Podcasts about Webster

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Best podcasts about Webster

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Latest podcast episodes about Webster

372 Pages We'll Never Get Back
Episode #126 – Super Constitution Ep 1 – Octopus Tentacles

372 Pages We'll Never Get Back

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 143:47


Support the podcast on Patreon to get every episode early, hear our recent live show from Minneapolis, and more great stuff! patreon.com/372pages Webster's defines “insane” as THIS BOOK! Find out how a book titled SUPER CONSTITUTION is hornier than The Mister, Susan Fletcher, and a Moon People date at Red Lobster combined. We'll also meet (and then … Continue reading "Episode #126 – Super Constitution Ep 1 – Octopus Tentacles"

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 8, 2022 is: crepuscular • krih-PUHSS-kyuh-ler • adjective Crepuscular means "of, relating to, or resembling twilight." It is also used in zoological contexts to describe creatures that are active during twilight, or to the activities of such creatures. // As evening came on, fireflies began to appear in the crepuscular gloaming. See the entry > Examples: "Cardinals, a crepuscular species, follow their own schedule, eating an early breakfast and a stylishly late dinner. They will break that schedule on very cold days." — Jim Williams, The Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota), 16 Feb. 2022 Did you know? The early Romans had two words for the twilight. Crepusculum was favored by Roman writers for the half-light of evening, just after the sun sets; diluculum was reserved for morning twilight, just before the sun rises—it is related to lucidus, meaning "bright." We didn't embrace either of these Latin nouns as substitutes for our word twilight, but we did form the adjective crepuscular in the 17th century. The word's zoological sense, relating to animals that are most active at twilight, developed in the 19th century.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
eminently

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 1:28 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 7, 2022 is: eminently • EM-uh-nunt-lee • adverb Eminently is used as a synonym of very and means “to a high degree.” // All three outfielders are eminently capable of making an All-Star-caliber catch to help their team. See the entry > Examples: “As far as tequila goes, blancos are by far my favorite. And not without good reason: They're eminently drinkable—whether in cocktails, on the rocks, or neat.” — Karla Alindahao, Forbes, 2 May 2022 Did you know? When British physician Tobias Venner wrote in 1620 of houses "somewhat eminently situated," he meant that the houses were literally located in a high place. That use has since slipped into obsolescence, as has the word's use to mean "conspicuously"—a sense that reflects its Latin root, ēminēre, which means "to stick out" or “protrude.” The figurative sense of “notably” or “very” that is prominent today was likely a new development when Venner was writing.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
adjudicate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 1:32 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 6, 2022 is: adjudicate • uh-JOO-dih-kayt • verb To adjudicate a dispute between parties is to make an official decision about which party is right. Adjudicate is also used to mean "to act as judge." // The case will be adjudicated in the state courts. // The property title cannot be transferred until a case concerning the affected rights of way is adjudicated. See the entry > Examples: "The request sought to move the trial to another location or bring an outside jury to adjudicate it." — Lydia Morrell, The Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Journal Sentinel, 20 June 2022 Did you know? Adjudicate, which is usually used to mean "to make an official decision about who is right in a dispute," is one of several terms that give testimony to the influence of jus, the Latin word for "law," on our legal language. Others include judgment, judicial, prejudice, jury, justice, injury, and perjury. What's the verdict? Latin "law" words frequently preside in English-speaking courtrooms.

Music Production Podcast
#278: What Do You Really Want with Robert Webster

Music Production Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 89:24 Very Popular


Robert Webster has been producing music and DJing since 1993, as RobJamWeb. Robert hit it big with a track called "Everybody" in 1999 and has since been releasing music and sharing his knowledge on his YouTube channel. Robert spoke about his work and the troubles he encountered with success when one of his tracks hit the charts and MTV. He discussed openly how his freedom from success has allowed him to find and pursue his musical passions. Listen on iTunes or Stitcher or Google Play or Spotify; watch on YouTube Show Notes: Robert's Official Site - https://www.waxadisc.com YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/waxadiscmusic Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/waxadiscmusic/ Everybody - https://youtu.be/oP--4ELAVug U-HE Tyrell Free VST Synthesizer - https://u-he.com/products/tyrelln6/ Brian Funk Links: My Website - https://brianfunk.com Intro Music Made with One Knob FX Ableton Live Pack - https://brianfunk.com/blog/one-knob Music Production Club - https://brianfunk.com/mpc Music Production Podcast - https://brianfunk.com/podcast Save 25% on Ableton Live Packs at my store with the code: PODCAST - https://brianfunk.com/store Thank you for listening.  Please review the Music Production Podcast on your favorite podcast provider! And don't forget to visit my site https://BrianFunk.com for music production tutorials, videos, and sound packs. Brian Funk

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
heartstring

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 1:42 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 5, 2022 is: heartstring • HAHRT-string • noun Heartstring is used, usually in the plural, to refer to someone's deepest emotions or affections. // The movie's emotional ending really pulls at your heartstrings. See the entry > Examples: "You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll be amazed at the talent on stage. These six actresses definitely know how to effortlessly make you chuckle while also tugging at your heartstrings." — Paul Lockwood, The Northwest Herald (Crystal Lake, Illinois), 22 Jun. 2022 Did you know? Before a love song could tug at your heartstrings, the job was more likely to be accomplished by a surgeon: the word heartstring used to refer to a nerve believed to sustain the heart. You might recognize the word's second syllable in hamstring, which refers to both a group of tendons at the back of the knee and to any of three muscles at the backs of the upper legs. It's also apparent in a rare dialect term for the Achilles tendon: heel string. And in light of these terms, it's not surprising to know that string itself was at one time used independently to refer to bodily cords like tendons and ligaments.

Ken Webster Jr
Rage Against the Vaccines Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 40:22


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: How Left Wing rock music has become hypocritical and contradictory Why are Texas Republican leaders behaving like Democrats? Do liberals regret bailing out the airlines?  Special guests Brandon Darby and Michael Quinn Sullivan

Ken Webster Jr
Rage Against the Vaccines Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 40:38


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: How Left Wing rock music has become hypocritical and contradictory Why are Texas Republican leaders behaving like Democrats? Do liberals regret bailing out the airlines?  Special guests Brandon Darby and Michael Quinn Sullivan

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
brackish

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 1:49 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 4, 2022 is: brackish • BRACK-ish • adjective Brackish is typically used to mean “somewhat salty,” and most often describes water or bodies of water, such as rivers, lakes, and estuaries. // The mangrove swamp is home to many species of plants and animals that thrive in brackish water. See the entry > Examples: “The Homosassa River is an estuarial waterway that flows through marine wetlands on the western edge of the Florida panhandle, turning brackish as it approaches the Gulf of Mexico.” — Marissa Grunes, Boston Review, 11 Feb. 2022 Did you know? When the word brackish first appeared in English in the 1500s, it simply meant "salty," as did its Dutch parent brak. (English speakers also adopted the synonymous brack from the same source but it gets very little use.) Then, as now, brackish was used to describe water that was a mixture of saltwater and freshwater, such as one encounters where a river meets the sea. Since that time, however, brackish has developed the additional meanings of "unpalatable" and "repulsive," presumably because of the oozy, mucky, and sometimes stinky (or stinkyish, if you prefer)—not just salty—qualities of coastal estuaries and swamps.

South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster
South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster

South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 126:15 Very Popular


The Garden Show | July 31, 2022

Ken Webster Jr
Brittney Griner Sentenced to 9 years in a Russian Prison Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 40:00


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Monkeypox invades Texas Paul Pelosi loves to party A local military veteran has his wheelchair stolen Houston business owners fighting back against crime 

Ken Webster Jr
Brittney Griner Sentenced to 9 years in a Russian Prison Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 39:48


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Monkeypox invades Texas Paul Pelosi loves to party A local military veteran has his wheelchair stolen Houston business owners fighting back against crime 

South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster
South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster

South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 129:31


The Garden Show | July 10, 2022

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 3, 2022 is: patina • puh-TEE-nuh • noun A patina is a usually green film that forms on copper and bronze that is exposed to moist air for an extended time. The word can also refer to a shiny or dark surface that over time forms naturally on something (such as wood or leather), or to a literal or figurative thin layer. // The town erected a statue in her honor, which over the years developed a seafoam green patina. // Although the winery is brand-new, it has been constructed and decorated to give it a patina of old-world quaintness. See the entry > Examples: "She has attracted a popular following for stories grounded in historical fact, adorned with a patina of romance and adventure." — Stephanie Parkyn, Canberra Times (Australia), 1 Jan. 2022 Did you know? When Italians began using patina in the 17th century to refer to the green film that forms on the surface of copper, they were drawing on Latin, in which patina means "a shallow dish." (Presumably, the Italian meaning developed from the observation of such film forming on copper dishes.) By the mid-18th century, English speakers were also calling the green film patina, and by the 20th century, they'd expanded the word's application to surface appearances of things that have grown more beautiful with age or use—think of an old wooden desk or a tarnished silver goblet. Use of the word to refer to thin layers both literal and figurative ("a patina of grime," "a patina of respectability") followed soon after.

GNBC Network
Whose Child Are You? | The Fundamentals Of Prayer | Words From The Word Podcast | Pastor Roderick Webster

GNBC Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 10:23


Connect with us and never miss a new episode: Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheGoodNewsBaptistChurchOfStMaarten Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gnbcnetwork Donate to the work: https://cxpay2fund.me/charity/online-church-services Life Blossom by Keys of Moon | https://soundcloud.com/keysofmoon Music promoted by https://www.chosic.com/free-music/all/ Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gnbc/message

The Terry & Jesse Show
03 Aug 22 – Merriam-Webster Has Altered Its Definition of “Female”

The Terry & Jesse Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 51:12


Today's Topics: 1) Gospel - MT 15:21-28 - “Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps that fall from the table of their masters.” Then Jesus said to her in reply, “O woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish.” And her daughter was healed from that hour. Bishop Sheen quote of the day 2) The Merriam-Webster Dictionary has altered its definition of the word “female” to include “having a gender identity that is the opposite of male.” “I thought Webster would redefine ‘woman' and then say that woman and female are not necessarily the same,” wrote commentator Matt Walsh. “But they went right for the most extreme rewrite, actually changing the biological definition of female” https://notthebee.com/article/merriam-webster-dictionary-changes-definition-of-female 3) Catholic 101: What about funerals for suicide victims? Father Reginald Martin writes about the sensitive subject. “The Fifth Commandment forbids all forms of murder, but we must leave to God's mercy the judgment of those who commit suicide.” https://www.simplycatholic.com/funerals-for-suicide-victims/ 4) Update with Church Militant on news as it relates to the Church & Culture

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
nebulous

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 1:47 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 2, 2022 is: nebulous • NEB-yuh-lus • adjective Nebulous is often used as a synonym of indistinct or vague, but can also be used to refer to something that is related to or that resembles a nebula. // Daniel's description of the film was so nebulous that I'm still not quite sure what it is about. See the entry > Examples: "Instead of promoting nebulous concepts of 'diplomacy,' we should turn to the principles of negotiations and focus on concrete questions." — Anastassia Fedyk, The Los Angeles Times, 12 June 2022 Did you know? Nebulous may sound other-worldly—after all, it's related to nebula, which refers to a distant galaxy or an interstellar cloud of gas or dust—but its mysteriousness is rooted in more earthly unknowns. Both words ultimately come from Latin nebula, meaning “mist, cloud,” and as far back as the 14th century nebulous could mean simply “cloudy” or “foggy.” Nebulous has since the late 17th century been the adjective correlating to nebula (as in “nebulous gas”), but the word is more familiar in its figurative use, where it describes things that are indistinct or vague, as when Jack London wrote of “ideas that were nebulous at best and that in reality were remembered sensations.”

GNBC Network
Prayer Without Meaning | The Fundamentals Of Prayer | Words From The Word Podcast | Pastor Roderick Webster

GNBC Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 10:20


Connect with us and never miss a new episode: Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheGoodNewsBaptistChurchOfStMaarten Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gnbcnetwork Donate to the work: https://cxpay2fund.me/charity/online-church-services Life Blossom by Keys of Moon | https://soundcloud.com/keysofmoon Music promoted by https://www.chosic.com/free-music/all/ Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gnbc/message

Ken Webster Jr
Why Joe Biden is Panicking Over Taiwan Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 40:00


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Pelosi defies the President China threatens wear Communists invade Texas public schools Special guests Brandon Waltens and Chris Fenton

Ken Webster Jr
Why Joe Biden is Panicking Over Taiwan Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 38:21


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Pelosi defies the President China threatens wear Communists invade Texas public schools Special guests Brandon Waltens and Chris Fenton

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 1, 2022 is: frolic • FRAH-lik • verb Frolic means “to play and run about happily.” One of the highlights of spring on the farm is watching newborn lambs frolic in the meadow. See the entry > Examples: “In front of her, kids frolicked on the playground and grassy field, dusting themselves off after tumbles and shrieking with joy.” — Kate Selig, The Mercury News (San Jose, California), 21 June 2021 Did you know? Frolic is a word rooted in pleasure. Its most common function today is as a verb meaning “to play and run about happily,” as in “children frolicking in the waves,” but it joined the language in the 16th century as an adjective carrying the meaning of its Dutch source vroolijk: “full of fun; merry.” Shakespeare's Puck used it this way in A Midsummer Night's Dream, saying “And we fairies … following darkness like a dream, now are frolic.” Verb use quickly followed, and by the early 17th century the word was also being used as a noun, as in “an evening of fun and frolic.”

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 1, 2022 is: frolic • FRAH-lik • verb Frolic means “to play and run about happily.” // One of the highlights of spring on the farm is watching newborn lambs frolic in the meadow. See the entry > Examples: “In front of her, kids frolicked on the playground and grassy field, dusting themselves off after tumbles and shrieking with joy.” — Kate Selig, The Mercury News (San Jose, California), 21 June 2021 Did you know? Frolic is a word rooted in pleasure. Its most common function today is as a verb meaning “to play and run about happily,” as in “children frolicking in the waves,” but it joined the language in the 16th century as an adjective carrying the meaning of its Dutch source vroolijk: “full of fun; merry.” Shakespeare's Puck used it this way in A Midsummer Night's Dream, saying “And we fairies … following darkness like a dream, now are frolic.” Verb use quickly followed, and by the early 17th century the word was also being used as a noun, as in “an evening of fun and frolic.”

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show
Ep. 181 8.1.22 Change Words to Change the Truth

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 11:18


Wikipedia changes definition of ‘recession' to soften Biden's economic collapse. This is all DE-GROWTH agenda in defiance of creation's dominion mandate in Gen 1:28. Webster changes definition of ‘female.' Starting with denying 6-day creation, changing words is a strategy of evil

Ken Webster Jr
Why Does Hollywood Love Red States so Much? Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 37:02


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Hunter Biden breaks more laws than the Crips and the Bloods Even the FDA admits they suck at their job Why World War 1 was bad for German prostitutes Everything you ever wanted to know about monkey pox

GNBC Network
How To Get God's Attention | The Fundamentals Of Prayer | Words From The Word Podcast | Pastor Roderick Webster

GNBC Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 9:26


Connect with us and never miss a new episode: Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheGoodNewsBaptistChurchOfStMaarten Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gnbcnetwork Donate to the work: https://cxpay2fund.me/charity/online-church-services Life Blossom by Keys of Moon | https://soundcloud.com/keysofmoon Music promoted by https://www.chosic.com/free-music/all/ Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gnbc/message

Ken Webster Jr
Why Does Hollywood Love Red States so Much? Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 39:14


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Hunter Biden breaks more laws than the Crips and the Bloods Even the FDA admits they suck at their job Why World War 1 was bad for German prostitutes Everything you ever wanted to know about monkey pox

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show
Ep. 181 8.1.22 Change Words to Change the Truth

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 11:18


Wikipedia changes definition of ‘recession' to soften Biden's economic collapse. This is all DE-GROWTH agenda in defiance of creation's dominion mandate in Gen 1:28. Webster changes definition of ‘female.' Starting with denying 6-day creation, changing words is a strategy of evil

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
menagerie

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 1:37 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 31, 2022 is: menagerie • muh-NAJ-uh-ree • noun Menagerie is used to refer to a collection of animals kept especially to be shown to the public, as well as a place where such animals are kept. It can also refer more broadly to any varied mixture. // The aviary featured a menagerie of exotic birds. // The living room is eclectically furnished with a menagerie of garage sale finds. See the entry > Examples: "Beatrix Potter created a delightful Peter Rabbit in her 1902 book publication, then went on to write about and draw a whole menagerie of related animal friends." — Brenda Yenke, cleveland.com, 10 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Back in the days of Middle French, ménagerie meant "the management of a household or farm" or "a place where animals are tended." When English speakers adopted menagerie in the 1600s, they applied it specifically to places where wild and often also foreign animals were kept and trained for exhibition, as well as to the animals so kept. This second meaning was eventually generalized to refer to any varied mixture, especially one that includes things that are strange or foreign to one's experience.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
ineffable

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 1:48 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 30, 2022 is: ineffable • in-EFF-uh-bul • adjective Ineffable is used to describe something that is indescribable or unspeakable and that cannot be expressed in words. It is also used for things which are taboo and are not to be uttered. // Ed felt an ineffable joy at the sight of his daughter walking toward him from the plane. See the entry > Examples: "But onstage alone, talking to a crowd, he's smooth as can be. A seductive presence, he has that ineffable quality of stardom: a preternatural ability to connect." — Jason Zinoman, The New York Times, 28 May 2022 Did you know? "Every tone was a testimony against slavery, and a prayer to God for deliverance from chains. The hearing of those wild notes always depressed my spirit, and filled me with ineffable sadness," wrote Frederick Douglass in his autobiography. Reading Douglass's words, it's clear that ineffable means "indescribable" or "unspeakable." And when we break the word down to its Latin roots, we see how those meanings came about. Ineffable comes from ineffābilis, which joins the prefix in-, meaning "not," with the adjective effābilis, meaning "capable of being expressed." Effābilis comes from effārī, "to speak out," which in turn comes from ex- and fārī, meaning “to speak.”

FAN Outdoors
Fan Outdoors: Tommy George, Mike Frisch, Tyler Webster

FAN Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 98:46


The captain is back in studio with Bob, Tommy George tells more fishing stories, Mike Frisch talks bass fishing and his TV show Fishing The Midwest, then Tyler Webster talks about his podcast and his travels.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
brouhaha

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 1:56 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 29, 2022 is: brouhaha • BROO-hah-hah • noun Brouhaha is a synonym of both uproar and hubbub, and can mean "a noisy confusion of sound" or "state of commotion." // A brouhaha erupted over the bill, even though the opposing party stood to gain just as much from its passage. See the entry > Examples: “An international piano competition back in 1958—the Tchaikovsky, in Moscow—made Texas-raised Van Cliburn an overnight international celebrity. In the height of Cold War tensions, his face was splashed across front pages, and he was feted with a ticker tape parade on Wall Street. No classical music competition anywhere stirs up that kind of brouhaha today.” — Scott Cantrell, The Dallas Morning News, 26 May 2022 Did you know? The English language borrowed brouhaha directly from French in the late 18th century, but its origins beyond that are uncertain—not quite the subject of noisy brouhaha but perhaps more modest debate. What's less arguable is that brouhaha is fun to say, as are many of its synonyms, including hubbub, williwaw, hullabaloo, bobbery, and kerfuffle. And many of these, also like brouhaha, tend to suggest a certain judgment that the reason for all the foofaraw is a bit silly, or at least not worth getting all worked up about. A dad joke, for example, might raise some brouhaha, even though it's really no reason for an uproar to brew. Haha!

Ken Webster Jr
James Parker Takes Over Pursuit of Happiness Today Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 38:59


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: James Parker hosts the show.

GNBC Network
The Fundamentals Of Prayer | Words From The Word | Pastor Roderick Webster

GNBC Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 10:40


Connect with us and never miss a new episode: Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheGoodNewsBaptistChurchOfStMaarten Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gnbcnetwork Donate to the work: https://cxpay2fund.me/charity/online-church-services Life Blossom by Keys of Moon | https://soundcloud.com/keysofmoon Music promoted by https://www.chosic.com/free-music/all/ Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gnbc/message

Ken Webster Jr
James Parker Takes Over Pursuit of Happiness Today Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 39:01


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: James Parker hosts the show.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
ostentatious

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 1:39 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 28, 2022 is: ostentatious • ah-stun-TAY-shus • adjective Ostentatious means "attracting or seeking to attract attention, admiration, or envy." Things that are ostentatious tend to stand out as overly elaborate or conspicuous. // His ostentatious displays of knowledge were often less than charming. See the entry > Examples: "The Met Gala, in full ostentatious, crowd-pleasing costumery, returned this week, flooding the fashion news cycle." — Vanessa Friedman, New York Times, 11 May 2022 Did you know? Ostentatious comes from a Latin word meaning “display," and the idea of display persists in the English word's current use: people and things described as ostentatious seem to be practically begging to be looked at. The word is often applied to objects and buildings that can also be described as luxurious—flashy jewelry, mansions, edifices with marble columns. Someone with an ostentatious lifestyle spends money in a way that makes it obvious that they have a lot of it. Used in negative constructions—“the house is large but not ostentatious”—the implication is that display isn't the point.

Ken Webster Jr
Chinese Communist Party Infecting Houston Public Schools Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 41:06


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Why isn't anyone alarmed that communists are educating our kids? How Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo teamed up with billionaires to erode your rights the story of the hero who stopped a mass shooter that never made national news Special guests Michael Quinn Sullivan and Dan Cohen.

Ken Webster Jr
Chinese Communist Party Infecting Houston Public Schools Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 40:10


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Why isn't anyone alarmed that communists are educating our kids? How Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo teamed up with billionaires to erode your rights the story of the hero who stopped a mass shooter that never made national news Special guests Michael Quinn Sullivan and Dan Cohen.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
apropos

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 1:30 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 27, 2022 is: apropos • ap-ruh-POH • preposition Apropos means "with regard to." It is frequently used in the phrase "apropos of." // Sean interrupted our conversation about politics and, apropos of nothing, asked who we thought would win the basketball game. See the entry > Examples: "It was July 2020 and, apropos of the times, they were in a Zoom meeting." — Alix Wall, The New York Times, 20 May 2022 Did you know? Apropos wears its ancestry like a badge—or a beret. From the French phrase à propos, meaning “to the purpose,” the word's emphasis lands on its last syllable, which ends in a silent “s”: ap-ruh-POH. Apropos typically functions as an adjective describing what is suitable or appropriate (“an apropos comment”), or as a preposition (with or without of) meaning “with regard to,” as in “apropos (of) the decision, implementation will take some time.” The phrase “apropos of nothing” suggests that something does not relate to a specified topic.

Ken Webster Jr
The FBI is not Making America Great Again (Kenny Webster)

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 37:23


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Why is the DOJ protecting Hunter Biden? Dr Birx admits the government lied Another reason why college is overrated Ukrainian war glamour shots

Ken Webster Jr
The FBI is not Making America Great Again (James Parker)

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 38:59


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Why is the DOJ protecting Hunter Biden? Dr Birx admits the government lied Another reason why college is overrated Ukrainian war glamour shots Guest host James Parker fills in for the first hour of Pursuit of Happiness.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
Luddite

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 2:06 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 26, 2022 is: Luddite • LUH-dyte • noun Luddite refers to someone who is opposed to change, and especially to technological change. // Call me a Luddite, but I enjoy the sense of privacy that comes with not owning a smartphone. See the entry > Examples: “A high school English teacher who has been working for more than a quarter century, Beasley is no Luddite. She taught online courses before the pandemic and has used a learning-management system for years, unlike some of her colleagues, who still prefer a traditional pen-and-paper grade book.” — Alyson Klein, Education Week, 8 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Long before your Luddite friend was waxing poetic about how blissful it is to not have a smartphone, Luddites were protesting the textile machinery that was slowly replacing them. It was toward the end of 1811, in the vicinity of Nottingham, England, when handicraftsmen formed organized bands and began to riot for the destruction of the new machinery. Their name is of uncertain origin, but it may be connected to a (probably mythical) person named Ned Ludd. According to an unsubstantiated account in George Pellew's Life of Lord Sidmouth (1847), Ned Ludd was a Leicestershire villager of the late 1700s who, in a fit of rage, rushed into a stocking weaver's house and destroyed his equipment; subsequently, his name was proverbially connected with machinery destruction. With the onset of the information age, Luddite gained a broader sense describing anyone who shuns new technology.

Bob Enyart Live
Bob Enyart debates Moral Relativist Greg Koukl

Bob Enyart Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022


Today we're going back to a debate between the late great Bob Enyart and famed Christian apologist and talk show host Greg Koukl of Reasons to Believe. Tragically, Koukl puts on full display his moral relativism, which Bob takes issue with. This debate is the battle of two conservatives, both intellectual powerhouses. Dominic Enyart will also be adding some commentary on today's broadcast classic, then next week on Bob Enyart Live we're going to get to a devastating 2020 update from Koukl where he said, "some same sex couples are fabulous." Today's Resource: Monthly Bible Study Subscription Receive Bible studies once a month, and start by getting a firm foundation of the basics. Once you have a solid understanding of the overall plot of the Bible, the origins of Israel, the integration of the gentiles, and the character of God, then you'll be ready to dive into the deeper details of the Bible. Start with the milk, then graduate to the meat. Those who have subscribed to the Monthly Bible studies have said it's changed their life dramatically for the better and given them a new appreciation for the Bible and God Himself. Sign up now, before prices rise! (Due to inflation. Thanks, Biden- ugh.) See the original show summary below from October 26th, 2007.  [See below for the written description of this 2007 program.] * Tragic 2020 Update: Considered a solid Christian leader by many thousands of believers (and in many ways beloved by us here at BEL), the founder and host of Stand to Reason, Greg Koukl has tragically stated, beginning at 9:40 into a podcast, that "some same sex couples are fabulous." Please pray for Greg and for the man who phoned in a question, and for all those Greg is not-so-subtly influencing to become moral relativists. Here's what happened... A caller asks whether children are better off in foster care or adopted by same sex parents. "Some same sex couples are fabulous. Some same sex couples are deplorable. And actually, the same is true for heterosexual couples." Greg then offers the softest possible objection to one of the fiercest moral dangers of our day, which is homosexuality. (For, "In the public square, biblical Christianity and homosexuality are mutually exclusive. One or the other will be in the closet.") He followed that by repeatedly obfuscating with moral relativist utilitarian distinctions about which parents give the "advantage" and which is "better".  Koukl draws false equivalencies between homosexuality and heterosexual singleness, cohabitation, and bad parenting. Regarding same sex parenting, "there are other things [aspects of their parenting] that may be really good... there are a number of factors that are involved here. ... All things being equal I think it is better for heterosexual couples to raise children." "A father brings something different to the relationship than a mother does. Period." Koukl puts much more emphasis on practical distinctions than he does on the far greater matter of the utter perversion and rebellion of homosexuality. Greg exhibits more fear about how his audience will view him than he does about the child raised in a dystopian world of normalized homosexuality. "Just to show that I'm not unfairly prejudiced here... I don't believe that single people should adopt." "What we want to do is to make decisions based on the ideal." "This is why it's hard to make a judgment. Are children in foster care better off [being adopted by] same sex couples or better off staying in foster care. It depends on the individual circumstance. I would rather see a child in a reasonably healthy environment with a same sex couple than in an abusive environment with a heterosexual couple." If that isn't moral relativism, then there is no such thing. Constantly equivocating on underlying morality and legitimacy, "The big thing is, what's best for the kid... Heterosexual parents are better than same sex parents, on balance." "However if this child had no parent whatsoever and was living in the squalor in the street somewhere..." Talk about situational ethics. Would Greg rather see a child rescued from a volcanic eruption by a human trafficker, than be burned alive? Oh brother. Come on. (Here's an actual example. In our 2007 debate Greg was defending pro-abort Rudi Guiliani, who got 3% of the pimary vote, and Christian listeners applied his arguments to pro-abort Mitt Romney of course, who got 22% of the vote, with pro-abort McCain winning. Regarding Romney, the presidential candidate four years later who regarding an unborn child who might end up being raised by a crack-addicted mother, would be only too happy to support the premptive killing of that baby. Or, for that matter, he supported killing any unborn child for any reason, for Romney is the father of tax-funded late-term abortion on demand.) "Heterosexual couples bring something more to the parenting environment than same sex couples bring." "You've got to start from the standards and work to the circumstances that you're faced with." Which is exactly the opposite of what Greg had just done in yet another text-book case of moral relativism. * Correction: Bob unintentionally exaggerated Clinton's willingness to support the PBA ban. See the full correction at the end of this show summary. * Christian Leader Koukl Defends Candidate Giuliani: Stu Epperson moderates the debate between Bob Enyart and STR.org's Greg Koukl on Stu's syndicated TruthTalkLive.com talk show. In the debate, Koukl defends Rudi Giuliani, an aggressively pro-abortion, pro-homosexual, anti-Christian worldview candidate, as acceptable to Christian voters. Koukl denies that Giuliani is a mass murderer and denied the parallel between Koukl's own position and that of the Herodians of the New Testament. To start the debate, Bob asked Greg, "What if Rudi Giuliani is the Republican nominee, should Christians support someone like Rudi Giuliani?" Greg spent the whole show answering that question in the affirmative, stipulating only that his answer applies if two candidates in the running are Rudi and a Democrat candidate like Hillary Clinton. Bob characterized Greg's position as moral relativism. * Bob's Notes Against Christian Support for Giuliani: Christians should not support mass murderers. Rudi Giuliani is a mass murderer who as a governing official and candidate promotes child killing through public hospitals, tax funding, police enforcement, etc. Moral relativist Christians would oppose a candidate who was caught embezzling funds (not because it violates God's command, Do not steal, but because it is politically-incorrect). And while they'd not support a Republican caught embezzling, they support Republican candidates who brag of their support for killing children. The Gospels mention a pragmatic political party, the Herodians, the religious leaders who allied themselves with Herod Antipas, thinking that the Herodian dynasty was the lesser evil (than any alternative allegiance, with a choice between Herod or Christ, they would choose Herod), thinking the Herods were the best the Jewish worshippers could pragmatically expect in their hopes of attaining to their kingdom on Earth. (I have this understanding of the Herodians from my recollection of reading, way back in the 1970s, Alfred Edershiem's Life & Times of Jesus the Messiah, a classic written in the 1800s.) Like Rudi Giuliani, Herod was personally sexually immoral and murderous. Greg Koukl's moral relativism would defend supporting Herod. But John the Baptist, instead of joining the Herodians, rebuked Herod, and for his courage, this wicked ruler beheaded the man whom Jesus described as the greatest born to women (Mat. 11:11). But how would Jesus describe Koukl? Greg's moral relativism might have led him to campaign for Herod (as he does for Giuliani), and instead of persecution, Herod might have hired Koukl as an apologist for his murderous reign and his hopes for the continued support of Ceasar after Antipas built Tiberias (Koukl: yes, Herod murdered John the Baptist, but I would still campaign for him to rule). Greg Koukl is imitating the pragmatic religious leaders, the Herodians. Mat 22:16, 18 ...the Herodians, [said], "Teacher, we know that You are true, and teach the way of God in truth [lip service]... But Jesus perceived their wickedness, and said, "Why do you test Me, you hypocrites?" [also at Mark 12:13] Mark 3:5-6   [Jesus saw] the hardness of their hearts, [and] the Herodians [plotted] against Him, how they might destroy Him. "You shall not murder" (Rom. 13:9) "Do not kill the innocent" (Exodus 23:7) Romans 3:8 mentions "do[ing] evil that good may come of it" (Romans 3:8), Paul considered it slander to be accused of something Christians now embrace, doing evil, that good may come of it. "we must obey God rather than men" (Acts 5:29) Giuliani is not only radically pro-abortion, but for years even supported the especially horrific partial-birth abortion. Giuliani is radically pro-homosexual, and would ban all handguns. New York Daily News, March 8, 2004  Rudy Giuliani came out yesterday against President Bush's call for a ban on gay marriage. ... "I certainly wouldn't support [a ban] at this time," added Giuliani, who lived with a gay Manhattan couple when he moved out of Gracie Mansion during his nasty divorce. Secular humanists who support Giuliani: Sean Hannity, Hugh Hewitt, Michael Medved, etc. Publicans: tax collectors, public building contractors, and military suppliers. The New Testament condemns the publicans, so Christians now sell their souls for the Re-publicans. The theme of much of the Old Testament, from the books of Moses, through Joshua & Judges, through the prophets, is that God's people did not trust Him, nor obey Him, not with national politics, and instead made alliances with wicked leaders, and so God abandoned them to their own destruction. * Comments at TruthTalkLive.com: Carl: where does Koukl draw the line? ... at 100,000,000? What line must be crossed that will turn Christians from supporting wickedness and back to God? Dave: Koukl thinks that Scalia, Thomas, Roberts and Alito would fight for the Personhood of a child. I guess he did not read the Supreme Court decision of Gonzales v. Carhart. John quotes Reagan: "Politics I supposed to be the second-oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first." Gus B: Mr. Koukl says Giuliani will appoint justices like Thomas and Scalia. Pastor Enyart points out these two do not believe in personhood... to which Koukl says, "Pro-Life Justices are not relevant to this topic." Andrew: To support the better of two murderers is relative. ... Webster should post your photograph next to "moral relativist." * Give your opinion at TruthTalkLive.com. * Koukl on Foster Care: The socialist foster care system of the government being intimately involved in the funding and raising of children should be abolished. Sadly, in Greg Koukl's ten-minute call beginning at 9:20 about homosexuality and foster care, he never gets around to condemning either and instead makes destructive comments such as, "some same sex couples are fabulous" and misleads on a terrible aspect of socialism by saying at 15:05 that "in the foster care system there are many saints." Today's Resource: Have you seen the Government Department at our KGOV Store? You can view BOTH of our powerhouse Focus on the Strategy DVDs for only $22.99! Also, we are featuring Bruce Shortt's vitally-important book, The Harsh Truth about Public Schools. And also, check out the classic God's Criminal Justice System seminar, God and the Death Penalty, Bob on Drugs and the Live from Las Vegas DVDs! * Correction: I need to clarify a comment I made debating Greg Koukl. I unintentionally exaggerated when I stated that Hillary supported the PBA ban. I was taking this position from the years of public position the Clinton administration maintained regarding the PBA ban. When Hillary and Bill came to Colorado in 1999 and spoke as a couple to Columbine parents, Brian Rohrbough told Bill, "Mr. President, when you vetoed the PBA ban, you became responsible for murder far more violent than what happened to our children." Clinton replied, with Hillary at his side, that he would have signed the bill, but it did not have an exception for the life of the mother. To the extent that they were a two-for-one deal in the White House, I had always assumed that was her position also: willing to support the law, as long as it had exceptions (like many "pro-life" Republicans). At any rate, it was wrong to say outright that Hillary supported the ban. I should have clarified, and in the intensity of the debate, I did not realize that I had mistated her position. Also, I kept wanting to talk about Rudy's pro-abortion actions as NYC mayor, but never got that in. And finally on this, since the 1990s, we have had an Errata link on our homepage and on every page at kgov.com (just scroll down to see it) And I've also posted this correction at Stu Epperson's TruthTalkLive blog. Thanks! -Bob Enyart * Dec. 21, 2015 Update: Bob Enyart posted the following to STR... Hi STR! Dr. Richard Holland of Liberty University wrote "God, Time and the Incarnation" surveying the leading Christian theologians on this topic and concluded that specifically *with respect to the Incarnation* the church has never openly defended its claim that God is utterly unchangeable. In my debate with theologian Dr. James White I took that insight and five times asked him about whether God the Son took upon Himself a human nature. (There's a 2-min YouTube showing those excerpts.) So far beyond the old/new covenant issue, reaching right into the heart of the Trinity, God the Son became a Man. God is unchanging in His fierce commitment to righteousness (i.e., His holiness), but because He is the Living God, He changes in immeasurable ways, including when the Son became the Son of Man. * For Bob's Many Other Fun and Educational Debates: See kgov.com/debates for our creation/evolution sparring with Lawrence Krauss, Eugenie Scott, AronRa, Michael Shermer (and spats with Jack Horner, PZ Myers, Phil Plait, & Jerry Coyne), and our exposing the liberal in the conservative with Ann Coulter, Dan Caplis, Greg Koukl (of course), Tom Tancredo, AFA's Bryan Fischer, AUL's Paul Linton, CWA's Robert Knight, National RTL's Board, NRTL's Political Director, Focus on the Family's Washington State Affiliate; and exposing the wickedness in the liberal with Barry Lynn and libertarian candidates; and opposing the national sales tax with Ken Hoagland and Neal Boortz; and debating sexual immorality with homosexual activists Wayne Besen and Gregory Flood; and defending the death penalty on Court TV; and theology with a Seventh Day Adventist, drinking alcohol with a Church of Christ minister; and whether or not God is inexhaustibly and eternally creative with Dr. James White, and King James Onlyism with one of their leading advocates; and finally, abortion with Ilana Goldman, Peggy Loonan, and Boulder, Colorado's infamous late-term abortionist Warren Hern.  

Mississippi Crop Situation Podcast
Rice Weed Control with Connor Webster

Mississippi Crop Situation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 29:53


Connor Webster from the LSU AgCenter calls into the Crop Doctors' Podcast studio in Stoneville to talk about this year's weed control in rice.  Connor is a recent graduate of LSU and began his job as the rice weed scientist earlier this year.  Connor, Hunter, Tom, and Jason spend awhile talking about herbicide carryover in rice and touch on new cases of herbicide resistance affecting rice in Louisiana. 

Ken Webster Jr
How Communists Took Over our Military Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 40:21


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Kurt Schlichter discuses our broken Pentagon Brandon Waltens on Biden's plans for Galveston  Comedian Alex Strenger punks the Austin City Council Kenny brother-in-law explains why he's chosen to homeschool his kids

Ken Webster Jr
How Communists Took Over our Military Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 39:33


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Kurt Schlichter discuses our broken Pentagon Brandon Waltens on Biden's plans for Galveston  Comedian Alex Strenger punks the Austin City Council Kenny brother-in-law explains why he's chosen to homeschool his kids

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
extradite

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 1:56 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 25, 2022 is: extradite • EK-struh-dyte • verb To extradite someone who has been accused of a crime is to send that person to the state or country that has jurisdiction to try them for that crime. // The U.S. has rejected the country's request to extradite the journalist because of concerns that she will be subjected to an unfair trial there. // An alleged criminal is typically only extradited under the provisions of a treaty or statute, but a fugitive is occasionally surrendered by one state or country to another as an act of good will. See the entry > Examples: "The U.S. State Department on Friday asked authorities in El Salvador to 'immediately' extradite leaders of the international criminal gang MS-13 to be put on trial in the United States." — Nelson Renteria and Brendan O'Boyle, Reuters, 24 June 2022 Did you know? Extradite and its related noun extradition are both ultimately Latin in origin: their source is tradition-, tradition, meaning “the act of handing over.” (The word tradition, though centuries older, has the same source; consider tradition as something handed over from one generation to the next.) While extradition and extradite are of 19th century vintage, the U.S. Constitution, written in 1787, addresses the idea in Article IV: “A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, shall on demand of the executive authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime.”

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
pathos

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 1:54 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 24, 2022 is: pathos • PAY-thahss • noun Pathos refers to some element of an experience or of an artistic representation that evokes compassion or pity. The word also refers to a feeling of sympathetic pity. // Our knowledge of the hero's tragic end adds an element of pathos to the story of his early success. See the entry > Examples: "It's all in good fun, though. This is Maverick's movie, as the title declares. As a character study of an iconic hero, Cruise and Kosinski do fine work, plumbing pathos and power out of a mythic One Last Flight." — Eric Webb, Austin (Texas) American-Statesman, 27 May 2022 Did you know? The Greek word páthos means "experience, misfortune, emotion, condition,” and comes from Greek path-, meaning “experience, undergo, suffer.” In English, pathos usually refers to the element in an experience or in an artistic work that makes us feel compassion, pity, or sympathy. The word is a member of a big family: empathy is the ability to share someone else's feelings. Pathetic (in its gentlest uses) describes things that move us to pity. Though pathology is not literally "the study of suffering," it is "the study of diseases." Other relatives of pathos include sympathy, apathy, and antipathy.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
conscientious

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 1:55 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 23, 2022 is: conscientious • kahn-shee-EN-shus • adjective Conscientious often describes those who are concerned with doing things correctly. It can be used as a synonym for both meticulous and careful. // Although Marvin was brilliant, he was not a very conscientious student, and he frequently lost points for forgetting to turn in his homework. See the entry > Examples: “Findings from Gosling's studies revealed that highly conscientious people tend to have homes or offices that are clean and in good condition. Books, TV remotes, and magazines may be neatly arranged and conveniently located, for example. Their music records and books might be organized and grouped together on the bookshelf by type or genre.” — Brian Collisson, Psychology Today, 25 May 2022 Did you know? According to American writer and editor H. L. Mencken, "Conscience is the inner voice which warns us someone may be looking." A person who is conscientious makes sure that if others are watching, they approve of what they see. This is true for someone who is “governed by their conscience” as the oldest sense of the word is defined—as in “a conscientious objector to the war”—but it is also true for the conscientious person paying close, careful attention to the task at hand. Conscientious came to English from French, centuries after Middle English had adopted conscience from Old French; both ultimately come from Latin scire, “to know.”

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 22, 2022 is: muse • MYOOZ • verb To muse about something is to think about it carefully and thoroughly. The word can also mean "to become absorbed in thought," or "to think or say something in a thoughtful way." // The conversation meandered, as the cousins mused about what had changed and what had remained the same since the last family reunion. See the entry > Examples: "In the first single, 'Canola Fields,' the singer is musing about a long-ago love, and the song sounds as intimate as a conversation and as infectiously vibrant as a roadhouse rocker." — Jay N. Miller, The Patriot Ledger (Quincy, Massachusetts), 14 June 2022 Did you know? Muse on this: the word muse comes from the Anglo-French muser, meaning “to gape, to idle, to muse.” (Amuse has the same source.) The image evoked is one of a thinker so absorbed in thought as to be unconsciously open-mouthed. Those who muse on their pets' musings might like to know that muser is ultimately from Latin musus, meaning “mouth of an animal”—also source of the word muzzle. The sister goddesses of Greek mythology known as the Muses have no etymological link: that word, which in lowercase refers to a source of inspiration, comes from Greek Mousa. The ultimate Greek origin of the word museum translates as “of the Muses.”

The Matt Walsh Show
Ep. 989 - The Trans Cult Officially Rewrites The Dictionary

The Matt Walsh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 67:16 Very Popular


Today on the Matt Walsh Show, as the Left continues to use 1984 as more of an instruction manual than a warning, trans activists have successfully bullied Webster's dictionary into changing the definition of “female,” though the new definition makes no sense. And that's not the most Orwellian thing happening this week. Gender activists are also pushing anthropologists to impose gender theory onto the corpses of our ancestors. Plus, congressional Democrats make the case for packing the court, the LA Times gets in trouble for acknowledging the solar power isn't all it's cracked up to be, and in our Daily Cancellation mass hysteria and outrage as a Sesame Street character is accused of committing a hate crime against a black child.    Become a DailyWire+ member today access the extensive content catalog: https://utm.io/ueMfc    Check out Morning Wire on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, DailyWire+, or wherever you listen to podcasts. — Today's Sponsors:  American Financing empowers families with personalized mortgage solutions. From lower rates to shorter terms, and even debt consolidation! Call American Financing for a FREE mortgage review at (866) 569-4711 OR Visit AmericanFinancing.net  Helix Mattresses are made to match your unique sleep preferences. Get up to $350 OFF + 2 FREE Pillows with all mattress orders! www.HelixSleep.com/WALSH  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices