Podcasts about Old French

Gallo-Romance dialect continuum spoken from the 9th century to the middle of the 14th century

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  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
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Old French

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Best podcasts about Old French

Latest podcast episodes about Old French

Radio Omniglot
Adventures in Etymology – Rabbit

Radio Omniglot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022


Today we are burrowing into the origins of the word rabbit. A rabbit [ˈɹæbɪt] is: a mammal of the family Leporidae, with long ears, long hind legs and a short, fluffy tail. It comes from the Middle English rabet(te) (young rabbit), from the Middle French *robotte/rabotte or the Anglo-Latin rabettus, from the Old French rabotte, […]

Shirtless Plantain Show
SPS Arsenal Special (Arsenal vs Brentford) - "Paint me like your old French manager..."

Shirtless Plantain Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 43:23


Long time, no play. Wasn't that just fantastic, fellow Gooners? The Arsenal crew delves into what was arguably Arsenal's best performance under Mikel Arteta. Have a cuppa and enjoy!

Word of the Day

Pique is a noun that refers to a feeling of irritation or resentment from a slight. Our word of the day has many meanings, but today we're focusing on the noun that refers to a sense of annoyance or frustration that comes from a slight. Pique is derived from an Old French word for ‘stabbing blow.' Here's an example of it in use: Mr. Henderson left the office in a fit of pique. He couldn't believe they selected the pizza for the party without consulting him.

D&D Journey of the Fifth Edition
30 Day Dungeons and Dragons Challenge Day 28 Favorite Weapon

D&D Journey of the Fifth Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 17:15


What's your favorite D&D Weapon? A rapier (/ˈreɪpiər/) or espada ropera is a type of sword with a slender and sharply-pointed two-edged blade that was popular in Western Europe, both for civilian use (dueling and self-defense) and as a military side arm,[2] throughout the 16th and 17th centuries. A falchion (/ˈfɔːltʃən/; Old French: fauchon; Latin: falx, "sickle") is a one-handed, single-edged sword of European origin. Falchions are found in different forms from around the 13th century up to and including the 16th century. In some versions, the falchion looks rather like the seax and later the sabre, and in other versions more like a machete with a crossguard. Please support our shows at www.patreon.com/cppn and even join us in some games! Also keep an eye at the new things on our now affiliated Twitch channel: https://www.twitch.tv/creativeplayandpodcast Also follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/CreativePlayandPodcastNetwork Would you be interested if we hosted D&D and Edge of Empire games on Roll20 for you to join? Email us at Creativeplaypodcastnet@Gmail.com

Harry Potter Theory
How Muggles Made the Malfoys RICH - Harry Potter Theory

Harry Potter Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 8:13 Transcription Available


Welcome to Harry Potter Theory. Today we're discussing WIZARDING WEALTH. It's a hot topic- people want to talk about. Why is Harry so RICH? Why do the Lestrange's have a vault full of gold? Who is the RICHEST family? These are all questions I've answered in the past. However, what I've never properly answered is how the Malfoy family were able to amass THEIR wealth.  The wizarding world has an economy just like our own with mediums of exchange and a system of finance. And they also of course have their own wizarding money- coming in many different forms including galleons, sickles and knuts. Galleons are the largest form of currency, equivalent to about 17 sickles or 493 knuts. According to the FORBES fictional 15 - which takes speculation to the next level when it ranks the net worth of all different sorts of fictional characters, Lucius Malfoy is worth an astonishing 1.3 billion USD or 943,542 pounds. If we convert that in to muggle currency, that gives us a figure of approximately 188,708,000 galleons- not bad Lucius. Astonishingly, the Malfoys are NOT the richest family in the wizarding world, but they're certainly up there- probably top 3. When we think of the Malfoy family lineage- certain words come to most people's minds- but these words scarcely hold a positive connotation.  Usually when someone says ‘Malfoy'- you might think ‘bigot' or ‘prejudiced'- but that's a reputation that was earned through centuries of intolerance. In fact, the name Malfoy comes from Old French and literally means ‘bad faith'. These are characteristics almost ingrained in their bloodline, and it wasn't until really, Draco, that this intolerance began to waiver somewhat. Historically, they are a wealthy family of morally crooked witches and wizards, that will whimper when caught red handed, and gloat when in a position of power. So, how did this family acquire their IMMENSE level of wealth? Well, I'm about to air their dirty dark secret- they're rich EXCLUSIVELY because of muggles.

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast
Episode 213: Jazz Cabbage

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 117:35


Quizmasters Lee and Marc meet with Kyle Anne for a trivia quiz with topics including Collections, Pro Wrestling, Musicians, Fish, Medical, Geography, Mythology & Folklore and more! Round One COLLECTIONS - The word 'deltiologist', derived from the Greek 'deltos' (meaning 'writing tablet') refers to a collector of what? COMPOSERS - What future film-composer authored a calypso theme for the pilot episode of Gilligan's Island? PRO WRESTLING - Which professional wrestler had a career as an outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds before making it big in the wrestling industry? POP SINGERS - What mononymous Senegalese singer and producer was born Aliaune Athium? FISH - Which temperate and tropical pelagic fish of the family Scombridae has a common name which comes from an Old French homonym that means "marked, spotted" as well as "pimp, procurer, or broker"? BRITISH MUSICIANS - Who is the only British musician to have won a Grammy for each of their first four albums? Round Two AIRPLANES - As of January 2022, what airplane manufacturer has the most popular airplane model by sales total (selling more than 45,000)? MEDICAL - Quinsy is an inflammation of which part of the body? HOLLYWOOD SCREENWRITERS - As revealed in an interview with Playboy, which writer and director secretly wrote the script for the 1994 SNL film It's Pat as a favor for their friend Julia Sweeney? GREEK MYTHOLOGY - In Greek Mythology, Artemis is the twin sister of what god who is often seen with a lyre? FOLKLORE - In what German town did the Pied Piper lead away the rats and children with his music? MUSEUMS - Lobotomy instruments, cans of new Coke, the Ford Edsel automobile and synthetic traces are all items that are on display at which museum located in Sweden? Rate My Question GEOGRAPHY - Known as the world mushroom capital, due to the fact that it produces half of the U.S.'s crop, Kennett Square is located in what U.S. state? Final Questions THEME SONGS - According to an interview with Billy West on The Nerdist podcast, which musician pitched a theme song for Ren & Stimpy, but was never used and was subsequently lost? U.S. CIVICS - The right to a jury trial in a civil lawsuit is which amendment to the constitution? FAMOUS CHARACTERS - Wisp is the identity of what heroic character created by Hallmark Cards who had two animated series as well as a 1985 film? Upcoming LIVE Know Nonsense Trivia Challenges August 10rd, 2022 - Know Nonsense Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 7:30 pm EST August 11th, 2022 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - Ollie's Pub Records and Beer - 7:30 pm EST August 13th, 2022 - Know Nonsense Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 6:00 pm EST You can find out more information about that and all of our live events online at KnowNonsenseTrivia.com All of the Know Nonsense events are free to play and you can win prizes after every round. Thank you Thanks to our supporters on Patreon. Thank you, Quizdaddies – Gil, Tim, Tommy, Adam, Brandon, Blake Thank you, Team Captains – Kristin & Fletcher, Aaron, Matthew, David Holbrook, Mo, Lydia, Rick G, Skyler Thank you, Proverbial Lightkeepers – Elyse, Kaitlynn, Frank, Trent, Nina, Justin, Katie, Ryan, Robb, Captain Nick, Grant, Ian, Tim Gomez, Rachael, Moo, Rikki, Nabeel, Jon Lewis, Adam, Lisa, Spencer, Luc, Hank, Justin P., Cooper, Sarah, Karly, Lucas, Mike K., Cole, Adam Thank you, Rumplesnailtskins – Mike J., Mike C., Efren, Steven, Kenya, Dallas, Issa, Paige, Allison, Kevin & Sara, Alex, Loren, MJ, HBomb, Aaron, Laurel, FoxenV, Sarah, Edsicalz, Megan, brandon, Chris, Alec, Sai, Nathan, Tim, Andrea, Ian If you'd like to support the podcast and gain access to bonus content, please visit http://theknowno.com and click "Support." Special Guest: Kyle Anne.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
conscientious

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 1:55 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 23, 2022 is: conscientious • kahn-shee-EN-shus • adjective Conscientious often describes those who are concerned with doing things correctly. It can be used as a synonym for both meticulous and careful. // Although Marvin was brilliant, he was not a very conscientious student, and he frequently lost points for forgetting to turn in his homework. See the entry > Examples: “Findings from Gosling's studies revealed that highly conscientious people tend to have homes or offices that are clean and in good condition. Books, TV remotes, and magazines may be neatly arranged and conveniently located, for example. Their music records and books might be organized and grouped together on the bookshelf by type or genre.” — Brian Collisson, Psychology Today, 25 May 2022 Did you know? According to American writer and editor H. L. Mencken, "Conscience is the inner voice which warns us someone may be looking." A person who is conscientious makes sure that if others are watching, they approve of what they see. This is true for someone who is “governed by their conscience” as the oldest sense of the word is defined—as in “a conscientious objector to the war”—but it is also true for the conscientious person paying close, careful attention to the task at hand. Conscientious came to English from French, centuries after Middle English had adopted conscience from Old French; both ultimately come from Latin scire, “to know.”

The Earful Tower: Paris
5th Arrondissement: Historic Paris

The Earful Tower: Paris

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 43:02 Very Popular


5th Arrondissement: Historic Paris   The XXth arrondissement is xxxx (oliver writes description) The Earful Tower podcast episode This podcast episode on the XXth district of Paris includes an interview with xxx and our final ranking on the district out of 100.  Video guide to the 5th arrondissement We'll share our visit, in video format, on our YouTube channel in the coming days. We'll be making one of these travel vlogs every week, so be sure to subscribe (you can do it in one click via this link).  The Earful Tower's guide to the xxth arrondissement   Oldest arrondissement in Paris (claimed Wikipedia) - first built by the Romans.  Latin Quarter, known as such because in the Middle Ages the students here were taught in Latin. Students lived here historically and now. Beat Generation, many of the greats of that movement lived in the neighborhood.    Tops things to find in the 5th arrondissement   Plan:   Breakfast at LouLou Cluny  Pantheon Bibliotheque genevieve Jardin des plantes Musee natural history Zoo (but it was shit) Mosque for tea Mouffetard  Midnight in Paris steps Le Contrescarpe Maison de Verlaine Caveau de la huchette   Natural History Museum  + Jardin des Plantes Address: 2 Rue Buffon, 75005 Tickets   Grande Mosquée de Paris Address: 2bis Pl. du Puits de l'Ermite, 75005 Lockers available, only for women, open every day 10h - 21h, variety of hamman options, book tickets here   Saint-Geneviève Library Address: 10 Pl. du Panthéon, 75005 Hours Mon - Sat 10h - 22h To enter you need to fill out this form and bring a valid form of ID. Then you complete your registration at the library.   Shakespeare and Company @shakespeareandcoparis Address: 37 Rue de la Bûcherie, 75005   Place de l'Abbé Basset Address: 1 Rue Saint-Etienne du Mont, 75005 The Midnight in Paris steps   Arab World Institute Address: 1 Rue des Fossés Saint-Bernard, 75005 Hours: Tues - Sun 10h - 19h   Panthéon Address: Pl. du Panthéon, 75005   Cluny Museum - National Museum of the Middle Ages Address: 28 Rue du Sommerard, 75005 (with a quick visit to the roman ruins of the old bath houses)   Le Caveau de la Huchette @caveaudelahuchetteofficiel Address: 5 Rue de la Huchette, 75005 Hours: Open every evening, no reservation. Fri, Sat & pubic holidays: 21h - 4h The musician: Du mercredi 29 juin au samedi 2 juillet : Matthieu Boré Blues in New Orleans   Ancient vestiges of the city: Phillipe Auguste wall, the Romann baths and the Arène de Lutèce. Perhaps an honorable mention?   Outdoor Sculpture Museum Along the banks of the Seine always such an amazing atmosphere here Address: 11 Bis Quai Saint-Bernard, 75005   Food   Resturants   La Tour D'Argent Address: 19 Quai de la Tournelle, 75005    Chinaski @chinaskiparis Address: 46 Rue Daubenton, 75005 Paris, France Cafe by day, neo bistro by night   Restaurant Flocon @restaurantfocon Address: 75 Rue Mouffetard, 75005  Great spot to visit on the vibey Rue Mouffetard   Le Bel Ordinaire @lebelordinaire Address: 5 Rue de Bazeilles, 75005   Au P'tit Grec Address: 68 Rue Mouffetard, 75005 Paris, France Great cheap crêpes on Mouffetard   Marché Maubert Address: Pl. Maubert, 75005 Good square with great bakeries, cheese shops and green grocers.    Le Loulou @loulou_restaurant Address: 90 Bd Saint-Germain, 75005 Brunch & Coffee   Drink   Place de la Contrescarpe Address: 2-2 Pl. de l'Estrapade, 75005  Hemmingway lived just around the corner ay 74 rue du Cardinal-Lemoine he came here often. James Joyce finished Ulysses just down the road at 71 rue du Cardinal Lemoine.   Rue Mouffetard Rue Mouffetard was so-named because of the mouffle, Old French for stink, that came from the river Bièvre at the foot of the hill (!! cool link) Orwell wrote about this area in Down and Out in Paris and London.   Coffee   Jozi Café @jozicafeparis Address: 3 Rue Valette, 75005

The French History Podcast
The Old French Language with Olivier Robichaud

The French History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 34:13


Hi again, Olivier here to talk to you about Old French. Hunh, what? Didn't we already cover this? I thought there was already a guest episode about the origins of Old French. Well, yes that's true. But last time, I was really aiming to answer two questions. First: where did French come from? And second: […]

The Breakfast Club
New Mixed with Old (French Montanna Interview, Cesar Pina and Jen Tips Interview and Ryan Wilson and TK Peterson Interview)

The Breakfast Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 101:34 Very Popular


Today on the show we hadvCesar Piña & Jenni Tips stop by and discuss the real estate market, investment properties, new platform and more. Next, its been awhile since we had our guy French Montanna stop by, who discussed quitting alcohol, starting verzuz, upcoming documentary, new album and more. Lastly, we had Ryan Wilson & TK Petersen stop by to speak on the Gathering Spot', building community, financial inclusion and more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Instant Trivia
Episode 493 - "M"Enagerie - In A Pickle - Four - Triangles - Summertime

Instant Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 7:16


Welcome to the Instant Trivia podcast episode 493, where we ask the best trivia on the Internet. Round 1. Category: "M"Enagerie 1: As adults, these lepidoptera are harmless, but the caterpillars love to feast on your clothes. moths. 2: Though its voice is shrill, this small monkey's name is derived from Old French "marmouser", to murmur. a marmoset. 3: It's said ancient Romans not only ate these eels but fed their disobedient slaves to them. a moray eel. 4: The tiny eyes of this insectivore are hidden in its fur. a mole. 5: These crow relatives got their name from a girl's name, Margaret. magpie. Round 2. Category: In A Pickle 1: To make your standard pickle, pickle this veggie. cucumber. 2: This pickle maker introduced its spokesstork in 1974. Vlasic. 3: Common name of Anethum graveolens, a plant in the parsley family used in a popular pickle. dill. 4: In 1900 this company built the first electric advertising sign in New York City, a 40-foot-long pickle. H.J. Heinz. 5: This noted pickle dealer of 15th century Seville has 2 continents named for him. Amerigo Vespucci. Round 3. Category: Four 1: Naismith sport played by the men on the "Road to the Final Four". Basketball. 2: The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse appear in the book of Revelation, written by this "divine" saint. Saint John the Divine. 3: His third wife was a member of the Gang of Four. Mao Tse-tung. 4: Suffering is the substance of all of the Four Noble Truths of this religion. Buddhism. 5: In a 1939 article for National Geographic, Lincoln Ellsworth described his 4 expeditions to this continent. Antarctica. Round 4. Category: Triangles 1: Body part in the triangle atop the pyramid in the Great Seal of the United States. Eye. 2: In the "Steel City" of Pittsburgh, the downtown area is known as this triangle. the Golden Triangle. 3: To get into this city's Golden Triangle you can use the Fort Pitt Bridge. Pittsburgh. 4: The east side of this large, triangular citadel faces Red Square. the Kremlin. 5: In 1911 a devastating fire at this company's factory in New York City killed 146 garment workers. the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. Round 5. Category: Summertime 1: This object is the "S" in SPF, which should be at least 30 in the stuff mom slathers onto you. the sun. 2: On warm days the mind turns to this rhyming word that precedes "basket" and "table". picnic. 3: In the northern hemisphere, Vega, Altair and Deneb, 3 of these, make up the "summer triangle". stars. 4: Are you smarter than a fifth grader? Not a fifth grader who's at SIG, summer institute for them. the gifted. 5: In Houston in the summer, this averages over 90% for the morning. humidity. Thanks for listening! Come back tomorrow for more exciting trivia!

Fiddle Hangout Newest 100 Songs

fun old Canadian fiddle tune

Banjo Hangout Newest 100 Songs

fun old Canadian fiddle tune

Word of the Day

You're listening to Lingo Phoenix's word of the day for March 16. Today's word is cuisine, spelled c-u-i-s-i-n-e. The stress mark in this word falls on the second syllable. cui‧sine /kwɪˈziːn/ ●○○ noun [uncountable] a particular style of cooking the food cooked in a particular restaurant or hotel, especially when it is very good Here's the word used in a sentence: Enjoy the delicious cuisine created by our award-winning chef. Venetian cuisine is based on seafood and rice. The reality is that the contribution of food from the African diaspora is the cornerstone of American cuisine today. — Kiki Louya, Bon Appétit, "How One Detroit Chef Is Serving History in a Shoebox," 26 Feb. 2021 Interesting Fact: History and Etymology for cuisine French, literally, kitchen, from Old French, from Late Latin coquina With your word of the day, I'm Mohammad Golpayegani. Join our Telegram channel @lingophoenix to make sure you never miss an episode of Lingo Phoenix's Word of the Day.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: San Francisco Schools Abolish the Word ‘Chief'

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 21:07


The San Francisco Unified School District is dropping the word “chief” from job titles (“chief technology officer,” “chief of staff,” etc.) for its 10,000-strong workforce because — you guessed it — the word is associated with Native Americans. According to spokesperson Gentle Blythe, “While there are many opinions on the matter, our leadership team agreed that, given that Native American members of our community have expressed concerns over the use of the title, we are no longer going to use it.” No substitute has been agreed upon, which suggests how much thought was put into the decision. Not only is this cultural erasure of Native Americans in the service of supposedly removing a source of offense, it is also a symptom of the educational illiteracy of our educators. As Chris Pandolfo at the Blaze notes, “The word ‘chief' does not have Native American roots. It is an English word borrowed from an Old French word (chef) meaning ‘leader,' derived from the Latin ‘capus,' which means captain or chieftain.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: San Francisco Schools Abolish the Word ‘Chief'

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 21:07


The San Francisco Unified School District is dropping the word “chief” from job titles (“chief technology officer,” “chief of staff,” etc.) for its 10,000-strong workforce because — you guessed it — the word is associated with Native Americans. According to spokesperson Gentle Blythe, “While there are many opinions on the matter, our leadership team agreed that, given that Native American members of our community have expressed concerns over the use of the title, we are no longer going to use it.” No substitute has been agreed upon, which suggests how much thought was put into the decision. Not only is this cultural erasure of Native Americans in the service of supposedly removing a source of offense, it is also a symptom of the educational illiteracy of our educators. As Chris Pandolfo at the Blaze notes, “The word ‘chief' does not have Native American roots. It is an English word borrowed from an Old French word (chef) meaning ‘leader,' derived from the Latin ‘capus,' which means captain or chieftain.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SipTalk
SipTalk Ep. 185: Biggest Misnomers & Misconceptions

SipTalk

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 74:39


Mis·no·mer /misˈnōmər/ noun: A wrong or inaccurate name or designation. Origin: Late Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French, from the Old French verb mesnommer, from mes- ‘wrongly' + nommer ‘to name' CoHost, James Boswell, Accountant, Philosopher, Bartender & Professional Referee (James.Boswell.204@gmail.com) tw: @GetOffMyLawn204 Get 2 free stocks on me: https://act.webull.com/e/icKU7YcnnRID/x0w/ $20 off your first box at Bespoke Post: https://bespokepost.com/r/7834fe0b Products I recommend: https://www.amazon.com/shop/justindigiulio And let me put $5 in your pocket: https://www.acorns.com/invite/AT63GR My favorite credit card is this: http://refer.amex.us/JUSTIDo8te?xl=cp01 Justin@DiGiulioGroup.com Text: 212-239-1839 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/justin-digiulio/support

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 14, 2022 is: verdant • VER-dunt • adjective Verdant means "green in tint or color," "green with growing plants," or "unripe in experience or judgment." // The golf course is noted for its tricky hazards and lush, verdant borders along its fairways. See the entry > Examples: "Vermont is famous for its verdant summer landscapes and postcard-worthy fall colors. But it's the Green Mountain State's winter landscape that truly sparks my photographic eye." — Caleb Kenna, The New York Times, 26 Mar. 2022 Did you know? English speakers have been using verdant as a ripe synonym of green since at least the 16th century, and as a descriptive term for inexperienced or naïve people since the 19th century. (By contrast, the more experienced green has colored our language since well before the 12th century, and was first applied to inexperienced people in the 16th century.) Verdant comes from the Old French word for "green," vert, which itself is from Latin virēre, meaning "to show green growth" or "to be green." Today, vert is used in English as a word for green forest vegetation and the heraldic color green. A related word is virescent, meaning "beginning to be green."

Radio Omniglot
Adventures in Etymology – Quiet

Radio Omniglot

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022


Today we’re looking into the origins of the word quiet. Quiet [ˈkwaɪ.ɪt / ˈkwaɪ.ət] means: making little or no noise or sound free or comparatively free of noise silent restrained in speech or manner free from disturbance or tumult; peaceful It comes from the Middle English quiete (peace, rest, gentleness), from the Old French quiet(e) […]

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
abeyance

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 1:41 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 4, 2022 is: abeyance • uh-BAY-unss • noun Abeyance means "a state of temporary inactivity." The word itself is commonly preceded by the preposition in. // The misdemeanor charges are in abeyance while the suspect is being prosecuted for the felony. See the entry > Examples: "The consensus of analysts is that the crisis may be in abeyance for the moment, but is far from over." — Fred Weir, The Christian Science Monitor, 13 Dec. 2021 Did you know? Abeyance comes from Old French baer, meaning "to have the mouth wide open," which was joined with the prefix a- to form abaer, a verb meaning "to open wide," and, in later Anglo-French usage, "to expect or await." There followed Anglo-French abeyance, which referred to a state of expectation—specifically, a person's expectation of inheriting a title or property. The word, in English, was then applied for the expectation to the property itself: a property or title "in abeyance" is in temporary limbo, waiting to be claimed by a rightful heir or owner.

The Multicultural Middle Ages
Medieval Trans Studies

The Multicultural Middle Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 50:00


Trans people and non-cis cultures and artifacts are not only a part of, they shape and define the Middle Ages. Legendary saints and military leaders, theology, poetry and science, documented religious and regular people, mainstream fictional characters, allegories, mythological figures, alchemical and celestial bodies are part of nonbinary, gender fluid, trans, asexual, queer, non-cis, non-normative history. Medieval Trans Studies enable us to see that gender was variable and contingent in global medieval cultures. The scholars whose voices you hear in this podcast work not only on trans studies, but also critical race studies, disability, social justice and diversity in education and employment. They discuss the ethics of scholarship and the future of trans studies. Gabrielle Bychowski speaks on Eleanor Rykener, Micah Goodrich on Piers Plowman, Blake Gutt on Old French literature, Anna Kłosowska on Polish court depositions and Clovis Maillet on Byzantine, Latin, French, German and Italian trans saints, trans knights and trans historical figures. In the work of these scholars, specialists will find topics they can teach and research, and non-specialists can learn about the importance of recovering trans experiences, as well as how the medieval archive speaks back to modern understandings of identity. Drawing on literary traditions and documents from Byzantium to Rome, from France to Poland, this podcast is about the beauty and joy of trans.Follow this link for more information about Gabrielle, Micah, Blake, Anna, and Clovis, and to learn more about their conversation: https://tinyurl.com/2p9bn3hu.

The Wellness Compass Podcast
Be an Encourager, Episode 29

The Wellness Compass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 23:27


Be an Encourager With the weather turning warmer, we got our bikes out of the garage this week to go for a ride. We were so excited to get going that it wasn't until we were a few blocks from home that we realized that our tires needed air. We returned home, pumped up the tires, and wow, what a difference it made both in comfort and ease of effort. Because we are both family therapists and we think about stuff like this, when we returned from our ride, we joked about how our experience with pumping up our tires was a metaphor for the power of encouraging one another. Any of us can use a little air in our tires, a little extra encouragement from time to time, to make our travels a bit less bumpy. Just as over a long winter, the air slowly leaks out of bike tires, life itself can slowly deflate our self-esteem and sense of well-being. When this happens, expressions of encouragement can go a long way in pumping up our emotional “tires.” Be an encourager. The first three words in the quote in the box above by Dave Willis are so simple that it would be easy to miss their power. Offering encouraging words to your child, partner, friend, colleague, family member, or even a stranger, is so simple, and we can often see the positive effect immediately. It's that easy and that powerful. The word “courage” derives from the same root as the Latin word for heart, “cor,' and in Old French, the word “corage.” The prefix “en” means “to cause to be in,” or “to put in” and so together we can see that to encourage another person means to put heart into that person. Think of that the next time you text someone a heart emoji, a beautiful and simple expression of love and encouragement. Think of it also the next time you give a bit of your heart to someone who is in need of your support. Your encouragement might be just the air they need in their tires to make their ride just a little smoother and easier right now. Making It Personal. Is there someone in your life who could use some encouragement right now? Think of something specific you could do or say. How could you be more accepting and encouraging of yourself? Again, think of something specific.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for March 6, 2022 is: milieu • meel-YOO • noun A milieu is the physical or social setting in which something occurs or develops. The word is synonymous with environment. // The quiet suburban neighborhood provides the perfect milieu for raising a family. See the entry > Examples: "Before the pandemic, a lot of people were focused on how to make a home office sustainable … and that includes not only how the milieu is conducive to productivity, but also how it helps you establish a good work-life balance….." — Ashlee Piper, quoted in Entrepreneur, 10 Feb. 2022 Did you know? Milieu comes from Old French mi (meaning "middle") and lieu ("place"). The word refers to an environment or setting. In English, lieu also is used to mean "place" and most often occurs in the phrase "in lieu of," as in "Cash is preferred but in lieu of cash a credit card is acceptable."

The Modern Yoga Podcast
Episode XXVI: In Depth: Non-Violence (Ahimsa)

The Modern Yoga Podcast

Play Episode Play 59 sec Highlight Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 113:47


Mary Beth & Joyce dive deep on the Yamas & Niyamas of yoga. This episode addresses Ahimsa, or non-violence. You might be surprised to look inside and find out how broad the definition of "do no harm" can be! We refer to  "The Yamas & Niyamas" text by Deborah Adele to support the discussion. Come and learn with us!(Roseann quoted by Sager: all hatred is just fear and all fear is insecurity(harmony: late Middle English: via Old French from Latin harmonia ‘joining, concord', from Greek, from harmos ‘joint'. )("Masks" by Shel Silverstein   She had blue skin,  And so did he. He kept it hid And so did she. They searched for blue Their whole life through. Then passed right by– And never knew.)(*Valerie Bertinelli's brother was 17 MONTHS old, not years.)Learn More about Modern Yoga.

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
76. Problem & Solution

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 17:10


What is the problem?Is there a real solution?We have a method.* * *Last episode we promised a closer look at what we mean by “the problem,” and suggested that you might take another look at what you would define as your particular case example. What did you come up with? While it is true that the fundamental problem of existence is a shape-shifter, it seems to cycle through permutations back to its original form. Its iterations turn out to be variations on a theme.One of the problems in writing is that we take the words we use for granted. A handy method for taking a look at them in greater depth is by referring to the universal definitive tool, the humble dictionary. This is not in itself a solution, of course. How each case is resolved depends upon the writer using the tool.“Problem” is a word we use so often and so broadly that it becomes almost meaningless, if unexamined. You may have heard the expression, “The unexamined life is not worth living.” If you are like me you do not know whence it came. Another ubiquitous tool we have available today, much like a massively expanded dictionary, or its bigger sibling the encyclopedia, is Google. The generic for any search engine, having taken first position in the category some time ago. Like Kleenex is for facial tissue. Or Xerox once was for copiers. Looking it up, or “googling” it (which has become so vernacular that the word processor does not underline it in red), it turns out to be the coinage of Socrates. The very first entry on the internet “page” (incidentally defined as “one side of a sheet of paper” irony not lost on me) states that “Socrates believed that living a life where you live under the rules of others, in a continuous routine without examining what you actually want out of it is not worth living.”It is worth noting that Socrates specifying “living under the rules of others… in a continuous routine” as aggravating conditions of the unexamined life, probably reflects his assessment of actual fellow citizens. These are the definitive characteristics of a state of slavery, which was widely practiced in ancient Greece. Googling further, we find that Socrates did indeed inveigh against the practice. Slavery as a societal problem has probably been with us since the dawn of so-called civilization, all the way back to prehistoric times. But that doesn't make it acceptable, even in its many current disguises.Getting back to the thread of this episode, a problem is generically defined as “a matter or situation regarded as unwelcome or harmful and needing to be dealt with and overcome; a thing that is difficult to achieve or accomplish.” Or, as a modifier: “denoting or relating to people whose behavior causes difficulties to themselves and others.” And, as specifically related to physics and mathematics: “an inquiry starting from given conditions to investigate or demonstrate a fact, result, or law.” And more specifically to geometry: “a proposition in which something has to be constructed.”A term's etymology often sheds an interesting light on its original meanings. “Problem” derives from late Middle English: “originally denoting a riddle or a question for academic discussion.” Even earlier from Old French, via Latin, from the Greek, meaning “put forth” or “to throw before.” Coming full circle back to Socrates.There's a lot to unpack here, amplified by connections to Zen and Design disciplines. The “matter or situation” of life itself, as a problem, cannot be considered “unwelcome” exactly, though its salient characteristics as defined by Buddha — aging, sickness, and death — may certainly be regarded as harmful or undesirable to the living. In early Buddhism the Hinayana view of self-salvation regarded human existence as a kind of test “needing to be dealt with and overcome,” as do most religions. In Zen, the test is not simply a pass-fail. And we do not imagine a more perfect world to be found after death.Design likewise regards certain aspects of human life as unwelcome and harmful, on both personal and social levels. As an application of artful, semi-scientific problem-solving, the definitions related to physics and mathematics may be more apropos. Design proceeds from “an inquiry starting from given conditions” as in science, but is intended “to… demonstrate a… result,” such as a new product or program, rather than to prove a fact or law.Applied Design usually entails something that “has to be constructed.” In Design, the old must often be demolished to make room for the new and improved. The construction phase in architectural design is often preceded by demolition or “creative destruction.” Likewise in Zen as well. We may justifiably regard zazen practice as a process of actively deconstructing our own mind, to rebuild on a sounder foundation.Buddhism certainly defines the problem of human existence as “relating to people whose behavior causes difficulties to themselves and to others,” as do most religious and philosophical systems. Zen, however, goes beyond the diagnosis of ignorance afflicting people, to the prognosis of meditation — as the most dependable approach to thoroughly defining the central problem. The natural process of contemplation, not overthinking, reveals potential solutions to life's problems, in general and in detail. What we learn directly through observation on the cushion can modify our attitude and approach off the cushion, if we allow it to. This amounts to the purposeful actualization of the bodhisattva vow. We are not likely to be able to help others, if we are not even able to help ourselves.Both Zen and Design encourage us to go beyond conventional definitions of the many problems of life, as well as the pat approaches and existing solutions on offer from others, notably in the “self-help” niche of modern publishing. This “going beyond” was a favorite expression of one of my formative teachers, when a student transcended the parameters of an assigned classroom problem. A most comprehensive example of going beyond is found in Hsinhsinming, Trust in Mind, by Master Sengcan, third patriarch in China. Toward the end he begins to summarize:Emptiness here emptiness there but the infinite universe stands always before your eyesInfinitely large infinitely small no difference because definitions have vanished and no boundaries are seenDefinitions we may hold for such terms as “emptiness” and “infinity” come into question. We must go beyond them. “No boundaries” is an expression that Matsuoka Roshi used to explain the aspirational aspect of my first dharma name, Great Cloud, in Japanese, Taiun. Like a cloud flying in the sky, “no barriers anywhere.” Of course, every time I turn around, I run into another barrier. So, I have something rather concrete to aspire to, if I am to live up to my Zen name. It is a recurring problem.The process of innovation in Design, as well as Zen, typically begins with self-study, evaluating our own personal needs and streamlining our efforts to meet them, before addressing similar problems as general conditions of society. This is broadly true of any process of invention. If we solve our personal problems of satisfying Maslow's hierarchy of physiological needs for food, water, clothing, sleep and shelter, we are in a better position to help others do the same. The airplane oxygen mask syndrome. Same for safety and security. The higher needs of love and belonging, self-esteem and, finally self-actualization, take a little longer, and may require not a little creativity. Maslow may have been a closet Zen master.It should be possible to aspire to satisfying higher needs while lacking the wherewithal on a subsistence level, you may argue. But this is the stuff of saints. It is not reasonable to expect this level of transcendence over circumstance from others, though you may demand it from yourself.The Middle English derivation of “problem” as: “denoting a riddle or a question for academic discussion” sounds a lot like the koan practice of Rinzai Zen. But Rinzai himself would push back against the idea that koan training is designed to foster “academic discussion.” The endpoint of koan study is the same as that of zazen in Soto circles: to penetrate beyond the problem as framed, to the mystery at the core of existence. In other words, redefining the core problem.Putting forth the proposition, or throwing the Great Matter before the assembly in dharma combat, however, is part and parcel of all Zen pedagogy. The question behind the questions put forth in Zen may be reduced to: What is the problem, exactly? And we are back, full circle, to problem definition.Interchanges between masters and students as recorded in the Buddhist lineage often comprise the content of classic koan collections. But rather than functioning as a simple Q&A, where one party knows the answer and the other keeps trying until finally getting it right, these dialogs may more usefully be regarded as collaborative exercises in defining and redefining the fundamental problem in Zen. The student's response to the probe posed by the master redefines the meaning of the exchange, furthering the dialog rather than bringing it to a conclusion. As Matsuoka Roshi would often say, “We teach each other Buddhism.” And what we are trying to grasp is “round and rolling, slippery and slick.” Ungraspable.We might say that the Zen Problem, capital P, and the internal processes leading to its Solution, capital S, are not fundamentally different, whether the approach is Rinzai or Soto. Both are pointing at the same insight, while recognizing that such insight will necessarily be different for each individual. The external methodology is where we find the most obvious differences. Like any subject of education, the end result may be equally accurate and useful, but different schools stress differing methods in getting from here to there. But as Master Tozan says in Hokyo Zammai, Precious Mirror Samadhi:Whether teachings and approaches are mastered or not, reality constantly flowsThis constantly flowing reality is captured in glowing terms by the ancestors of Zen in their poems of enlightenment, which we recite as liturgy. The implication is that the solution to the problem of existence in Zen comes not as an intellectual conclusion or mathematical formula, but as revelatory manifestation, an alteration in consciousness itself. Nothing actually changes, but everything is completely changed.In our next episode we will focus more specifically on the method leading to the solution, the approach Zen prescribes to foster this change in awareness and attitude, and some of the techniques and subroutines that we find helpful. As a pedagogy, zazen has been refined over centuries and redesigned by hundreds of skillful masters in the lineage. We are fortunate to be the heirs of this model of simplicity directed toward defining and solving the most complex problem of all.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

New Books in Medieval History
Megan Moore, "The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Medieval History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 42:31


The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean (Cornell UP, 2021) considers how emotions propagate power by exploring whose lives are grieved and what kinds of grief are valuable within and eroticized by medieval narratives. Megan Moore argues that grief is not only routinely eroticized in medieval literature but that it is a foundational emotion of medieval elite culture. Focusing on the concept of grief as desire, Moore builds on the history of the emotions and Georges Bataille's theory of the erotic as the conflict between desire and death, one that perversely builds a sense of community organized around a desire for death. The link between desire and death serves as an affirmation of living communities. Moore incorporates literary, visual, and codicological evidence in sources from across the Mediterranean—from Old French chansons de geste, such as the Song of Roland and La mort le roi Artu and romances such as Erec et Enide, Philomena, and Floire et Blancheflor; to Byzantine and ancient Greek novels; to Middle English travel narratives such as Mandeville's Travels. In her reading of the performance of grief as one of community and remembrance, Moore assesses why some lives are imagined as mattering more than others and explores how a language of grief becomes a common language of status among the medieval Mediterranean elite. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Megan Moore, "The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 42:31


The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean (Cornell UP, 2021) considers how emotions propagate power by exploring whose lives are grieved and what kinds of grief are valuable within and eroticized by medieval narratives. Megan Moore argues that grief is not only routinely eroticized in medieval literature but that it is a foundational emotion of medieval elite culture. Focusing on the concept of grief as desire, Moore builds on the history of the emotions and Georges Bataille's theory of the erotic as the conflict between desire and death, one that perversely builds a sense of community organized around a desire for death. The link between desire and death serves as an affirmation of living communities. Moore incorporates literary, visual, and codicological evidence in sources from across the Mediterranean—from Old French chansons de geste, such as the Song of Roland and La mort le roi Artu and romances such as Erec et Enide, Philomena, and Floire et Blancheflor; to Byzantine and ancient Greek novels; to Middle English travel narratives such as Mandeville's Travels. In her reading of the performance of grief as one of community and remembrance, Moore assesses why some lives are imagined as mattering more than others and explores how a language of grief becomes a common language of status among the medieval Mediterranean elite. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Megan Moore, "The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 42:31


The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean (Cornell UP, 2021) considers how emotions propagate power by exploring whose lives are grieved and what kinds of grief are valuable within and eroticized by medieval narratives. Megan Moore argues that grief is not only routinely eroticized in medieval literature but that it is a foundational emotion of medieval elite culture. Focusing on the concept of grief as desire, Moore builds on the history of the emotions and Georges Bataille's theory of the erotic as the conflict between desire and death, one that perversely builds a sense of community organized around a desire for death. The link between desire and death serves as an affirmation of living communities. Moore incorporates literary, visual, and codicological evidence in sources from across the Mediterranean—from Old French chansons de geste, such as the Song of Roland and La mort le roi Artu and romances such as Erec et Enide, Philomena, and Floire et Blancheflor; to Byzantine and ancient Greek novels; to Middle English travel narratives such as Mandeville's Travels. In her reading of the performance of grief as one of community and remembrance, Moore assesses why some lives are imagined as mattering more than others and explores how a language of grief becomes a common language of status among the medieval Mediterranean elite. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in European Studies
Megan Moore, "The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 42:31


The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean (Cornell UP, 2021) considers how emotions propagate power by exploring whose lives are grieved and what kinds of grief are valuable within and eroticized by medieval narratives. Megan Moore argues that grief is not only routinely eroticized in medieval literature but that it is a foundational emotion of medieval elite culture. Focusing on the concept of grief as desire, Moore builds on the history of the emotions and Georges Bataille's theory of the erotic as the conflict between desire and death, one that perversely builds a sense of community organized around a desire for death. The link between desire and death serves as an affirmation of living communities. Moore incorporates literary, visual, and codicological evidence in sources from across the Mediterranean—from Old French chansons de geste, such as the Song of Roland and La mort le roi Artu and romances such as Erec et Enide, Philomena, and Floire et Blancheflor; to Byzantine and ancient Greek novels; to Middle English travel narratives such as Mandeville's Travels. In her reading of the performance of grief as one of community and remembrance, Moore assesses why some lives are imagined as mattering more than others and explores how a language of grief becomes a common language of status among the medieval Mediterranean elite. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Literary Studies
Megan Moore, "The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 42:31


The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean (Cornell UP, 2021) considers how emotions propagate power by exploring whose lives are grieved and what kinds of grief are valuable within and eroticized by medieval narratives. Megan Moore argues that grief is not only routinely eroticized in medieval literature but that it is a foundational emotion of medieval elite culture. Focusing on the concept of grief as desire, Moore builds on the history of the emotions and Georges Bataille's theory of the erotic as the conflict between desire and death, one that perversely builds a sense of community organized around a desire for death. The link between desire and death serves as an affirmation of living communities. Moore incorporates literary, visual, and codicological evidence in sources from across the Mediterranean—from Old French chansons de geste, such as the Song of Roland and La mort le roi Artu and romances such as Erec et Enide, Philomena, and Floire et Blancheflor; to Byzantine and ancient Greek novels; to Middle English travel narratives such as Mandeville's Travels. In her reading of the performance of grief as one of community and remembrance, Moore assesses why some lives are imagined as mattering more than others and explores how a language of grief becomes a common language of status among the medieval Mediterranean elite. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in French Studies
Megan Moore, "The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 42:31


The Erotics of Grief: Emotions and the Construction of Privilege in the Medieval Mediterranean (Cornell UP, 2021) considers how emotions propagate power by exploring whose lives are grieved and what kinds of grief are valuable within and eroticized by medieval narratives. Megan Moore argues that grief is not only routinely eroticized in medieval literature but that it is a foundational emotion of medieval elite culture. Focusing on the concept of grief as desire, Moore builds on the history of the emotions and Georges Bataille's theory of the erotic as the conflict between desire and death, one that perversely builds a sense of community organized around a desire for death. The link between desire and death serves as an affirmation of living communities. Moore incorporates literary, visual, and codicological evidence in sources from across the Mediterranean—from Old French chansons de geste, such as the Song of Roland and La mort le roi Artu and romances such as Erec et Enide, Philomena, and Floire et Blancheflor; to Byzantine and ancient Greek novels; to Middle English travel narratives such as Mandeville's Travels. In her reading of the performance of grief as one of community and remembrance, Moore assesses why some lives are imagined as mattering more than others and explores how a language of grief becomes a common language of status among the medieval Mediterranean elite. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

Law School
Tort law (2022): Property torts: Replevin (claim and delivery)

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 15:02


Replevin or claim and delivery (sometimes called revendication) is a legal remedy, which enables a person to recover personal property taken wrongfully or unlawfully, and to obtain compensation for resulting losses. Etymology. The word "replevin" is of Anglo-Norman origin and is the noun form of the verb "replevy". This comes from the Old French replevir, derived from plevir ("to pledge"), which is derived from the Latin replegiare ("to redeem a thing taken by another"). Nature. In The Law of Torts, John Fleming has written: From medieval times, there has also come down to us a summary process, known as replevin, by which a man out of whose possession goods have been taken may obtain their return until the right to the goods can be determined by a court of law. Replevin arose out of the need of a turbulent society to discourage resort to self-help and although for a long time primarily used in disputes about distress between landlord and tenant, it was gradually expanded to cover all cases of allegedly wrongful dispossession. If the plaintiff wanted return of his chattel in specie, replevin was a more appropriate remedy than either trespass or trover in which only damages could be recovered. Restoration of the property is, of course, only provisional, pending determination of title. In common law, several types of action existed with respect to deprivation of possession (being subdivided into the wrongful taking of chattels and the unjust detention of them, even where the original taking was lawful): In the case of wrongful taking: A writ of replevin was available only for an unlawful taking in the nature of a wrongful distress, where restitution could be made for the goods wrongfully taken (being in the nature of a redelivery of the pledge or the thing taken in distress) with damages for the loss sustained by such action. As distrained goods are in the custody of the law, any attempt to take them back by force without a writ of replevin could be contested by writ of rescous or de parco fracto, with a remedy in damages. A writ of trespass vi et armis was available in the taking of goods, with a remedy in damages. An action of trover and conversion was available for the non-forcible taking of goods, with a remedy in damages. · In the case of unjust detention: Replevin lay to recover goods still held after a tender of amends. Detinue lay to recover lent goods where the holder refused to return them to the owner. However, the defendant was allowed to exculpate himself by oath, so this action was displaced by that of trover and conversion. At common law, the ordinary action for the recovery of goods wrongfully taken was originally one of detinue, but no means of immediate recovery was possible until the action was tried. Replevin arose to deal with the matter of the illegal distress of goods for rent or damage feasant, in order to procure their restoration to the owner. Illegal distress has been held to occur where: 1. no relationship of landlord and tenant exists at all, 2. there is no demise at a fixed rent, 3. no rent is due, or nondue to the person who has distrained, 4. goods have been released before the distress, or tendered before the impounding, 5. the entry was illegal, or 6. things privileged from distress (for example, neither goods nor chattel) have been seized. Replevin will not lie where if any part of the rent claimed was due, but this defense is not effective where the only rent claimed by the landlord is not recoverable by distress. It has been held that replevin applies to any wrongful taking of goods and chattel. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

Radio Omniglot
Episode 50 – Solstice

Radio Omniglot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


As I recorded this episode 21st December, I decided to look at the meanings and origins of some seasonal words. Solstice [ˈsɒl.stɪs/ˈsɑl.stɪs] – from Old French solstice (solstice), from the Latin sōlstitium ((summer) solstice), from sōl (sun) and sistō (to stand still) [source]. Sāturnālia [ˈsɒl.stɪs/ˈsɑl.stɪs] – an ancient Roman holiday honouring Saturn, the Roman of […]

Radio Omniglot
Adventures in Etymology – Companion

Radio Omniglot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021


In today's Adventure in Etymology we're looking at the origins of the word companion. Companion [kəmˈpænjən] is: a person who is frequently in the company of, associates with, or accompanies another: a person employed to accompany, assist, or live with another in the capacity of a helpful friend. It comes from the Old French compaignon […]

Pj Alpha Music Podcast
Episode #144 The Beauty of faith

Pj Alpha Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 14:47


"Faith, derived from Latin fides and Old French feid, is confidence or trust in a person, thing, or concept. In the context of religion, one can define faith as "belief in God or in the doctrines or teachings of religion". Wikipedia Here is my opinion on The Beauty of faith To support my podcast: https://anchor.fm/pj-alpha-music-podcast/support/ Host: Pablo J Ruiz Vargas --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pj-alpha-music-podcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pj-alpha-music-podcast/support

Instant Trivia
Episode 279 - Honky "Cat" - "M"Enagerie - Nevada - Austin - File Under "S"

Instant Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 7:38


Welcome to the Instant Trivia podcast episode 279, where we ask the best trivia on the Internet. Round 1. Category: Honky "Cat" 1: Tiffany published its first one of these in 1845 (online shopping came a little later). catalog. 2: This tough, thin cord is used to string musical instruments and tennis rackets. catgut. 3: It's a 2-hulled sailing boat. catamaran. 4: The name of this ancient war device is partly from the Greek for "hurl". catapult. 5: A book giving the basic principles of Christianity in Q- and -A form. catechism. Round 2. Category: "M"Enagerie 1: Though its voice is shrill, this small monkey's name is derived from Old French "marmouser", to murmur. a marmoset. 2: It's said ancient Romans not only ate these eels but fed their disobedient slaves to them. a moray eel. 3: Of the musk ox, musk deer or musk turtle, the 1 that secretes the musk used in purfume. the musk deer. 4: The tiny eyes of this insectivore are hidden in its fur. a mole. 5: This ferretlike carnivore that has a bird in its name subsists on snakes and rodents. a mongoose. Round 3. Category: Nevada 1: Built by the federal government, Boulder City is the only community in Nevada where this isn't legal. Gambling. 2: From 1870 to 1893, after a gold and silver boom, this state capital was home to a U.S. Mint. Carson City. 3: In 1973 this variety of sheep was designated Nevada's state animal. a bighorn sheep. 4: In 1973 this variety of sheep was designated Nevada's state animal. a bighorn sheep. 5: Just southeast of Las Vegas, it began as a WWII magnesium-supplying town and is now Nevada's 2nd-largest city. Henderson. Round 4. Category: Austin 1: The Confederate Soldiers Monument on the State Capitol grounds has 5 bronze statues headed by this president. Jefferson Davis. 2: At dusk, April through October, millions of these mammals fly out from under the Congress Ave. Bridge to feed. bats. 3: At 30 years, this PBS series from the Austin music scene is the longest-running music showcase now on TV. Austin City Limits. 4: Austin's African-American history is chronicled in a museum named for this agricultural scientist. George Washington Carver. 5: This Old West cattle trail that ran from Texas to Kansas crossed the eastern part of Austin. the Chisholm Trail. Round 5. Category: File Under "S" 1: Head and Shoulders, Agree, and Pert Plus are leading types of these. Shampoos. 2: It's a heavy, single-edged cavalry sword with a blade less curved than a scimitar. Saber. 3: This disease caused by the lack of ascorbic acid is called Barlow's Disease in infants. Scurvy. 4: This Middle Eastern dog is also called a gazelle hound because it was once trained to hunt gazelles. Saluki. 5: Known as "Old Fuss N' Feathers", he wrote the Army's first complete manual of drill regulations. Winfield Scott. Thanks for listening! Come back tomorrow for more exciting trivia!

Law School
Property law (2022): Types of property: Personal property + Community property

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 10:20


Personal property is property that is movable. In common law systems, personal property may also be called chattels or personalty. In civil law systems, personal property is often called movable property or movables – any property that can be moved from one location to another. Personal property can be understood in comparison to real estate, immovable property or real property (such as land and buildings). Movable property on land (larger livestock, for example) was not automatically sold with the land, it was "personal" to the owner and moved with the owner. The word cattle is the Old Norman variant of Old French chatel, chattel (derived from Latin capitalis, “of the head”), which was once synonymous with general movable personal property. Classifications. Personal property may be classified in a variety of ways. Intangible. Intangible personal property or "intangibles" refers to personal property that cannot actually be moved, touched or felt, but instead represents something of value such as negotiable instruments, securities, service (economics), and intangible assets including chose in action. Tangible. Tangible personal property refers to any type of property that can generally be moved (for example, it is not attached to real property or land), touched, or felt. These generally include items such as furniture, clothing, jewelry, art, writings, or household goods. In some cases, there can be formal title documents that show the ownership and transfer rights of that property after a person's death (for example, motor vehicles, boats, etcetera) In many cases, however, tangible personal property will not be "titled" in an owner's name and is presumed to be whatever property he or she was in possession of at the time of his or her death. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

John's Old Time Radio Show
OTRS 124 R. CRUMB’S RECORD ROOM part 55 “OLD FRENCH MUSIC FROM CANADA”

John's Old Time Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 52:52


GCCA Podeia
Recap & Reminders - Week 9

GCCA Podeia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 6:17


Read by Autumn HartshornWord of the Week by Eve Hartshornhippopotamus (n.)omnivorous ungulate pachydermatous mammal of Africa, 1560s, from Late Latin hippopotamus, from Greek hippopotamus "riverhorse," an irregular formation from earlier ho hippos potamios "the horse of the river"), from hippos "horse" (from PIE root *ekwo- "horse") + adjective from potamos "river, rushing water" (see potamo-). Replaced Middle English ypotame (c. 1300), which is from the same source but deformed in Old French. Glossed in Old English as sæhengest.

Afrikas Unsung Hereos
Afrikas Unsung Hereos

Afrikas Unsung Hereos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 0:47


ambition (n.) mid-14c., "eager or inordinate desire for honor or preferment," from Old French ambicion (13c.), or directly from Latin ambitionem (nominative ambitio) "a going around,"

The John Batchelor Show
1774: 3500-year-old ghost of Babylon. "Indiana" Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 ; @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 6:40


Photo:  A falchion (Old French: fauchon; Latin: falx, "sickle") is a one-handed, single-edged sword of European origin. Falchions are found in different forms from around the 13th century up to and including the 16th century. In some versions the falchion looks rather like the seax and later the sabre, and in other versions more like a machete with a crossguard. 3500-year-old ghost of Babylon.  "Indiana" Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1  ; @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2021/oct/16/figures-of-babylon-oldest-drawing-of-a-ghost-found-in-british-museum-vault Where to find a Crusader sword  https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/10/18/ftse-100-index-markets-live-news-energy-tax-rates/

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 3, 2021 is: adroit • uh-DROYT • adjective Adroit means "having or showing skill, cleverness, or resourcefulness in handling situations." // The CEO has been praised for his adroit management of the company's financial recovery. See the entry > Examples: "[Dominic Raab] has proved adroit in the past at defusing potentially difficult select committee sessions, notably over overseas aid cuts." — Patrick Wintour, The Guardian (UK), 31 Aug. 2021 Did you know? Adroit goes back to an Old French word meaning "handsome or elegant" as well as "skilled in combat." The adjective is still used to imply skillfulness, but usually not of the physical kind. Adroit most often describes cleverness that achieves one's purpose in spite of difficulties.

Fairy Sleepy: Fall asleep fast
The Sleeping Beauty

Fairy Sleepy: Fall asleep fast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 44:51


From the book "The Sleeping Beauty and other fairy tales" From the Old French retold by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch and illustrated by Edmund Dulac.I hope it makes you very, fairy, sleepy!

The Word Café Podcast with Amax
S1 Ep. 32 My Angel Story

The Word Café Podcast with Amax

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 15:14


‘The angelof the LORDencampsaroundthose who fear Him,and he delivers them' Psalm 34:7The stories of angelic visitations are replete in the scriptures and often times they show up either to deliver a message, to bring about God's deliverance and to effect God's will here on earth. The mentioning of the word ‘Angel' brings that sense of spirituality and the unseen realm, yet very real image of divine presence.Looking at the etymology of the word we come to see the following; "one of a class of spiritual beings, attendants and messengers of God," a c. 1300 fusion of Old English engel (with hard -g-) and Old French angele. Both are from Late Latin angelus, from Greek angelos, literally "messenger, envoy, one that announces," in the New Testament "divine messenger," which is possibly related to angaros "mounted courier," both from an unknown Oriental word (Watkins compares Sanskrit ajira- "swift;" Klein suggests Semitic sources). Used in Scriptural translations for Hebrew mal'akh (yehowah) "messenger (of Jehovah)," from base l-'-k "to send." An Old English word for it was aerendgast, literally "errand-spirit."  https://www.etymonline.com/word/angelFrom the above, we come to see clearly that Angels are spiritual beings whose origin is in God and they are His messengers.In this episode, I would love to share my personal angel story which happened when I was in Secondary School (High School). This experience reinforced my conviction on what the scripture recorded in Hebrews 1:14, 14Are not the angels ministering spirits sent to serve those who will inherit salvation?Support the show

AVALON
The Hobbit: The Dragon, the Ring and the Confrontation with Nothingness

AVALON

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 97:38


This is a recording of one of the sessions on Tolkien held this summer, 2021. Of the topics considered, the nature of dragons is paramount. What is a dragon? Tolkien said "I desired dragons with a profound desire. Of course, I in my timid body did not wish to have them in the neighborhood . . . . But the world that contained even the imagination of Fáfnir was richer and more beautiful, at whatever cost of peril.” Tolkien's dragons are of the Western variety. Treasure hording, highly intelligent, they cannot ignore riddles but are inhuman in their destructive nature and tend to spread despair & half-truths through their greed and hatred. The English word, "dragon", derives (via Middle English, Old French, and Latin) from Ancient Greek δράκων drákōn, "serpent, dragon", from δέρκομαι, "I see", ἒδρακον, "I saw", δἐδορκα, "I have seen" (in various senses); hence perhaps "sharp-sighted one"; or because a snake's eyes seem to be always open. The Greek word probably derives from an Indo-European base derk- meaning "to see"; the Sanskrit root dŗç- also means "to see". Dragons, therefore, have to do with vision, insight, wisdom. They are "the final test of heroes" as professor Tolkien wrote. The encounter with a Western dragon poses a tremendous challenge but the reward for success, as Dr. Jordan Peterson points out, is riches beyond compare. Bilbo, we find, encounters the dragon under Lonely Mountain, but not necessarily in the way we might expect. Listen in to found out. Famous Western (European) Dragons 1. Mushkhushshu - Babylonian from Akkadian from Sumerian “MUŠ.ḪUS, 'reddish snake', sometimes also translated as 'fierce snake'. 'splendor serpent' (

SLEERICKETS
Ep 7: My love is like a red red grawlix

SLEERICKETS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 67:03


Some of the topics mentioned in this episode:– You still can't read Ryan Wilson's translation of Catullus XI– Etymology problems– Are curses real? (Yes)– Mean shit vs. maledictions– Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals– Shylock was on to something– The dozens– The Onion's post 9/11 article “Hijackers Surprised to Find Selves in Hell”– Two less-than-great reactions to the death of Osama bin Laden– David Ferry's The Odes of Horace– Horace I.37– Ben Folds' song “Song for the Dumped”– CeeLo Green's song “Fuck You”– SLEERICKETS' nonexistent Patreon– Heather McHugh's poem “Earthmoving Malediction”– Everette Maddox's poem “Anonymous”– Yeats' poem “No Second Troy”– Mary Jo Salter's poem “No Second Try”– Thomas Gray's poem “Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat Drowned in a Tub of Goldfishes”– My scientifically unimpeachable neurotransmitter analogy– Steve Scafidi's poem “To Whoever Set My Truck on Fire”Errata: Contrary to an offhand remark I make in this episode, “piss” is not, in fact, of Anglo-Saxon origin, but rather of Old French! And my reading of Horace I.37 does come off as kind of sarcastic even though I say he's not being sarcastic. And also, yes, I for some reason make a big deal at the end about not doing biographical readings right after recording a whole episode that's just crammed from top to bottom with biographical readings. What can I say? I'm a fucking genius.Please rate, review, and subscribe. Or just recommend the show to a friend!Send questions, comments, and suggestions to sleerickets@gmail.com.Music by ETRNLArt by Daniel Alexander Smith

#BoyMomUnited: Signs and portents in the land

The scripture we are using to pray this week is from Psalm 33:1, and it says, “Rejoice in the Lord, O you righteous! For praise from the upright is beautiful.” The most common definitions of rejoice will say something like “to be very glad” or “to show great excitement” while all these are true, I was struck by another definition I came across, curbed from the Old French word rejoiss, which means "to own, possess, enjoy the possession of, have the fruition of” so when the scripture says rejoice in the Lord, it means to enjoy the possession of the Lord. Let us pray that our children will own their possession of the Lord!

The Deus Vult Podcast
Offer It Up

The Deus Vult Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 55:00


patience (n.)c. 1200, pacience, "quality of being willing to bear adversities, calm endurance of misfortune, suffering, etc.," from Old French pacience "patience; sufferance, permission" (12c.) and directly from Latin patientia "the quality of suffering or enduring; submission."  - from Online Etymology Dictionary, https://www.etymonline.com/word/patience

Eavesdropping on Arthurians
Episode 5: Crossdressing Hero(ine?) and a Trickster Merlin:

Eavesdropping on Arthurians

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2020 39:52


Stephanie Morley chats about the Old French romance "Silence." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.