Podcasts about Silicon Valley

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  • 10,787PODCASTS
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  • Oct 23, 2021LATEST
Silicon Valley

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Best podcasts about Silicon Valley

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Latest podcast episodes about Silicon Valley

Sales vs. Marketing
John Hagel, Founder of Center For The Edge | Navigating The Journey Beyond Fear

Sales vs. Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 53:59


➡️ Like The Show? Leave A Rating: https://ratethispodcast.com/successstory ➡️ About The Guest John Hagel has spent over 40 years in Silicon Valley and has experience as a management consultant, entrepreneur, speaker and author. He has recently retired from Deloitte and founded a new company, Beyond our Edge, LLC, that works with companies and people who are seeking to anticipate the future and achieve much greater impact. He has also worked with McKinsey & Co. and Boston Consulting Group. In addition to his new book, John is the author of 7 books, including The Power of Pull, Net Gain, Net Worth, Out of the Box and The Only Sustainable Edge. He is widely published and quoted in major business outlets including The Economist, Fortune, Forbes, Business Week, Financial Times, and Wall Street Journal, as well as general media like the New York Times, NBC and BBC ➡️ Talking Points 11:24 - Why do we have so much fear? 13:26 - Reshaping the global economy and society. 23:58 - A culture of fear. 27:31 - The importance of personal & corporate narratives. 33:58 - Harnessing passion. 39:23 - Using platforms for personal growth. 48:28 - Optimizing for happiness. ➡️ Show Links https://twitter.com/jhagel https://www.linkedin.com/in/jhagel/ ➡️ Podcast Sponsors 1. Better Help —Virtual Therapy & Mental Wellness betterhelp.com/scottclary — 10% Off First Month 2. Laika — Compliance Tools & Software https://heylaika.com/success (20% Off) 3. Hubspot Podcast Network https://hubspot.com/podcastnetwork

Nervous Habits with Ricky Rosen
Nervous Habits - Episode 60: An Alternate History of Silicon Valley with Journalist Max Chafkin

Nervous Habits with Ricky Rosen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 123:33


Nervous Habits host Ricky Rosen is joined by journalist and author of The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley's Pursuit of Power, Max Chafkin, to explore issues including…. —Some of the most powerful criticisms of billionaire investor and entrepreneur Peter Thiel, and why exactly he is such a polarizing figure, —Peter Thiel's rivalry with Elon Musk and his mentorship of Mark Zuckerberg, —Peter Thiel's behind-the-scenes machinations in the 2016 presidential election and his financial support of a half-dozen Senatorial campaigns, and finally… —How Peter Thiel's anti-establishment mindset has shaped the culture of Silicon Valley over the last two and a half decades.

Changing Lives Selling Knives
278: Jim Lawrence - Flashback Friday

Changing Lives Selling Knives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 15:32


Jim Lawrence has been an elite professional in the Talent Acquisition industry for over 25 years. He was a star Track & Field athlete in high school and college, top sales leader and Branch Manager in Cutco/Vector, graduated from Washington State University and immediately married his high-school sweetheart and started their family. He used his Vector skills and experience to get a job that was not normally offered to recent college grads, and he has been a super-achiever in his industry ever since. He ran his own company for 12 years, has raised 2 daughters, and built a significant portfolio of real estate holdings in the Silicon Valley area. His is a true Great American Success Story! To get access to all episodes and free resources, visit  ChangingLivesPodcast.com.

Pillars Of Community
TREVOR GOSS = Tech. Entrepreneur = PILLARS LXXIV

Pillars Of Community

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 60:08


Trevor Goss has been a great friend of mine for much of my life dating back to a fateful day on the 8th grade gridiron (we'll leave that story for another day).  We went to Georgetown Prep together and he went to Cornell and then out to Silicon Valley to pursue a serious passion -- tech. start-ups.  Trevor journeyed, sloughed, and innovated in San Francisco for over a decade and all the while conceiving his latest baby: HQ: the world's first smart journal -- "Journals give you a space for writing. A smart journal gives you a space for everything."I hope you enjoy our conversation -- it sure got me thinking about how to optimize life.  Check out Trevor's slick website he built from scratch:https://my-hq.co/You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems. 

California Rebel Base with Steve Hilton
Ep. 45 How to Stop Woke Corporations ft. Vivek Ramaswamy

California Rebel Base with Steve Hilton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:29


California Rebel Base got hit by the woke police for wrong think! Steve and Kristen chat with Woke, Inc. author, Vivek Ramaswamy about what's behind this tech censorship, how wokeism took over our big corporations, and how to fight back.

The Technically Human Podcast
The Fork in the Road to Ethical Technology: Vivek Wadhwa on navigating ethical roadmaps in a perilous tech landscape

The Technically Human Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 43:00


In this episode, I sit down with Vivek Wadhwa to talk about his pivot from tech entrepreneur and big tech enthusiast, to critic and activist. We talk about his path to tech and then to his activism in education, his research into tech innovation, and his research into the importance of global diversity when considering questions of how we imagine, innovate, and build. Vivek Wadhwa is a Distinguished Fellow at Harvard Law School's Labor and Worklife Program. He is the author of five best-selling books: From Incremental to Exponential; Your Happiness Was Hacked; The Driver in the Driverless Car; Innovating Women; and The Immigrant Exodus. He has been a globally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post and held appointments at Carnegie Mellon University, Duke University, Stanford Law School, UC Berkeley, Emory University, and Singularity University. In 2012, the U.S. Government awarded Wadhwa distinguished recognition as an “Outstanding American by Choice” for his “commitment to this country and to the common civic values that unite us as Americans.” He was also named one of the world's “Top 100 Global Thinkers” by Foreign Policy magazine in that year; in June 2013, he was on TIME magazine's list of “Tech 40”, one of forty of the most influential minds in tech; and in September 2015, he was second on a list of “ten men worth emulating” in The Financial Times. In 2018, he was awarded Silicon Valley Forum's Visionary Award, a list of luminaries “who have made Silicon Valley synonymous with creativity and life-changing advancements in technology.”   Wadhwa is an advisor to several governments; mentors entrepreneurs; and writes for top publications across the globe. He has also researched Silicon Valley's diversity, or the lack of it.  He documented that women entrepreneurs have the same backgrounds and motivations as men do, but are rare in the ranks of technology CEOs and CTOs. He is the founding president of the Carolinas chapter of The IndUS Entrepreneurs (TIE), a non-profit global network intended to foster entrepreneurship.  He has been featured in thousands of articles in publications worldwide, including the Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Forbes magazine, The Washington Post, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, and Science Magazine, and has made many appearances on U.S. and international TV stations, including CBS 60 Minutes, PBS, CNN, ABC, NBC, CNBC, and the BBC. This episode was produced by Mereck Palazzo & Matt Perry. Art by Desi Aleman.

Puck Presents: The Powers That Be
NYT Succession Drama, Chappellegate, & ESPN's Future

Puck Presents: The Powers That Be

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 61:59


Join Puck writers Peter Hamby, Matt Belloni, and Dylan Byers for an expert discussion about these topics and more:​ Netflix's ongoing Dave Chappelle damage control campaign, and the silver lining for trans creators in Hollywood Halloween Kills' big win at the box office — and in the App Store Ratings are up for live sports, but how long will they be tied to linear TV? If Dean Baquet leaves this year, who will take over the New York Times? The challenges facing Politico as Axel Springer comes in Why might Disney spin off ESPN? Puck's team writes about the inside conversation happening in Wall Street, Washington, Silicon Valley, and Hollywood. https://puck.news/subscribe/ (Become a Puck member) starting at $12.99/month or $100/year for daily articles and breaking news from Peter, Matt, Dylan, and more.

1A
How Whistleblowers Have Put Big Tech On The Back Foot

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 30:18


As the power of Silicon Valley's tech companies has grown, so too has the number of people willing to air their dirty laundry.Facebook is the latest in the line of fire after whistleblower Francis Haugen's congressional testimony in early October.Apple is also reeling from an internal crisis. One of the organizers of the #AppleToo movement was fired last week. But even though these organizations seem to be on the back foot, blowing the whistle is complicated and risky. What does it take to be a whistleblower? And is it enough to actually implement change in Silicon Valley?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Venture Stories
Accelerating the next wave of global founders: ODX in partnership with Village Global

Venture Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 23:58


Ben Casnocha (@bencasnocha), Erik Torenberg (@eriktorenberg), Anne Dwane (@adwane), partners at Village Global, and David Booth (@david__booth), co-CEO of On Deck, discuss:- ODX in partnership with Village Global, the $100M+ community-backed accelerator that plans to invest in 1000 companies over the next few years: https://beondeck.com/x- The key differentiators of ODX: a dedicated partner for each company, an all-access pass to the On Deck community, and the fact that the entire community has upside in the fund.- Examples of how founders have taken advantage of On Deck's unique structure, including some examples of their most successful companies to date.- Why Erik has been so inspired by “putting people in business.”- On Deck's belief that humanity primarily progresses through tech, that tech primarily comes from startups, and that there are not enough founders starting startups today.- How to get started with ODX.Read more about the announcement:https://medium.com/village-global/re-imagining-the-accelerator-in-partnership-with-on-deck-11871f129f7bhttps://beondeck.com/post/announcing-odxThanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. Check us out on the web at www.villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.Want to get updates from us? Subscribe to get a peek inside the Village. We'll send you reading recommendations, exclusive event invites, and commentary on the latest happenings in Silicon Valley. www.villageglobal.vc/signup

What Is X?
What Is Mental Health? | Danielle Carr

What Is X?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 65:16


Since the mid-twentieth century, there has been an ongoing quarrel over the definition of mental health: Are disorders like depression, OCD, or schizophrenia biologically determined or are they socially constructed?In this episode of “What Is X?,” Justin E. H. Smith talks to Danielle Carr about the history of psychiatry and the politics of madness, from 1930s asylums and the DSM to the antipsychiatry movement and Elon Musk's newest hobby: neural implants. They discuss the big business of mental health in our therapeutic society—evident in the popularity of mental wellness apps, the proliferation of SSRIs, and Silicon Valley's fascination with brain chemistry. But could the extent and prevalence of everyday unhappiness point to problems that medicine and technology can't solve? Do they call for changing the social conditions that contribute to these feelings of loneliness and immiseration? “Mental health,” Carr argues, “is a terrain of struggle over the question of what human flourishing is and how to achieve it.” Does Justin agree?

Latitud Podcast
#64 - The power of network effects: Pete Flint, NFX

Latitud Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:09


Born in Essex, England, Pete Flint is a brit deeply immersed in Silicon Valley startup culture. He's a titan of disruptive innovation and a widely respected leader in the tech industry, and was one of my early supporters at Viva Real.Two times unicorn, he was part of the founding team of travel industry pioneer lastminute.com before starting Trulia, one of the most popular real state apps in the US.With tales of a successful IPO and an exit valued at $3.5b, Pete is now helping entrepreneurs leverage capital, experience and connections as a partner at venture firm NFX.Today Pete and I will be talking about:How to leverage network effectsBuilding a business that evolves at scaleAnd NFX's plans for its new $450 million pre-seed and seed fundBuilding something new? Apply for the Latitud Fellowship at apply.latitud.com

Incredible Life Creator with Dr. Kimberley Linert
Standing for justice regardless of the cost - Chris Riedel Ep 240

Incredible Life Creator with Dr. Kimberley Linert

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:58


Chris Riedel has spent the past 40 years in the healthcare industry, and more recently, as one of the leading healthcare fraud fighters. He founded and served as the CEO of five health care companies: Hunter Heart, Hunter Laboratories, Meris Laboratories (NASDAQ: MERS), MicroScan, and Micro Media systems. In May of 1992, Meris was ranked by Business Week as the 40th best small company in America. He also has served as a Managing Director for Providence Capital, a boutique New York investment bank, as the Chairman of Chi Laboratory Systems, the pre-eminent hospital and commercial laboratory consulting firm in the U.S., and as a member of the Board of Directors of Boston Heart Lab. Currently, is he is member of Business Executives for National Security (BENS). For the past decade, Mr. Riedel has concentrated his efforts on fraud fighting against medical labs that are defrauding American taxpayers and the medical industry — the subject of Blood Money. One of his proudest accomplishments came when he received the Taxpayers Against Fraud Whistleblower of the Year Award in 2011 for assisting in the recovery of $286 million from Quest and LabCorp, which he undertook on behalf of California taxpayers. Another accomplishment was developing and receiving FDA new drug approval for a more precise way to identify bacteria causing disease, and which antibiotics and dosage will be most effective in treatment — a product that has saved many lives around the world. A longtime resident of Silicon Valley, Mr. Riedel makes his home there with his wife, Marcia, and four sons, for whom he served as a soccer and basketball coach for years. He enjoys international travel and is an avid Bay Area sports fan. Contact Chris Reidel: http://chrisriedelauthor.com/ Do you want to live an incredible life? Get started now by reading my book: "Visualizing Happiness in Every Area of Your Life" https://amzn.to/2kvAuXU What is your biggest obstacle to creating an incredible life? You can book a free 15-minute mentoring session with Dr. Kimberley Linert. Click on this booking link: https://calendly.com/drkimberley/15min Please subscribe to the podcast and take a few minutes to review on iTunes, Thank you If you have an amazing story to tell about your life and how you are sharing your gifts and talents with the world, then I would love to have you as a guest on my podcast. Contact me via email: incrediblelifepodcast@gmail.com or private message me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/incrediblelifecreator www.DrKimberleyLinert.com

Screaming in the Cloud
Navigating the Morass of the Internet with Chloe Condon

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:32


About ChloeChloe is a Bay Area based Cloud Advocate for Microsoft. Previously, she worked at Sentry.io where she created the award winning Sentry Scouts program (a camp themed meet-up ft. patches, s'mores, giant squirrel costumes, and hot chocolate), and was featured in the Grace Hopper Conference 2018 gallery featuring 15 influential women in STEM by AnitaB.org. Her projects and work with Azure have ranged from fake boyfriend alerts to Mario Kart 'astrology', and have been featured in VICE, The New York Times, as well as SmashMouth's Twitter account. Chloe holds a BA in Drama from San Francisco State University and is a graduate of Hackbright Academy. She prides herself on being a non-traditional background engineer, and is likely one of the only engineers who has played an ogre, crayon, and the back-end of a cow on a professional stage. She hopes to bring more artists into tech, and more engineers into the arts.Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChloeCondon Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gitforked/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ChloeCondonVideos TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Somehow in the years this show has been running, I've only had Chloe Condon on once. In that time, she's over for dinner at my house way more frequently than that, but somehow the stars never align to get us together in front of microphones and have a conversation. First, welcome back to the show, Chloe. You're a senior cloud advocate at Microsoft on the Next Generation Experiences Team. It is great to have you here.Chloe: I'm back, baby. I'm so excited. This is one of my favorite shows to listen to, and it feels great to be a repeat guest, a friend of the pod. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yes indeed. So, something-something cloud, something-something Microsoft, something-something Azure, I don't particularly care, in light of what it is you have going on that you have just clued me in on, and we're going to talk about that to start. You're launching something new called Master Creep Theatre and I have a whole bunch of questions. First and foremost, is it theater or theatre? How is that spelled? Which—the E and the R, what direction does that go in?Chloe: Ohh, I feel like it's going to be the R-E because that makes it very fancy and almost British, you know?Corey: Oh, yes. And the Harlequin mask direction it goes in, that entire aesthetic, I love it. Please tell me what it is. I want to know the story of how it came to be, the sheer joy I get from playing games with language alone guarantee I'm going to listen to whatever this is, but please tell me more.Chloe: Oh, my goodness. Okay, so this is one of those creative projects that's been on my back burner forever where I'm like, someday when I have time, I'm going to put all my time [laugh] and energy into this. So, this originally stemmed from—if you don't follow me on Twitter, oftentimes when I'm not tweeting about '90s nostalgia, or Clippy puns, or Microsoft silly throwback things to Windows 95, I get a lot of weird DMs. On every app, not just Twitter. On Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, oh my gosh, what else is there?Corey: And I don't want to be clear here just to make this absolutely crystal clear, “Hey, Chloe, do you want to come back on Screaming in the Cloud again?” Is not one of those weird DMs to which you're referring?Chloe: No, that is a good DM. So, people always ask me, “Why don't you just close your DMs?” Because a lot of high profile people on the internet just won't even have their DMs open.Corey: Oh, I understand that, but I'm the same boat. I would have a lot less nonsense, but at the same time, I want—at least in my case—I want people to be able to reach out to me because the only reason I am what I am is that a bunch of people who had no reason to do it did favors for me—Chloe: Yes.Corey: —and I can't ever repay it, I can only ever pay it forward and that is the cost of doing favors. If I can help someone, I will, and that's hard to do with, “My DMs are closed so hunt down my email address and send me an email,” and I'm bad at email.Chloe: Right. I'm terrible at email as well, and I'm also terrible at DMs [laugh]. So, I think a lot of folks don't understand the volume at which I get messages, which if you're a good friend of mine, if you're someone like Corey or a dear friend like Emily, I will tell you, “Hey, if you actually need to get ahold of me, text me.” And text me a couple times because I probably see it and then I have ADHD, so I won't immediately respond. I think I respond in my head but I don't.But I get anywhere from, I would say, ohh, like, 30 on a low day to 100 on a day where I have a viral tweet about getting into tech with a non-traditional background or something like that. And these DMs that I get are really lovely messages like, “Thank you for the work you do,” or, “I decided to do a cute manicure because the [laugh] manicure you posted,” too, “How do I get into tech? How do I get a job at Microsoft?” All kinds of things. It runs the gamut between, “Where's your shirt from?” Where—[laugh]—“What's your mother's maiden name?”But a lot of the messages that I get—and if you're a woman on the internet with any sort of presence, you know how there's that, like—what's it called in Twitter—the Other Messages feature that's like, “Here's the people you know. Here's the people”—the message requests. For the longest time were just, “Hey,” “Hi,” “Hey dear,” “Hi pretty,” “Hi ma'am,” “Hello,” “Love you,” just really weird stuff. And of course, everyone gets these; these are bots or scammers or whatever they may be—or just creeps, like weird—and always the bio—not always but I [laugh] would say, like, these accounts range from either obviously a bot where it's a million different numbers, an account that says, “Father, husband, lover of Jesus Christ and God.” Which is so [laugh] ironic… I'm like, “Why are you in my DMs?”Corey: A man of God, which is why I'm in your DMs being creepy.Chloe: Exactly. Or—Corey: Just like Christ might have.Chloe: And you would be shocked, Corey, at how many. The thing that I love to say is Twitter is not a dating site. Neither is LinkedIn. Neither is Instagram. I post about my boyfriend all the time, who you've met, and we adore Ty Smith, but I've never received any unsolicited images, knock on wood, but I'm always getting these very bait-y messages like, “Hey, beautiful. I want to take you out.” And you would be shocked at how many of these people are doing it from their professional business account. [laugh]. Like, works at AWS, works at Google; it's like, oh my God. [laugh].Corey: You get this under your name, right? It ties back to it. Meanwhile—again, this is one of those invisible areas of privilege that folks who look like me don't have to deal with. My DM graveyard is usually things like random bot accounts, always starting with, “Hi,” or, “Hey.” If you want to guarantee I never respond to you, that is what you say. I just delete those out of hand because I don't notice or care. It is either a bot, or a scam, or someone who can't articulate what they're actually trying to get from me—Chloe: Exactly.Corey: —and I don't have the time for it. Make your request upfront. Don't ask to ask; just ask.Chloe: I think it's important to note, also, that I get a lot of… different kinds of these messages and they try to respond to everyone. I cannot. If I responded to everybody's messages that I got, I just wouldn't have any time to do my job. But the thing that I always say to people—you know, and managers have told me in the past, my boyfriend has encouraged me to do this, is when people say things like, “Close your DMs,” or, “Just ignore them,” I want to have the same experience that everybody else has on the internet. Now, it's going to be a little different, of course, because I look and act and sound like I do, and of course, podcasts are historically a visual medium, so I'm a five-foot-two, white, bright orange-haired girl; I'm a very quirky individual.Corey: Yes, if you look up ‘quirky,' you're right there under the dictionary definition. And every time—like, when we were first hanging out and you mentioned, “Oh yeah, I used to be in theater.” And it's like, “You know, you didn't even have to tell me that, on some level.” Which is not intended to be an insult. It's just theater folks are a bit of a type, and you are more or less the archetype of what a theatre person is, at least to my frame of reference.Chloe: And not only that, but I did musicals, so you can't see the jazz hands now, but–yeah, my degree is in drama. I come from that space and I just, you know, whenever people say, “Just ignore it,” or, “Close your DMs,” I'm like, I want people to be able to reach out to me; I want to be able to message one-on-one with Corey and whoever, when—as needed, and—Corey: Why should I close my DMs?Chloe: Yeah.Corey: They're the ones who suck. Yeah.Chloe: [laugh]. But over the years, to give people a little bit of context, I've been working in tech a long time—I've been working professionally in the DevRel space for about five or six years now—but I've worked in tech a long time, I worked as a recruiter, an office admin, executive assistant, like, I did all of the other areas of tech, but it wasn't until I got a presence on Twitter—which I've only been on Twitter for I think five years; I haven't been on there that long, actively. And to give some context on that, Twitter is not a social media platform used in the theater space. We just use Instagram and Facebook, really, back in the day, I'm not on Facebook at all these days. So, when I discovered Twitter was cool—and I should also mention my boyfriend, Ty, was working at Twitter at the time and I was like, “Twitter's stupid. Who would go on this—[laugh] who uses this app?”Fast-forward to now, I'm like—Ty's like, “Can you please get off Twitter?” But yeah, I think I've just been saving these screenshots over the last five or so years from everything from my LinkedIn, from all the crazy stuff that I dealt with when people thought I was a Bitcoin influencer to people being creepy. One of the highlights that I recently found when I was going back and trying to find these for this series that I'm doing is there was a guy from Australia, DMed me something like, “Hey, beautiful,” or, “Hey, sexy,” something like that. And I called him out. And I started doing this thing where I would post it on Twitter.I would usually hide their image with a clown emoji or something to make it anonymous, or not to call them out, but in this one I didn't, and this guy was defending himself in the comments, and to me in my DM's saying, “Oh, actually, this was a social experiment and I have all the screenshots of this,” right? So, imagine if you will—so I have conversations ranging from things like that where it's like, “Actually I messaged a bunch of people about that because I'm doing a social experiment on how people respond to, ‘Hey beautiful. I'd love to take you out some time in Silicon Valley.'” just the weirdest stuff right? So, me being the professional performer that I am, was like, these are hilarious.And I kept thinking to myself, anytime I would get these messages, I was like, “Does this work?” If you just go up to someone and say, “Hey”—do people meet this way? And of course, you get people on Twitter who when you tweet something like that, they're like, “Actually, I met my boyfriend in Twitter DMs,” or like, “I met my boyfriend because he slid into my DMs on Instagram,” or whatever. But that's not me. I have a boyfriend. I'm not interested. This is not the time or the place.So, it's been one of those things on the back burner for three or four years that I've just always been saving these images to a folder, thinking, “Okay, when I have the time when I have the space, the creative energy and the bandwidth to do this,” and thankfully for everyone I do now, I'm going to do dramatic readings of these DMs with other people in tech, and show—not even just to make fun of these people, but just to show, like, how would this work? What do you expect the [laugh] outcome to be? So Corey, for example, if you were to come on, like, here's a great example. A year ago—this is 2018; we're in 2021 right now—this guy messaged me in December of 2018, and was like, “Hey,” and then was like, “I would love to be your friend.” And I was like, “Nope,” and I responded, “Nope, nope, nope, nope.” There's a thread of this on Twitter. And then randomly, three weeks ago, just sent me this video to the tune of Enrique Iglesias' “Rhythm Divine” of just images of himself. [laugh]. So like, this comedy [crosstalk 00:10:45]—Corey: Was at least wearing pants?Chloe: He is wearing pants. It's very confusing. It's a picture—a lot of group photos, so I didn't know who he was. But in my mind because, you know, I'm an engineer, I'm trying to think through the end-user experience. I'm like, “What was your plan here?”With all these people I'm like, “So, your plan is just to slide into my DMs and woo me with ‘Hey'?” [laugh]. So, I think it'll be really fun to not only just show and call out this behavior but also take submissions from other people in the industry, even beyond tech, really, because I know anytime I tweet an example of this, I get 20 different women going, “Oh, my gosh, you get these weird messages, too?” And I really want to show, like, A, to men how often this happens because like you said, I think a lot of men say, “Just ignore it.” Or, “I don't get anything like that. You must be asking for it.”And I'm like, “No. This comes to me. These people find us and me and whoever else out there gets these messages,” and I'm just really ready to have a laugh at their expense because I've been laughing for years. [laugh].Corey: Back when I was a teenager, I was working in some fast food style job, and one of my co-workers saw customer, walked over to her, and said, “You're beautiful.” And she smiled and blushed. He leaned in and kissed her.Chloe: Ugh.Corey: And I'm sitting there going what on earth? And my other co-worker leaned over and is like, “You do know that's his girlfriend, right?” And I have to feel like, on some level, that is what happened to an awful lot of these broken men out on the internet, only they didn't have a co-worker to lean over and say, “Yeah, they actually know each other.” Which is why we see all this [unintelligible 00:12:16] behavior of yelling at people on the street as they walk past, or from a passing car. Because they saw someone do a stunt like that once and thought, “If it worked for them, it could work for me. It only has to work once.”And they're trying to turn this into a one day telling the grandkids how they met their grandmother. And, “Yeah, I yelled at her from a construction site, and it was love at first ‘Hey, baby.'” That is what I feel is what's going on. I have never understood it. I look back at my dating history in my early 20s, I look back now I'm like, “Ohh, I was not a great person,” but compared to these stories, I was a goddamn prince.Chloe: Yeah.Corey: It's awful.Chloe: It's really wild. And actually, I have a very vivid memory, this was right bef—uh, not right before the pandemic, but probably in 2019. I was speaking on a lot of conferences and events, and I was at this event in San Jose, and there were not a lot of women there. And somehow this other lovely woman—I can't remember her name right now—found me afterwards, and we were talking and she said, “Oh, my God. I had—this is such a weird event, right?”And I was like, “Yeah, it is kind of a weird vibe here.” And she said, “Ugh, so the weirdest thing happened to me. This guy”—it was her first tech conference ever, first of all, so you know—or I think it was her first tech conference in the Bay Area—and she was like, “Yeah, this guy came to my booth. I've been working this booth over here for this startup that I work at, and he told me he wanted to talk business. And then I ended up meeting him, stupidly, in my hotel lobby bar, and it's a date. Like, this guy is taking me out on a date all of a sudden,” and she was like, “And it took me about two minutes to just to be like, you know what? This is inappropriate. I thought this is going to be a business meeting. I want to go.”And then she shows me her hands, Corey, and she has a wedding ring. And she goes, “I'm not married. I have bought five or six different types of rings on Wish App”—or wish.com, which if you've never purchased from Wish before, it's very, kind of, low priced jewelry and toys and stuff of that nature. And she said, “I have a different wedding ring for every occasion. I've got my beach fake wedding ring. I've got my, we-got-married-with-a-bunch-of-mason-jars-in-the-woods fake wedding ring.”And she said she started wearing these because when she did, she got less creepy guys coming up to her at these events. And I think it's important to note, also, I'm not putting it out there at all that I'm interested in men. If anything, you know, I've been [laugh] with my boyfriend for six years never putting out these signals, and time and time again, when I would travel, I was very, very careful about sharing my location because oftentimes I would be on stage giving a keynote and getting messages while I delivered a technical keynote saying, “I'd love to take you out to dinner later. How long are you in town?” Just really weird, yucky, nasty stuff that—you know, and everyone's like, “You should be flattered.”And I'm like, “No. You don't have to deal with this. It's not like a bunch of women are wolf-whistling you during your keynote and asking what your boob size is.” But that's happening to me, and that's an extra layer that a lot of folks in this industry don't talk about but is happening and it adds up. And as my boyfriend loves to remind me, he's like, “I mean, you could stop tweeting at any time,” which I'm not going to do. But the more followers you get, the more inbound you get. So—Corey: Right. And the hell of it is, it's not a great answer because it's closing off paths of opportunity. Twitter has—Chloe: Absolutely.Corey: —introduced me to clients, introduced me to friends, introduced me to certainly an awful lot of podcast guests, and it informs and shapes a lot of the opinions that I hold on these things. And this is an example of what people mean when they talk about privilege. Where, yeah, “Look at Corey”—I've heard someone say once, and, “Nothing was handed to him.” And you're right, to be clear, I did not—like, no one handed me a microphone and said, “We're going to give you a podcast, now.” I had to build this myself.But let's be clear, I had no headwinds of working against me while I did it. There's the, you still have to do things, but you don't have an entire cacophony of shit heels telling you that you're not good enough in a variety of different ways, to subtly reinforcing your only value is the way that you look. There isn't this whole, whenever you get something wrong and it's a, “Oh, well, that's okay. We all get things wrong.” It's not the, “Girls suck at computers,” trope that we see so often.There's a litany of things that are either supportive that work in my favor, or are absent working against me that is privilege that is invisible until you start looking around and seeing it, and then it becomes impossible not to. I know I've talked about this before on the show, but no one listens to everything and I just want to subtly reinforce that if you're one of those folks who will say things like, “Oh, privilege isn't real,” or, “You can have bigotry against white people, too.” I want to be clear, we are not the same. You are not on my side on any of this, and to be very direct, I don't really care what you have to say.Chloe: Yeah. And I mean, this even comes into play in office culture and dynamics as well because I am always the squeaky wheel in the room on these kind of things, but a great example that I'll give is I know several women in this industry who have had issues when they used to travel for conferences of being stalked, people showing up at their hotel rooms, just really inappropriate stuff, and for that reason, a lot of folks—including myself—wouldn't pick the conference event—like, typically they'll be like, “This is the hotel everyone's staying at.” I would very intentionally stay at a different hotel because I didn't want people knowing where I was staying. But I started to notice once a friend of mine, who had an issue with this [unintelligible 00:17:26], I really like to be private about where I'm staying, and sometimes if you're working at a startup or larger company, they'll say, “Hey, everyone put in this Excel spreadsheet or this Google Doc where everyone's staying and how to contact them, and all this stuff.” And I think it's really important to be mindful of these things.I always say to my friends—I'm not going out too much these days because it's a pandemic—and I've done Twitter threads on this before where I never post my location; you will never see me. I got rid of Swarm a couple [laugh] years ago because people started showing up where I was. I posted photos before, you know, “Hey, at the lake right now.” And people have shown up. Dinners, people have recognized me when I've been out.So, I have an espresso machine right over here that my lovely boyfriend got me for my birthday, and someone commented, “Oh, we're just going to act like we don't see someone's reflection in the”—like, people Zoom in on images. I've read stories from cosplayers online who, they look into the reflection of a woman's glasses and can figure out where they are. So, I think there's this whole level. I'm constantly on alert, especially as a woman in tech. And I have friends here in the Bay Area, who have tweeted a photo at a barbecue, and then someone was like, “Hey, I live in the neighborhood, and I recognize the tree.”First of all, don't do that. Don't ever do that. Even if you think you're a nice, unassuming guy or girl or whatever, don't ever [laugh] do that. But I very intentionally—people get really confused, my friends specifically. They're like, “Wait a second, you're in Hawaii right now? I thought you were in Hawaii three weeks ago.” And I'm like, “I was. I don't want anyone even knowing what island or continent I'm on.”And that's something that I think about a lot. When I post photo—I never post any photos from my window. I don't want people knowing what my view is. People have figured out what neighborhood I live in based on, like, “I know where that graffiti is.” I'm very strategic about all this stuff, and I think there's a lot of stuff that I want to share that I don't share because of privacy issues and concerns about my safety. And also want to say and this is in my thread on online safety as well is, don't call out people's locations if you do recognize the image because then you're doxxing them to everyone like, “Oh”—Corey: I've had a few people do that in response to pictures I've posted before on a house, like, “Oh, I can look at this and see this other thing and then intuit where you are.” And first, I don't have that sense of heightened awareness on this because I still have this perception of myself as no one cares enough to bother, and on the other side, by calling that out in public. It's like, you do not present yourself well at all. In fact, you make yourself look an awful lot like the people that we're warned about. And I just don't get that.I have some of these concerns, especially as my audience has grown, and let's be very clear here, I antagonize trillion-dollar companies for a living. So, first if someone's going to have me killed, they can find where I am. That's pretty easy. It turns out that having me whacked is not even a rounding error on most of these companies' budgets, unfortunately. But also I don't have that level of, I guess, deranged superfan. Yet.But it happens in the fullness of time, as people's audiences continue to grow. It just seems an awful lot like it happens at much lower audience scale for folks who don't look like me. I want to be clear, this is not a request for anyone listening to this, to try and become that person for me, you will get hosed, at minimum. And yes, we press charges here.Chloe: AWSfan89, sliding into your DMs right after this. Yeah, it's also just like—I mean, I don't want to necessarily call out what company this was at, but personally, I've been in situations where I've thrown an event, like a meetup, and I'm like, “Hey, everyone. I'm going to be doing ‘Intro to blah, blah, blah' at this time, at this place.” And three or four guys would show up, none of them with computers. It was a freaking workshop on how to do or deploy something, or work with an API.And when I said, “Great, so why'd you guys come to this session today?” And maybe two have iPads, one just has a notepad, they're like, “Oh, I just wanted to meet you from Twitter.” And it's like, okay, that's a little disrespectful to me because I am taking time out to do this workshop on a very technical thing that I thought people were coming here to learn. And this isn't the Q&A. This is not your meet-and-greet opportunity to meet Chloe Condon, and I don't know why you would, like, I put so much of my life online [laugh] anyway.But yeah, it's very unsettling, and it's happened to me enough. Guys have shown up to my events and given me gifts. I mean, I'm always down for a free shirt or something, but it's one of those things that I'm constantly aware of and I hate that I have to be constantly aware of, but at the end of the day, my safety is the number one priority, and I don't want to get murdered. And I've tweeted this out before, our friend Emily, who's similarly a lady on the internet, who works with my boyfriend Ty over at Uber, we have this joke that's not a joke, where we say, “Hey if I'm murdered, this is who it was.” And we'll just send each other screenshots of creepy things that people either tag us in, or give us feedback on, or people asking what size shirt we are. Just, wiki feed stuff, just really some of the yucky of the yuck out there.And I do think that unless you have a partner, or a family member, or someone close enough to you to let you know about these things—because I don't talk about these things a lot other than my close friends, and maybe calling out a weirdo here and there in public, but I don't share the really yucky stuff. I don't share the people who are asking what neighborhood I live in. I'm not sharing the people who are tagging me, like, [unintelligible 00:22:33], really tagging me in some nasty TikToks, along with some other women out there. There are some really bad actors in this community and it is to the point where Emily and I will be like, “Hey, when you inevitably have to solve my murder, here's the [laugh] five prime suspects.” And that sucks. That's [unintelligible 00:22:48] joke; that isn't a joke, right? I suspect I will either die in an elevator accident or one of my stalkers will find me. [laugh].Corey: It's easy for folks to think, oh, well, this is a Chloe problem because she's loud, she's visible, she's quirky, she's different than most folks, and she brings it all on herself, and this is provably not true. Because if you talk to, effectively, any woman in the world in-depth about this, they all have stories that look awfully similar to this. And let me forestall some of the awful responses I know I'm going to get. And, “Well, none of the women I know have had experiences like this,” let me be very clear, they absolutely have, but for one reason or another, they either don't see the need, or don't see the value, or don't feel safe talking to you about it.Chloe: Yeah, absolutely. And I feel a lot of privilege, I'm very lucky that my boyfriend is a staff engineer at Uber, and I have lots of friends in high places at some of these companies like Reddit that work with safety and security and stuff, but oftentimes, a lot of the stories or insights or even just anecdotes that I will give people on their products are invaluable insights to a lot of these security and safety teams. Like, who amongst us, you know, [laugh] has used a feature and been like, “Wait a second. This is really, really bad, and I don't want to tweet about this because I don't want people to know that they can abuse this feature to stalk or harass or whatever that may be,” but I think a lot about the people who don't have the platform that I have because I have 50k-something followers on Twitter, I have a pretty big online following in general, and I have the platform that I do working at Microsoft, and I can tweet and scream and be loud as I can about this. But I think about the folks who don't have my audience, the people who are constantly getting harassed and bombarded, and I get these DMs all the time from women who say, “Thank you so much for doing a thread on this,” or, “Thank you for talking about this,” because people don't believe them.They're just like, “Oh, just ignore it,” or just, “Oh, it's just one weirdo in his basement, like, in his mom's basement.” And I'm like, “Yeah, but imagine that but times 40 in a week, and think about how that would make you rethink your place and your position in tech and even outside of tech.” Let's think of the people who don't know how this technology works. If you're on Instagram at all, you may notice that literally not only every post, but every Instagram story that has the word COVID in it, has the word vaccine, has anything, and they must be using some sort of cognitive scanning type thing or scanning the images themselves because this is a feature that basically says, hey, this post mentioned COVID in some way. I think if you even use the word mask, it alerts this.And while this is a great feature because we all want accurate information coming out about the pandemic, I'm like, “Wait a minute. So, you're telling me this whole time you could have been doing this for all the weird things that I get into my DMs, and people post?” And, like, it just shows you, yes, this is a global pandemic. Yes, this is something that affects everyone. Yes, it's important we get information out about this, but we can be using these features in much [laugh] more impactful ways that protects people's safety, that protects people's ability to feel safe on a platform.And I think the biggest one for me, and I make a lot of bots; I make a lot of Twitter bots and chatbots, and I've done entire series on this about ethical bot creation, but it's so easy—and I know this firsthand—to make a Twitter account. You can have more than one number, you can do with different emails. And with Instagram, they have this really lovely new feature that if you block someone, it instantly says, “You just blocked so and so. Would you like to block any other future accounts they make?” I mean, seems simple enough, right?Like, anything related—maybe they're doing it by email, or phone number, or maybe it's by IP, but like, that's not being done on a lot of these platforms, and it should be. I think someone mentioned in one of my threads on safety recently that Peloton doesn't have a block user feature. [laugh]. They're probably like, “Well, who's going to harass someone on Peloton?” It would happen to me. If I had a Peloton, [laugh] I assure you someone would find a way to harass me on there.So, I always tell people, if you're working at a company and you're not thinking about safety and harassment tools, you probably don't have anybody LGBTQ+ women, non-binary on your team, first of all, and you need to be thinking about these things, and you need to be making them a priority because if users can interact in some way, they will stalk, harass, they will find some way to misuse it. It seems like one of those weird edge cases where it's like, “Oh, we don't need to put a test in for that feature because no one's ever going to submit, like, just 25 emojis.” But it's the same thing with safety. You're like, who would harass someone on an app about bubblegum? One of my followers were. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The biggest question that doesn't get asked that needs to be in almost every case is, “Okay. We're building a thing, and it's awesome. And I know it's hard to think like this, but pivot around. Theoretically, what could a jerk do with it?”Chloe: Yes.Corey: When you're designing it, it's all right, how do you account for people that are complete jerks?Chloe: Absolutely.Corey: Even the cloud providers, all of them, when the whole Parler thing hit, everyone's like, “Oh, Amazon is censoring people for freedom of speech.” No, they're actually not. What they're doing is enforcing their terms of service, the same terms of service that every provider that is not trash has. It is not a problem that one company decided they didn't want hate speech on their platform. It was all the companies decided that, except for some very fringe elements. And that's the sort of thing you have to figure out is, it's easy in theory to figure out, oh, anything goes; freedom of speech. Great, well, some forms of speech violate federal law.Chloe: Right.Corey: So, what do you do then? Where do you draw the line? And it's always nuanced and it's always tricky, and the worst people are the folks that love to rules-lawyer around these things. It gets worse than that where these are the same people that will then sit there and make bad faith arguments all the time. And lawyers have a saying that hard cases make bad law.When you have these very nuanced thing, and, “Well, we can't just do it off the cuff. We have to build a policy around this.” This is the problem with most corporate policies across the board. It's like, you don't need a policy that says you're not allowed to harass your colleagues with a stick. What you need to do is fire the jackwagon that made you think you might need a policy that said that.But at scale, that becomes a super-hard thing to do when every enforcement action appears to be bespoke. Because there are elements on the gray areas and the margins where reasonable people can disagree. And that is what sets the policy and that's where the precedent hits, and then you have these giant loopholes where people can basically be given free rein to be the worst humanity has to offer to some of the most vulnerable members of our society.Chloe: And I used to give this talk, I gave it at DockerCon one year and I gave it a couple other places, that was literally called “Diversity is not Equal to Stock Images of Hands.” And the reason I say this is if you Google image search ‘diversity' it's like all of those clip arts of, like, Rainbow hands, things that you would see at Kaiser Permanente where it's like, “We're all in this together,” like, the pandemic, it's all just hands on hands, hands as a Earth, hands as trees, hands as different colors. And people get really annoyed with people like me who are like, “Let's shut up about diversity. Let's just hire who's best for the role.” Here's the thing.My favorite example of this—RIP—is Fleets—remember Fleets? [laugh]—on Twitter, so if they had one gay man in the room for that marketing, engineering—anything—decision, one of them I know would have piped up and said, “Hey, did you know ‘fleets' is a commonly used term for douching enima in the gay community?” Now, I know that because I watch a lot of Ru Paul's Drag Race, and I have worked with the gay community quite a bit in my time in theater. But this is what I mean about making sure. My friend Becca who works in security at safety and things, as well as Andy Tuba over at Reddit, I have a lot of conversations with my friend Becca Rosenthal about this, and that, not to quote Hamilton, but if I must, “We need people in the room where it happens.”So, if you don't have these people in the room if you're a white man being like, “How will our products be abused?” Your guesses may be a little bit accurate but it was probably best to, at minimum, get some test case people in there from different genders, races, backgrounds, like, oh my goodness, get people in that room because what I tend to see is building safety tools, building even product features, or naming things, or designing things that could either be offensive, misused, whatever. So, when people have these arguments about like, “Diversity doesn't matter. We're hiring the best people.” I'm like, “Yeah, but your product's going to be better, and more inclusive, and represent the people who use it at the end of the day because not everybody is you.”And great examples of this include so many apps out there that exists that have one work location, one home location. How many people in the world have more than one job? That's such a privileged view for us, as people in tech, that we can afford to just have one job. Or divorced parents or whatever that may be, for home location, and thinking through these edge cases and thinking through ways that your product can support everyone, if anything, by making your staff or the people that you work with more diverse, you're going to be opening up your product to a much bigger marketable audience. So, I think people will look at me and be like, “Oh, Chloe's a social justice warrior, she's this feminist whatever,” but truly, I'm here saying, “You're missing out on money, dude.” It would behoove you to do this at the end of the day because your users aren't just a copy-paste of some dude in a Patagonia jacket with big headphones on. [laugh]. There are people beyond one demographic using your products and applications.Corey: A consistent drag against Clubhouse since its inception was that it's not an accessible app for a variety of reasons that were—Chloe: It's not an Android. [laugh].Corey: Well, even ignoring the platform stuff, which I get—technical reasons, et cetera, yadda, yadda, great—there is no captioning option. And a lot of their abuse stuff in the early days was horrific, where you would get notifications that a lot of people had this person blocked, but… that's not a helpful dynamic. “Did you talk to anyone? No, of course not. You Hacker News'ed it from first principles and thought this might be a good direction to go in.” This stuff is hard.People specialize in this stuff, and I've always been an advocate of when you're not sure what to do in an area, pay an expert for advice. All these stories about how people reach out to, “Their black friend”—and yes, it's a singular person in many cases—and their black friend gets very tired of doing all the unpaid emotional labor of all of this stuff. Suddenly, it's not that at all if you reach out to someone who is an expert in this and pay them for their expertise. I don't sit here complaining that my clients pay me to solve AWS billing problems. In fact, I actively encourage that behavior. Same model.There are businesses that specialize in this, they know the area, they know the risks, they know the ins and outs of this, and consults with these folks are not break the bank expensive compared to building the damn thing in the first place.Chloe: And here's a great example that literally drove me bananas a couple weeks ago. So, I don't know if you've participated in Twitter Spaces before, but I've done a couple of my first ones recently. Have you done one yet—Corey: Oh yes—Chloe: —Corey?Corey: —extensively. I love that. And again, that's a better answer for me than Clubhouse because I already have the Twitter audience. I don't have to build one from scratch on another platform.Chloe: So, I learned something really fascinating through my boyfriend. And remember, I mentioned earlier, my boyfriend is a staff engineer at Uber. He's been coding since he's been out of the womb, much more experienced than me. And I like to think a lot about, this is accessible to me but how is this accessible to a non-technical person? So, Ty finished up the Twitter Space that he did and he wanted to export the file.Now currently, as the time of this podcast is being recorded, the process to export a Twitter Spaces audio file is a nightmare. And remember, staff engineer at Uber. He had to export his entire Twitter profile, navigate through a file structure that wasn't clearly marked, find the recording out of the multiple Spaces that he had hosted—and I don't think you get these for ones that you've participated in, only ones that you've hosted—download the file, but the file was not a normal WAV file or anything; he had to download an open-source converter to play the file. And in total, it took him about an hour to just get that file for the purposes of having that recording. Now, where my mind goes to is what about some woman who runs a nonprofit in the middle of, you know, Sacramento, and she does a community Twitter Spaces about her flower shop and she wants a recording of that.What's she going to do, hire some third-party? And she wouldn't even know where to go; before I was in tech, I certainly would have just given up and been like, “Well, this is a nightmare. What do I do with this GitHub repo of information?” But these are the kinds of problems that you need to think about. And I think a lot of us and folks who listen to this show probably build APIs or developer tools, but a lot of us do work on products that muggles, non-technical people, work on.And I see these issues happen constantly. I come from this space of being an admin, being someone who wasn't quote-unquote, “A techie,” and a lot of products are just not being thought through from the perspective—like, there would be so much value gained if just one person came in and tested your product who wasn't you. So yeah, there's all of these things that I think we have a very privileged view of, as technical folks, that we don't realize are huge. Not even just barrier to entry; you should just be able to download—and maybe this is a feature that's coming down the pipeline soon, who knows, but the fact that in order for someone to get a recording of their Twitter Spaces is like a multi-hour process for a very, very senior engineer, that's the problem. I'm not really sure how we solve this.I think we just call it out when we see it and try to help different companies make change, which of course, myself and my boyfriend did. We reached out to people at Twitter, and we're like, “This is really difficult and it shouldn't be.” But I have that privilege. I know people at these companies; most people do not.Corey: And in some cases, even when you do, it doesn't move the needle as much as you might wish that it would.Chloe: If it did, I wouldn't be getting DMs anymore from creeps right? [laugh].Corey: Right. Chloe, thank you so much for coming back and talk to me about your latest project. If people want to pay attention to it and see what you're up to. Where can they go? Where can they find you? Where can they learn more? And where can they pointedly not audition to be featured on one of the episodes of Master Creep Theatre?Chloe: [laugh]. So, that's the one caveat, right? I have to kind of close submissions of my own DMs now because now people are just going to be trolling me and sending me weird stuff. You can find me on Twitter—my name—at @chloecondon, C-H-L-O-E-C-O-N-D-O-N. I am on Instagram as @getforked, G-I-T-F-O-R-K-E-D. That's a Good Placepun if you're non-technical; it is an engineering pun if you are. And yeah, I've been doing a lot of fun series with Microsoft Reactor, lots of how to get a career in tech stuff for students, building a lot of really fun AI/ML stuff on there. So, come say hi on one of my many platforms. YouTube, too. That's probably where—Master Creep Theatre is going to be, on YouTube, so definitely follow me on YouTube. And yeah.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:37:57]. Chloe, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it, as always.Chloe: Thank you. I'll be back for episode three soon, I'm sure. [laugh].Corey: Let's not make it another couple of years until then. Chloe Condon, senior cloud advocate at Microsoft on the Next Generation Experiences Team, also chlo-host of the Master Creep Theatre podcast. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment saying simply, “Hey.”Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Commercial Real Estate Pro Network
Rental Property Future with Michael Zuber - CRE PN #323

Commercial Real Estate Pro Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:35


Today, my guest is Michael Zuber. Michael is a former Silicon Valley accounting professional turned full time real estate investor and the author of one rental at a time where he promises if you can get to four doors, it will change your life. Additionally, he he hosts the every day, I want to say the everyday daily YouTube channel, one rental at a time, where he dispenses tons of useful info investor knowledge by discussing current events and their effect have effect on the real estate market. And he also has a panel of real estate experts. He interviews regularly for additional knowledge. And he's also got an online course. And he's got a challenge to get to 500 deals of which I have participated in here and grateful member of his audience there and I can't encourage you enough to check him out. And in just a minute, we're going to speak with Michael about rentals and rental market.

Business Daily
'Fixing' Facebook's algorithm

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 18:04


The social media giant's algorithm has been accused of amplifying divisive content and disinformation. Could regulating it make Facebook a kinder platform? Ed Butler speaks to the BBC's Silicon Valley correspondent James Clayton about the latest revelations from Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen, and renewed demands for a crackdown by US lawmakers. Former Facebook data scientist Roddy Lindsay explains how Facebook's alogrithm became the focus of criticism of the platform, and how a change to the law could solve it. Daphne Keller from Stanford's Cyber Policy Center explains the legal minefield when it comes to regulating what social media users can say, and what platforms can promote, online. (Photo: Frances Haugen testifies in Congress in October 2021, Credit: Getty Images)

B2B Revenue Acceleration
113: How to Tell Your B2B's Brand Story In 2022 w/ Ken Rutsky

B2B Revenue Acceleration

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:37


For this episode of the B2B Revenue Acceleration Podcast, we will be airing again one of our most listened to episodes: “How to Tell Your B2B's Brand Story”. This episode was first published in 2018 when we started our show and it's as relevant as ever at this time of the year when Sales & Marketing leaders prepare their Go-to-Market plans for 2022. … Breaking through the noise in a loud and crowded market is tough. How do you make sure your messaging is being heard in a sea of competition? Ken Rutsky, the author of Launching to Leading: How B2B Market Leaders Create Flashmobs, Marshal Parades and Ignite Movements has created an 8-layer cake for B2B messaging that helps brands tell their story and stand out. He spent many years in product marketing in Silicon Valley, and he specialized in security, infrastructure, and business applications in the sales & marketing automation space. Now he helps companies define their message clearly. Ken shows businesses how they can build their brand through storytelling to accelerate revenue.

Stayin' Alive in Technology
Wagner James Au: "Virtual Reality"

Stayin' Alive in Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 57:38


Second Life is widely credited for mainstreaming the concept of the metaverse as a virtual social platform—and today's guest, James Au, invites us in to hear the inside scoop on how this platform foreshadowed today's social media and virtual worlds, both in promise and in pitfalls.   A freelance tech journalist at the time, James was hired to report on the Second Life metaverse shortly after its launch in 2003. He created an avatar and focused on the real-life stories that could get both inspiring and wild, ranging from users who were homeless in real life building virtual mansions to real-life private detectives hired to determine if someone was virtually cheating on their virtual significant other.  Author of "The Making of Second Life,” James describes what the platform was originally conceived to be like and explains what he means when he calls Second Life “the biggest mystery in Silicon Valley.” And you don't even need an avatar to listen. Links Mentioned in This Episode: Second Life and Linden Lab ​​James's HarperCollins Author Page James's stories for Wired New World Notes - James's long-running blog devoted to all things Second Life and VR  James's book - The Making of Second Life James's book - Game Design Secrets How to Change Your Mind by Michael Pollan Oculus Quest Sine Wave Entertainment NetHack - an open-source single-player game Salon once described as “one of the finest gaming experiences the computing world has to offer.”

The Last Archive
The Last Archive Presents: The Evening Rocket

The Last Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 1:46


Last Spring, Jill Lepore made a radio show with the BBC's Radio 4 called The Evening Rocket, and now Pushkin Industries is releasing that show stateside for the first time. The Evening Rocket is all about Elon Musk, and his strange new kind of capitalism — call it Muskism, extravagant extreme capitalism, extraterrestrial capitalism, where stock prices are driven by earnings, and also by fantasies. The series explores Silicon Valley's futurism, and how, in Musk's life, those visions of the future all stem from the same place: the science-fiction he grew up on. To understand where Musk wants to take the rest of us - with his electric cars, his rockets to Mars, his meme stocks, and tunnels deep beneath the earth — Jill Lepore looks at those science fiction stories, and helps us understand what he's missed about them. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Money talks from Economist Radio
Money Talks: In a tightening spot

Money talks from Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 29:42


Higher inflation looks likely to last into 2022. The Bank of England could be the first big central bank to raise interest rates—why might it make the first move? Also, our team explores how real-time data are upending economics. And Michael Dell, boss of the eponymous tech firm, on why founders are leaving Silicon Valley for Texas and why PCs are still sexy. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
Money Talks: In a tightening spot

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 29:42


Higher inflation looks likely to last into 2022. The Bank of England could be the first big central bank to raise interest rates—why might it make the first move? Also, our team explores how real-time data are upending economics. And Michael Dell, boss of the eponymous tech firm, on why founders are leaving Silicon Valley for Texas and why PCs are still sexy. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Momenta Edge
#160 Alpha Connector - Robert Marcus - Founder, and CEO of Alpha10X

Momenta Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 28:31


In this week's episode, Ken Forster speaks with Robert Marcus, Founder, and CEO of Alpha10X. Specialized in AI, Robert is a former Silicon Valley venture capitalist, investment banker, public company CEO, Microsoft Manager, and founder of several successfully exited companies.

Tough Things First
Insurance and Options

Tough Things First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:43


Insurance is one of the highest cost for business, and alternatives are needed. Ray Zinn, Silicon Valley's longest serving CEO, is joined by John Butler, and expert in business insurance and some of the interesting alternatives available today. Ray Zinn: Well hello everyone, welcome to another wonderful podcast of Tough Things First, we are so delighted to have with us […]

Lochhead on Marketing
130 Thinking About Thinking Is The Most Important Kind Of Thinking

Lochhead on Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 17:26


In this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, let's talk about why thinking about thinking is the most important kind of thinking. Context Matters More Than Content This might be obvious, but it bears repeating: context matters more than content. In any strategy discussion, the context of which is what leads to some kind of outcome or content. Most people, particularly those who are entrepreneurial, have a strong bias to action, which can be healthy and powerful. However, it does have it downsides sometimes. “A strong bias to action means that sometimes, and I know I've been guilty of this more times than I will ever know, we spring to action without doing enough thinking. More importantly, without doing enough thinking and dialoguing around what the context is for whatever it is we're talking about.” – Christopher Lochhead Accept or Reject the Premise The next piece to think of when discussing the context, is that whether you accept or reject the premise of said context? It could be a product, a service, or and prevalent idea. Here's what I know. “Legendary category designers, legendary entrepreneurs, creators, and marketers reject the premise. They start by rejecting the premise. So somebody says something and you go, that's interesting. And in our mind, we go, I reject the whole thing.” – Christopher Lochhead Now, you may end up circling back to that premise and either accepting it entirely, or just part of it. Though the reason why starting by rejecting the premise is so powerful, is that all premise, context, and established thinking is based on past experience, insight, or research. Of course, there are many cases where accepting the premise is the wise thing to do. Yet here's the rub: how do you create a different future, if the premise or context you start with is tied to the past? So we reject the premise, we reject the rules of the past and open ourselves up to a whole new kind of thinking. Listen to the Words In business and marketing, almost every sentence that somebody says to us use “accept the premise” language. Part of rejecting the premise is listening to the words they say. One example is “go to market”. You might ask, what's wrong with that premise? If you think about it, that premise suggests that there is a market out there, and we need to go and grab it. Which means that you are competing for other businesses that are also going to the same market. Yet wouldn't it be better to create your own market? That way, you get the lion's share of it outright, and you don't have to compete for it. Moreover, the customers/users then come to you, and not the other way around. To hear more about how thinking about thinking is the most important kind of thinking, download and listen to this episode. Bio Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger. He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur. Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist. In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion. He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive. We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and subscribe on Apple Podcast! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content.

My New Life
Setting our kids up for success

My New Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 20:42


We all have big dreams for our little people, and there are so many ways to define success: finding purpose in life and work, reaching goals (whatever those might be), surrounding yourself with loved ones, to name just a few. Psychologists have pointed to a variety of practices that can help our kids achieve these things. Spending time with your child is a major one; others include letting your child make decisions and prioritizing kindness.   Jessica Rolph welcomes Esther Wojcicki to today's episode to talk about raising successful children, her area of expertise. Her daughters, Susan, Janet, and Anne, are some of the most powerful women in Silicon Valley. They are respectively, the CEO of YouTube, a professor of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Founder and CEO of the genetic testing company 23andMe. Esther, also known as the Godmother of Silicon Valley, is the author of How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results.   Key Takeaways: [2:17] Did Esther set out to raise CEOs? [3:24] Esther explains the acronym TRICK: Trust, Respect, Independence, Collaboration, and Kindness. [5:19] What does trust look like in our modern-day society? [8:00] Perhaps we shouldn't be so worried all the time. [8:50] Esther explains why allowing babies to self-soothe can be a demonstration of trust. [12:02] How can parents of toddlers show respect? Just listen! [14:15] Don't do anything for your children that they can do for themselves. [15:12] Esther speaks about collaboration in the home. [17:30] The profound impact of kindness.   Mentioned in this episode: Brought to you by Lovevery.com Visit Raise Successful People 

The Global Politico
Taiwan's digital minister on China's “digital authoritarianism”

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:12


Imagine a world in which middle schoolers fact check presidential debates and public officials publish transcripts of every conversation they have. That's the world that Audrey Tang, Taiwan's digital minister, has helped create, thereby fortifying Taiwan's democracy even as it faces increasing threats from China. Tang tells POLITICO's Ryan Heath what it's like to govern and live in the shadow of China. Audrey Tang is Taiwan's digital minister.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi  edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

What's Next|科技早知道
S5E29|重金押注抗衰老公司,硅谷真的可以做出长生不老药吗?

What's Next|科技早知道

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 53:42


2021 年 9 月 4 日,《麻省理工科技评论》发布报道,称亚马逊创始人 Jeff Bezos 和硅谷著名投资人 Yuri Milner 在近期投资了专注于抗衰方向的生物科技公司 Altos Labs,一家今年四月才成立的抗衰老公司,科学家团队包括 2012 年诺贝尔生理学或医学奖的获得者山中伸弥;截至今年六月,该公司已经吸引了至少 2.7 亿美元的投资。这并非硅谷富豪们第一次入局抗衰领域。 2018 年, Jeff Bezos 和 PayPal 联合创始人 Peter Thiel 共同投资抗衰领域独角兽 Unity Biotechnology;而更早之前,还有谷歌创始人 Larry Page 宣布 10 亿美元投资生物科技公司 Calico,目前 Calico 已经被整合至谷歌母公司 Alphabet Inc。我们似乎可以清晰地看见,在颠覆互联网、物流制造、航空航天等领域之后,硅谷大佬们的下一个目标,正是通过生物工程技术突破人类目前的寿命上限,将长生不老的选择权紧紧握在手里。 本期节目,我们邀请到了同样在抗衰领域被视为明星公司的硅谷新贵 Gordian 的首席科学家 Martin Borch Jensen。他和主播 Diane 一起探讨了硅谷的投资者们都是出于什么原因投资 Altos Labs 等生物科技公司,值得关注技术路径有哪些,投资人应该如何看待生物科技领域的超长投资周期和技术挑战,头部公司可以通过什么途径实现商业回报。 #加入我们# 声动活泼正在招聘「内容研究员」、「业务拓展和合作管理总监/经理」、「声音设计师」、「播客制作实习生」、「内容营销负责人」及「节目制作人」,查看详细讯息请在公号「声动活泼」回复暗号:入场券 。简历接收邮箱

Rebel Human Resources Podcast
Episode 67: Leading with Love - Odessa Jenkins

Rebel Human Resources Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:11


Featured on Fox, CBS, ESPN, Yahoo Sports and more, Odessa "OJ" Jenkins is a sports disrupter and known leadership expert who was also named one of the most influential and powerful women in sports by Sports Illustrated. She co-founded women's national tackle football league, is the first female owner (and coach) of a national sports team and the winningest female football coach in football history. In addition to her sports background, she recently took a position as one of Silicon Valley's only openly gay, black female presidents of a technology company, Emtrain, that is helping to improve diversity, equity & inclusion programs among Fortune 500 companies.Prior to Emtrain, she served as head of business development for Parity, and VP of operations at YourCause, a start-up that helped to revolutionize the CSR industry. An in-demand national speaker, Jenkins is a recognized market leader in CSR, DE&I, Team Dynamics, and SAAS technology with multiple years of leadership experience in private funded start-ups, joint ventures and Fortune 100 public companies. Football was OJ's shield growing up and her ticket out of central L.A., where her brother was murdered by gangs when OJ was just 11. From that point on, she lived by the motto, "create opportunities where none exist before your life is over". That motto has served her throughout her professional and personal life, and its one to be shared with your audience. We discuss How to lead from love while holding people accountableHow to breakdown workplace inequitiesWhy leading with your "why" is critical to future successCreating champions of your people OJ is a female football Hall of Famer, a 5X National Champion, 2X USA National Team captain, 2X Gold Medalist and was named the world's leading running back by FIFA in 2013. Odessa's Profilelinkedin.com/in/odessajenkinsTwitterOJENKINS3Rebel HR is a podcast for HR professionals and leaders of people who are ready to make some disruption in the world of work.We'll be discussing topics that are disruptive to the world of work and talk about new and different ways to approach solving those problems.Follow Rebel HR Podcast at:www.rebelhumanresources.comhttps://twitter.com/rebelhrguyhttps://www.facebook.com/rebelhrpodcastwww.kyleroed.comhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/kyle-roed/Rebel ON, HR Rebels!  Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/rebelhrpodcast)

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Welcome to the Central Texas real estate market

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 27:16


Kevin Guerin is an investor-focused real estate agent and part of the Roofstock Certified Agent network. Serving the Central Texas Market for over 20 years, Kevin is a wealth of knowledge for investors looking to expand into the Central Texas market.   In this episode, Michael and Kevin discuss neighborhoods, price points, tax assessments, rates of appreciation, common issues that investors need to be aware of.   Contact Kevin: https://www.guerinpropertyservices.com/contact --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today I'm interviewing Kevin Guerin who is our Roofstock certified agent out in Central Texas. Kevin's going to be talking to us today about some of the Central Texas markets as well as the Austin market and some of the things that we as investors should be aware of. So let's get into it.   Kevin Guerin, out in Austin, Texas. Thanks so much for joining us. How are you today, man?   Kevin: Good. Thanks for having me.   Michael: Now, my pleasure. My pleasure. So I know we were chatting just before we hopped on recording here, but for everyone listening at home, or in the car, or wherever they are. Tell us a little bit about yourself. Are you an Austin guy born and bred and how long you've been in Texas.   Kevin Born and raised in Texas, which doesn't happen that much anymore, it seems but I've been a I was born in Houston moved to Dallas at a young age than it was in a small town called Granberry outside of Fort Worth through high school. And then as soon as I graduated high school, I came down here to Central Texas and went to school. It used to be Southwest Texas now it's called Texas State. But that was in 1987. And I haven't gone anywhere since. So I've been down here a long, long time.   Michael: Right on and in that time. I mean, just from what I've seen in Texas, or Austin do in the last five to 10 years. You must have seen it really changed in the last 30 years.   Kevin: Yeah, the last 30 years have been crazy. This place went from you know, the capital of Texas with the University of Texas downtown to all of these tech businesses moving here and just the growth of people just moving to the city. The high rises downtown. They kind of they call it crane city from time to time because there's just there's cranes building all of these big condo buildings and just people moving here left and right. Because quality living is great, that's a beautiful city. People just love being in Austin.   Michael: That's awesome. That's awesome. What do you love most about living in Austin?   Kevin: Well, we live out by the lake. there's a there's a few lakes that are out here. So we live out by Lake Travis. So you know, we take the kids, wakeboarding, and hay out of the lake as much as possible. And a bunch of hike and bike trails out here and sports and fitness is huge. And in the Austin area. And so we're on a baseball field or a golf course on the lake most of the most of the time and just kind of get out into the, into the nature in the wilderness and enjoy life.   Michael: That's awesome, man. All right, well, let's jump into the meat and potatoes here of the episode. And I would love if you could share with everybody a little bit about Austin as a market and who is coming to the market in terms of companies.   Kevin: Yeah, so Austin. Austin has been a solid market Austin and the cities around it has just been a great place for for investing, you know, for years now. Tons of people moving here, our rentals just don't sit vacant very long, because there's just still a shortage of supply. I remember one time I looked and it said that about 186 people per day were moving to the city of Austin. So when you think about that number and how many buildings are here, it's just you know, it's a supply and demand thing.   So now we've got you know, Apple is expanding Amazon. Tesla, obviously in Tesla's the latest announcement, I guess they're moving their home offices here. Samsung's talking about putting another big operation where they're building more chips or things in town. It seems like every week, there's a different tech company that's moving here and not just from California, they're coming here from other places like VR Bo is here. Indeed is here there's a lot of different companies that love to have their base here. So it's great with the University of Texas here and the other universities here is huge talent pool of, of employees. And so they're here and they're taking advantage of that.   Michael: That's awesome. I mean, it's really sounds like a mini Silicon Valley or another Silicon Valley might even be bigger geographically than what we have out here in California.   Kevin: I think it is I think we still have more land to build on. A lot of our current investors like to purchase things that are going to be a little bit closer into where all these tech companies are going. But there's still a lot more land around where you know, we're gonna have the appreciation because of simple supply and demand and people are going to want to buy and live closer in but it's, it's just never going to get as congested as some of the other places because you know, we don't have an ocean right on the other side to where that we have to stop building. There's there's Still space out there. There's still farmland. But I think prices are going to continue what they've been doing for years just because not everybody wants to be an hour out. Everybody wants to be 15 minutes away.   Michael: Yeah. Yeah, yeah, that makes total sense. So let's talk about prices for a little bit, what are you seeing and maybe you can give people kind of a high level 30,000 foot level tour of Austin and some of the different markets and sub markets within the city where they could look for rentals if they're looking at they're interested in investing in Austin proper.   Kevin: Yeah, prices. Who would have ever thought that through a COVID we would see price increases the way that we have over the last couple of years, but the days of trying to find something around 200,000 or even gone like we're, we're definitely creeping up to more expensive markets, or the sweet spot is kind of in between three and 400,000 that's gonna get you to 2000-2500 square foot house or so. A lot of the markets that that investors are really interested in are going to be kind of north of downtown Austin.   So we've got some other sub markets or smaller cities up north of Austin called Round Rock, there's Georgetown, there's Cedar Park, Leander, gosh, Liberty Hill even now hadow bunch of these little areas that have great subdivisions, masterplan subdivisions that have the hike and bike trails, and the resort style pool and the gymnasiums and things that are that are there that that they offer for, for people who live in these places. And, you know, we can rent them out quickly for a nice amount of rent. It's just, we can't get enough of them. We manage a bunch of properties. Here, we manage about 250 or so. And we may have two or three vacant right now. And that's just because we just put them on the market a few days ago. So things go really quick.   South is also pretty pretty happening right now because the Tesla that everybody knows about is down right by the airport. So there's some some markets maner Dell Valley and Kyle Buda people are buying those areas to because they know that there's going to be you know, however many 1000 employees at Tesla, they're going to need places to live to so we don't really focus as much in the city of Austin itself. The school systems not as good there as it is as some of these sub markets. So most of my most of my investors want, you know, the better schools. So we go into the other places that have higher rankings in the school districts.   Michael: Okay, that's great. And just as kind of a ballpark figure in that three to $400,000 rental, the 2000 2500 square foot, what would an average rent and north of the city expect it to be?   Kevin: It all depends on the sun, the square footage and sub square footage in the subdivision. And you know, the age of the home. So if it's a newer home $350,000 and it's going to be 2020 200 square feet somewhere in there. Again, it depends on which subdivision is but we're anywhere from 1900 a month to 20 $500 a month somewhere in there nowhere near the 1% rule that we used to be yours in the past but now hopefully we're still we're still able to you know at 20% down are so we're still even able to get to at least even or maybe cash flowing just a little bit after property management fees and taxes and HOAall that all that good stuff.   Michael: All that fun stuff. Yeah. Talk to us a little bit about property taxes. Since this is one of the biggest misses I see, especially for new investors, and even those seasoned investors investing remotely. How do those work in Austin, just again, high level cuz I know county by county, it's likely to differ slightly.   Kevin: Yeah, we're gonna be a little bit higher than most of the other markets, we're gonna be anywhere from two and a quarter to 3% of the county assessed value. So a lot of people think when you buy a house at 400,000, that that that percentage is going to be based off of that 400,000. But what it's actually based off of is what each county assesses that property for so the county may think that this house is only worth 300,000. So then then that the 2.5% is only off of that 300,000 instead of the 400,000. So it is definitely a little bit higher than some of the other markets that Roofstock is in. But we thank goodness we don't have a state income tax here. And it is how they pay for a lot of the schools. That's why some of the schools are good. Most of the people here go to public schools, they don't have to go to any kind of charter private schools because the public school system here is really good. And a lot of that comes from property taxes.   Michael: That's great. Do you know how often the properties are reassessed   Kevin: The property taxes are reassessed every year, and I believe the taxes the tax bills are due may 31. But most people are going to have a mortgage and it's going to be you know rolled into it but they reassess it every single year.   Michael: Okay, perfect. So in theory, if you buy that house for 400,000 County assessor's it for 300,000 a year you buy it that could go up year over year. And you know, is there a limit for the amount that that could go up and could have jumped to 400,000? The following year,   Kevin: There's a cap, I want to say is 20%. cap. So I don't think you can go all the way up to the top, you know, can't can't jump 100,000.   Michael: Okay. Okay, perfect. So that's great to know. And also great to keep in mind for everybody listening, as you're looking to determine what your property taxes are. Definitely chat with Kevin chat with your local personnel on the ground to get a handle on, you know what that current assessed value might be, and to wrap your head around what it might be able to get up to?   Kevin: Yeah, all those records are posted on the county website. So the tax assessor website, so whenever we're running our analysis, we go straight there and look to see what it was last year, and see what it was the year before that to kind of get an idea of what the increase may be going forward. But all of those numbers are on there to where you're not really guessing you're you're looking at the actuals.   Michael: You're calculating? That's great. That's great. So Kevin, I know there's a lot of other really great markets in Central Texas. Can you talk to our listeners about what some of those might be? And maybe a little bit, they might be a little bit less competitive?   Kevin: Yeah, so we, we've helped people buy homes from Killeen, Texas, which is up. That's where Fort Hood is. It's a little bit north of Austin prices are a little bit cheaper up there. We had one listed the other day for rent and my leasing agent said he had to finally just just shut it off because he got so many phone calls on it, but homes up there are going to be you know, under 200,000 or so. So they're a little bit a little bit more affordable.   New Braunfels is another market that has just exploded last I saw it was like the seventh fastest growing city in the country. And it's halfway in between Austin and San Antonio. So what I think a lot of people are doing is, you know, mom may work up in Austin dad may work down in San Antonio, but they live in New Braunfels and split the commute time.   Georgetown is also another area that if you look on a map, it's going to look like it's a good distance away from Austin, but it's simply not they've we've built some toll roads here where you can legally drive 85 miles an hour on them and get places really quick. And Georgetown has just exploded over the last few years. It's got a it's got a university there, Southwestern University, it's got a bunch of medical but there's just the ton of great subdivisions going on up in the Georgetown area.   So that place is also exploded, and, you know, even all the way down to San Antonio, San Antonio is going to be a little bit more affordable. I've been nervous in the years past about how long things were gonna sit in the market, vacant for rent in San Antonio. But those days are gone too. I think people have just been priced out of the Austin market a little bit people that are moving here from different states. And they're going to some of these other areas that are just a little bit more affordable. And San Antonio is definitely one of those along with Killeen, New Braunfels, Georgetown, I mean, I would take a look at all those areas, because I think you're gonna get some really good deals that are going to fill, fill quickly. And you're still going to have that appreciation play that everybody says it's kind of icing on the cake. But around here when it's historical, and it's been 15% over the last 10-15 years, you kind of have to consider that when you're you're looking at the different investments that you want to make.   Michael: Yeah, absolutely. And in talking about some of the different price points and some of those different markets you mentioned, does the rent scale fairly linearly, or does that does that price to rent ratio actually get stronger with some of these more affordable markets?   Kevin: That definitely get stronger if somebody's strictly looking for cash for the cash flow play, they're going to have to go in some of these sub markets because it won't quite be the 1% but it's going to be a little bit more affordable on the on the price of the home and rents are going to be stronger. Austin the rents just can't keep up with the explosion that we've had with with home prices going through the roof rents are always going to be lagging when it comes to you know, being able to get up to that next levels but some of these other markets that didn't have the explosion that's Austin's Austin's had over the last few years they're definitely stronger on the on the cash flow play.   And a lot of our clients that's what they're doing they're buying it they get that they get the easy one that's going to have the cash flow every month and then after they get that one and get some rents coming in then they look for that growth play property that's going to be close to Apple or close to Samsung and and that way they kind of they're kind of a wash when it comes to you know how they're looking at their investments when they're making a little bit monthly on one but they know that in 10 years is where they're gonna make make most of their money on the on the Austin property.   Michael: Make the big money. Yeah, that makes sense. And just as a frame of reference for people, how far is it to drive from Austin to San Antonio because I just like being California I have no idea how long that takes.   Kevin: So it's it's depending on what side of town you want to be on but you know from like the downtown area to the downtown area is about an hour and a half. And what they're saying is Dallas and Fort Worth is a Metroplex that kind of grew together. Now there's our LinkedIn in between where the Cowboys play and the Rangers play, but it's it's they call it Dallas Fort Worth metroplex. They're saying the same thing is going to happen here because in between Austin and San Antonio are these other sub markets from Kyle to Sam Marcus, where they go to college to New Braunfels to Selma and shirts and San Antonio so it's all grown together and you can I mean obviously I've been here for 30 plus years I've seen that happen you used to be driving in the middle of nowhere but now you're just driving driving within cities.   So it's you know, some parts are hour hour and 15 minutes to get from one part to the other, but they're pretty easy to get to and again with those toll roads that they've added, you can you can fly down there and get there really quick.   Michael: Yeah. And that makes total sense then for those folks splitting the difference one partner living working in Austin, the other in San Antonio, it's a 45 minute split down the middle. I mean, especially someone coming from California. That's like a dream to commute. 45 minutes to work.   Kevin: Yeah, yeah, no, most places here if you're going 45 minutes, they feel like it's a long way. At most things around here. point eight V is going to be you know, between 20 to 30 minutes to get from, you know, these cities that are up north of town to downtown or to the university or to the Capitol. It's pretty easy to get around except for I 35. I 35 is the one interstate that runs through Austin and they can get congested just because of all the people that are here but as I said, they've built some toll roads and they're continuing to build them that helps people get around a little bit quicker.   Michael: Okay, that's great. Kevin, talk to us a little bit about insurance cuz all I hear about not all I hear about but I so often hear about hail storms, tornadoes, hurricanes, these type of issues in Texas. So in Central Texas in Austin and some of these other markets do you have a lot of those natural hazard issues?   Kevin: Hail is the biggest one. When we get hurricanes that hit the coast here, a lot of people kind of hope that that it makes it up to Austin to fill the lakes that are historically 10 to 15 feet low. So hail is the one thing that you know if you buy a house here and you're gonna hold it for 10 years you're going to replace the roof, the roof is going to need need to be replaced at some point because a hailstorm is going to roll through here with golf ball and sometimes baseball sized hail that will damage your roof. Tornadoes or just south enough to where we don't have a whole lot of tornadoes knock on wood that has not been a huge issue flooding is not an issue here it's it's literally the only thing that you have to worry about is hail.   And then we do have foundation issues at time to time there's some of the the ground around here is has some issues with some shifting and so we get an inspection on every single property just to make sure that homes haven't settled a little bit too much but those are two of the biggest things that we look for is how's the roof does it need to be replaced and you know is the foundation doing as it's supposed to do it most of them are going to be slab up here because most of them are going to be newer construction we don't have basements here so we got to make sure that the foundation is doing what it should the roof is in good shape and insurance will cover the roof it won't cover the foundation but insurance is not expensive here either I'm not sure what it is and other parts of the country but most people are getting really good coverage for you know eight sometimes 700 800 to 1100 a year to cover those things again not the foundation but wind and and rain and hail that kind of stuff.   Michael: Oh that's super cheap on like a $300,000 property I mean that's that's pretty amazing.   Kevin: Good. Well we can we need it with some of the property taxes that we have to pay. Michael: Yeah, it all it all evens out. So would you say that foundation and hail damage are two things that somebody kind of colloquialisms unique to this central Texas that people should really expect to see or not be shooked. If they see that on an inspection report or other other things that are kind of unique to Central Texas that hey, every property just has termite damage for every property is going to have this type of thing. Because a lot of remote investors when they see certain things that they're not used to seeing get really spooked. So talk to people about what they what they should be expect to see and what how they should keep their cool.   Kevin: Yeah, yeah. Almost every inspection report is going to state something about a hairline crack because of a foundation shift or you know, they're going to say that they can tell that there's been some sort of movement, we shouldn't freak out about it because It's going most properties are going to move just a little bit. But you know, in 10 years, if it's only moved a quarter of an inch, I think we're going to be good, you know, the HV AC system because it is hot here. Most of the time, we'll only have a few months where it's cool. People's hv AC systems are going to be used a lot. So when we're doing our inspections, we also really dive deep into how the unit looks. How old is the unit? Does it look like it's you know, somebody's been cranking it down to 65 degrees every day for the last three or four years it changing out that AC filter, but you know, we're looking at the ACS really close the roof, obviously the foundation, but none of them scare you away, if you know if we can get the sellers to take care of whatever small items there are.   But I would say the foundation is one that yeah, if it's got if it's got major issues, we're going to get a foundation company to go in there and take a look and see if it's something we should just run away from the roof. Literally most people don't even know that their roof has the damage on it. So we get somebody out there to take a look at it. And you know if they say yeah, this, this area had a storm six months ago, and there's enough damage on there, we have a lot of sellers that are that are taking care of replacing the roof before we close because that needed to be done. They just didn't, you know, nobody's hopped up on the roof lately to see that it needed to be done.   Michael: And to just give people an idea of what a roof replacement costs, do you have a ballpark idea for your, you know, 2000 square foot property.   Kevin: Yeah. 7500 to 12,000, depending on all the peaks and how high it is. I think two stories are going to be more expensive than a you know, a flat one story, but they're gonna be last one we just saw was right around 7500 for a full replacement.   Michael: Okay. Okay, that's great to know. That's great to know. And then, Kevin, my last question for you is we're recording this mid October 2021. So for everyone listening, keep that in mind. But what are you seeing people do who are winning offers? Are they coming in all cash? Are they going over ask and you can talk specifically to kind of each of the sub markets that you touched on if you'd like, but just you know, what do folks need to do to win these twin these properties?   Kevin: Yeah, you know, I think that the craziness of for about 10 months last November was the first time that I ever had anybody wanted to make an offer above list price. Like that was unheard of here. I've never seen that before. And I actually told him I said, You're crazy. We don't we don't do that here list price, we'll win it. Like No, no, we need to go. I think it was $20,000. Over I said, well, that's the craziest thing I've ever heard. And then every offer after that for about 10 months had to be above lists, we had multiple offers on things I was one of 75 offer one of 75 offers on a house in Pflugerville. It ended up going for like $100,000 over on a $300,000 house, it was chaotic, those times a little bit. They've slowed.   So we're still a strong market, there may be a couple of offers on property, but it's not the way it was. So now I would just suggest, you know, you definitely can't come in significantly lower and expect to win anything sellers, sellers are still sellers are still living in the past, when they think that they're going to get 75 offers at $100,000 over list. Those days are gone. So right, they have to be educated things have slowed down a little bit, let's price it appropriately, and then hope that we can get that price.   So you know, if we're coming in at less price financing is fine. People are still writing the appraisal waivers. So if it does get appraised a little bit lower than what they're willing to offer, they're coming to the table with a little bit of funds. But I'm not even seeing those as much as we were there for a little bit. But I would say it depends on the days on the market is something just hit the market and somebody really likes it, it checks all of their boxes, let's go in at list price and try to get it wrapped up. If it's been on the market for 20 plus days, maybe able to get a little bit of a discount, but I would you know $10,000 off or maybe 15-20,000 try to meet at $10,000 off somewhere in there.   But we've got to be strong with them. Just again, because there's not as much inventory as we've had in years past. There's more than there was a few months ago but sellers are still expecting to make a little bit of money on on their cell and they're getting it so nobody's giving away properties. Nobody's discounting big. We just got to make a lot of the other terms good, you know, we want to try to close within 30 days, our due diligence periods, try to make them a little bit shorter. Give them a nice deposit at the beginning to where they know that we're serious. So we try to sweeten the pot that way. And if we can if we can go in with a highly qualified buyer close in 30 days at what people are asking then Hopefully we can we can capture some deals.   Michael: That's fantastic. All right Kevin My last question for you is you are a rootstock certified agent out in Central Texas so what is it that you're looking for when you're publishing properties to the rootstock select marketplace program?   Kevin: Sure so we found that most of our clients are they like newer they like newer properties in nicer areas with better schools that are going to obviously rent quickly so we try to get something within you know, built within 2010 and newer, if we can't find enough of that then we go to the year 2000 and newer, we try to get to 1700 square feet to about 23-24 maybe 2500 square feet depending on the area and just something that looks clean that has what everybody's looking for you know the granite countertops the the good looking wood floors, we don't want any you know green bedroom green walls in the bedrooms and pink bathrooms we try to go pretty basic but you know, modern looking looking homes that that is not going to ship they're not gonna scare a potential renter away when they walk in there.   A lot of our clients just don't want to go in and spend a bunch of money up front they just want to buy something that may just need to be cleaned and maybe one wall painted and then they put it on the market and get it rented really quick and the price range you know we kind of talked about it some of these sub markets will look and try to find something in that 225 range and then you know everybody realizes when they're buying in Austin it's just gonna be a little bit more so we try to put a good variety out there because you know everybody's looking for something different for the most part.   Michael:  Alrighty everybody that was our episode a big big, big thank you to Kevin, I learned a ton about the central Texas markets as a whole hopefully you did too. Check us out wherever you listen to your podcasts, Google, Spotify and apple. We love comments and ratings. We look forward to seeing on the next one and as always, happy investing

Digital Conversations
Pharmaceutical Companies Can Lead the Healthcare Industry into the Age of Digital Consumer Engagement. Friction is the Enemy and the Opportunity.

Digital Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 19:03


Despite countless billions of dollars spent, and decades of effort, healthcare still lags behind other industries when it comes to successfully using digital technologies to interact with its customers — the patients. The ongoing challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in rapid advances in digital health solutions and telehealth. The pharmaceutical industry essentially performed a miracle in delivering several effective new drugs in just months. Bradford Lee, VP of Life Sciences at Lifelink Systems, sat down with Greg Kefer to share some of the developments he's been part of in his role working with top innovation executives across all segments of the pharmaceutical industry. The combination of big organizations, legacy processes, and heavy regulation have historically held back rapid innovation and Silicon Valley thinking, but that may be changing.   Mature technology that's mobile and conversational is lowering the friction barrier for patients and trial participants. Healthcare providers are showcasing their digital transformation successes, paving the path for the entire industry. We are also seeing the traditional internal barriers for digital transformation come down as life science companies begin to look for ways to deploy simple, effective solutions quickly to get wins on the board and begin to generate the kinds of results needed for wide-scale innovation. Healthcare may be on the cusp of finally catching up to the other consumer industries that the leaders keep saying they want to emulate. 

Boomers Today
Living A Rewarding Life After a Long Career

Boomers Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:03


Andy Robin is an author, speaker, Executive Coach and Life Coach, also serves on the Board of a foundation in Palo Alto and a NYC hedge fund, and enjoys day-trips, lectures, and concerts around the San Francisco Bay Area and Silicon Valley. He wrote "Tapas Life" to do some good for others who haven't yet come to grips with their likely extended longevity, and the need to assemble a new type of life to make those bonus years rich and rewarding.Sponsor: www.SeniorCareAuthority.com

America Meditating Radio Show w/ Sister Jenna
Finding Soul, From Silicon Valley to Africa with Kurt Davis & Sister Jenna

America Meditating Radio Show w/ Sister Jenna

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:00


Kurt Davis is a technology entrepreneur, mindfulness expert, and social impact worker. The first 20-years of his career were spent between Silicon Valley and Asia working with technology startups in finance and business development roles. In 2017, he took time off and traveled to Africa volunteering at many emerging business accelerators and non-profits. Witnessing that entrepreneurship gives people hope, Kurt started Kakuma Ventures to empower and finance local entrepreneurs in the Kakuma refugee camp. His experiences are documented in his book, “Finding Soul, From Silicon Valley to Africa.”  Visit www.kdalive.com & https://kakumaventures.com. Listen to the Om Shanti album by Sister Jenna on Spotify. Visit www.americameditating.org and subscribe to our YouTube page at www.YouTube.com/AmericaMeditating.

The Munk Debates Podcast
Be it resolved: America's best days are behind it

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 53:05


Falling wages. Failing infrastructure. Soaring public debts. Many believe that America's future looks anything but bright. Stark ideological and partisan divisions have fractured the country at home while a string of failed foreign military interventions have soured Americans on the country's role as defender of the liberal international order. Add in exploding disparities between rich and poor, a bungled pandemic response, and lacklustre economic growth and you have all the markers of a country in decline. Others argue that betting against America has always been a losing proposition. Declinists fail to account for the country's amazing ability to adapt and re-invent itself time and time again. From world beating technological innovations in Silicon Valley to vaccine breakthroughs to the frontiers of commercial space exploration, America has proven it can rise to meet new challenges and opportunities. The strength of its diversity, size of its population, its entrepreneurial drive, military might, and financial prowess all ensure its continued dominance as a global power in the 21st century. In a world beset with authoritarian regimes, statist economies and the absence of human liberty, America will remain a powerful magnet for talented people the world over committed to democracy and freedom. Arguing for the motion is Gideon Rachman, Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator of the Financial Times and author of Easternization: Asia's Rise and America's Decline From Obama to Trump and Beyond. Arguing against the motion is Kori Schake, Director of Foreign and Defense Policy at the American Enterprise Institute and the author of America vs the West: Can the Liberal World Order Be Preserved? QUOTES: GIDEON RACHMAN “I've never seen the country in the state it's in now...it seems to me to be of a different order and one that does raise quite profound questions about the enduring success of the American experiment.”  KORI SCHAKE “Don't underestimate the loud raucous conflictual way America solves its problems... that's how we have traditionally clawed our way towards being a better republic and I believe that continues to happen now.” Sources: The Hill, CNET, Global News, CNN, Yahoo Finance, CNBC, Thames TV, ABC The host of the Munk Debates is Rudyard Griffiths - @rudyardg.   Tweet your comments about this episode to @munkdebate or comment on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/munkdebates/ To sign up for a weekly email reminder for this podcast, send an email to podcast@munkdebates.com.   To support civil and substantive debate on the big questions of the day, consider becoming a Munk Member at https://munkdebates.com/membership Members receive access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, newsletter and ticketing privileges at our live events. This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue - https://munkdebates.com/ The Munk Debates podcast is produced by Antica, Canada's largest private audio production company - https://www.anticaproductions.com/   Executive Producer: Stuart Coxe, CEO Antica Productions Senior Producer: Ricki Gurwitz Editor: Kieran Lynch Associate Producer: Abhi Raheja

The Quest with Justin Kan
Is Facebook Unethical? China's Crypto Ban, Theranos and Fraud (The OnlyFriends Show)

The Quest with Justin Kan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 79:51


Welcome to my new show OnlyFriends, where my Silicon Valley group chat comes to life. On this episode, we discuss China banning crypto, the Theranos trial and fraud in Silicon Valley, whether Facebook is unethical, and free startup ideas. Starring: Justin Kan: Twitch co-founder and investor at Goat Capital (https://twitter.com/justinkan) Emmett Shear: Twitch co-founder and current Twitch CEO (https://twitter.com/eshear) Michael Seibel: Twitch co-founder and CEO of Y Combinator (https://twitter.com/mwseibel) Nicole Farb: Darby Smart co-founder and investor at Headline (https://twitter.com/nicolefarb)If you liked  this episode, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter! A thank to our sponsors Universe and CashApp for making this podcast possible.   THE QUEST MEDIA | CONTENT MEETS SILICON VALLEY |

Venture Stories
Andy Rachleff on Investing, Company-Building & Product Market Fit… Lessons from Wealthfront & Benchmark

Venture Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 43:05


Andy Rachleff (@arachleff), president and CEO of Wealthfront, joins Anne Dwane and Lucas Bagno to discuss:- What Andy learned from endowment investing and his quest to democratize excellent investing advice at Wealthfront.- Why you shouldn't try to time the market and why in his opinion all-time highs are “absolutely irrelevant.”- Andy's lessons from witnessing four day-trading frenzies in his career and why you should think about absolute return rather than relative returns.- How his position on crypto has evolved over time and why he's optimistic about its ability to revolutionize commerce but skeptical about its place in an investment portfolio.- His learnings on product market fit from Don Valentine, and why Don said that if a startup can screw something up, it will. He also said that to succeed, it needs the market to pull the product out of the startup's hands.- Why operating investors often make better investment decisions because operating experience is a proxy for network rather than because of the operating experience itself. - His top book recommendations.Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. Check us out on the web at www.villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.Want to get updates from us? Subscribe to get a peek inside the Village. We'll send you reading recommendations, exclusive event invites, and commentary on the latest happenings in Silicon Valley. www.villageglobal.vc/signup

Love What You Love
Episode 50: Wildlife Rescue with Laura Hawkins

Love What You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:04


Before we get started, I just have to note that this is the 50th Love What You Love interview! Thank you so much for being here! I've been lucky enough to work with some of the best around: Zeke Rodrigues Thomas of Mindjam Media was unbelievably helpful in terms of editing and helping me get up to speed, and the delightful Emily White of The Wordary continues to create the best podcast transcripts around. Of course, I've also been super honored to chat with the most interesting people, interested in the coolest things. Speaking of, let's meet this week's guest! Laura Hawkins is the executive director of the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley whose mission is to provide sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife with exceptional free care, rehabilitation, and the opportunity for release. They also educate the public about coexisting peacefully with local wildlife. It was so cool to talk with Laura! In this chat, we talk ducks that act like dogs; what to do when you find a baby animal; why you shouldn't trim your trees until late October; saving squirrels in India; why it's a really stupid idea to keep a wild animal as a pet; fighting for the underdog; and so, so much more. Find Laura https://wcsv.org https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeCenterofSiliconValley https://instagram.com/wildlifesiliconvalley https://twitter.com/Wildlife_Center   *** My favorite nonprofits: Humane Society Silicon Valley https://hssv.org  Southern Poverty Law Center https://www.splcenter.org  Town Cats of Morgan Hill https://towncats.org  Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley https://wcsv.org World Central Kitchen https://wck.org  *** We're on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/lovewhatyoulovepod  Hang out with me at https://instagram.com/lovewhatyoulovepod or https://twitter.com/whatyoulovepod  Need transcripts? Contact Emily White at The Wordary Emily@TheWordary.com  Check out my books at https://juliekrose.com  LWYL Music: Inspiring Hope by Pink-Sounds https://audiojungle.net/user/pink-sounds

Free to Offend
Good intentions don't always translate to better outcomes

Free to Offend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:09


So many bad government policies begin life as well-intended attempts to make the world a better place. Which is why “good intentions” simply aren't a useful metric for evaluating policy solutions. For free-market advocates, however, understanding these good intentions is a critical piece of understanding how we can connect with people who don't already think the way we do. Bob Zeidman, tech entrepreneur and author, joined the program to talk about the way “good intentions” have caused so much political, cultural and societal disfunction. Zeidman is a Silicon Valley entrepreneur and President of Zeidman Consulting. His latest venture is Good Beat Poker, a new way to play and watch poker online, and he is also the author of the political satire Good Intentions. His newest book, Animal Lab, will be released soon.

Field Tripping
Shabbat Sharoom | Greg Ferenstein

Field Tripping

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 77:15


Greg Ferenstein joins Ronan to discuss how psychedelics can make you a better co-worker, his field research in Silicon Valley, mental health advocacy, psychedelic policy reform, and more! Greg is a scientific consultant to mental health programs and psychedelic startups through his firm, Frederick Research. He's also currently a scientific advisor on psychedelics and gathers research on how people use medicines such as psilocybin and LSD to improve their health, relationships, and careers. He is also the research director for Tech4America, a non-profit organization that looks at how access to mental health services impacts low-income individuals seeking to get into high-tech careers. His research has been featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, and The Guardian.Feel free to leave Ronan a message with your comments, questions, or just to say hello! https://www.speakpipe.com/fieldtripping or write us an email at fieldtripping@kastmedia.com. And please check out our Field Tripping YouTube channel where you can watch the show! Follow us! Official Website: fieldtriphealth.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fieldtriphealth/ Facebook: facebook.com/fieldtriphealth Twitter: twitter.com/fieldtriphealth Instagram: instagram.com/fieldtriphealth Guest Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/ferensteinDownload our app: tripapp.co

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
62. A masterclass in crowdsourcing, w/Duolingo's Luis von Ahn

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:13


Crowdsourcing is more than a group of people interested in the same cause, it's a way to tap skills – and scale – that you don't have. And when it works, it can be the rocket fuel that launches you to scale further than you could have ever imagined. No one knows this better than Luis von Ahn, founder and CEO of Duolingo. Duolingo is a language app with over 300 million users worldwide, who complete over 7 billion exercises a month. It's their passion for learning that drives them to create even more content for the app – igniting the rocket fuel that Duolingo needs. Cameo appearance by Elizabeth Sampat (game designer and author). Read a transcript of this interview at: https://mastersofscale.com/luis-von-ahn/Subscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter at http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Immigration Law for Tech Startups
093: Recruiting with Beth Scheer

Immigration Law for Tech Startups

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:14


In this week's Immigration Law for Tech Startups podcast, I'm speaking with Beth Scheer, who has an illustrious background in recruiting and HR with her time at Salesforce and Google. For the last six and a half years, she has been at Homebrew, an amazing VC that focuses on mission-driven founders solving large and urgent problems at the seed stage. They have over 70 companies in their portfolio, including some in Canada and Brazil.    Beth's role is to teach her founders how to fish. She provides counsel and advises their portfolio companies on everything under the talent umbrella. Today, Beth shares some of her insights on how she educates founders on strategies related to recruiting and compensation, sourcing, the interview process, and diversity and inclusion.    Please share this episode with companies, HR and recruiting professionals, startup founders, international talent, or anyone who can benefit from it. Sign up for the Alcorn monthly newsletter to receive the latest immigration news and issues. Reach out to us if we can help you determine the best immigration options for yourself, your company, your employees or prospective employees, or your family whether in the U.S. or abroad. In this episode, you'll hear about: What attracts people to early-stage startups Some challenges startups try to overcome in the recruiting process Investing in a sourcing tool and an applicant tracking system Best practices for attracting and retaining talent Diversity & inclusion and international hiring trends Tips to avoid recruiting missteps   Don't miss my upcoming conversations with top Silicon Valley venture capitalists, startup founders, professors, futurists, and thought leaders on Immigration Law for Tech Startups. Subscribe to this podcast here or on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or whatever your favorite platform is. As always, we welcome your rating and review of this podcast. We appreciate your feedback! Resources: www.homebrew.co   Alcorn Immigration Law: Subscribe to the monthly Alcorn newsletter   Immigration Law for Tech Startups podcast: Episode 73: International Entrepreneur Parole is Back! Episode 81: The Engineers I'm Recruiting Want H-1B Transfers and Green Cards… What Do I Do? Episode 87: All the Ways to Get a Work Permit   Immigration Options for Talent, Investors, and Founders Immigration Law for Tech Startups eBook Extraordinary Ability Bootcamp course for best practices for securing the O-1A visa, EB-1A green card, or the EB-2 NIW (National Interest Waiver) green card—the top options for startup founders. Use promotion code ILTS for 20% off the enrollment fee.

Growth Mindset Podcast
188: Choosing Growth After Grief - Jarie Bolander, The Entrepreneur Ethos podcast host

Growth Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 45:42


In this episode, Jarie Bolander, host of The Entrepreneur Ethos podcast, talks with Sam about how he became an entrepreneur and the story of his failures and successes as he walks through his entrepreneurship journey. We'll later find out how he was able to manage his life after losing a loved one. CONNECT WITH JARIE LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jariebolander) Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/jarie) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/jariebolander/) Twitter (https://twitter.com/thedailymba) The Daily MBA (https://www.thedailymba.com) The Entrepreneur Ethos Podcast (https://theentrepreneurethos.com) ABOUT THE HOST My name is Sam Harris. I am a British entrepreneur, investor and explorer. From hitchhiking across Kazakstan to programming AI doctors I am always pushing myself in the spirit of curiosity and Growth. My background is in Biology and Psychology with a passion for improving the world and human behaviour. I have built and sold companies from an early age and love coming up with unique ways to make life more enjoyable and meaningful. Connect with Sam: Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/samjamharris/) Twitter (https://twitter.com/samjamharris) LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/sharris48/) Wiser than Yesterday (https://www.wiserpod.com) ReasonFM (https://reason.fm/podcast/growth-mindset-podcast) Sam's blog - SamWebsterHarris.com (https://samwebsterharris.com/) Support the Show - Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/growthmindset) Subscribe! If you enjoyed the podcast please subscribe and rate it. And of course, share with your friends!

Secret Leaders
Killing Kittens - the world famous sex party turning into a tech business, with Founder & CEO Emma Sayle

Secret Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:14


“Every time you masturbate, God kills a kitten, and I went ‘right, that's it, that's what I'm calling my business.'” This is the story of Killing Kittens, the cult-like sex party, founded by Emma Sayle.  “Everyone starts talking to each other and mingling and then you'll see maybe a few couples disappear off into a room, or you know a group of girls go off. One minute you've got a packed bar and the next minute it's only 10 people in the bar and everyone's gone off into different rooms, getting naked, having sex, doing whatever. It's like Dante's Inferno, limbs everywhere.” Killing Kittens begun life in 2005 as a series of monthly hedonistic parties led by empowered women in London, but it has since grown into a global movement including apps like the most private of private messaging platforms.  In this latest episode, Emma shares where the idea for Killing Kittens came from, why women today are much better at owning their sexuality, sexual double standards, what to expect at a KK party, and how to turn something like this into a big business.  “I need to raise money because we need to go big or go home on the whole platform side of it. And to make it fly before some Silicon Valley upstart with millions in the bank comes in claiming to own the female digital sex space.” Sponsor links: www.smithandwilliamson.com/secretleaders www.netsuite.com/secretleaders www.linkedin.com/secretleaders vanta.com/secretleaders

Texas Business Minds
San Antonio: Will Conway on Pathwire's $1.9B Sale and How the Alamo City Stacks Up With Austin

Texas Business Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 40:27


Tech talent from across America is pouring into Texas. And while Austin grabs headlines thanks to Elon Musk and other Silicon Valley transplants, San Antonio boasts its own impressive tech lineup and offers more bang for the buck. In this episode, SABJ Tech Reporter Jeannette Garcia checks in with Pathwire CEO Will Conway, who reflects on the growth of his group, it's recent sale, and shares why more tech companies are settling in San Antonio.

EDEN
The Path to Financial Peace | Rich in Faith Pt 1

EDEN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 37:54


We launched a new message series called “Rich in Faith”, and it's all about learning to live a life of generosity! GET CONNECTED + PRAYER New to EDEN? We'd love to pray for you, too! Let us know at https://eden.church/connect LEARN ABOUT EDEN CHURCH EDEN is a startup church in Silicon Valley. Learn more at https://eden.church FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA FB: https://www.facebook.com/edenthechurch IG: https://www.instagram.com/edenthechurch/ GIVE TODAY https://eden.church/give

Singularity University Radio
FBL31 - Katy Cook: The Psychology of Silicon Valley

Singularity University Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 47:46


This week our guest is social psychologist, Katy Cook, who authored the 2019 book: The Psychology of Silicon Valley : Ethical Threats and Emotional Unintelligence in the Tech Industry. And so as you might expect, that's exactly what we talk about. That takes us on a tour exploring ideas like empathy, capitalism, and the concept of progress. In a lot of ways, the key focus of Katy's work and this conversation deals with the lack of the humanities (and to that extent humanistic values) in tech companies, which ultimately impacts all of us due to the monopoly such companies have on our attention. The ebook version of Katy's book is FREE and can be found here on Google Books You can also follow Katy's next adventure exploring individualism around the country on Instagram: @the.states.of.the.nation ** Apply to join our Nov 7th - 11th Executive Program @ go.su.org/ep2021 ** Host: Steven Parton - LinkedIn / Twitter Music by: Amine el Filali

City Cast Denver
Why A Big Brother Tech Giant Moved to Denver

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 18:45


Palantir Technologies is a massive, publicly traded defense contractor founded on the promise of bringing Silicon Valley-style data analysis to the U.S. armed forces. And now, after years spent complaining about the “monoculture” of the Bay Area, Palantir's leaders have moved the company's headquarters to Denver. So what do they see in us? Why are people protesting them in the street? And what can we expect from our new neighbor? City Cast Denver producer Paul Karolyi speaks with Max Chafkin, reporter for Bloomberg Businessweek and author of a brand new book on Palantir's co-founder Peter Thiel: The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley's Pursuit of Power.  For more on Palantir's early operations in Denver, past City Cast Denver guest Ed Sealover has a good article for you right here: https://www.bizjournals.com/denver/news/2020/11/16/palantir-technologies-denver-headquarters-move.html After speaking with Max, we reached out to the City of Denver and the State of Colorado to learn more about what kinds of negotiations or incentives helped lure Palantir to Denver, and neither said they actively recruited or offered any sort of special benefit. “But we're not surprised that our workforce talent pool and quality of life is a major selling point for any major tech company, and has made us a destination for these businesses to locate and relocate,” a spokesperson for the city added. Hate Chipotle's new queso? Got an off-menu order that changes the game? We're talking all things Denver-style, Mission-style burritos this week, and we want to hear from you! Give us your name, your neighborhood, and your hottest take, and you may hear your voicemail on the show. The number to call is (720) 500-5418‬. Sign up for our newsletter! https://denver.citycast.fm/newsletter/ Follow us on Twitter! @citycastdenver

Just Go Grind with Justin Gordon
#302: Nicholas Hinrichsen on How Clutch turns Credit Unions into FinTech companies, Raising from a16z, and Hiring Talent in LATAM

Just Go Grind with Justin Gordon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 26:49


Nicholas Hinrichsen is the co-founder of Clutch, a SaaS company working to turn credit unions into FinTechs, while helping you to refinance your auto loan and save thousands in minutes. Nicholas used to be an avid golfer, playing on Germany's national team for four years. After finishing his master's degree in Germany, he worked at Bain & Company and Merrill Lynch before he moved to the U.S. in 2011. Nicholas and his co-founder Chris Coleman met at Stanford Business School, and after graduating in 2013 they started Carlypso, the Amazon for used cars. They eventually sold to Carvana in 2017, and stayed on board until 2020, when they started the original iteration of Clutch. Topics Covered by Nicholas Hinrichsen in this Episode The pivot Clutch is making and how it came about How they're turning credit unions into FinTech companies Creating a self-serve product Why loan origination systems are archaic and how Clutch is implementing technology to make credit unions more efficient The current business model for Clutch The challenge of competing for talent in Silicon Valley and Clutch's unique approach to new hiring How they came to the decision to hire internationally and the complexities of doing so Their most recent round of fundraising with Andreessen Horowitz What's next for Clutch and the ultimate vision for their consumer experience Listen to all episodes of the Just Go Grind Podcast: https://www.justgogrind.com Follow Justin Gordon on Twitter: https://twitter.com/justingordon212

Beyond The Horizon
Human Trafficking: Facebook Has A Human Trafficking Problem

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 23:34


Facebook has a serious issue when it comes to it's platform being used to aid those who wish to engage in human trafficking and now a report is taking aim at this problem and putting a spotlight on the dangers that are present online, especially on facebook. To contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comSource:https://www.cbsnews.com/amp/news/facebook-sex-trafficking-online-recruitment-report/?__twitter_impression=true&s=09

Modern Minorities
Phil Yu (isn't always) the Angry Asian Man

Modern Minorities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 46:28


“You have to choose to become Asian American. I went from just being a Korean kid in Silicon Valley to belonging to this community. I want that to mean something.” Phil Yu is best known for AngryAsianMan.com - THE website about Asian American perspectives. But he's really not as angry as people think? Phil's a writer, speaker, and host. AngryAsianMan.com is one of the most widely read / longest-running sites covering news, culture, and perspectives from the Asian American community. Phil ALSO hosts the podcasts “They Call Us Bruce” and “All The Asians On Star Trek” (a new personal favorite). And in January 2022, Phil's book “RISE: A Pop History of Asian American from the Nineties to Now” comes out. Phil's been featured in The NY Times, NPR, the LA Time, CNN, WaPo, Gawker, and more. He's won awards for his work AND worked in documentaries, film commentaries, and web series. Honestly, Phil's been the guest we've wanted since we started our podcast, as he is one of the reasons why we do what we do. Phil was doing this before most of us, and continues to trailblaze for the rest of us. AND he's a total nerd that wants to change the world, one angry word at a time... LEARN ABOUT PHIL AngryAsianMan.com instagram.com/angryasianman twitter.com/angryasianman Podcast: theycallusbruce.libsyn.com Podcast: alltheasiansonstartrek.com Forbes: The Future Of Telling Asian American Stories: An Interview With Angry Asian Man MENTIONS FILM: Who Killed Vincent Chin? (1987): imdb.com/title/tt0096440 A&F Wong Bros racist t-shirt: news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/1938914.stm --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/modern-minorities/support

Digitale Optimisten: Perspektiven aus dem Silicon Valley
#38 Sophie, wie geht globale Skalierung im Health-Sektor?

Digitale Optimisten: Perspektiven aus dem Silicon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 86:50


Sophie Chung ist Gründerin von Qunomedial - und möchte jedem den oder die beste Ärztin vermitteln, am besten über alle Ländergrenzen hinweg.***Alle Infos auf www.digitaleoptimisten.de***Herzlich Willkommen bei Digitale Optimisten. Ich bin Alex und ich bin in diesem Podcast auf der Suche nach den Elon Musks von morgen, die mit ihren Ideen aber noch ganz am Anfang sind.Heute spreche ich mit einer wirklich außergewöhnlichen Gründerin. Sie war auf dem Cover von Forbes, ist im Handelsblatt, in der Wirtschaftswoche, spricht auf der Noah Conference, bei Bits & Pretzels und hat als ehemalige Beraterin bei BCG überall auf der Welt gearbeitet. Jetzt fragst du dich vielleicht, was gründet so eine Überfliegerin für ein Start-Up?Die Antwort ist: Qunomedical. Sophie macht sich mit Qunomedical die Unterschiede und Ineffizienzen der weltweiten Gesundheitssysteme zunutze. Das zentrale Wertversprechen: Finde den richtigen Arzt im In- oder ganz besonders im Ausland. Also: wenn du eine größere Operation, sei es eine Zahn-Op, Haartransplantation, eine Schönheits-OP oder etwas anderes planst, dann will dir Qunomedical den richtigen Arzt oder die richtige Ärztin vermitteln. In dem ein oder anderen Presseartikel über Sophies Start-Up liest man den Begriff Medizintourismus, was sie davon hält, hörst du in diesem Podcast. Wir haben diese Folge übrigens vor unserer kleinen Sommerpause vor ein paar Monaten aufgenommen.Wie immer gilt: wenn dir dieser Podcast gefällt, dann erzähl doch bitte einer weiteren Bekannten, Freund oder Arbeitskollegin von diesem Podcast oder abonniere den Podcast einfach, um keine Gründergeschichte zu verpassen. 

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
Rapid Response: Overcoming institutional hurdles, w/ U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee CEO Sarah Hirshland

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:58


In the last year, Sarah Hirshland has had to face one daunting issue after another as the CEO of the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee – each of which have required urgent, in-the-moment decisions. Most recently Sarah mandated that U.S. athletes be vaccinated against COVID-19 to participate in the upcoming Beijing winter games. But that's just the latest of a slew of cultural issues she's been tasked to act on. She's faced pandemic disruptions, social action protests, sexual misconduct scandals, mental health stress, and more. Through all of it, Sarah has been motivating her team around an evolving mission to reflect not just where America is as a country today but where it's going. Read a transcript of this interview at: mastersofscale.comSubscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter at http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.