Podcasts about Vocabulary

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Body of words used in a particular language

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  • May 27, 2022LATEST

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    Best podcasts about Vocabulary

    Show all podcasts related to vocabulary

    Latest podcast episodes about Vocabulary

    The Allusionist
    155. The Tiffany Problem

    The Allusionist

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 20:23


    The name Tiffany has been around for some 800 years. But you can't name a character in a historical novel 'Tiffany', because people don't believe the name is old. Science fiction and fantasy author Jo Walton coined the term "The Tiffany Problem" to express the disparity between historical facts and the common perception of the past. Find out more information about the topics in this episode at theallusionist.org/tiffany, plus a transcript and the full dictionary entry for the randomly selected word. Sign up to be a patron at patreon.com/allusionist and not only are you supporting an independent podcast, you get patron-exclusive video livestreams and a Discord community full of language chat, craft pics and word game camaraderie. The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow.  The Allusionist is produced by me, Helen Zaltzman. The music is composed and sung by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs via palebirdmusic.com. Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Bombas, whose mission is to make the comfiest clothes ever, and match every item sold with an equal item donated. Go to bombas.com/allusionist to get 20% off your first purchase. • BetterHelp, online therapy with licensed professional counsellors. Allusionist listeners get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/allusionist.  • Squarespace, your one-stop shop for building and running a sleek website. Go to squarespace.com/allusionist for a free 2-week trial, and get 10 percent off your first purchase of a website or domain with the code allusionist.  Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Study with Andrea
    TOEFL Advanced Vocabulary

    Study with Andrea

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 6:59


    Welcome to the TOEFL with Andrea podcast where I help you earn your dream score on the TOEFL. Today's lesson, like every Friday, is focused on expanding your vocabulary quickly. We'll look at another 15 advanced vocabulary words to help you expand your vocabulary.English vocabulary is critical for success on the TOEFL exam... that's why I'm giving you my Advanced  Vocabulary Course (normally $69) for free when you purchase the TOEFL video course. You'll get all of the video lessons, audio files, quizzes, and downloadable PDF from the course. This includes over 200 advanced vocabulary words... simply visit StudyWithAndrea.com/200 to learn more.Happy learning, AndreaSupport the show

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 27, 2022 is: uncanny • un-KAN-ee • adjective Uncanny is typically used to describe something that is strange or unusual in a way that is surprising or difficult to understand. It can also describe something that seems to have a supernatural character or origin. // The child has an uncanny ability to recognize streets and locations she's seen only once or twice before. // The noise suddenly stopped, and an uncanny silence filled the room. See the entry > Examples: "Having reinvented contemporary circus as an aesthetically ambitious artform, the company here demonstrates ... what can be achieved when uncanny acrobatic prowess meets the poised spatial intelligence of contemporary dance and the intensities of physical theatre." — Andrew Fuhrmann, Cameron Woodhead, and Jessica Nicholas, The Age (Melbourne, Australia), 10 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Uncanny describes that which unsettles us, such as disquieting observations, or mysterious situations and circumstances. Strip the word of its common negating prefix, though, and you're left with canny, a word that shares semantic territory with clever and prudent. While canny and uncanny don't appear to be antonyms, they both come from an early Scottish word canny meaning “free from risk; wise, prudent, cautious.” And in Scottish, canny has for centuries had a secondary meaning that correlates better to its mysterious cousin: the Oxford English Dictionary reports that the word is used in negative constructions to describe what is not safe to be involved with, or more broadly, what is not in accordance with what is right or natural. Rather uncanny.

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    352 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 7 | Word #6 - Distribute

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 5:47


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 7

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 26, 2022 is: fetter • FET-er • noun A fetter is a chain or shackle for the feet. Fetter is also used figuratively to refer to something that confines or restrains someone in some way. // John keeps his smartphone with him when he goes hiking, but Linda leaves hers at home, preferring to free herself temporarily of the fetters of technology. See the entry > Examples: "The Alaska Constitution was written by a months-long gathering of 55 elected men and women in Fairbanks during the winter of 1955-1956. … They wanted a legislature free of the fetters that hobbled the older state governments—restraints that had prompted a nationwide outcry for constitutional reform in the years prior to the Alaska Constitutional Convention." — Gordon Harrison, The Fairbanks (Alaska) Daily News-Miner, 24 Apr. 2022 Did you know? While now used as a more general term for something that confines or restrains, fetter was originally applied specifically to a chain or shackle for the feet. Not surprisingly, the word's Old English ancestor, feter, is etymologically shackled to fōt, the Old English ancestor of foot. Fetter is also used as a verb with meanings that correspond to the noun's meanings: a prisoner can be fettered literally, and a person can feel fettered by obligations or responsibilities.

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    351 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 7 | Word #5 - Distraught

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 5:20


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 7

    French Your Way Podcast: Learn French with Jessica | French Grammar | French Vocabulary | French Expressions

    Listener Nancy would like to clarify when “ne” can be dropped in French. When is it possible to deliberately forget this common 2-letter word? Is there any change in the meaning? Listen to find out! Vocabulary and Spelling of the French Words mentioned in this episode Je n'aime pas quand tu fumes = j'aime pas… Read More → The post FYW 244 : When is “ne” optional in French ? appeared first on French Your Way.

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 25, 2022 is: benevolent • buh-NEV-uh-lunt • adjective Benevolent means "kind and generous," or less commonly, "organized for the purpose of doing good." // The event's reception was courtesy of a benevolent anonymous donor. // They belong to several benevolent societies and charitable organizations. See the entry > Examples: "I want to thank the benevolent stranger who found my keys and reunited me with them after seven months." — Curt Vazquez, letter in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 16 May 2022 Did you know? One who is benevolent genuinely wishes other people well, a meaning reflected clearly in the word's Latin roots: benevolent comes from bene, meaning "good," and velle, meaning "to wish." Other descendants of velle in English include volition, which refers to the power to make one's own choices or decisions, and voluntary, as well as the rare velleity, meaning either "the lowest degree of volition" or "a slight wish or tendency." A more familiar velle descendant stands directly opposed to benevolent: malevolent describes someone or something having or showing a desire to cause harm to another person.

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    350 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 7 | Word #4 - Distort

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 5:46


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 7

    Spanish Lessons With Pablo - Learn Spanish.
    Spanish Vocabulary & Phrases Episode 21. Learn Spanish With Pablo.

    Spanish Lessons With Pablo - Learn Spanish.

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 10:34


    Spanish Vocabulary & Phrases Episode 21. Learn Spanish With Pablo Subscribe for all content on Spotify/Anchor: https://anchor.fm/learn-spanish-with-pablo/subscribe Visit https://www.learnspanishwithpablo.com for more. My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/freespanishtutorials --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/learn-spanish-with-pablo/message

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 24, 2022 is: dander • DAN-der • noun Dander is a synonym of dandruff and is also used to refer to anger or temper, especially in the phrase "get someone's dander up." // Some people are allergic to pet dander. // The customer's disrespectful attitude got the waitstaff's dander up. See the entry > Examples: "Unlike traditional vacuum cleaners made to handle a wider range of different messes, these next-level vacuums for pet hair are engineered to sweep away all of the stubborn pet fur…, allowing you to quickly de-fuzz your stuff and keep dander under control." — Korin Miller, The Daily Beast, 8 Apr. 2022 Did you know? How did dander acquire its "temper" sense? There are several theories, though the evidence is inconclusive. It has been proposed that the meaning comes from the image of an angry person tearing out their hair by the fistful, scattering dandruff in the process. Some think it comes from a West Indian word dander, which refers to a kind of ferment and suggests "rising" anger (in English, ferment can mean "a state of unrest or excitement"). Others have suggested that the "anger" sense comes from the Dutch phrase op donderen, meaning "to burst into a sudden rage."

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 24, 2022 is: dander • DAN-der • noun Dander is a synonym of dandruff and is also used to refer to anger or temper, especially in the phrase "get someone's dander up." // Some people are allergic to pet dander. // The customer's disrespectful attitude got the waitstaff's dander up. See the entry > Examples: "Unlike traditional vacuum cleaners made to handle a wider range of different messes, these next-level vacuums for pet hair are engineered to sweep away all of the stubborn pet fur…, allowing you to quickly de-fuzz your stuff and keep dander under control." — Korin Miller, The Daily Beast, 8 Apr. 2022 Did you know? How did dander acquire its "temper" sense? There are several theories, though the evidence is inconclusive. It has been proposed that the meaning comes from the image of an angry person tearing out their hair by the fistful, scattering dandruff in the process. Some think it comes from a West Indian word dander, which refers to a kind of ferment and suggests "rising" anger (in English, ferment can mean "a state of unrest or excitement"). Others have suggested that the "anger" sense comes from the Dutch phrase op donderen, meaning "to burst into a sudden rage."

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    349 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 7 | Word #3 - Dissent

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 5:55


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 7

    How to Spanish Podcast
    Episodio 196: Amor internacional (ft. La Chica de Quebec)

    How to Spanish Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 27:47


    Algunas personas aprenden español por diversión, viajes o trabajo, pero Myriam aprendió español porque se casó con un mexicano y se mudaron a México. En este episodio que es una mezcla de un episodio normal + un episodio de la serie "Inspiración para hablar español", vamos a escuchar la historia de Myriam y Samuel ❤️

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 23, 2022 is: mercurial • mer-KYUR-ee-ul • adjective Mercurial means "changing often" or "characterized by rapid and unpredictable changeableness of mood." It can also mean "having qualities of eloquence, ingenuity, or thievishness attributed to the god Mercury or to the influence of the planet Mercury." // The boss has a mercurial temperament when at jobsites but she was relaxed and happy at the company picnic. // The iconic brand has somehow always managed to maintain its esteemed position in the mercurial fashion world. See the entry > Examples: "But Cabrera was the definition of mercurial. He might be yelling at the top of his lungs, playfully arguing with a teammate, then quickly turn sullen when approached by a reporter." — Carlos Monarrez, The Detroit Free Press, 26 Apr. 2022 Did you know? The Roman god Mercury was the messenger and herald of the gods and also the god of merchants and thieves (his counterpart in Greek mythology is Hermes). He was noted for his eloquence, swiftness, and cunning, and the Romans named what appeared to them to be the fastest-moving planet in his honor. Mercurial comes from the Latin adjective mercurialis, meaning "of or relating to Mercury."

    FYI - For Your Inglés
    FYI - Central Park (bonus audio)

    FYI - For Your Inglés

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 28:12


     We are going to take a long leisurely stroll through this lush lung smack dab in the center of NYC. Aside from being one of New York's top tourist attractions, it's also a lifeline where you can leave the hectic hustle and bustle of New York's busy streets behind. Join me as we go off the beaten path and stroll around stunning Central Park on today's episode of FYI! Support the show

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    348 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 7 | Word #2 - Disseminate

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 6:45


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 7

    You too can learn Thai
    88: Winter in Thailand (2) - Learn Thai grammar and vocabulary with a story and practicing Thai listening comprehension

    You too can learn Thai

    Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 27:53


    Unlock premium episodes: https://anchor.fm/learnthai/subscribe Tutorial for member subscription: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1n-tZKW76sT7ULyvOVdH7_3NcPpbWmXRAzIZp7T0_rUM/edit?usp=sharing The payment is processed by Anchor which is part of Spotify, so your info is safe :) ** Facebook: www.facebook.com/youtoocanlearnthai YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/YoutoocanlearnThai Khru Nan's books: https://viewauthor.at/KhruNan Amazon affiliate links: Use our link to go to Amazon homepage before you shop. USA: https://amzn.to/37OqSN3 UK: https://amzn.to/3dOdIU8 France: https://amzn.to/3wvTAfR Japan: https://amzn.to/348UD99 *** Merch (shirts and phone grips): USA: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1EZF44ILW1L5N UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/hz/wishlist/ls/14ESIQA0SZ5LL Germany: https://www.amazon.de/hz/wishlist/ls/219DDRPHY347Y *** ช่วงหน้าหนาวในประเทศไทย อุณหภูมิในแต่ละภาคจะไม่ค่อยเหมือนกันนะคะ อย่างเช่น ภาคเหนือจะหนาวกว่าภาคอื่น ๆ ในช่วงที่หนาวที่สุด อุณหภูมิจะอยู่ที่ประมาณ 10 องศาเซสเซียส หรือ 50 องศาฟาเรนไฮต์ค่ะ ส่วนภาคกลางจะไม่ค่อยหนาวมาก ในช่วงที่หนาวที่สุด อุณหภูมิจะอยู่ที่ประมาณ 15 องศาเซสเซียส หรือ 60 องศาฟาเรนไฮต์ค่ะ กิจกรรมที่คนไทยชอบทำในช่วงหน้าหนาวก็คือไปเที่ยวค่ะ คนที่อยู่ภาคกลางหรือภาคใต้ก็จะชอบไปเที่ยวที่ภาคเหนือ ไปสัมผัสอากาศเย็น ๆ ไปแคมป์ปิงบนภูเขา ไปนอนดูดาวค่ะ ส่วนคนที่อยู่ภาคเหนือแต่ไม่ชอบอากาศหนาว ก็จะชอบไปเที่ยวทะเลที่ภาคใต้ค่ะ เพราะว่าช่วงหน้าหนาว ภาคใต้อากาศกำลังดี ไม่ร้อนมาก ไม่หนาวมาก แต่ว่าที่ทะเลอาจจะมีพายุ ก็ต้องระวังกันด้วยนะคะ

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 22, 2022 is: galumph • guh-LUMF • verb Galumph means "to move with a clumsy heavy tread." // After long days at his landscaping job, their teenage son galumphs into the house and flings himself onto the couch, sighing heavily. See the entry > Examples: "One moment he'd be pitter-pattering…; the next he'd be whirling and galumphing about the stage." — Jeffrey Gantz, The Boston Globe, 8 Feb. 2022 Did you know? Bump, thump, thud. There's no doubt about it—when someone or something galumphs onto the scene, ears take notice. Galumph first lumbered onto the English scene in 1872 when Lewis Carroll used the word to describe the actions of the vanquisher of the Jabberwock in Through the Looking Glass: "He left it dead, and with its head / He went galumphing back." Carroll likely constructed the word by splicing gallop and triumphant (galumph did in its earliest uses convey a sense of exultant bounding). Other 19th-century writers must have liked the sound of galumph, because they began plying it in their own prose, and it has been clumping around our language ever since.

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    347 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 7 | Word #1 - Dissemble

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 7:01


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 7

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 21, 2022 is: paradox • PAIR-uh-dahks • noun Paradox refers to a statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true. It can also refer to something or someone having seemingly contradictory qualities or phases. // The statement "less is more" is a common paradox. // It is a paradox that computers need time-consuming updates so often since they are meant to save people time. See the entry > Examples: "Demand for semiconductors has never been higher…. Yet chip stocks are one of the worst-performing sectors in the U.S. market this year. That paradox reflects the cliff that investors see looming for the economy and the stock market...." — Subrat Patnaik and Jeran Wittenstein, Bloomberg, 12 Apr. 2022 Did you know? The ancient Greeks were well aware that a paradox can take us outside our usual way of thinking. They combined the prefix para- ("beyond" or "outside of") with the verb dokein ("to think"), forming paradoxos, an adjective meaning "contrary to expectation." Latin speakers used that word as the basis for a noun paradoxum, which English speakers borrowed during the 1500s to create paradox.

    Learn Spanish with Live Lingua
    1.10: Vocabulary – Family Members

    Learn Spanish with Live Lingua

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 2:06


    For better or worse, we may actually have to introduce members of our family to the people we meet in Latin America or in Spain — this may be more embarrassing for some than for others! Here at Live Lingua, we're going to teach you the basic vocabularly words you need to do so. Say them out loud, both in English and Spanish — we promise, it will help you memorize the terms. Without further ado, let's get started with the practice. After listening, try the practice episodes here in this blog post. Don't forget to subscribe here, rate 5 stars, and leave a review!

    Study with Andrea
    TOEFL Advanced Vocabulary

    Study with Andrea

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 6:43


    Welcome to the TOEFL with Andrea podcast where I help you earn your dream score on the TOEFL. Today's lesson, like every Friday, is focused on expanding your vocabulary quickly. We'll look at another 15 advanced vocabulary words to help you expand your vocabulary.English vocabulary is critical for success on the TOEFL exam... that's why I'm giving you my Advanced  Vocabulary Course (normally $69) for free when you purchase the TOEFL video course. You'll get all of the video lessons, audio files, quizzes, and downloadable PDF from the course. This includes over 200 advanced vocabulary words... simply visit StudyWithAndrea.com/200 to learn more.Happy learning, AndreaSupport the show

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 20, 2022 is: ad hoc • AD-HOCK • adjective Ad hoc means "concerned with a particular end or purpose" or "formed or used for specific or immediate problems or needs." // An ad hoc committee was formed to investigate the matter. // There was an unexpected change of plans and ad hoc solutions had to be made. See the entry > Examples: "The council voted unanimously last fall to establish an ad hoc advisory strategic planning board tasked with writing a new long-range plan for the town." — Jodie Wagner, The Palm Beach (Florida) Daily News, 12 Apr. 2022 Did you know? In Latin ad hoc literally means "for this," and in English it describes anything that can be thought of as existing "for this purpose only." For example, an ad hoc committee is generally authorized to look into a single matter of limited scope, not to pursue any issue of interest. Ad hoc can also be used as an adverb meaning "for the particular end or case at hand without consideration of wider application," as in "decisions were made ad hoc."

    FYI - For Your Inglés
    FYI - London

    FYI - For Your Inglés

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 27:03


    Whether you've been to this legendary lavish location with lackluster weather, or have simply seen it on the silver screen. This historically happening cultural and commercial center is crammed with charisma, from its cabs to its clock towers. Pick up a pint, mate, and join me as we peruse lively London on this week's episode of FYI!Support the show

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    346 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 6 | Word #30 - Disrupt

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 3:14


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 6

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 19, 2022 is: kibosh • KYE-bosh • noun Kibosh refers to something that serves as a check or stop. It is usually used in the phrase "put the kibosh on." // The rain put the kibosh on the Fourth of July fireworks display. See the entry > Examples: "The state Senate last week put the kibosh on up to $60 million more in aid for school districts." — Kevin Landrigan, The (Manchester) New Hampshire Sunday News, 24 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Evidence of kibosh dates the word to only a few years before Charles Dickens used it in an 1836 sketch, but despite kibosh being relatively young in English its source is elusive. Claims were once made that it was Yiddish, despite the absence of a plausible Yiddish source. Another hypothesis pointed to Irish caidhp bhais, literally, "coif (or cap) of death," explained as headgear a judge put on when pronouncing a death sentence, or as a covering pulled over the face of a corpse when a coffin was closed. But evidence for any metaphorical use of this phrase in Irish is lacking, and kibosh is not recorded in English as spoken in Ireland until decades after Dickens' use. More recent source theories include a heraldic term for an animal's head when born with only its face fully showing, and an Arabic word meaning “whip, lash,” but as the note at our etymology explains, no theory has sufficient evidence to back it.

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    345 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 6 | Word #29 - Disproportionate

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 2:48


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 6

    THE Leadership Japan Series by Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo,  Japan
    464: Sixteen Communication Success Principles For Leaders

    THE Leadership Japan Series by Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo, Japan

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 13:39


    “Yeah, I'm a good communicator”, we say to ourselves, but that proposition is rarely seasoned with some solid self-awareness.  We blandly make this type of statement because we see communication as a one direction process, where we are telling someone, something which is important to us.  Being perpetually time poor, we abbreviate complex ideas into “headlines” devoid of the sustaining background and context. Try gauging your actual communication abilities against these sixteen principles to see how you really stack up.   Understand your own and your listeners' assumptions, viewpoints and attitudes and harmonise both.We tend to make comments without much reflection, either about why we think what we do or considering how the other person might receive the content. Build an open and creative culture where “a hundred flowers bloom and a thousand schools contend”.In modern business, bosses no longer are all knowing or have a monopoly on good ideas. Being open to subordinates ideas and thinking requires boss inner strength and confidence, which is why the idea is not popular with weak leaders. Listen first for what is not being said, as well as listening to how things are unfolding, before you proffer advice, information or insight.Being really heard by the boss is a fundamental requirement if staff are to be motivated to do their best. Communicate on the same wave length as your team members.Vocabulary and grammatical structures used can be blockers to good understanding amongst native speakers and become steel barriers to understanding for non-native speakers. Creative endeavours should use a broad net to involve our people and require throwing hierarchy, status and power out of the window. Massive boss listening and tremendous restraint before speaking unearths a rich tapestry of subordinate potential. Empathetic listening is at the highest level. It means we are listening with our eyes and sensing with our hearts, the how of what is being said and constantly searching for what is not being shared. The articulate are few and ramblers many, but as the boss we have to fairly divine and parse whatever is offered by our team members. Leader communication is never conducted in a vacuum.There is always a context at play and we have to be self-aware of what is going on inside of us during the act. How the leader communicates is within the framework of the culture of the organisation and the leader creates that culture.If that culture is built on trust for and confidence in the leader, then the team will receive it honestly. Trust in what the boss says is built up layer by layer, based on consistency of message, follow through, transparency and personal integrity. Boss communication is a combination of the energy they radiate, the actions they take and the sincerity of their intentions.All of these elements are being transmitted without any words being spoken, every second of the day, every day. Formal funnels of communication are never superior to the grapevine.Leaders know they cannot allow a vacuum of information to exist otherwise rumours, fake news and dissembling take over.The correct messages must be constantly and continuously communicated in order for them to replace the wrong messages. Feeling the feelings of subordinates is not easy, but it is deep communication and allows the boss to fully tune in to what is important for them. Anger, disappointment, rage, irritability are boss communication drivers we have to stop before they get started.These communication sparks are selfish, inwardly focused and often immediately regretted, however it is too late once they have been unleashed.Suspend your inner turmoil and “speak to others as they want to be spoken to” is a good rule. “There is only one way and that is my way” is an out of date boss concept.The leader seeks to understand the subordinate first where they are coming from and what is important to them.In that frame, the decisions the boss take are more likely to be the right ones.   So how did you go?  These types of lists can be confronting and also revealing.  When we do serious self-reflection about ourselves as communicators in leadership positions, we realise how much we take for granted on the part of the listener.  We haven't told them the why but somehow we imagine that is magically taking place.  It isn't and we cannot be satisfied with the situation or expect that the listener has to improve and do better.  The source of poor communication or wasted communication will be us and we are the ones who have to fix it.  These sixteen principles are painful reminders that we are not perfect as the leader and have a long way to go before we can say “yeah, I'm a good communicator”.

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 18, 2022 is: indoctrinate • in-DAHK-truh-nayt • verb Indoctrinate means "to teach (someone) to fully accept the ideas, opinions, and beliefs of a particular group and to not consider other ideas, opinions, and beliefs." // The goal of the professor is to teach politics, rather than to indoctrinate students with a narrow set of political beliefs. See the entry > Examples: "Moreover, in a pluralistic society, parents from varied backgrounds want to know their children can receive a public education without being indoctrinated into a faith not their own." — David Callaway, The Parsons (Kansas) Sun, 26 Dec. 2020 Did you know? Indoctrinate means "brainwash" to many people, but its meaning isn't always so negative. When the verb first appeared in English in the 17th century, it simply meant "to teach"—a meaning linked closely to its source, the Latin verb docēre, which also means "to teach." (Other offspring of docēre include docile, doctor, document, and, of course, doctrine). By the 19th century, indoctrinate was being used in the sense of teaching someone to fully accept only the ideas, opinions, and beliefs of a particular group.

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    344 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 6 | Word #28 - Dispose

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 2:49


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 6

    Learn French | FrenchPod101.com
    Can Do French for Absolute Beginners #104 - How to Talk About Your Nationality - Vocabulary and Review

    Learn French | FrenchPod101.com

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 3:16


    review the vocabulary that is useful when talking about your nationality

    The ESL Teaching Podcast
    21.How to pre-teach vocabulary in the mainstream classroom

    The ESL Teaching Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 19:53


    To us EL teachers, vocabulary pre-teaching is our daily bread, but I received a question from one of the content area teachers that made me think…what comes naturally to us, does not necessarily make immediate sense to our colleagues.I recently saw a post from a science teacher tasked with teaching English Newcomers and suggested a list of ideas, one being pre-teaching vocabulary. But, how do you pre-teach vocabulary in a mainstream classroom? Today's episode addresses this question and more.Why is pre-teaching vocabulary good for all learners?There are 3 tiers of words we talk about in EL instruction: Tier 1, or everyday, words, Tier 2, or frequently used words that show up across content areas, and Tier 3, or subject specific words. Pre-teaching, particularly tier 2 words, is important for access to the academics and equity. All students are building their vocabulary and ability to communicate their ideas and building confidence in demonstrating their content knowledge.What you will hear in this episode:What vocabulary pre-teaching isThe reasons why it is so important to pre-teach vocabulary in the mainstream classroomThe steps that can be taken to pre-teach vocabularyHow pre-teaching vocabulary will benefit all students not just the language learnersResourcesAs mentioned in the episode, I am linking some useful resources!The ESL Teaching Roadmap – membership community for middle and high school ESL/ELL teachers. As a thank you for listening, use code ESLPODCAST for 10% off when you join. 25 Authentic Speaking Activities for Your ESL ClassroomSimply Ieva ESL Teachers Pay Teachers StoreTeachable Platform - Courses and WorkshopsFollow me on Instagram Join the Simply Ieva Facebook Group You may also be interested in:Sample vocabulary slide - Google SlidesEpisode 14 - Vocabulary for ESL Students

    Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
    Ryan Busse and Tim Wise Episode 605

    Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 81:00


    Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more   Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Ryan Busse is a former firearms executive who helped build one of the world's most iconic gun companies, and was nominated multiple times by industry colleagues for the prestigious Shooting Industry Person of The Year Award. Busse is an environmental advocate who served in many leadership roles for conservation organizations, including as an advisor for the United States Senate Sportsmen's Caucus and the Biden Presidential Campaign. He remains a proud outdoorsman, gun owner, father, and resident of Montana. About the book.... A long-time former executive at one of the country's top gun manufacturers reveals how his industry radicalized a large swathe of America, and explains how it must change before we can reduce gun violence and heal as a nation. Ryan Busse has traveled a long, circuitous path along the American gun journey. As an avid hunter, outdoorsman, and conservationist–all things that the firearms industry was built on–he rose to the highest ranks of the rapidly growing, multibillion-dollar firearms industry. But replacing self-imposed decency with rampant fear-mongering, racism, hardline conservative politics, massive profits from semi-automatic weapons sales, and McCarthyesque policing have driven Busse to do something few other gun executives have done: he's ending his 30-year career in the industry to tell its secrets. He watched the industry change from its smaller, less corporate and far-less-powerful form to the partisan, power-hungry entity it is today. He thought he could go up against the power of the industry from within, and over the years had made small inroads toward sensible gun ownership and use. But that's simply not possible anymore. This book is an insider's call-out, a voice-driven tale of personal transformation, and a fast ride through wild times and colorful characters that populate a much-speculated-about, but little-known industry. It's also a story of how authoritarianism spreads in the guise of freedom, how voicing one's conscience becomes an act of treason in a culture that demands sameness and loyalty. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Follow and Support Gareth Sever  Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 17, 2022 is: nonpareil • nahn-puh-REL • adjective Nonpareil means "having no equal." // The singer's stunning performance was nonpareil. See the entry > Examples: "A multitasker nonpareil, he is a musician, actor, director, author, artist, poet, playwright and composer, not to mention a self-styled pierogi-making king…." — Bill Brownstein, The Gazette (Montreal, Canada), 5 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Trace nonpareil back to its Middle French origins and you'll find that it comes from a term meaning "not equal." Pareil itself comes from a Latin par, which means "equal," and non- is a common prefix meaning "not." In addition to its adjectival use, nonpareil also functions as a noun describing an individual of unequaled excellence ("the nonpareil of cellists"), and as the name of a chocolate candy disk covered with small sugar pellets. A full exploration of the word's history, and its current functions in French, can be found here.

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    343 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 6 | Word #27 - Disparate

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 2:33


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 6

    How to Spanish Podcast
    Episodio 195: Locuras mexicanas [ft. Mextalki]

    How to Spanish Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 26:01


    Go Natural English Podcast | Listening & Speaking Lessons
    Essential Travel Vocabulary – Improve Your English

    Go Natural English Podcast | Listening & Speaking Lessons

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 16:13


    It's so much fun to travel, practice your English, and learn new things! Traveling is a lot easier if you know some essential English travel vocabulary. These are words you really need to know before you go! ✈️

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 16, 2022 is: epithet • EP-uh-thet • noun An epithet is "a characterizing word or phrase that accompanies, or occurs in place of, the name of a person or thing" or "a disparaging or abusive word or phrase." // Richard the First is frequently referred to by the epithet "Lionheart." // The school's policy makes it clear that derogatory epithets will not be tolerated. See the entry > Examples: "Seeing the [Combat Veterans motorcycle club] holding American Flags … brings back a lot of patriotic emotions. WWII vets are part of what has been referred to as 'The Greatest Generation.' I wonder what the epithet will be for our current generation." — Stephen Rowland, The Daily Herald (Columbia, Tennessee), 23 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Nowadays, epithet is usually used negatively, with the meaning "a disparaging word or phrase," but it wasn't always that way. Epithet comes from Greek epitithenai, meaning "to put on" or "to add." In its oldest sense, epithet is simply a descriptive word or phrase, especially one joined by fixed association to the name of someone or something, as in "Ivan the Great" or the Homeric phrase "wine-dark sea."

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    342 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 6 | Word #26 - Dismal

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 3:01


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 6

    You too can learn Thai
    87: Winter in Thailand (1) ฤดูหนาวในประเทศไทย - Learn Thai vocabulary, culture, and listen to a story

    You too can learn Thai

    Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 24:06


    Donate: https://anchor.fm/learnthai/support *** Amazon affiliate links: Use our link to go to Amazon homepage before you shop. USA: https://amzn.to/37OqSN3 UK: https://amzn.to/3dOdIU8 France: https://amzn.to/3wvTAfR Japan: https://amzn.to/348UD99 *** Thai alphabet book and activity books: https://viewauthor.at/khrunan *** Merch (shirts and phone grips): USA: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1EZF44ILW1L5N UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/hz/wishlist/ls/14ESIQA0SZ5LL Germany: https://www.amazon.de/hz/wishlist/ls/219DDRPHY347Y *** Facebook: www.facebook.com/youtoocanlearnthai YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/YoutoocanlearnThai *** ช่วงหน้าหนาวในประเทศไทย อุณหภูมิในแต่ละภาคจะไม่ค่อยเหมือนกันนะคะ อย่างเช่น ภาคเหนือจะหนาวกว่าภาคอื่น ๆ ในช่วงที่หนาวที่สุด อุณหภูมิจะอยู่ที่ประมาณ 10 องศาเซสเซียส หรือ 50 องศาฟาเรนไฮต์ค่ะ ส่วนภาคกลางจะไม่ค่อยหนาวมาก ในช่วงที่หนาวที่สุด อุณหภูมิจะอยู่ที่ประมาณ 15 องศาเซสเซียส หรือ 60 องศาฟาเรนไฮต์ค่ะ กิจกรรมที่คนไทยชอบทำในช่วงหน้าหนาวก็คือไปเที่ยวค่ะ คนที่อยู่ภาคกลางหรือภาคใต้ก็จะชอบไปเที่ยวที่ภาคเหนือ ไปสัมผัสอากาศเย็น ๆ ไปแคมป์ปิงบนภูเขา ไปนอนดูดาวค่ะ ส่วนคนที่อยู่ภาคเหนือแต่ไม่ชอบอากาศหนาว ก็จะชอบไปเที่ยวทะเลที่ภาคใต้ค่ะ เพราะว่าช่วงหน้าหนาว ภาคใต้อากาศกำลังดี ไม่ร้อนมาก ไม่หนาวมาก แต่ว่าที่ทะเลอาจจะมีพายุ ก็ต้องระวังกันด้วยนะคะ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/learnthai/support

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 15, 2022 is: hark back • HAHRK-BAK • verb Hark back means "to turn back to an earlier topic or circumstance" or "to go back to something as an origin or source." // The sisters' stories hark back to the good old days of their youth. // The diner's interior harks back to the 1950s. See the entry > Examples: "This can be a fun pastime that harks back to childhood…. Simply collect a range of leaves on a woodland walk, then place a piece of paper over them and rub a crayon across the page. The imprint of the leaf, with all its intricate veins, will show through, allowing you to appreciate all its details that might usually pass you by." — Rebecca Thair, Happiful, 24 Apr. 2022 Did you know? Hark, a very old word meaning "to listen," was used as a cry in hunting. The master of the hunt might cry "Hark! Forward!" or "Hark! Back!" The cries became set phrases, both as nouns and verbs. Thus, a "hark back" was a retracing of a route by dogs and hunters, and to "hark back" was to turn back along the path. From its use in hunting, the verb soon acquired its current figurative meanings. The variants hearken and harken (also very old words meaning “to listen”) are also used, with and without back, as synonyms of hark back.

    FYI - For Your Inglés
    FYI - Las Vegas (bonus audio)

    FYI - For Your Inglés

    Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 29:35


    Calling all high rollers: So much is at stake in this sizzling oasis know as sin city. Whether you want to sink into slots, roll the dice, be dazzled by the spectacular shows and awesome attractions, or just blow off some steam, there's no place like it! Jackpot! We are going to cruise the strip and see the lavish lights of Las Vegas on today's FYI.Support the show

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
    341 : Daily English Vocabulary - Book 6 | Word #25 - Dislodge

    Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 3:27


    In today's episode, you will learn a new English vocabulary word. You will also hear a story related to today's vocabulary word. This episode will give you the vocabulary you need to sound more like a native English speaker.GET YOUR Ebook | Daily English Vocabulary Book 6

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 14, 2022 is: verdant • VER-dunt • adjective Verdant means "green in tint or color," "green with growing plants," or "unripe in experience or judgment." // The golf course is noted for its tricky hazards and lush, verdant borders along its fairways. See the entry > Examples: "Vermont is famous for its verdant summer landscapes and postcard-worthy fall colors. But it's the Green Mountain State's winter landscape that truly sparks my photographic eye." — Caleb Kenna, The New York Times, 26 Mar. 2022 Did you know? English speakers have been using verdant as a ripe synonym of green since at least the 16th century, and as a descriptive term for inexperienced or naïve people since the 19th century. (By contrast, the more experienced green has colored our language since well before the 12th century, and was first applied to inexperienced people in the 16th century.) Verdant comes from the Old French word for "green," vert, which itself is from Latin virēre, meaning "to show green growth" or "to be green." Today, vert is used in English as a word for green forest vegetation and the heraldic color green. A related word is virescent, meaning "beginning to be green."

    The Allusionist
    154. Objectivity

    The Allusionist

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 30:53


    Couple of easy straightforward questions for us to chew on: 1. What is ‘objectivity' supposed to mean? And 2. does it exist? Lewis Raven Wallace, a journalist and audiomaker fired from his public radio job over his blog post entitled ‘Objectivity is dead and I'm okay with it', considers the principals and practice of objectivity, and what might be fairer ones. Find out more information about the topics in this episode at theallusionist.org/objectivity, plus a transcript and the full dictionary entry for the randomly selected word. Sign up to be a patron at patreon.com/allusionist and not only are you supporting independent podcast, you get fortnightly patron-exclusive video livestreams and a Discord community full of language chat, craft pics and word game camaraderie. The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow.  The Allusionist is produced by me, Helen Zaltzman. The music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs via palebirdmusic.com. Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Bombas, whose mission is to make the comfiest clothes ever, and match every item sold with an equal item donated. Go to bombas.com/allusionist to get 20% off your first purchase. • Tab For a Cause: turn your browsing into charity fundraising at tabforacause.org/allusionist. • Squarespace, your one-stop shop for building and running a sleek website. Go to squarespace.com/allusionist for a free 2-week trial, and get 10 percent off your first purchase of a website or domain with the code allusionist.  Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.