contained FUCK was published in 1900, and Queen Victoria was still alive.   According to the Oxford English Dictionary: Forms:  α. 1500s fucke, 1500s– fuck; also Scottish pre-1700 fuk.   Frequency (in current use):  Show frequency band information Origin: Probably a word inherited from Germanic. Etymology: Probably cognate with Dutch fokken …   In coarse slang. In these senses typically, esp. in early use, with a man as the subject of the verb. Thesaurus » Categories » intransitive. To have sexual intercourse. ▸ ?a1513   W. Dunbar Poems (1998) I. 106   Be his feirris he wald haue fukkit.   transitive. To have sexual intercourse with (a person). In quot. a1500   in Latin-English macaronic verse; the last four words are enciphered by replacing each letter with the following letter of the alphabet, and fuccant has a Latin third-person plural ending. The passage translates as ‘They [sc. monks] are not in heaven because they fuck the wives of Ely.' [a1500   Flen, Flyys (Harl. 3362) f. 47, in T. Wright & J. O. Halliwell Reliquiæ Antiquæ (1841) I. 91   Non sunt in cœli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk [= fuccant uuiuys of heli].]   transitive. With an orifice, part of the body, or something inanimate as an object. Also occasionally intransitive with prepositional objects of this type. [1680   School of Venus ii. 99   An hour after, he Ferked my Arse again in the same manner.]   transitive. To damage, ruin, spoil, botch; to destroy, put an end to; = to fuck up 1a at Phrasal verbs 1. Also (chiefly in passive): to put into a difficult or hopeless situation; to ‘do for'. Cf. also mind-fuck v. 1776   Frisky Songster (new ed.) 36   O, says the breeches, I shall be duck'd, Aye, says the petticoat, I shall be f—d.   transitive. U.S. To cheat; to deceive, betray. Frequently without. 1866   G. Washington Affidavit 20 Oct. in I. Berlin et al. Black Mil. Experience in Civil War (1982) v. xviii. 792   Mr. Baker replied that deponent would be fucked out of his money by Mr. Brown.   transitive. In oaths and imprecations (chiefly in optative with no subject expressed): expressing annoyance, hatred, dismissal, etc. Cf. damn v. 6, bugger v. 2a. See also fuck it at Phrases 2, fuck you at Phrases 1b. 1922   J. Joyce Ulysses ii. xv. [Circe] 560   God fuck old Bennett!   Phrases   Imprecatory and exclamatory phrases (typically in imperative or optative with no subject expressed sense).  P1. Expressing hostility, contempt, or defiant indifference. Categories » go fuck yourself and variants. 1895   Rep. Senate Comm. Police Dept. N.Y. III. 3158   By Senator Bradley: Q. Repeat what he said to you? A. He said, ‘Go on, fuck yourself, you son-of-a-bitch; I will give you a hundred dollars'; he tried to punch me, and I went out.   fuck you. 1905   L. Schindler Testimony 20 Dec. in People State of N.Y. Respondent, against Charles McKenna (1907) (N.Y. Supreme Court) 37   Murray said to me, ‘Fuck you, I will give you more the same.' And as he said that, I grabbed the two of them.   P2. fuck it: expressing dismissal, exasperation, resignation, or impetuousness. 1922   E. E. Cummings Enormous Room iv. 64   I said, ‘F— it, I don't want it.'   P3. fuck me and elaborated variants: expressing astonishment or exasperation. 1929   F. Manning Middle Parts of Fortune II. xi. 229   ‘Well, you can fuck me!' exclaimed the astonished Martlow. Cunt Cunt is a vulgar word for the vulva or vagina. It is used in a variety of ways, including as a term of disparagement. Reflecting national variations, cunt can be used as a disparaging and obscene term for a woman in the United States, an unpleasant or stupid man or woman in the United Kingdom, or a contemptible man in Australia and New Zealand. However, in Australia and New Zealand it can also be a neutral or positive term when used with a positive qualifier (e.g., "He's a good cunt"). The term has various derivative senses, including adjective and verb uses.   Feminist writer and English professor Germaine Greer argues that cunt "is one of the few remaining words in the English language with a genuine power to shock". The earliest known use of the word, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, was as part of a placename of a London street, Gropecunt Lane. Use of the word as a term of abuse is relatively recent, dating from the late nineteenth century. The word appears not to have been taboo in the Middle Ages, but became that way toward the end of the eighteenth century, and was then not generally not allowed to be printed until the latter part of the twentieth century.   There is some disagreement on the origin of the term cunt, although most sources agree that it came from the Germanic word (Proto-Germanic *kunto, stem *kunton-), which emerged as kunta in Old Norse. The Proto-Germanic form's actual origin is a matter of debate among scholars. Most Germanic languages have cognates, including Swedish, Faroese, and Nynorsk (kunta), West Frisian, and Middle Low German (kunte), Middle Dutch (conte), Dutch kut (cunt), and Dutch kont (butt), Middle Low German kutte, Middle High German kotze ("prostitute"), German kott, and maybe Old English cot. The Proto-Germanic term's etymology ia questionable.   It may have arisen by Grimm's law operating on the Proto-Indo-European root *gen/gon "create, become" seen in gonads, genital, gamete, genetics, gene, or the Proto-Indo-European root guneh or "woman" (Greek: gunê, seen in gynaecology). Relationships to similar-sounding words such as the Latin cunnus ("vulva"), and its derivatives French con, Spanish coño, and Portuguese cona, or in Persian kos (کُس), have not been conclusively demonstrated. Other Latin words related to cunnus are cuneus ("wedge") and its derivative cunēre ("to fasten with a wedge", (figurative) "to squeeze in"), leading to English words such as cuneiform ("wedge-shaped"). In Middle English, cunt appeared with many spellings, such as coynte, cunte and queynte, which did not always reflect the actual pronunciation of the word.   The word, in its modern meaning, is attested in Middle English. Proverbs of Hendyng, a manuscript from some time before 1325, includes the advice:   (Give your cunt wisely and make [your] demands after the wedding.) from wikipedia. The word cunt is generally regarded in English-speaking countries as unsuitable for normal publicconversations. It has been described as "the most heavily tabooed word of all English words".   Quoted from wikipedia: Some American feminists of the 1970s sought to eliminate disparaging terms for women, including "bitch" and "cunt". In the context of pornography, Catharine MacKinnon argued that use of the word acts to reinforce a dehumanisation of women by reducing them to mere body parts; and in 1979 Andrea Dworkin described the word as reducing women to "the one essential – 'cunt: our essence ... our offence'".   While “vagina” is used much more commonly in colloquial speech to refer to the genitals of people with vulvas than “cunt” is, its  origins are defined by its service to male sexuality, making “cunt” —  interestingly enough — the least historically misogynistic of the two. “Cunt” has also been used in Renaissance bawdy verse and in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, but it was not until Shakespeare's era that its meaning began to fundamentally shift, during the dawn of Christian doctrine.   Arguably, if cunt simply means and refers to “vagina”, then why would that be bad? Vaginas are pretty great! They provide people with pleasure, they give life, and they're even a naturally developed lunar calendar! So, why would a person refer to another, assumedly pissy person as a vagina?    So, should we as society fight the negative stereotypes and embrace the term cunt again? It's a tiny word that bears a lot of weight, but it should be anything but scary or offensive. It can be a massive dose of love instead of an enormous force of hate if we actively define our vocabulary rather than letting it define us.   Words only have that type of power when the uptight, vanilla flavored, missionary only Karen's and Kevin's of the world decide they don't like them. This has been going on for as long as we've been using words. So, let's take it back. We love you, ya cunts!   coarse slang in later use. Thesaurus » Categories » The female genitals; the vulva or vagina. Cf. quaint n.1 a1400   tr. Lanfranc Sci. Cirurgie (Ashm.) (1894) 172   In wymmen þe necke of þe bladdre is schort, & is maad fast to the cunte. 1552   D. Lindsay Satyre Procl. 144   First lat me lok thy cunt, Syne lat me keip the key. 1680   Earl of Rochester et al. Poems 77   I fear you have with interest repaid, Those eager thrusts, which at your Cunt he made. 1865   ‘Philocomus' Love Feast iii. 21   I faint! I die! I spend! My cunt is sick! Suck me and fuck me!   A woman as a source of sexual gratification; a promiscuous woman; a slut. Also as a general term of abuse for a woman. 1663   S. Pepys Diary 1 July (1971) IV. 209   Mr. Batten..acting all the postures of lust and buggery that could be imagined, and..saying that the he hath to sell such a pouder as should make all the cunts in town run after him.   As a term of abuse for a man. 1860   in M. E. Neely Abraham Lincoln Encycl. (1982) 154   And when they got to Charleston, they had to, as is wont Look around to find a chairman, and so they took a Cunt   A despised, unpleasant, or annoying place, thing, or task. 1922   J. Joyce Ulysses ii. iv. [Calypso] 59   The grey sunken cunt of the world.   Bitch   Women were frequently equated to dogs in Ancient Greek literature, which was used to dehumanize and shame them for their alleged lack of restraint and sexual urges. This is believed to have originated from the hunter goddess Artemis, who was frequently depicted as a pack of hounds and was perceived to be both beautiful and frigid and savage. According to popular belief, the term "bitch" as we use it today evolved from the Old English word "bicce," which meant a female dog, about the year 1000 AD. The phrase started out as a critique of a woman's sexuality in the 15th century but eventually evolved to signify that the lady was rude or disagreeable.   Clare Bayley has connected this growth of the term "bitch" as an insult to the suffrage struggle and the final passage of women's suffrage in the early 20th century, particularly the 1920s. Men were intimidated when women started to challenge their subordinate roles in the patriarchal power structure, and the phrase started to be used to ferocious and irate females. Men's respect for women and the prevalence of the term are clearly correlated, since usage of the term rapidly decreased during World War II as men's appreciation of women's contributions to the war effort increased.   However, as they competed with women for employment after the war ended and the men went back to work, the word's usage increased once more. As the housewife paradigm started to fade away during the war, the position of women in the workplace and society as a whole underwent an irreparable change. However, males perceived the presence of women in the workforce as a challenge to their supremacy in society.   With songs like Elton John's "The Bitch is Back" ascending the charts in 1974, the slur became more common in mainstream culture and music in the latter decades of the 20th century. As a result of artists like Kanye West and Eminem using the term "bitch" to denigrate women and depict violence against them in their lyrics, hip-hop culture has also long been accused of being misogynistic.   We just need to look at Hillary Clinton's recent campaign for president in 2016 to understand how frequently this slur is leveled at women, especially those in positions of authority who are defying patriarchal expectations and shattering glass ceilings. Rep. AOC being called a "fucking bitch" by a GOP Rep. is another similar example. It is evident that the usage of the phrase and the degree to which males regard women to be a danger are related.   bitch (v.)   "to complain," attested from at least 1930, perhaps from the sense in bitchy, perhaps influenced by the verb meaning "to bungle, spoil," which is recorded from 1823. But bitched in this sense seems to echo Middle English bicched "cursed, bad," a general term of opprobrium (as in Chaucer's bicched bones "unlucky dice"), which despite the hesitation of OED, seems to be a derivative of bitch (n.).   bitchy (adj.) 1925, U.S. slang, "sexually provocative;" later (1930s) "spiteful, catty, bad-tempered" (usually of females); from bitch + -y (2). Earlier in reference to male dogs thought to look less rough or coarse than usual. The earliest use of "bitch" specifically as a derogatory term for women dates to the fifteenth century. Its earliest slang meaning mainly referred to sexual behavior, according to the English language historian Geoffrey Hughes:   The early applications were to a promiscuous or sensual woman, a metaphorical extension of the behavior of a bitch in heat. Herein lies the original point of the powerful insult son of a bitch, found as biche sone ca. 1330 in Arthur and Merlin ... while in a spirited exchange in the Chester Play (ca. 1400) a character demands: "Whom callest thou queine, skabde bitch?" ("Who are you calling a whore, you miserable bitch?").   In modern usage, the slang term bitch has different meanings depending largely on social context and may vary from very offensive to endearing, and as with many slang terms, its meaning and nuances can vary depending on the region in which it is used.   The term bitch can refer to a person or thing that is very difficult, as in "Life's a bitch" or "He sure got the bitch end of that deal". It is common for insults to lose intensity as their meaning broadens ("bastard" is another example). In the film The Women (1939), Joan Crawford could only allude to the word: "And by the way, there's a name for you ladies, but it isn't used in high society - outside of a kennel." At the time, use of the actual word would have been censored by the Hays Office. By 1974, Elton John had a hit single (#4 in the U.S. and #14 in the U.K.) with "The Bitch Is Back", in which he says "bitch" repeatedly. It was, however, censored by some radio stations. On late night U.S. television, the character Emily Litella (1976-1978) on Saturday Night Live (portrayed by Gilda Radner) would frequently refer to Jane Curtin under her breath at the end of their Weekend Update routine in this way: "Oh! Never mind...! Bitch!"   Bitchin' arose in the 1950s to describe something found to be cool or rad. Modern use can include self-description, often as an unfairly difficult person. For example, in the New York Times bestseller The Bitch in the House, a woman describes her marriage: "I'm fine all day at work, but as soon as I get home, I'm a horror....I'm the bitch in the house."Boy George admitted "I was being a bitch" in a falling out with Elton John. Generally, the term bitch is still considered offensive, and not accepted in formal situations. According to linguist Deborah Tannen, "Bitch is the most contemptible thing you can say about a woman. Save perhaps the four-letter C word." It's common for the word to be censored on Prime time TV, often rendered as "the b-word". During the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign, a John McCain supporter referred to Hillary Clinton by asking, "How do we beat the bitch?" The event was reported in censored format:   On CNN's "The Situation Room," Washington Post media critic and CNN "Reliable Sources" host Howard Kurtz observed that "Senator McCain did not embrace the 'b' word that this woman in the audience used." ABC reporter Kate Snow adopted the same location. On CNN's "Out in the Open," Rick Sanchez characterized the word without using it by saying, "Last night, we showed you a clip of one of his supporters calling Hillary Clinton the b-word that rhymes with witch." A local Fox 25 news reporter made the same move when he rhymed the unspoken word with rich.   A study reported that, when used on social media, bitch "aims to promote traditional, cultural beliefs about femininity". Used hundreds of thousands of times per day on such platforms, it is associated with sexist harassment, "victimizing targets", and "shaming" victims who do not abide by degrading notions about femininity   Son of a bitch The first known appearance of "son-of-a-bitch" in a work of American fiction is Seventy-Six (1823), a historical fiction novel set during the American Revolutionary War by eccentric writer and critic John Neal.  The protagonist, Jonathan Oadley, recounts a battle scene in which he is mounted on a horse: "I wheeled, made a dead set at the son-of-a-bitch in my rear, unhorsed him, and actually broke through the line." The term's use as an insult is as old as that of bitch. Euphemistic terms are often substituted, such as gun in the phrase "son of a gun" as opposed to "son of a bitch", or "s.o.b." for the same phrase. Like bitch, the severity of the insult has diminished. Roy Blount Jr. in 2008 extolled the virtues of "son of a bitch" (particularly in comparison to "asshole") in common speech and deed. Son of a bitch can also be used as a "how about that" reaction, or as a reaction to excruciating pain. In politics the phrase "Yes, he is a son of a bitch, but he is our son of a bitch" has been attributed, probably apocryphally, to various U.S. presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to Richard Nixon. Immediately after the detonation of the first atomic bomb in Alamogordo, New Mexico, in July 1945 (the device codenamed Gadget), the Manhattan Project scientist who served as the director of the test, Kenneth Tompkins Bainbridge, exclaimed to Robert Oppenheimer "Now we're all sons-of-bitches." In January 2022, United States President Joe Biden was recorded on a hot mic responding to Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy asking, "Do you think inflation is a political liability ahead of the midterms?" Biden responded sarcastically, saying, "It's a great asset — more inflation. What a stupid son of a bitch." The 19th-century British racehorse Filho da Puta took its name from "Son of a Bitch" in Portuguese. The Curtiss SB2C, a World War 2 U.S. Navy dive bomber, was called "Son-of-a-Bitch 2nd Class" by some of its pilots and crewmen. In American popular culture, the slang word "basic" is used to derogatorily refer to persons who are thought to favor mainstream goods, fashions, and music. Hip-hop culture gave rise to "basic bitch," which gained popularity through rap music, lyrics, blogs, and videos from 2011 to 2014. "Bros" is a common word for their male counterparts. Other English-speaking nations have terms like "basic bitch" or "airhead," such as modern British "Essex girls" and "Sloane Rangers," as well as Australian "haul girls," who are noted for their love of shopping for expensive clothing and uploading films of their purchases on YouTube. Oxford English Dictionary  transitive. To call (a person, esp. a woman) a bitch. 1707   Diverting Muse 131   Why how now, crys Venus, altho you're my Spouse, [If] you Bitch me, you Brute, have a care of your Brows   transitive. To behave like a bitch towards (a person); to be spiteful, malicious, or unfair to (a person); to let (a person) down. 1764   D. Garrick Let. 23 Aug. (1963) II. 423   I am a little at a loss what You will do for a Woman Tragedian to stare & tremble wth yr Heroes, if Yates should bitch You—but she must come.   intransitive. To engage in spiteful or malicious criticism or gossip, esp. about another person; to talk spitefully or cattily about. 1915   G. Cannan Young Earnest i. x. 92   It's the women bitching at you got into your blood.   intransitive. Originally U.S. To grumble, to complain (about something, or at someone). Frequently collocated with moan. 1930   Amer. Speech 5 238   [Colgate University slang] He bitched about the course.   †3. intransitive. To back down, to yield. Obsolete. rare. 1777   E. Burke Let. 9 May in Corr. (1961) III. 339   Norton bitched a little at last, but though he would recede; Fox stuck to his motion.   Shit shit (v.) Old English scitan, from Proto-Germanic *skit- (source also of North Frisian skitj, Dutch schijten, German scheissen), from PIE(proto indo-european) root *skei- "to cut, split." The notion is of "separation" from the body (compare Latin excrementum, from excernere "to separate," Old English scearn "dung, muck," from scieran "to cut, shear;" see sharn). It is thus a cousin to science and conscience.   "Shit" is not an acronym. Nor is it a recent word. But it was taboo from 1600 and rarely appeared in print (neither Shakespeare nor the KJV has it), and even in the "vulgar" publications of the late 18c. it is disguised by dashes. It drew the wrath of censors as late as 1922 ("Ulysses" and "The Enormous Room"), scandalized magazine subscribers in 1957 (a Hemingway story in Atlantic Monthly) and was omitted from some dictionaries as recently as 1970 ("Webster's New World"). [Rawson]   It has extensive slang usage; the meaning "to lie, to tease'' is from 1934; that of "to disrespect" is from 1903. Also see shite. Shat is a humorous past tense form, not etymological, first recorded 18th century.   To shit bricks "be very frightened" attested by 1961. The connection between fear and involuntary defecation has generated expressions in English since the 14th century. (the image also is in Latin), and probably also is behind scared shitless (1936).   shit (n.) Middle English shit "diarrhea," from Old English scitte "purging, diarrhea," from source of shit (v.). The general sense of "excrement" dates from 1580s (Old English had scytel, Middle English shitel for "dung, excrement;" the usual 14c. noun for natural discharges of the bodies of men or beasts seems to have been turd or filth). As an exclamation attested in print by 1920 but certainly older. Use for "obnoxious person" is by 1508; meaning "misfortune, trouble" is attested from 1937. Shit-faced "drunk" is 1960s student slang; shit list is from 1942. Shit-hole is by 1937 as "rectum," by 1969 in reference to undesirable locations. Shitload (also shit-load) for "a great many" is by 1970. Shitticism is Robert Frost's word for scatological writing.   Up shit creek "in trouble" is by 1868 in a South Carolina context (compare the metaphoric salt river, of which it is perhaps a coarse variant). Slang not give a shit "not care" is by 1922. Pessimistic expression same shit different day is attested by 1989. To get (one's) shit together "manage one's affairs" is by 1969. Emphatic shit out of luck is by 1942. The expression when the shit hits the fan "alluding to a moment of crisis or its disastrous consequences" is attested by 1967.   Expressing anger, despair, surprise, frustration, resignation, excitement, etc. 1865   Proc. Court Martial U.S. Army (Judge Advocate General's Office) U.S. National Arch.: Rec. group 153, File MM-2412 3 Charge II.   Private James Sullivan...did in contemptuous and disrespectful manner reply..‘Oh, shit, I can't' or words to that effect.   Ass/Asshole The word arse in English derives from the Proto-Germanic (reconstructed) word *arsaz, from the Proto-Indo-European word *ors-, meaning "buttocks" or "backside". The combined form arsehole is first attested from 1500 in its literal use to refer to the anus. The metaphorical use of the word to refer to the worst place in a region (e.g., "the arsehole of the world"), is first attested in print in 1865; the use to refer to a contemptible person is first attested in 1933. In the ninth chapter of his 1945 autobiography, Black Boy, Richard Wright quotes a snippet of verse that uses the term: "All these white folks dressed so fine / Their ass-holes smell just like mine ...". Its earliest known usage in newspapers as an insult was 1965. As with other vulgarities, these uses of the word may have been common in oral speech for some time before their first appearances in print. By the 1970s, Hustler magazine featured people they did not like as "Asshole of the Month." In 1972, Jonathan Richman of Modern Lovers recorded his song "Pablo Picasso", which includes the line "Pablo Picasso was never called an asshole."   Until the early 1990s, the word was considered one of a number of words that could not be uttered on commercial television in the United States. Comedian Andrew Dice Clay caused a major shock when he uttered the word during a televised MTV awards show in 1989. However, there were PG-13 and R-rated films in the 1980s that featured use of the word, such as the R-rated The Terminator (1984), the PG-13-rated National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation (1989), and the PG-rated Back to the Future (1985). By 1994, however, vulgarity had become more acceptable, and the word was featured in dialog on the long-running television series NYPD Blue, though it has yet to become anything close to commonplace on network TV. In some broadcast edits (such as the syndication airings of South Park), the word is partially bleeped out, as "assh—". A variant of the term, "ass clown", was coined and popularized by the 1999 comedy film Office Space.   The word is mainly used as a vulgarity, generally to describe people who are viewed as stupid, incompetent, unpleasant, or detestable. Moral philosopher Aaron James, in his 2012 book, Assholes: A Theory, gives a more precise meaning of the word, particularly to its connotation in the United States: A person, who is almost always male, who considers himself of much greater moral or social importance than everyone else; who allows himself to enjoy special advantages and does so systematically; who does this out of an entrenched sense of entitlement; and who is immunized by his sense of entitlement against the complaints of other people. He feels he is not to be questioned, and he is the one who is chiefly wronged.   Many would believe the term ass to be used to describe an ungulate or a hoofed mammal of the smaller variety. Those people would be correct. However ass would be used as slang to describe the incompetence of people as they seem to resemble that of a donkey. Slow and stupid. We don't see donkeys in this manner but the people of old may have.   A stupid, irritating, or contemptible person; a person who behaves despicably. Cf. arsehole n. 3, shithole n. 2. Quot. 1954, from a story originally told in 1933, provides evidence for the development of this sense from figurative uses of sense 1. [1954   V. Randolph Pissing in Snow (1976) lxx. 106   When God got the job [of making men and women] done,..there was a big pile of ass-holes left over. It looks to me like the Almighty just throwed all them ass-holes together, and made the Easton family.]   Dick/dickhead   Dick is a common English language slang word for the human penis. It is also used by extension for a variety of slang purposes, generally considered vulgar, including: as a verb to describe sexual activity; and as a term for individuals who are considered to be rude, abrasive, inconsiderate, or otherwise contemptible. In this context, it can be used interchangeably with jerk, and can also be used as a verb to describe rude or deceitful actions. Variants include dickhead, which literally refers to the glans. The offensiveness of the word dick is complicated by the continued use of the word in inoffensive contexts, including as both a given name (often a nickname for Richard) and a surname, the popular British dessert spotted dick, the classic novel Moby-Dick, the Dick and Jane series of children's books, and the American retailer Dick's Sporting Goods. Uses like these have given comic writers a foundation to use double entendre to capitalize on this contradiction. In the mid-17th century, dick became slang for a man as a sexual partner. For example, in the 1665 satire The English Rogue by Richard Head, a "dick" procured to impregnate a character that is having difficulty conceiving:   “The next Dick I pickt up for her was a man of a colour as contrary to the former, as light is to darkness, being swarthy; whose hair was as black as a sloe; middle statur'd, well set, both strong and active, a man so universally tryed, and so fruitfully successful, that there was hardly any female within ten miles gotten with child in hugger-mugger, but he was more than suspected to be Father of all the legitimate. Yet this too, proved an ineffectual Operator.”   An 1869 slang dictionary offered definitions of dick including "a riding whip" and an abbreviation of dictionary, also noting that in the North Country, it was used as a verb to indicate that a policeman was eyeing the subject. The term came to be associated with the penis through usage by men in the military around the 1880s.   The term "dick" was originally used to describe a vile or repulsive individual in the 1960s.   A stupid, annoying, or objectionable person (esp. a male); one whose behaviour is considered knowingly obnoxious, provocative, or disruptive. Cf. dick n.1 6. 1960   S. Martinelli Let. 28 Dec. in C. Bukowski & S. Martinelli Beerspit Night & Cursing. (2001) 132   You shd listen to yr own work being broadcast [on the radio]... You cd at least tell ME when to list[en] dickhead!   Twat noun Slang: Vulgar. vulva. First recorded in 1650–60; perhaps originally a dialectal variant of thwat, thwot (unattested), presumed Modern English outcome of Old English thwāt, (unattested), akin to Old Norse thveit “cut, slit, forest clearing” (from northern English dialect thwaite “forest clearing”)   What does twat mean? Twat is vulgar slang for “vagina.” It's also used, especially in British English slang, a way to call someone as stupid, useless, or otherwise contemptible person. While twat has been recorded since the 1650s, we don't exactly know where it comes from. One theory connects twat to the Old English term for “to cut off.” The (bizarre) implication could be that women's genitalia were thought to be just shorter versions of men's.   Twat was popularized in the mid-1800s completely by accident. The great English poet Robert Browning had read a 1660 poem that referred, in a derogatory way, to a “nun's twat.” Browning thought a twat must have been a kind of hat, so he incorporated it into his own work.   Words for genitalia and other taboo body parts (especially female body parts) have a long history of being turned into abusive terms. Consider a**, d*ck, p***y, among many others. In the 1920s, English speakers started using twat as an insult in the same way some use a word like c**t, although twat has come to have a far less offensive force than the c-word in American English. In the 1930s, twat was sometimes used as a term of abuse for “woman” more generally, and over the second half of the 1900s, twat was occasionally used as slang for “butt” or “anus” in gay slang.   Twat made headlines in June 2018 when British actor Danny Dyer called former British Prime Minister David Cameron a twat for his role in initiating the Brexit referendum in 2016—and then stepping down after it passed.   Twat is still common in contemporary use as an insult implying stupidity, especially among British English speakers.   Even though it's a common term, twat is still vulgar and causes a stir when used in a public setting, especially due to its sexist nature. Public figures that call someone a twat are often publicly derided. Online, users sometimes censor the term, rendering it as tw*t or tw@t.   If you're annoying, you might be accused of twattiness; if you're messing around or procrastinating, you might be twatting around; if you're going on about something, you might be twatting on. Twatting is also sometimes substituted for the intensifier ”fucking”.   As a term of abuse: a contemptible or obnoxious person; a person who behaves stupidly; a fool, an idiot. Now chiefly British. The force of this term can vary widely. Especially when applied to a woman, it can be as derogatory and offensive as the term cunt (cunt n. 2a), but it can also be used (especially of men) as a milder form of abuse without conscious reference to the female genitals, often implying that a person's behaviour, appearance, etc., is stupid or idiotic, with little or no greater force than twit (twit n.1 2b). 1922   ‘J. H. Ross' Mint (1936) xxxv. 110   The silly twat didn't know if his arse-hole was bored, punched, drilled, or countersunk. The top 10 movies with the most swear words: The Wolf of Wall Street (Martin Scorsese, 2013) – 715 Uncut Gems (Josh and Benny Safide, 2019) – 646 Casino (Martin Scorsese, 1995) – 606 Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (Kevin Smith, 2001) – 509 Fury (David Ayer, 2014) – 489 Straight Outta Compton (F. Gary Gray, 2015) – 468 Summer of Sam (Spike Lee, 1999) – 467 Nil By Mouth (Gary Oldman, 1997) – 432 Reservoir Dogs (Quentin Tarantino, 1992) – 418 Beavis and Butt-Head Do America (Mike Judge, 1996) – 414