Podcasts about Webster

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Best podcasts about Webster

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Latest podcast episodes about Webster

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 28, 2021 is: menorah • muh-NOR-uh • noun A menorah is a candelabra with seven or nine lights that is used in Jewish worship. // At sundown on the first night of Hanukkah, Aaron's father helped him light the first candle on the menorah. See the entry > Examples: "The world's largest menorah went up in Manhattan on Tuesday and will be lit on Thursday after sundown…." — ABC7 (New York), 10 Dec. 2020 Did you know? In English, menorah was originally the name for the seven-branched candelabra used in Jewish worship. The nine-branched Hanukkah candelabra is called hanukkiah in Hebrew, but English speakers came to use menorah for this too. The Hanukkah menorah recalls expulsion by Judah Maccabee of invading forces from the Temple of Jerusalem. Maccabee and his followers sought oil for the temple's menorah so that the sanctuary could be rededicated, but they found only enough oil for a single day. Miraculously, that tiny amount of oil burned for eight days, until a new supply could be obtained. The Hanukkah menorah includes a candle for each day the oil burned, plus the shammes, a "servant candle" that is used to light the others.

Tree Speech
The Liberty Tree with Mark Linehan, Maddie Webster, and Catherine Hanna Schrock

Tree Speech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 52:49


In our next episode we examine the history of Boston's Liberty Tree, including its origin story and how that story evolved over time depending on who was telling it. We have wonderfully spirited conversations with distinguished actor, singer, dancer, and educator, Mark Linehan and historian Maddie Webster, a Boston University PhD student in the American & New England Studies Program. Then, we seek to uncover what liberty and liberation means in the present day with activist and Applied theatre practitioner Catherine Hanna Schrock, the Co-founder and Director of Imagine Brave Spaces, a San Diego-based theater company who shares a spoken word piece she wrote about her company which also serves as a call to action in making liberation a reality for all. Mark Linehan is a Boston-based actor with extensive stage and dance experience. A native of Massachusetts, he has performed in theaters across New England as a professional singer, dancer and actor. Mark's specialty is musical theater, and he has also worked in children's theater, drama and film. Maddie Webster is a PhD candidate in the American & New England Studies Program, where she studies urban history and historic preservation with a focus on Boston. Her dissertation explores Black Bostonians' historic preservation efforts from the late nineteenth century onward, a story that comes into clearer focus by reframing what activities constitute preservation work. As a public historian, Maddie wants to collaborate with and bolster Boston's citizen historians. Her partnership with the Initiative on Cities stems from this same impulse to engage with the modern city—and its challenges and opportunities—with the lessons of history close at hand. Catherine Hanna Schrock is an Applied Theater Practitioner, which unites her roles as an educator, theatre artist, and community organizer. She designs creative programming that equips diverse communities to engage in complex dialogues toward social and community development. Special thank you to Mark, Maddie and Catherine for their time and inspiration. For more info: Boston Historical Tours: https://www.bostonhistoricaltours.org/#/ Imagine Brave Spaces: https://imaginebravespaces.com Tree Speech's host, Dori Robinson, is a director, playwright, dramaturg, and educator who seeks and develops projects that explore social consciousness, personal heritage, and the difference one individual can have on their own community. Some of her great loves include teaching, the Oxford comma, intersectional feminism, and traveling. With a Masters degree from NYU's Educational Theatre program, she continues to share her love of Shakespeare, new play development, political theatre, and gender in performance. Dori's original plays have been produced in New York, Chicago, and Boston. More information at https://www.dorirobinson.com This week's episode was recorded in Massachusetts on the native lands of the Wabanaki Confederacy, Pennacook, Massachusett, and Pawtucket people. Logo design by Mill Riot. Special thanks to the Western Avenue Lofts and Studios for all their support. Tree Speech is produced and co-written by Jonathan Zautner with Alight Theater Guild. The mission of the guild is to advance compelling theatrical endeavors that showcase the diversity of our ever-changing world in order to build strong artists whose work creates empathy, challenges the status quo and unites communities. For more information about our work and programs, please visit www.alighttheater.org. Learn more about the podcast at: www.treespeechpodcast.com, and IG: treespeechpodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/treespeech/message

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 27, 2021 is: commensurate • kuh-MEN-suh-rut • adjective Commensurate means "proportionate" or "equal in size, amount, or degree." // The job posting states that salary will be commensurate with experience. // The budget cuts of the community college are commensurate with other state-funded agencies and programs. See the entry > Examples: "Nationwide was originally founded in the 1920s as Farm Bureau Mutual Automobile Insurance Company with the idea of offering farmers automobile insurance that was more commensurate with their driving habits at a time when many were being charged similar rates to their counterparts in densely-populated urban areas." — Jason Bisnoff, Forbes, 29 Sept. 2021 Did you know? Commensurate comes from the Latin word for the act of measuring, mensūra. That noun is based on mensus, the past participle of the verb mētīrī," meaning "to determine the extent of."

The Jason Gregor Show
Nov 26 - Hour 4 - Tom Gazzola & Danny Webster

The Jason Gregor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 30:47


In Hour 4 we were joined by Tom Gazzola in the Chronicles & NHL.com's Danny Webster

Oilers NOW with Bob Stauffer
Danny Webster from NHL.com (11/26/21)

Oilers NOW with Bob Stauffer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 22:15


Get the lowdown on the Vegas Golden Knight, from Robin Lehner to Jack Eichel and who they consider their biggest rival, from Golden Knights beat writer Danny Webster. Find Danny's work on NHL.com and on SB Nation at Knights On Ice. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 26, 2021 is: maître d' • may-truh-DEE • noun A maître d' (or maitre d') is the headwaiter of the dining-room staff of a restaurant or hotel. // The maître d' ushered the celebrity couple to a private table at the back of the restaurant. See the entry > Examples: "Mike is part of a long-standing trio responsible for making Lucca's one of Helena's premier fine-dining establishments. … Rounding out the team is Ray Spooner, maître d', who not only greets and seats patrons but starts the evening off by eloquently describing the featured wines." — Donnie Sexton, The Billings (Montana) Gazette, 19 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Maître d' is short for maître d'hôtel, which comes from French and literally means "master of the house." Maître d'hôtel was used in English for a head butler or steward of a household before it referred to the head of a dining-room staff. For the record, the plural of maître d'hôtel is maîtres d'hôtel whereas the plural of maître d' is maître d's.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 25, 2021 is: jovial • JOH-vee-ul • adjective Jovial means "markedly good-humored" and describes people and things that are cheerful or full of joy.   // Andy remembered his Uncle Jim as a jovial man with a ready smile, a firm handshake, and a cheery greeting for all. // Family reunions are a jovial occasion in which long-distance relatives reconnect and, of course, share amusing stories about each other. See the entry > Examples: "Still, part of the pleasure of dining at Margie's is ... its familial atmosphere. When Winston, a jovial seventeen-year-old senior at Far Rockaway High School, stopped to chat while clearing dishes, it was hard not to feel like a guest at an intergenerational dinner." — Jiayang Fan, The New Yorker, 16 Aug. 2021 Did you know? In Roman astrology, planets were named after gods, and people were thought to share the personality traits of the god whose planet was rising when they were born. Jupiter, also called Jove, was the chief Roman god and was considered a majestic type who was the source of joy and happiness. The Latin adjective jovialis means "of or relating to Jove." In French, this had become jovial, which English borrowed and used to describe people and things full of cheer or joy.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 24, 2021 is: feign • FAYN • verb Feign means "to give a false appearance of something." // After her mom told her that she will bring her to the doctor's, Kim confessed that she was feigning illness because she forgot to finish her book report. See the entry > Examples: "For his part, Hopkins said Collins had surprised him the most this preseason, adding that he's never seen a 6-9 player who can do the things his fellow freshman can on the court. Hopkins … also didn't attempt to feign surprise when told that every single one of his teammates had mentioned him by name when asked the same question." — Ben Roberts, The Lexington (Kentucky) Herald Leader, 21 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Feign is all about faking it, but that hasn't always been so. An early meaning of the word is "to fashion, form, or shape." That meaning comes from its Latin source: the verb fingere. In time, people began fashioning feign to suggest the act of forming, or giving shape to, false appearances.

The Fighting Moose
Daniel Webster

The Fighting Moose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:18


How many Webster's do you know? From history...I know of two. In my everyday life, I know a handful. Well, today, we read a short biography about Daniel Webster who was a preacher, mainly, who lived from 1782 to 1852 and was also the Secretary of State under President William Henry Harrison. Today's story comes from the book “The Children's Book of American Biography” written by Mary Stoyell Stimpson.   Where you from...What book(s) are you reading? Survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FM8626C   Website: http://www.thefightingmoose.com/   Blog https://thefightingmoosepodcast.blogspot.com/   iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-fighting-moose/id1324413606?mt=2/   Story (PDF): http://ww.thefightingmoose.com/episode248.pdf   Reading List: http://www.thefightingmoose.com/readinglist.pdf   YouTube: https://youtu.be/QZkDwIRqMks/   Book(s): “The Children's Book of American Biography” http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/32628   Music/Audio: Artist – Analog by Nature http://dig.ccmixter.org/people/cdk   National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA): http://www.nasa.gov   Song(s) Used: cdk - Sunday by Analog By Nature (c) copyright 2016 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/cdk/53755  

Trig Talk
So You Want to Host a Highland Games? (w/ Danny Webster)

Trig Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 40:56


Trig Talk host, Hayden Baillio, sits down with Athletic Director, Danny Webster, for this quick holiday bonus episode. Danny goes through the check list of items that are need to make a Highland Games happen, we also talk about potential speed bumps in the process and how to be proactive about these inevitable detours from the plan. Trig Talk™ is the a companion podcast for HGO (highlandgames.org). Host, Hayden Baillio, will sit down with a complete spectrum of Highland Games athletes, athletic directors and legends to discuss a wide breadth of topics. To gain access to more Trig Talk™ exclusive extras, like "yOU haD ThE HeiGhT", a short post-podcast show where Hayden sits down with the guest to trade funny stories and answer Patron's questions, become a patron of HGO at https://www.patreon.com/hgousa. Please press subscribe and rate the podcast if you already feel obliged. 5 stars preferably.... just saying. Follow Danny on Instagram @clan_webster Follow HGO on Instagram @highlandgamesorg Follow Host, Hayden Baillio, on Instagram @haydenbaillio Subscribe to HGO's YouTube Page: HGO YouTube --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/trigtalk/message

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 23, 2021 is: enclave • EN-klayv • noun An enclave is an area inhabited by people who are different in some way from the people in the surrounding areas. // The district includes an enclave in which students of the university reside. See the entry > Examples: "Harlem … was rapidly evolving; once a rural, village-like enclave for rich English, Dutch and French families, it had become desirable among city elites." — Sandra E. Garcia, The New York Times, 27 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Enclave comes from French enclaver, meaning "to enclose," which itself is based on the Latin noun clavis, meaning "key." Clavis opened the door to a few other English words, some of which might seem unlikely relatives of enclave. For example, clavicle, the word for the bone that joins the breastbone and the shoulder blade, and the musical sign clef.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 22, 2021 is: roister • ROY-ster • verb Roister means "to engage in noisy partying or celebration." // Fans roistered after their team won the championship. See the entry > Examples: "Of course, my student life wasn't all angst and regret. I spent much of my time falling in and out of love and roistering around the world of Cambridge theatre." — Joan Bakewell, The Guardian (London), 8 Sept. 2021 Did you know? Roister is related to French ruste, meaning "rude" or "rough." That word comes from the fairly neutral Latin rusticus, meaning "rural." Originally, the English verb was simply roist, and one who roisted was a roister. Those words are no longer used; instead, we have the verb roister, and the corresponding noun roisterer.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 21, 2021 is: univocal • yoo-NIV-uh-kul • adjective Univocal means "unambiguous"—that is, "clear" or "precise."    // The results of the study were univocal. See the entry > Examples: "An audience member asked the panel if fans might get to see a musical episode in Season 3. Several TV shows have gone down this path…. The answer from [Scott Grimes] was, at first, univocal: 'Absolutely not.' However, he paused and added, 'But if we did….'" — Scott Snowden, Space.com, 26 Oct. 2019 Did you know? In Latin, the prefix uni- ("one") united with vox ("voice"), creating univocus, the source of English's univocal.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 21, 2021 is: univocal • yoo-NIV-uh-kul • adjective Univocal means "unambiguous"—that is, "clear" or "precise."    // The results of the study were univocal. See the entry > Examples: "An audience member asked the panel if fans might get to see a musical episode in Season 3. Several TV shows have gone down this path…. The answer from [Scott Grimes] was, at first, univocal: 'Absolutely not.' However, he paused and added, 'But if we did….'" — Scott Snowden, Space.com, 26 Oct. 2019 Did you know? In Latin, the prefix uni- ("one") united with vox ("voice"), creating univocus, the source of English's univocal.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 20, 2021 is: trepidation • trep-uh-DAY-shun • noun Trepidation is a feeling of fear that causes hesitation because you think that something bad or unpleasant is going to happen. // The students felt a sense of trepidation as they walked toward the principal's office. See the entry > Examples: "The current market is great for employment. There was a lot of trepidation for companies in 2020. People wanted to see how things would work out and were stalling." — Lisa Noble, quoted in The New York Times, 8 Oct. 2021 Did you know? If you've ever trembled with fright, you know something of both the sensation and etymology of trepidation. The word comes from the Latin verb trepidare, which means "to tremble." Early meanings of trepidation, such as "tremulous motion" or "tremor," reflect that origin; those are followed by the word's sense of "apprehension."

Divine Superconductor Radio
The Uncensored Truth About ADHD, the Medication and How to Heal with Tane Webster

Divine Superconductor Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 164:01


Have you been diagnosed with ADD or ADHD? Have you taken medications like methylphenolate? Is Ritalin an amphetamine-like substance? Do these drugs cause brain damage? Is the DSM/Diagnostic and Statistical Manual a medical textbook or a spell book? Tane Webster, ADD expert and owner of Grow Sanctuary, shares his experience of being diagnosed with a behavioral disorder, his journey on the medications and how he healed. He shares his philosophy on the diagnosis and answers an extensive list of Q&A questions at the end of the show.  Show Resources Tane's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/growsanctuary/?hl=en Tane's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuH7dYnKqR7bLKF96aqUvvQ http://www.ritalindeath.com/Content.htm https://www.institute4learning.com/2019/08/29/17-reasons-why-i-believe-adhd-is-not-a-legitimate-medical-disorder/ https://www.madinamerica.com/author/mcorrigan/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ia6OGEj6wW0 https://www.bitchute.com/video/7PBsvmhIRYU/ https://www.bitchute.com/video/tMaiIHc5yGwF/ - best documentary on "ADHD" https://breggin.com/?s=adhd - one of the best authors on "ADHD" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjb1XuyEd5k - my other interview on "ADHD" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gigZD4RIXhg My website: www.matt-blackburn.com Mitolife products: www.mitolife.co Music by George Henner https://georgehenner.bandcamp.com

Just Pro Wrestling News
WWE Roster Cuts. Update To Survivor Series Match.

Just Pro Wrestling News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 4:53


Listen and subscribe at www.JustProWrestlingNews.com I'm Matt Carlins and this is JUST Pro Wrestling News for Friday, November 19, 2021. This update is brought to you by IndyWrestling.us. (STINGER: WWE) Another wave of talent releases hit WWE on Thursday. Multiple outlets started reporting the list late Thursday night: John Morrison, Drake Maverick, Jaxson Ryker, Tegan Nox, Shane Thorne, and what was left of Hit Row - Isaiah SWERVE Scott, Ashante Adonis, and Top Dolla. Hit Row was just called up to the main roster last month. Now, ALL of them are gone from WWE. Thursday's cuts follow the releases of 18 other talents just two weeks ago. WWE announced Toni Storm will take the open spot on the SmackDown women's team at Survivor Series. Sonya Deville kicked Aliyah off the team on last Friday's SmackDown. Tonight's SmackDown is promoting Sasha Banks vs. Shotzi...and the return of Sheamus. On Thursday's NXT UK…Teoman & Rohan Raja took down Gallus' Mark Coffey & Wolfgang. The end came after Charlie Dempsey ran out to ringside to attack Joe Coffey. Also on the show, A-Kid beat Sam Gradwell...Kenny Williams beat Saxon Huxley...Aleah James beat Nina Samuels. It was announced that Flash Morgan Webster will be out of action for a while with a shoulder injury. Webster tweeted he's been working with a torn labrum for three years. (STINGER: AEW) Tonight's AEW Rampage…has Jade Cargill vs. Red Velvet in the quarterfinals of the TBS Championship Tournament. Plus, Darby Allin vs. Billy Gunn...and Jurassic Express vs. Adam Cole & Bobby Fish. (STINGER: Impact) A stipulation added to Moose's Impact World Title defense against Eddie Edwards. It's coming up Saturday on the Turning Point special...and it will be Full Metal Mayhem. The X-Division Title match at Turning Point is now a 3-Way. Trey Miguel will now defend against Laredo Kid and Steve Maclin. Maclin fought his way into the match by beating Laredo Kid on last night's Impact Wrestling. Also added to Turning Point, Matt Cardona vs. W. Morrissey... And Rich Swann will go one-on-one with Brian Myers. The match was made after Myers beat Sam Beale on Before The Impact. Jordynne Grace will defend the Digitial Media Championship against Chelsea Green on the Countdown to Turning Point. Getting back to last night, Josh Alexander beat Minoru Suzuki, pinning him with the C4. The Knockouts Tag Champs The IInspiration beat the Undead Bridesmaids in a non-title match...Doc Gallows beat Hikuleo...and The Demon & Decay's Black Taurus & Crazzy Steve beat Johnny Swinger, Hernandez & Fallah Baah. (STINGER: ROH) This weekend's Ring Of Honor TV has Dragon Lee defending the ROH TV Title against Dalton Castle. Plus, Trish Adora vs. Allysin Kay vs. Mandy Leon. The winner there advances to face Willow Nightingale for the shot at ROH Women's Champ Rok-C at Final Battle. Also on this weekend's show, Brian Johnson vs. John Walters in a Pure Rules Match. (STINGER: New Japan) New Japan's World Tag League tournament resumes Friday...with the Guerillas of Destiny vs. Hirooki Goto & YOSHI-HASHI in the main event. SHO is alone on top of the standings after the first three nights of the Best Of The Super Juniors tournament. SHO beat Ryusuke Taguchi on Thursday, for his third straight win. Also on the show, Taiji Ishimori beat Robbie Eagles. New Japan Strong tapings will be held in Hollywood on December 9th. The matches already announced include Jay White vs. Christopher Daniels...and Jonah vs. David Finlay. CMLL is running a big show at Arena Mexico tonight...featuring New Japan's Jeff Cobb & TJP vs. Atlantis Jr. & Volador Jr. That's JUST Pro Wrestling News for Friday, November 19th. Our next update comes your way tomorrow morning, so be sure to subscribe to this feed. We also thank you in advance for leaving a glowing rating or review.. I'm Matt Carlins. Thank YOU for listening. ~~~Full run down at www.justprowrestlingnews.com ~~~ • • • • • wwe #wrestling #prowrestling #smackdown #wwenetwork #wweraw #romanreigns #ajstyles #NXT #raw #njpw #wwenxt #SethRollins #TNA #johncena #RandyOrton #wrestlemania #ROH #WWF #summerslam #tripleh #aewdynamite #professionalwrestling #aew #allelitewrestling #aewontnt #DeanAmbrose #nxt #KevinOwens #wwesmackdown 

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 19, 2021 is: draconian • dray-KOH-nee-un • adjective Draconian means "cruel" or "severe." It is usually used to describe harsh laws, rules, or regulations. // Small businesses believe that the new tax is draconian. See the entry > Examples: "Members of the public were mostly against the censure policy…. They said the policy was draconian, divisive and unnecessary." — Braden Cartwright, The Daily Post (Palo Alto, California), 14 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Draconian comes from Draco, the name of a 7th-century B.C. Athenian legislator who created a written code of law. Draco's code was intended to clarify existing laws, but its severity is what made it really memorable. According to the code, even minor offenses were punishable by death, and failure to pay one's debts could result in slavery. Draconian, as a result, became associated with especially authoritative actions that are viewed as cruel or harsh.

Ken Webster Jr
Star Wars Goes Woke Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 38:43


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: MSNBC banned from Rittenhouse trial Racist muppets Remember the Haitian migrants?  A musical tribute to Antifa 

Ken Webster Jr
Star Wars Goes Woke Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 38:29


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: MSNBC banned from Rittenhouse trial Racist muppets Remember the Haitian migrants?  A musical tribute to Antifa 

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 18, 2021 is: amity • AM-uh-tee • noun Amity means "friendship" or "friendly relations between nations." // Amity between the nations was restored with the treaty. See the entry > Examples: "He's one of the few people … to have a deep, long-lasting amity with Russell, who guards his privacy and is fiercely dismissive of the social whirl." — Bruce Jenkins, The San Francisco Chronicle, 11 Sept. 2021 Did you know? Amity comes from the Latin word for "friend," amicus, and is used especially for relationships between political leaders and nations in which goodwill is shown despite differences that might exist between the two parties. Amicus is also the root of the adjectives amiable and amicable.

Ken Webster Jr
Let the Riots Commence: There's no Curfew in Kenosha Tonight Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 37:33


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: the Cruz debunks Biden border lies the FBI really is investigating concerned parents Kamala Harris and Egg McMuffins the latest from the Rittenhouse trial

Ken Webster Jr
Let the Riots Commence: There's no Curfew in Kenosha Tonight Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 36:27


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: the Cruz debunks Biden border lies the FBI really is investigating concerned parents Kamala Harris and Egg McMuffins the latest from the Rittenhouse trial

South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster
South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster

South Texas Gardening with Bob Webster

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 137:22


The Garden Show | November 14, 2021

New Books in Biography
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books Network
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 17, 2021 is: negotiate • nih-GOH-shee-ayt • verb Negotiate means "to deal with or bring about through discussion or compromise." It also means, for people and things in motion, "to get through, around, or over successfully." // The parties negotiated an agreement. // The slope is designed for an experienced skier who can negotiate unpredictable terrain. See the entry > Examples: "... unionized workers are in better position now to negotiate higher wages…." — Dave Flessner, The Chattanooga (Tennessee) Times Free Press, 19 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Negotiate comes from Latin negōtiārī, meaning "to carry on business," and the word shares that meaning. In English, it can also mean "to successfully travel along or over."

Ken Webster Jr
Why the Cold War Never Ended Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 37:29


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Legal problems for Harris County Judge Latest from the Rittenhouse trial Beto is late-o Special guests Wesley Hunt and Holly Hansen 

Ken Webster Jr
Why the Cold War Never Ended Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 35:37


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Legal problems for Harris County Judge Latest from the Rittenhouse trial Beto is late-o Special guests Wesley Hunt and Holly Hansen 

Pass the Salt Live
Coach Dave LIVE | 11-16-2021 | WHEN ALL THE ANTS STAND UP – AUDIO ONLY

Pass the Salt Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:08


LINKS FROM TODAY’S SHOW: Enemies within the Church: https://enemieswithinthechurch.com/ “Slander” according to Webster 1828: http://www.webstersdictionary1828.com/Dictionary/slander  New Orleans upholds mandate block: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10197077/U-S-appeals-court-affirms-hold-Biden-COVID-19-vaccine-mandate.html 5th Circuit Court of Appeals with Tony Spell: https://coachdavelive.video/video/3091/prayer-and-praise-over-pastor-tony-spell?channelName=Bobbylee Bug’s Life clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLbWnJGlyMU Murder […]

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 16, 2021 is: facetious • fuh-SEE-shuss • adjective Facetious means "joking often inappropriately" or "meant to be humorous or funny." It usually describes something said or done as being annoying, silly, or improper. // I was just being facetious. See the entry > Examples: "Forget the license to kill. James Bond fanatics carry a license to argue about everything. Who's the best Bond? Well, Connery. Obviously. But Daniel Craig's a close second, many believe. And the other screen Bonds have their admirers, despite the lesser movies' unevenness or facetious gadgetry." — Michael Phillips, The Chicago Tribune, 8 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Facetious—which puzzle fans know is one of the few English words containing the vowels "a, e, i, o, u" in order—comes from French facetieux, which traces to the Latin word facētia, meaning "cleverness or wit." In English, facetiae refers to "witty or humorous writings or sayings."

Ken Webster Jr
Failing Your Way to the Top with Beto O'Rourke Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 41:04


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Beto announces governor campaign in Texas Some charges dropped in Rittenhouse trial 24 hours of funerals and weddings Brandon Waltens from Texas Scorecard

Ken Webster Jr
Failing Your Way to the Top with Beto O'Rourke

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:58


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Beto announces governor campaign in Texas Some charges dropped in Rittenhouse trial 24 hours of funerals and weddings Brandon Waltens from Texas Scorecard

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 15, 2021 is: wormhole • WERM-hohl • noun A wormhole is a hypothetical structure of space-time that is envisioned as a long, thin tunnel connecting points that are separated in (well) space and time. // Some science fiction writers speculate that wormholes are the intergalactic highways of the future. See the entry > Examples: "Imagine space as a vast sheet of paper. You live at one end and you want to travel to the other end. Ordinarily you'd have to trudge across the entire length of the page to get there. But what if you folded the paper in half instead? Suddenly, where you are and where you want to be are right next to each other. You simply have to jump that tiny gap. We call these objects wormholes because it is like a worm trying to navigate its way around an apple. To get from the top to the bottom it has two choices: Crawl around the outside, or chew a shortcut through the middle." — Colin Stuart, Space.com, 13 July 2021 Did you know? If you associate wormhole with quantum physics and sci-fi, you'll probably be surprised to learn that the word has been around since William Shakespeare's day. To Shakespeare, a "wormhole" was simply a hole made by a worm, but even the Bard subtly linked wormholes to the passage of time; for example, in the poem The Rape of Lucrece, he notes time's destructive power "to fill with worm-holes stately monuments." To modern astrophysicists, a wormhole isn't a tunnel wrought by a slimy invertebrate, but a theoretical tunnel between two black holes or other points in space-time, providing a shortcut between its end points.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 15, 2021 is: wormhole • WERM-hohl • noun A wormhole is a hypothetical structure of space-time that is envisioned as a long thin tunnel connecting points that are separated in (well) space and time. // Some science fiction writers speculate that wormholes are the intergalactic highways of the future. See the entry > Examples: "Imagine space as a vast sheet of paper. You live at one end and you want to travel to the other end. Ordinarily you'd have to trudge across the entire length of the page to get there. But what if you folded the paper in half instead? Suddenly, where you are and where you want to be are right next to each other. You simply have to jump that tiny gap. We call these objects wormholes because it is like a worm trying to navigate its way around an apple. To get from the top to the bottom it has two choices: Crawl around the outside, or chew a shortcut through the middle." — Colin Stuart, Space.com, 13 July 2021 Did you know? If you associate wormhole with quantum physics and sci-fi, you'll probably be surprised to learn that the word has been around since William Shakespeare's day. To Shakespeare, a "wormhole" was simply a hole made by a worm, but even the Bard subtly linked wormholes to the passage of time; for example, in the poem The Rape of Lucrece, he notes time's destructive power "to fill with worm-holes stately monuments." To modern astrophysicists, a wormhole isn't a tunnel wrought by a slimy invertebrate, but a theoretical tunnel between two black holes or other points in space-time, providing a shortcut between its end points.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 14, 2021 is: grisly • GRIZ-lee • adjective Grisly means "causing horror or intense fear." // The movie is a grisly tale with gruesome special effects and terrifying monsters. See the entry > Examples: "It is a national tragedy that we don't appreciate pumpkins more…. Other than carving them into ghoulish and grisly faces to adorn our windows, we seem to ignore them for the rest of the time they are in season." — JP McMahon, The Irish Times, 9 Oct. 2021 Did you know? An angry grizzly bear could certainly inspire fear, so grizzly and grisly must be related, right? Grizzly comes from the Middle English adjective grisel, meaning "gray." Like its close relative grizzled, grizzly means "sprinkled or streaked with gray." In other words, the grizzly bear got its name because the hairs of its brownish to buff coat usually have silver or pale tips, creating a grizzled effect, not because it causes terror. Grisly is related to Old English grislic, which comes from a verb meaning "to fear" and which gives grisly its "terrifying" sense.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 13, 2021 is: qualm • KWAHM • noun Qualm is often used in the plural form qualms for feelings of uneasiness about whether something is right or wrong. // Cynthia's parents had no qualms about her traveling abroad for a year after graduating high school. See the entry > Examples: "My main qualm with this pie was that there wasn't enough flavor for my liking…." — Molly Allen, Taste of Home, 7 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Etymologists are not sure how qualm came to be, but early use of the word is for a sudden sick feeling. It then was used for a sudden attack of emotion. Today, qualm usually refers to a feeling of uneasiness, particularly in not following one's conscience or better judgment.

Apostolic Fellowship Churches Of Christ Jesus
Waiting - Elder William Webster

Apostolic Fellowship Churches Of Christ Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 43:20


Apostolic Fellowship Church of Christ Jesus Friday Evening Worship Service, 1153 Blue Hills Ave, Bloomfield, CT 06002 We can be reached by contacting us at AFCMedia@AFC-ct.com or calling us at 860-242-3518.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 12, 2021 is: edify • ED-uh-fye • verb Edify means "to uplift, enlighten, or inform." // The speaker's words edified the graduating class, giving them hope and encouragement. See the entry > Examples: "This is our first theatrical performance where our theatre is now complete. Young audience members will be edified by being around lots of amazing women's stories, and the old ones will be reminded of the progress that we have made." — Cate Belleveau, quoted in The Bemidji (Minnesota) Pioneer, 29 Sept. 2021 Did you know? Edify comes from the Latin verb aedificare, meaning "to instruct or improve spiritually"; it is based on aedes, the word for "temple." Edify shares the spiritual meaning of its Latin root, but it is also used in general contexts to refer to the act of instructing in a way that improves the mind or character overall.

Ken Webster Jr
Saving Texas from the Left

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 40:48


Today on Pursuit of Happiness: Texas Heartbeat bill New rash of violence at the border Astroworld Special guest Don Huffines

The Scathing Atheist
456: Dodger Rodgers Edition

The Scathing Atheist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 61:30


In this week's episode, Joe Biden makes America slightly less great again for bigots, we learn from a religious essay contest that Webster's dictionary defines the afterlife as something proven with prose, and Don Ford will be here to give the Bible the funny voices it so richly deserves. --- Vulgarity for Charity Learn how you can participate in Vulgarity for Charity here: https://scathingatheist.com/2021/11/01/vulgarity-for-charity-2021/ To make a per episode donation at Patreon.com, click here: http://www.patreon.com/ScathingAtheist To buy our book, click there: https://www.amazon.com/Outbreak-Crisis-Religion-Ruined-Pandemic/dp/B08L2HSVS8/ To check out our sister show, The Skepticrat, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/the-skepticrat To check out our sister show's hot friend, God Awful Movies, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/god-awful-movies To check out our half-sister show, Citation Needed, click here: http://citationpod.com/ To check out our sister show's sister show, D and D minus, click here: https://danddminus.libsyn.com/ To hear more from our intrepid audio engineer Morgan Clarke, click here: https://www.morganclarkemusic.com/ --- Headlines: Biden administration walks back Trump era protections for federally funded religious bigotry: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/11/08/biden-admin-will-undo-rule-allowing-religious-bigotry-by-taxpayer-funded-groups/ Bobby Kirkhart, an irreplaceable atheist icon, has died at 78: ​​https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/11/02/bobbie-kirkhart-an-irreplaceable-atheist-icon-has-died-at-78/ Clay Clark alleges Alec Baldwin shooting was really a Satanic ritual to protect the Clintons: https://www.rightwingwatch.org/post/clay-clark-alleges-tragic-alec-baldwin-shooting-was-really-a-satanic-ritual-to-protect-the-clintons/ French Catholic Church agrees to compensate victims of sex abuse: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/11/09/frances-catholic-church-agrees-to-compensate-victims-of-sexual-abuse/ Conservatives are mad about not a Twix ad: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/11/05/conservatives-are-furious-over-a-twix-ad-that-twix-didnt-make-and-isnt-an-ad/ Wealthy man hands out $1,800,000 for essays showing "evidence" of the afterlife: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/11/08/wealthy-man-hands-out-1800000-for-essays-showing-evidence-of-the-afterlife/ --- This Week in Misogyny: Lori Alexander: Obesity would be solved if women stopped working: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/11/04/christian-mommy-our-obesity-problem-could-be-solved-if-women-stopped-working/ Ohio abortion ban would be even more restrictive than Texas: https://www.plannedparenthoodaction.org/planned-parenthood-advocates-ohio/media/ohio-introduces-more-extreme-abortion-ban-than-texas Afghan women's rights activists murdered: https://feminist.org/news/afghan-womens-rights-activists-murdered/

Coffee and a Mike
Dr. Angelina Farella #326

Coffee and a Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 90:44


Angelina Farella, MD is an independent solo practice pediatrician and owner of A Brighter Tomorrow Pediatrics in Webster, TX since 2004. She has been recognized by the AMA for a Leadership Award for Young Physicians and is board certified by the National Board of Physicians and Surgeons. On the podcast we discuss the rise in CO2 levels in children from wearing masks, why no kids should get the shot, old/new definition of vaccine and using smell therapies to regain sense of smell.

Sound & Vision
Emma Webster

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 94:57


Emma Webster is an artist who received her BA in Art Practice at Stanford University in 2011 and an MFA in Painting at Yale University in 2018. The British-American artist has been an artist-in-residence at Anderson Ranch, Vermont Studio Center, and Ox-Bow. Emma received Yale's award to attend the Dumfries Royal Drawing School in Scotland and the Raina Giese Award in Creative Painting. Recent exhibitions include: Alexander Berggruen, New York; Carl Kostyál, London; Diane Rosenstein, Los Angeles; Museum of Art & History, Lancaster; and Spinnerei (Pilotenkueche), Leipzig, Germany. She has been featured in publications including: The New Yorker, Harper's Magazine, Los Angeles Times, Artforum International, New American Painting, and Artsy. Her recent book Lonescape: Green, Painting, and Mourning Reality is available now through Alexander Berggruen's website. 

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 11, 2021 is: steadfast • STED-fast • adjective Steadfast means "firm in belief, determination, or adherence." // The mayor is a steadfast supporter of bringing more businesses into the downtown area. See the entry > Examples: "I remain steadfast in my adoration of the glorious season we are now entering. Between crisp mornings and humidity-free afternoons—not to mention kaleidoscope leaves, 20-pound pumpkins, campfire perfume, … and a dozen other joys—the here and now is heaven on Earth." — Sam Venable, The Knoxville (Tennessee) News-Sentinel, 10 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Steadfast has held its ground for many centuries. Its Old English predecessor, stedefæst, combines stede (meaning "place" or "stead") and fæst (meaning "firmly fixed"). The word was first used in battle contexts to describe warriors who stood their ground, which led to its "immovable" sense. That sense gave way to the word's use as an adjective implying unswerving faith, loyalty, or devotion.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 10, 2021 is: bevy • BEV-ee • noun A bevy is a large group or collection. // The gym offers a bevy of workout classes, including kickboxing and Zumba. See the entry > Examples: "Starting at 7:30 p.m. on most nights in October, a bevy of jack-o-lanterns will glow along pathways on Newfields' campus." — Domenica Bongiovanni, The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky), 10 Oct. 2021 Did you know? Bevy makes its appearance in Middle English as a word used especially for a group of deer, quail, larks, or young ladies. Etymologists aren't certain why bevy was chosen for those groups (though they have theories). Today, bevies include any person or thing—e.g., "a bevy of reporters," "a bevy of menu choices."

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 9, 2021 is: truncate • TRUNG-kayt • verb Truncate means "to shorten by or as if by cutting off." // Many statements in the court document were truncated before publication. See the entry > Examples: "[Derrick White] has never logged more than the 68 games he registered in 2019-20, an NBA season interrupted and truncated by the onset of the pandemic." — Jeff McDonald, The San Antonio (Texas) Express-News, 30 Sept. 2021 Did you know? The earliest use of truncate is as an adjective describing something (such as a leaf or feather) with the end squared off as if it had been cut. It makes sense, then, that the verb refers to shortening things. The word comes from Latin truncare ("to shorten"), which traces to truncus ("trunk").

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 8, 2021 is: demagogue • DEM-uh-gahg • noun A demagogue is a leader who makes use of popular prejudices and false claims and promises in order to gain power. // The country's voters ousted the demagogue who capitalized on the fears of the people. See the entry > Examples: "You need an internal guidance system for making decisions. Without one, your choices become heavily influenced by external forces such as peers, television, and demagogues." — Tom Muha, The Capital (Annapolis, Maryland), 2 Oct. 2021 Did you know? When the ancient Greeks used dēmagōgos (from dēmos, meaning "people," and agein, "to lead") they meant someone good—a leader who used outstanding oratorical skills to further the interests of the common people. But alas, the word took a negative turn, suggesting one who uses powers of persuasion to sway and mislead.