Podcasts about wypr

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Best podcasts about wypr

Latest podcast episodes about wypr

Midday
LaFontaine Oliver on Your Public Radio, WYPR's Fall Pledge Drive

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 5:51


Joining Tom now is LaFontaine Oliver, the president of the Your Public Radio Corporation and the General Manager of WYPR.  He has also just completed a term as chairman of NPR's Board of Directors. LaFontaine Oliver joins Tom in Studio A to talk about some of the issues facing Your Public Radio as WYPR wraps up its Fall Membership Campaign.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
Harding & White: Working Class Party nominees for MD Gov/Lt Gov

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 30:40


Now, another in Midday's series of Conversations with the Candidates, 2022, produced as a service to Maryland voters in the runup to the November 8 general election.  Midday host Tom Hall speaks with The Working Class Party of Maryland's nominees for Maryland Governor, David Harding, and for Maryland lieutenant governor, Cathy White. David Harding has lived and worked in Baltimore for many decades, as a steelworker, shipyard worker, and as a computer operator for the Maryland Department of Health. He has been active in two unions. Cathy White has worked in many different jobs, babysitting and cleaning other people's homes, working in a pizza joint, a pet hotel, a nursing home, and a warehouse. She has worked at a photofinishing factory for the last 35 years. Both candidates helped gather the signatures needed to win certification of the Working Class Party as Maryland's newest political party. The party was certified by the State Board of Elections in March, 2020, after submitting more than 10,000 valid petition signatures to the state elections office. David Harding was the chairman of the petition effort. Our interview was conducted on September 16, 2022. Mr. Harding spoke with Tom in the WYPR studio, while Ms. White joined on Zoom. This conversation is being distributed exclusively on Midday's Web and podcast platforms.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Aneks Kryminalny
Morderstwo Amy Allwine

Aneks Kryminalny

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 68:31


Wypróbuj Surfshark VPN przez 3 miesiące za darmo: https://surfshark.deals/agarojek Wesprzyj mnie na Patronite: https://patronite.pl/agarojek Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/00bR40E... Instagrama też mam: @agnyeshka kontakt: ciekawesprawykryminalne@gmail.com źródła: https://1drv.ms/w/s!AgWf3w81bcS6iWFTMim4eUoKkDIq?e=mJh8pE

On The Record on WYPR
Double Scoop Stoop! Jessica Murphy Garrett and Arianne Rice

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 16:08


Storytelling is at the core of what we do here at WYPR. So today, as a special fund-drive treat, we're offering up a double scoop of Stoop Stories! Arianne Rice, a newly ordained priest facing a crisis, talks about what she wished she'd learned in seminary and Jessica Murphy Garrett, who heard her biological clock ticking at age 35, tells how she decided to take matters into her own hands: “And I thought the right thing to do is to give him first right of refusal on being the sperm donor, basically, and I said, you know, ‘Since we're married I don't know if that's something you want.' And he said, romantically and wistfully, ‘Nah, I'm good.' Links: Stoopstorytelling, LIVE Stoop Tales from the Crypt, Stoop podcasts.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19
Marylanders are poised to say yes to legalizing recreational marijuana

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 29:16


A medical panel at the U.S Department of Health is recommending that everyone under age 65 get screened for anxiety. Our health reporter talked with the Director of  the Mental Health Association of Maryland about how  this pandemic has affected us all, and what help there is for Marylanders. The sanitation issues of the city's homeless encampments got a public hearing today. Most Marylanders condone recreational marijuana use according to a Goucher Poll with WYPR and the Baltimore Banner. We'll have more results from the poll, plus tomorrow is the 29th annual “Dining Out for Life,” I'll have a conversation with their director about this year's goal for supporting Maryland's chronically ill and food insecure.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Zagadki Kryminalne
STACEY CASTOR - CZARNA WDOWA

Zagadki Kryminalne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 23:04


Motyw czarnych wdów często przewija się w dawnych i świeżych sprawach kryminalnych, jednak czasem pojawiają się przypadki znacznie bardziej przerażające niż większość - jednym z nich jest sprawa Stacey Castor. Tajemniczy zgon jej męża był szokujący, ale okazał się dopiero początkiem mrożących krew w żyłach wydarzeń. BOOKBEAT: https://www.bookbeat.pl/karolinaanna?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=influencer&utm_campaign=karolin+anna+30+dni&utm_content=video. Wypróbuj aplikację przez 30 dni za darmo z moim kodem: ZAGADKI

Prawdziwe Zbrodnie
#192: Kochanka psychopaty i Rozpruwacz z Hollywood

Prawdziwe Zbrodnie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 96:19


Ten odcinek wspiera BookBeat Link do szybkiej rejestracji: https://www.bookbeat.pl/prawdziwezbrodnie?utm_source=spotify&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=prawdziwe+zbrodnie+30+days&utm_content=epi+description Wypróbuj BookBeat i słuchaj audiobooków przez 30 dni za darmo z kodem: ZBRODNIE30 Pierwsza Karolina opowie o sprawie Marka Acklom'a - brytyjskiego oszusta, który znalazł się na liście 10 najbardziej poszukiwanych zbiegów Wielkiej Brytanii. Druga Karolina wybrała historię mordercy Michaela Gargiulo znanego jako „Rozpruwacz z Hollywood”. (1:20) „ Długa noc” Wojciech Chmielarz (2:07) „ Shantaram” Gregory David Roberts (3:40) Selling the OC, Netflix (13:30) Jesień (14:30) Swetry z drugiej ręki (17:25) Pierwsza historia „Sleeping with a psychopath" (58:30) Druga historia Murders in Hollywood

Midday
The Goucher Poll: As Election Day nears, a key portrait of MD voters

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 17:32


Election day in Maryland is less than two months away. Early voting starts Oct. 27. Election day is Nov. 8. If you are requesting a mail-in ballot, you have until Nov. 1 to request one by mail, and Nov. 4 to request one on-line. Today, the Sarah T. Hughes Center for Politics at Goucher College released a wide-ranging poll, commissioned by WYPR and the Baltimore Banner, that shows the Democratic candidates for the state's top three offices in commanding leads over their Republican challengers. The poll also explored what issues remain top of mind for Maryland voters. Dr. Mileah Kromer is the director of the Hughes Center. She joins Tom in Studio A to tell us what the numbers reveal… On Wednesday night (Sept. 21), Goucher College and our partners, the Baltimore Banner will hold the first in a series of “Promote the Vote” events. Mileah Kromer will talk about the results of the WYPR/Banner poll from 6-8. Follow the link for more information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19
Checking the pulse of Maryland voters in a new poll

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 13:24


A judge orders convicted murderer Adnan Syed to be freed. A new poll conducted by Goucher College in partnership with WYPR and The Baltimore Banner shows democrats would sweep the midterm election if held today. There's some optimism about the economy too. We'll have those stories and some headlines coming up and talking about sexuality to children as young as 3½? An educator of human sexuality for half a century says, yes, we can!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19
Baltimore's Mayor reacts to fallout from E. Coli

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 20:38


The city's Department of Public Works was raked over the coals at a hearing last night on its handling of the E.Coli water crisis. Today Mayor Brandon Scott  addressed the fallout on WYPR's Midday.  A  trial delay for Baltimore's outgoing top prosecutor. A hearing Monday could mean freedom for convicted murderer Adnan Syed. The union representing thousands of University System of Maryland employees brought their grievances to College Park today.  Baltimore's health department lays out a comprehensive plan to fight Monkeypox and the dissension continues over how to give Baltimore County teachers a promised pay raise.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

My Block Counts
The Water Crisis, Mississippi and Beyond: Part I

My Block Counts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 39:43


On this episode of My Block Counts, Dr. Sacoby Wilson discusses the water crisis in his home state of Mississippi as it relates to environmental justice. He also does a brief recap of the recent Center for Community Engagement, Environmental Justice and Health (CEEJH) Environmental Justice Symposium held in August with special guest Dr. Mustafa Santiago Ali. This is a two part episode. My Block Counts is a podcast series produced by The Center for Community Engagement, Environmental Justice, and Health, with assistance from WYPR. The views expressed are solely Dr. Wilson's.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Aneks Kryminalny
Sprawa Christiny Aistrup Hansen

Aneks Kryminalny

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 75:39


Wypróbuj BookBeat przez miesiąc za darmo: https://www.bookbeat.pl/aneks?utm_source=Spotify&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=aneks+30+days&utm_content=epi+description kontakt: ciekawesprawykryminalne@gmail.com Instagrama: @agnyeshka źródła: Kristin Corfixen "Pielęgniarka" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christi...

Midday
Reporters' Notebooks: The MD governor race & other top stories

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 48:37


Yesterday, Attorney General Merrick Garland addressed for the first time the court-approved search that was conducted at Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago club on Monday. He spoke for two minutes and did not take any questions from reporters. The Attorney General announced that he had personally approved the decision to seek a search warrant in this matter. The New York Times reports that according to three unnamed sources, Mr. Trump had received a subpoena last spring asking for documents that Trump had improperly removed from the White House. Regarding the search, Garland said this:“... The department does not take such a decision lightly. Where possible, it is standard practice to seek less intrusive means as an alternative to a search and to narrowly scope any search that is undertaken." As to what the DOJ was looking for when they executed the warrant, Mr. Garland said: “Much of our work is by necessity conducted out of the public eye. We do that to protect the constitutional rights of all Americans and to protect the integrity of our investigations. Federal law, longstanding department rules, and our ethical obligations prevent me from providing further details as to the basis of the search at this time.” Garland announced that he had petitioned a federal court in Florida to unseal the search warrant and supporting documents in this case, if Mr. Trump agreed to their release. Late last night, Mr. Trump said he would allow it, and in fact, he encouraged their release. Today on Midday, a Reporter's Notebook about some of the local stories that are top of mind this week. We'll talk with reporters from the Baltimore Banner and MD Matters about what they've been looking into. We begin with Pamela Wood, who covers Maryland politics for the Baltimore Banner.  Then, Tom speaks with Bruce Depuyt of MD Matters, who has an update on the ballot recounts that are taking place in three jurisdictions where some tight races have yet to be settled.  Next, Tom turns to Liz Bowie, the education reporter for WYPR's partner, the Baltimore Banner.  And Tom winds up this Reporters Notebook edition of Midday in a conversation with Penelope Blackwell, breaking news and accountability reporter at the Banner about her story on the sharp rise in applications for concealed carry gun permits in Maryland. All of our guests join us on Zoom. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

My Block Counts
What Is My Block Counts?

My Block Counts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 32:15


Dr. Sacoby Wilson introduces what listeners can expect from the My Block Counts Podcast. He also defines in detail the definition of environmental justice, why your zip code is more important than your genetic code, climate change, water justice and so much more.   My Block Counts is a podcast series produced by The Center for Community Engagement, Environmental Justice, and Health, with assistance from WYPR. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Choose the Hard Way
Life Cycles: The Women's Tour de France with Documentary Filmmakers Jill Yesko & Ally Davis

Choose the Hard Way

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 52:19


In 2022, the women's Tour de France is back. What most people don't know is that there was also a women's Tour de France from 1984-1989. Uphill Climb is a documentary film that tells the story of that race and the legendary cyclists who competed in it.If you enjoy this episode, please give it a five-star rating on Spotify or Apple podcasts, subscribe and share it with a friend. My guests are the filmmakers behind Uphill Climb. Director Jill Yesko is a journalist, author and Fellow at the Center for Sports Communication & Media at The University of Texas. She represented the United States in cycling at the 1983 World University Games and competed in the Olympic trials. Jill's previous films include Tainted Blood: The Untold Story of the 1984 Olympic Blood Doping Scandal and Broken Trust: Athlete Abuse Exposed. She is the host of the podcast The Bounce: Sports Talk With a Spin on WYPR and NPR. Uphill Climb's executive producer, Ally Davis, is a life-long serious cyclist, an entrepreneur who has started up three companies and an award-winning veteran of television, sports production, global marketing and brand partnerships, athlete marketing and brand development. Ally has held senior leadership roles at Fox Sports, E!, NBC Universal Sports and Red Bull.  Go to www.uphillclimbfilm.com and @uphillclimb.film on Instagram to learn more and support the film.  This episode is part of Life Cycles, a new series I've launched within Choose the Hard Way. Conversations in this series cover the topics you've come to expect from Choose the Hard Way with guests whose lives and careers have been shaped by cycling or whose lives and careers have shaped the world of cycling. To suggest a guest or say hello, hit me at choosethehardway@gmail.com or @hardwaypod on Twitter or Instagram.  Choose the Hard Way is the podcast where guests share stories about how doing hard things build stronger, more resilient humans. Share it with a friend and subscribe to the newsletter at www.choosethehardway.com.

On The Record on WYPR
Battle lines drawn for Maryland's gubernatorial race

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 22:14


Votes from the primary election are still being counted, but the trend lines are so clear that Democrat Wes Moore claimed victory in the race to carry his party's banner in the race for governor. He drew a sharp contrast between himself and Republican nominee Dan Cox, saying, "It's a choice between unity and division. It's a choice between a future built on hope and optimism versus a future built on cynical policies of conspiracy theories and fear.”  Baltimore Banner politics reporter Pamela Wood joins us to talk about the dynamics behind who won and who lost, and how things are shaping up for the November election. Plus, we ask former Lieutenant Gov. Michael Steele, a Republican, about where his party is heading in the Free State.  Find more election reporting by WYPR and the Baltimore Banner.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
'Renew Baltimore' advocates on the plan to cut city property taxes

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 38:54


The property tax rate in the city of Baltimore is roughly twice as high as any other jurisdiction in MD. For decades, candidates for public office in the city have feigned interest in reducing taxes for homeowners and businesses, and some modest reductions have taken place from time to time. Now, a group of civic leaders have entered into the conversation determined to take decisive, dramatic action with a proposal to cut the tax rate nearly in half over a period of six years, and to change the city charter so the annual reductions can't be reversed by whomever happens to be in elected office at the time. The group has organized itself as a coalition called “Renew Baltimore.” Today on Midday: a conversation about their proposal, and its implications for businesses, homeowners and the city coffers. Andre Davis is a retired federal judge who served as Baltimore City Solicitor. He joins us on Zoom… Anirban Basu is the Chairman and CEO of the Sage Policy Group and the host of The Morning Economic Report on WYPR. He joins us on Zoom as well…See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
Midday_20220MD's 2022 Primary Election recap, with WYPR reporter John Lee725_A_Primary Recap_JohnLee

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 9:48


Today on Midday, we're going to talk taxes, and a proposal to dramatically reduce the property tax rate in Baltimore City. But we begin with a quick update on MD's 2022 primary election with WYPR's John Lee, who covers Baltimore County… John Lee joins us on our digital line from Baltimore.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On The Record on WYPR
With Maryland's mail-in ballot canvass underway, which Baltimore County races are tightening?

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 19:17


About 24 hours into counting mail-in ballots cast in the primary election, we speak with WYPR Baltimore County reporter John Lee. We'll ask: what's the latest in the contests for County executive and council, as well as the extremely tight race to be Democratic nominee for state's attorney -- where progressive Robbie Leonard is challenging four-term incumbent Scott Shellenberger. And we talk through the logistics of canvassing thousands of mail-in ballots. Lee spoke with Ruie LaVoie, Baltimore County Elections director, who said, "We're going to process and scan 6 to 8,000 a day because I did the math and if we do that we're going to certify July 29th." Find more election coverage from the WYPR newsroom. Listen to John Lee's latest story here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On The Record on WYPR
Analysis of the 2022 Maryland Primary Election

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 24:58


With thousands of mail-in ballots still a mystery, author and activist Wes Moore is ahead in the votes counted so far to be the Democratic nominee for governor.In the Republican primary, Trump-endorsed state Delegate Dan Cox declared victory. We'll talk about it with WYPR's Rachel Baye and pollster Mileah Kromer. Listen to Rachel Baye's story: "Dan Cox, an election denier, wins the Maryland Republican primary for governor." Check out the results of the recent Goucher College Poll, conducted in partnership with WYPR and the Baltimore Banner. In Baltimore, defense attorney Ivan Bates leads the current vote count for state's attorney. Tim Prudente of the Baltimore Banner outlines the contentious race between Bates, incumbent Marilyn Mosby, and former prosecutor Thiru Vignarajah. Read Tim Prudente's latest: "Ivan Bates holds 4,000 vote lead in Baltimore state's attorney race as rivals await mail-in count."See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
MD Election Day: Redistricting, misplaced voters, delayed returns

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 30:02


It's Primary Election Day in Maryland. Polls opened at 7:00 Tuesday morning. They will remain open until 8:00 tonight. If you're voting with a mail-in ballot, you have until 8:00 tonight to drop your ballot in a drop box, or have it postmarked. If you are an eligible voter who has not yet registered to vote, it's not too late. You may register at your polling place. Go to the MD Board of Elections website to find out where your polling place is. Polling places for some voters have changed since the last time we voted, because MD adopted new districts, based on data from the 2020 Census. The districts proposed by Democrats in the General Assembly were challenged in court, and the legal wrangling took some time to sort out, causing election officials to delay the primary until today. It was originally scheduled to take place three weeks ago, on June 28th. So, if you're a voter who is a little confused about what's going on this time around, you're not alone. And, as it turns out, there's been plenty of confusion on the part of some election officials as well. Tom's next guest is Joan Jacobson, a former reporter for the Baltimore Sun and the author of two books. She lives in Baltimore City, and she encountered all sorts of problems in her efforts to get a correct mail-in ballot. She is visiting family in Florida, where she joins us on Zoom… Then, Tom speaks with Brenda Wintrode, who covers state government, agencies and policies for our partner news organization, The Baltimore Banner… While polls close at 8:00 tonight, acceptance and concession speeches, a usual part of election nights, will likely not take place tonight. Results in the statewide races may not be known for several days, or longer, given that about a half a million voters requested mail-in ballots, and officials can't begin to count them until Thursday morning. When we have questions about voting, and the history of voting in Maryland, we turn to John Willis. He served as MD Secretary of State from 1995 - 2003. He is executive in residence at the University of Baltimore, and a scholar of all things electoral in MD and beyond. John Willis joins us on Zoom… Again, the polls close at 8:00 tonight. Matt Tacka and Tom Hall will have live coverage of some of the early returns tonight starting at 8:00, and stay tuned to WYPR for complete coverage of Primary results on Wednesday and throughout the days ahead as we track the results and find out who the major party nominees will be.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Zagadki Kryminalne
TRAGEDIA NIANI - SOPHIE LIONNET

Zagadki Kryminalne

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 20:02


20-letnia Francuzka Sophie Lionnet przyjechała do Londynu pracować jako au pair u pewnej zamożnej pary. Coś co miało być przygodą życia i szansą na zdobycie cennych doświadczeń wkrótce zmieniło się w najgorszy możliwy koszmar. Pracodawcy Sophie okazali się sadystami, dziewczyna była całymi dniami przesłuchiwana i torturowana i niestety finał historii miał okazać się tragiczny. BOOKBEAT: https://www.bookbeat.pl/karolinaanna?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=influencer&utm_campaign=karolin+anna+30+dni&utm_content=video. Wypróbuj aplikację przez 30 dni za darmo z moim kodem: ZAGADKI

On The Record on WYPR
What do Maryland voters think?

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 17:07


Maryland citizens who have made a choice about who they want as their next governor, or person in congress, or any of the scores of other public offices up for election this year, have started voting in the party primary -- either in person or by mail or dropbox. They have until 8 p.m. July 19 to vote. Recent polling hints that many MORE citizens are still making up their minds. WYPR politics reporter Rachel Baye says voters often decide at the last minute. And Pamela Wood of The Baltimore Banner says it doesn't mean they're not interested, "Marylanders are not used to voting in July. This is very unusual. Kids are off at summer camp, families are going on vacation. There is also I think a challenge, particularly on the Democratic side, that there are so many candidates.” More on the Goucher Poll, conducted in partnership with WYPR and the Baltimore Banner:Full poll resultsIs Maryland ‘moving in the right direction? Depends on which voter you askMaryland voters still largely undecided for Governor's Race, poll showsPoll: Top three Democratic candidates for Maryland governor are tied, with many still undecided    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
A conversation: MD gubernatorial candidates Tom Perez, Wes Moore

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 48:45


Maryland voters head to the polls next week. Mail-in voting has already begun. Early voting starts Thursday. Election day is two weeks from Tuesday. Today, it's a special installment in our series of Conversations with the Candidates 2022.  Two of the three leading candidates in the Democratic primary for Governor join Tom for the hour to discuss the issues on the minds of Marylanders. In early June, a poll published by the Baltimore Sun identified Comptroller Peter Franchot, non-profit executive Wes Moore and former Labor Secretary Tom Perez leading a 10-person field in the Democratic primary. Those three candidates polled in the low double-digits. A large number of respondents said they had not made up their minds. In a poll released on Tuesday of this week, commissioned by WYPR, the Baltimore Banner and Goucher College showed the race between Mr. Franchot, Mr. Moore and Mr. Perez to be even closer than it was in early June. Those three candidates are now in a statistical tie. The other candidate who is closest to them is former Attorney General Doug Gansler, who is about ten points behind. We invited the top three candidates to appear on Tuesday of this week. Peter Franchot's spokesperson declined our invitation citing a schedule conflict. We tried a different date, today, and once again citing a schedule conflict, the Franchot campaign declined our invitation. And so, we are pleased to welcome Wes Moore and Tom Perez to today's conversation. They join us on Zoom. Wes Moore is a best-selling author who has worked in the private and non-profit sector. He was most recently the CEO of the Robin Hood Foundation, a national philanthropic organization. And, full disclosure: he once hosted Future City,a public affairs show on WYPR. He has chosen as his running mate former Delegate Aruna Miller from Montgomery County… Tom Perez is a lawyer who headed the Civil Rights Division in the US Justice Department, and served as MD labor secretary during the O'Malley administration. He was also appointed US Labor Secretary during the Obama Administration, and he was the chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC). He has chosen as his running mate Shannon Sneed, a former Baltimore City Councilwoman… We begin with an opportunity for each candidate to say hello and explain why they deserve your vote. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19
USM schools hope ridding SAT, ACT tests will boost fairness, diversity

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 13:34


Baltimore Raven's linebacker Jaylen Ferguson's death was the result of illicit drugs according to the state's medical examiner. Maryland public schools must stop using restraints and seclusion to manage students' unwanted behavior.  One Maryland gubernatorial candidate gets a surprise endorsement from a local leader. According to a WYPR election poll with Goucher College and The Baltimore Banner, republicans and democrats are concerned about election integrity, but their reasons differ. And our education reporter tells us what some Maryland colleges hope to gain by getting rid of the SAT and ACT tests. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19
Maryland needs election judges and there's an incentive

The Daily Dose: Maryland Confronts COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 12:52


Early voting begins next week in Maryland. With less than three weeks to go before our primary election, the races to be the Republican and Democratic nominees for governor are tight according to a new poll by WYPR and The Baltimore Banner. Education and democracy are also on the minds of voters.  Maryland is in dire need of election judges and is offering incentives to state employees who sign up. And Baltimore police have made an arrest of a suspect in a traffic stop that has left an officer in critical condition. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
New Goucher Poll: As primaries near, a snapshot of MD's electorate

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 17:53


Midday begins today with a look at the first part of a new Goucher Poll, conducted in collaboration with The Baltimore Banner and WYPR, that takes the pulse of the Maryland electorate, with just 10 days to go before early voting begins in the 2022 statewide primary elections. The Goucher College Poll was conducted by telephone from June 15 to 19, 2022. It surveyed 502 registered Democrats and 507 registered Republicans living in Maryland and has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.4 percent.  Joining Tom to help unpack some of the key findings in the new poll are two astute observers of Maryland politics:Mileah Kromeris director of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Centerat Goucher College, which runs the Goucher Poll. She is also an Assistant Professor in the the Department of Political Science and International Relations at Goucher. Pamela Wood is the Maryland politics and government reporter at The Baltimore Banner. They join us on Zoom. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
Special Coverage: More Reactions to High Court's Ruling on Abortion

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 48:36


Today on Midday, we continue WYPR's Special Coverage of the historic Supreme Court ruling overturning 50 years of constitutional protections for abortion rights. Writing for the High Court majority that overturned Roe v Wade in a 6-3 decision announced Friday, Justice Samuel Alito said that the decision “returns the authority to regulate abortion to the people” meaning states can decide whether or not abortions will be allowed. A poll released this morning by PBS shows 56% of Americans oppose the ruling. In his noon-hour remarks from the White House on Friday, President Biden said the only way to restore abortion rights is to codify the provisions of Roe into law. The current Congress will not make that happen. Here in Maryland, women will have access to abortion, but Governor Larry Hogan is refusing to release money approved by the legislature to expand the number of people who can perform abortions. Initially, the General Assembly wrote the law so that training would begin in July of 2023. A new urgency has arisen to begin training these providers because of the SCOTUS decision, and legislators want to start next month instead of next year, but the Governor isn't budging. Among Tom's guests today are Baltimore City Councilwoman Phylicia Porter, who represents the 10th District in South Baltimore; Professor Mary Fissell, a medical historian at Johns Hopkins University; and Miriam Burg, a Rabbi and Jewish educator who works with pregnant women. We were told that Catholic Archbishop William Lori would be able to join us today as well, but this morning, his spokesperson said he would not be available. We hope to have him on at another time. But we begin with Karen J. Nelson, the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, a major provider of reproductive health services across the state. Like our other guests, Ms. Nelson joins us on Zoom… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
Special Coverage: The High Court Strikes Down Abortion Rights

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 81:04


Today, during the first half of the noon Midday hour, we continue WYPR's Special Live Coverage of the historic rulingending abortion rightshanded down Friday morning in a 6-3 decision by the conservative majority of the US Supreme Court. Ahead of President Joe Biden's scheduled remarks on the ruling at 12:33pm, Midday host Tom Hallspeaks with Prof. Margaret Johnson, co-director of the Center on Applied Feminism at the University of Baltimore School of Law, and director of the law school's Bronfein Family Law Clinic. Later in the half hour, Tom speaks with Maryland State Delegate Emily Shetty (Democrat, Dist.18) about the ruling's human and political impacts. Then, WYPR News reporter Rachel Baye joins us with excerpts from her interview Thursday with Karen Nelson, the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, who notes that while abortion will remain legal in Maryland, she is expecting the large influx of residents from states that have banned abortions to put a significant strain on Maryland's reproductive health resources. ______________________________________ Our continuing live, local coverage of Friday's historic Supreme Court ruling resumes during the 3pm hour. Midday host Tom Hall returns for a full hour of live conversation and listener interaction. Tom's guests this hour include Stacey Lee, associate professor of the Practice at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School; Dr. Lisa Cooper, founding director of the Center for Health Equity, part ofthe Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; and WYPR reporterJohn Lee, who joins us to share some of his interviews with Heather Mizeur, aformer Maryland State Delegate and currently a Democratic primary candidate for Maryland's 1st District US Congressional seat, and Dave Harden, a rival Democratic primary candidate for that 1st District seat. The incumbent 1st District congressman, Republican Andy Harris, declined John's request for an interview, but his office released a statement supporting the Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Stay tuned to WYPR this weekend for more of NPR's special coverage of the Supreme Court ruling striking down abortion rights. Midday's live coverage will continue during our regular noon-1pm broadcast on Monday, June 27. For a list of pro-choice events and demonstrations happening this weekend, go to the wewontgoback.com Website. For information on the anti-abortion movement, visit the March for Life site. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On The Record on WYPR
How Baltimore Banner editor Kimi Yoshino is building her newsroom

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 24:28


Kimi Yoshino had established an impressive career in journalism-- she was managing editor of the Los Angeles Times -- when business magnate Stewart Bainum asked her to leave all that to become editor-in-chief of the online news operation he was starting: The Baltimore Banner. Yoshino says, "This for me was a chance to start fresh and to build the kind of newsroom that I wanted to work in, the kind of newsroom that I thought would serve a community, and a way to really make a difference." That newsroom she's building, Yoshino said, is diverse but needs to be more so. Its sole focus is to cover the Baltimore region, with hard news that holds public officials accountable--but also arts, culture and personal insights. Check out Baltimore Magazine's coverage of the Banner's launch. Or this piece by the Northwestern Medill Local News Initiative Learn about WYPR and the Baltimore Banner's joint operating agreement. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Aneks Kryminalny
Morderstwa Yoo Young Chula

Aneks Kryminalny

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 59:12


Wypróbuj BookBeat przez miesiąc za darmo: https://www.bookbeat.pl/aneks?utm_source=Spotify&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=aneks+30+days&utm_content=epi+description Instagram@agnyeshka kontakt: ciekawesprawykryminalne@gmail.com źródła: https://1drv.ms/w/s!AgWf3w81bcS6iRVwp...

Midday
The Banner's new 'Baltimore Now' poll takes the pulse of city politics

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 5:29


We begin today with a friend and colleague from our partner news organization, The Baltimore Banner.  Emily Sullivan is an award-winning reporter who is a former member of the WYPR news team, and who's now covering City Hall for the Banner. Emily Sullivan joins Tom on our digital line to discuss some of the key findings from the Baltimore Banner's new "Baltimore Now" poll, conducted for the Banner in late May by Goucher College.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Można Zwariować
69. Uważność – dlaczego to takie ważne! (+NIESPODZIANKA!)

Można Zwariować

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 40:19


Uważność - temat dla mnichów, naukowców, czy sceptyków? Jesteśmy zdania, że dla każdego! Opowiadamy, jak to się stało, że buddyjska technika sprzed ponad 2 tysięcy lat stała się obiektem badań i zainteresowała tak wiele osób. Co potrzeba do praktyki medytacji i dlaczego warto zacząć swoją przygodę z mindfulness? Jak zrobić to bezpiecznie? Cleo w końcu dzieli się ze światem projektem, nad którym pracował jej start-up - to właśnie aplikacja do medytacji! Wypróbujcie MEditate app i dajcie znać co myślicie pisząc DM na instagramie do @cleocwiek, albo jeszcze lepiej – na @meditate_app! MEditate App dla iOS MEditate App dla Android Instagram MEditate App Spotify MEditate App Wspominamy o: How meditation can change your life and mind? | Sam Harris, Jon Kabat-Zinn & more. Obrazek: Wiesz dlaczego Twój pies jest szczęśliwszy od Ciebie? Dziękujemy za Wasze wsparcie na Patronite oraz słanie dobrego słowa o podcaście! Jeśli chcecie podzielić się swoimi refleksjami to piszcie do nas na: podcast@moznazwariowac.pl lub na Instagramie: Cleo Cwiek @cleocwiek Ania Cyklińska @psychoedu_ Fundacja Można Zwariować @moznazwariowac Grupa FB Można Zwariować www.moznazwariowac.pl

Midday
'This Will Not Pass': Chronicling an embattled American democracy

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 47:30


“Let me be very clear to all of you, and I've been very clear to the President. He bears responsibilities for his words and actions — no ifs, ands or buts. I asked him personally today, does he hold responsibility for what happened? Does he feel bad about what happened? He told me he does have some responsibility for what happened and he needs to acknowledge that.” —House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, speaking withfellow Republicans about Donald Trump's culpability for the attack on the Capital on January 6th of last year. The US House of Representatives' Special Committee investigating that attack and efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election will hold its first public hearing tonight. WYPR will carry NPR's live coverage beginning at 8:00pm Today on Midday,a conversation with New York Times national correspondent Alexander Burns about a compelling and comprehensive book he co-authored with his Times colleague, Jonathan Martin, about the last year of the Trump administration, including the months preceding the insurrection, through the first months of the Biden Administration. Burns and Martin make a strong case for the fragility of the basic architecture of American democracy. They argue that government cannot function in a two-party system in which neither party is internally coherent and serious about governing. It is a book full of excellent reporting and trenchant insights. It's called This Will Not Pass:  Trump, Biden, and the Battle for America's Future.  Alexander Burns joins us on Zoom from Washington, DC… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
A Baltimore County news update with WYPR reporter John Lee

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 13:54


The Fraternal Order of Police held a vote of no-confidence last night regarding Baltimore County Police Chief Melissa Hyatt, and called for her dismissal. The County school system is grappling with persistent transportation problems and a nationwide driver shortage. And concerns over Baltimore County teacher pay and school safety sparked a protest rally last week outside a school board meeting. Tom's next guest is WYPR's John Lee, who covers all things Baltimore County for the station's award-winning news team. John joins us on our digital line with details on these and other developments. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Leftist Teen Drama
#12 - Emma Nelson, Hazel Aden, and Post-9/11 Politics on Early ‘Degrassi'

Leftist Teen Drama

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 115:50


GMOs and anti-Muslim bigotry, it *must* be the George Bush era. Maria and her guests, childhood friends Dondré Taylor-Stewart and Rosalie Murray, go back in time to the first two seasons of DEGRASSI: THE NEXT GENERATION (2001-2015) to discuss political storylines headed by resident activist girl Emma Nelson and resident Early-2000s-Black-Woman-Who-Deserved-Better Hazel Aden. From Emma telling off teasing boys when she gets her period to Hazel's journey accepting her Somalian identity publicly in a post-9/11 world to Emma's GMO protest turned free speech protest, we run the gamut of early 2000s politics in our first (but certainly not our last) DEGRASSI episode.  For this episode, we recommend you first watch or have familiarity with DEGRASSI: THE NEXT GENERATION Seasons 1-2, especially episodes 1x05 “Parents Day,” 1x09 “Coming of Age,” 2x11 “Don't Believe the Hype,” and 2x19 “Fight For Your Right,” all streaming on HBO Max. FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL | instagram, tumblr, tiktok: @leftistteendrama | twitter: @leftyteendrama | website: leftistteendrama.com _ ABOUT US: MARIA DIPASQUALE (she/her; host/editor) is a Brooklyn-based union communicator and writer who watches too much TV. Follow Maria on Twitter @Maria_DiP26, IG @mdzip, and tiktok @marialovesunions. In addition to Leftist Teen Drama, Maria hosts Bodysuits For Bughead: A Riverdale Podcast | tumblr: @bodysuitsforbughead twitter: @B4B_Podcast instagram: @bodysuits4bughead DONDRÉ TAYLOR-STEWART (he/him, recurring guest) is a Jersey-born, Jamaican-raised TV writer whose work often employs satire to examine the cultural crossroads of his identity. He splits his time in Los Angeles with a day job in environmental public policy, freelance writing gigs, and crafting original pilots. Ultimately, Dondré dreams of sustaining a highly collaborative career telling Black stories to help expand imaginations. IG: oxtail.papi TWITTER: dondrenesta ROSALIE MURRAY (she/her, guest) is an elementary school social worker/human living in Queens, NY.  Besides spending time with her cat, Louise, she loves to cook tasty ass vegan food with friends, karaoke-ing or starting another unfinished crochet project. She also loves to watch endless youtube videos, reality television and, of course, Degrassi. CHARLES O'LEARY (they/them; art) is, of course, a Brooklyn-based designer, artist, and dilettante. A survivor of the 2012-2016 Tumblr wars, media criticism is all they know. You can find their work at charles-oleary.com, and their silly little life on Instagram at @c.s.0.l. JEFF MCHALE (he/him; producer) is an extremely online guy who plays games, streams sometimes, and loves talking old TV. Maria and Jeff's good union cats CLARENCE and VINNY may make an appearance and/or be mentioned.  intro song: Stomping the Room by Delicate Beats All opinions shared on this show are that of individuals and do not represent the views of any organization we may be affiliated with. _ SOURCES DISCUSSED IN THE EPISODE:  December 9, 2021, WYPR, Baltimore's squeegee kids: debating how the community should respond Disney Channel 9/11 PSAs: here's one, and here's another. And this video has a lot of them too. July 6, 2015, The Washington Post: Why we're so scared of GMOs, according to someone who has studied them since the start by Roberto A. Ferdman June 25, 2003, IATP.org, Hundreds Demonstrate Against Genetically Modified Food | IATP by Oscar Duron May 22, 2012, The Guardian, GM crops: protesters go back to the battlefields by Leo Hickman September 20, 2020, BBC News, GM crops: The Greenpeace activists who risked jail to destroy a field of maize - BBC News by Orla Moore and Zoe Applegate  March 26, 2000, CNN Money, Protest erupts at BIO meet  by Martha Slud

Midday
WYPR's Oliver details new joint agreement with Baltimore Banner

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 6:52


We begin today with some breaking news that will alter the media landscape in the Baltimore metro area. WYPR and the Baltimore Banner,a multi-platform news organization that is expected to begin publishing this summer, announced this morning that the two organizations have entered into a joint operating agreement. LaFontaine Oliver, the president of the Your Public Radio Corporation and the General Manager of WYPR, joins Tom now from WYPR's Studio B. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
WTMD's new doc spotlights 15 yrs of Baltimore's vibrant music scene

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 23:57


We open this part of the show with the music of the composer and performer Dan Deacon: a track called Sat by a Tree from his 2020 album, Mystic Familiar.  Deacon is one of dozens of Baltimore musicians featured in a new film about the Baltimore music scene that is receiving its world premiere Thursday night at the Charles Theater here in Baltimore. It's called Do Whatever You Want All the Time: The Baltimore Music Scene 2005-2020. Tom's next guests are the creative spirits behind this great project: Sam Sessa, the Baltimore Music & Community Engagement Manager and host of Baltimore Hit Parade at WYPR's sister station, WTMD, and Julia Golonka, a filmmaker and co-producer of the movie. There will be free public screenings at 7pm this Thursday at the Charles Theatre, and at 6 pm & 7:30 pm on June 23 at Maryland Art Place. Sam Sessa and Julia Golonka join us on Zoom from the studios of WTMD. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On The Record on WYPR
Democratic lawmakers accomplish major goals ahead of sine die

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 23:46


The suspense that typically suffuses the last day of the General Assembly session is missing: Democrats sent important bills to Gov. Hogan a week earlier than normal, so he was under a deadline to deal with them. One he let become law without his signature mandates deep cuts in carbon emissions. Democrat Paul Pinsky, chair of the Senate environment committee, told his colleagues, "Today, I want to do something ​somewhat out of character, and that is: I want to publicly thank the governor of Maryland. Yesterday, the governor endorsed the action of the legislature that decided to take the lead on climate change, and I publicly want to thank him, whatever the motivation. We'll ask WYPR's Joel McCordand MPT's Charles Robinson what else the legislature has done. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midday
Laura Neuman: Democratic candidate for Maryland Governor

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 49:36


Before we begin the latest installment in our series of Conversations with the Candidates: 2022,a word about the redistricting plan created by the Maryland General Assembly: it ain't happening, at least for now. On Friday, Judge Lynn A. Battaglia ruled in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that the map for new Congressional districts submitted by the Democratic-controlled legislature is unconstitutional and “a product of extreme partisan gerrymandering.” She ordered the General Assembly to redraw maps by Wednesday. The legislature, which was represented by The Maryland Attorney General's office, may appeal the ruling. This is the first time a court has found a congressional map in violation of the state constitution. Minutes after the ruling was announced, Gov. Larry Hogan called on the General Assembly to pass the Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission maps. That's the commission the Governor appointed. WYPR's Joel McCord is following this story, and he'll keep us up to speed as it develops. Tom's guest today doesn't have to worry about congressional or state legislative district maps, at least for the time being, because she is running statewide. Laura Neuman joins us for the hour.  A former Republican, she is one of 10 candidates in the Democratic primary for Maryland Governor. In 2013, while serving as the CEO of the Howard County Economic Development Authority, she was appointed Anne Arundel County Executive when John Leopold resigned after a misconduct scandal. She held that position for almost two years. She was unsuccessful in her bid for a full term. Before she entered politics, Laura Neuman was a successful tech entrepreneur. She received an MBA from Loyola University Maryland. She was accepted into that program with a GED, and having never attended college. She is also a graduate of the Executive Program at Stanford Business School. She is a venture capitalist and an executive in residence at the University of MD College Park, an advisor to a management firm based in Pittsburgh, and she serves on several boards and commissions. Laura Neuman is 57 years old. She is the mother of two teenage daughters. She lives in Baltimore. We welcome your comments and questions for the candidate. Call us at 410.662.8780, email us at midday@wypr.org or Tweet us @MiddayWYPR Laura Newman joins us on Zoom from Annapolis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Local Color: A Baltimore Podcast
Episode 102 - Nicki Nanami

Local Color: A Baltimore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 46:44


This is the first episode I'm releasing with WYPR's new podcast platform Your Public Studios and I couldn't have asked for a better guest. If you've been listening for a while you'll know I'm a big fan of anime and videogames, and Twitch streamer and cosplayer Nicki Nanami matches my nerd energy. We talk about life for Nicki in both of those worlds, prioritizing mental health over the social media rat race, and what inspires her to continue to build her brand in the face of online trolls.

On The Record on WYPR
An 'Audible' coming-of-age story

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 18:26


Amaree McKenstry-Hall was in his senior year at the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick. Football, Homecoming, and his future weighed on his mind. That's why filmmaker Matt Ogens made Amaree the heart of his coming-of-age documentary, “Audible.” "Audible" was recently nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary - Short Subject. The Oscars air March 27. "Audible" is available on Netflix. TRANSCRIPT: Sheilah Kast Good morning, I'm Sheilah Kast. We're On the Record. The documentary “Audible” follows an important season in Amaree McKinstry Hall's life football season. It's his last. He's a senior at the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick. The stakes are high. The Orioles have not lost to a Deaf school in 16 years. Just minutes into the film, that winning streak is broken. In the film, we see the searing pain of that loss. But we also see that while that streak was broken, the Orioles are not. Over and over, "Audible" shows how Amaree and his friends persevere. The film, out on Netflix, was recently nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary -Short Subject. Joining us to talk about it is director Matt Ogens, a Maryland native. His other projects include the documentary, "Confessions of a Superhero," about the costumed superheroes who roam the Hollywood Walk of Fame and the Emmy nominated docu-series, "Why We Fight," which follows fighters from across the globe. Matt Ogens, welcome to the show. Matt Ogens Thank you so much, Sheilah. Thanks for having us. Sheilah Kast Also with us is Amaree McKinstry Hall, who graduated from the Maryland School for the Deaf in 2020. We're speaking to Amaree with the assistance of Anessa Hughes, an American Sign Language interpreter from the Centralized Interpreter Referral Service. Welcome, Amaree. Amaree McKinstry Hall Thanks. Happy to be here! Sheilah Kast Matt, where did the idea for this film come from? Matt Ogens So I grew up in Maryland, about 30 minutes away from from Maryland school for the Deaf in Frederick. But I had a lot of connections, so my aunt is an ASL interpreter in the D.C. Maryland area and interpreted at the Maryland school for the Deaf for about six years when I was a kid. But I think the biggest connection is my best friend, also from Maryland, is Deaf. We've been best friends since we were seven years old, I was just texting with him. And so it actually I came up with the idea of wanting, wanting to do something with Maryland School for the Deaf 12 years before I made the film. It took that long of just stops and starts and different partners and almost and maybes and getting it made until I connected with Netflix. And they really understood and believed in the story. And I think at the end of the day, in some ways, on a personal level, it was a way for me to try to understand and connect with my friend and the larger Deaf community. Sheilah Kast And why did you decide to make Amaree the main subject? Matt Ogens I wouldn't say this is a football or a sports documentary. It's a coming of age film. There's relationships, there's family, there's tragedy and there's sports. And when I say coming of age, I wanted, I knew I wanted the main character to be a senior. Because for every teenager, graduating high school, going off into the larger world or college or whatever you're going to, do is a pivotal moment. And imagine that if you're Deaf and going out into a more of a broader hearing world. But what that meant is over 12 years I tried to make the film. I wanted a senior. That means I had to recast every single year for 12 years because they would graduate. And I'm so glad it took 12 years because if I didn't wait 12 years, I wouldn't have met this man on on this as well, Amaree. And besides just being an amazing human, what I loved about his story, it has all the marks of a great of great storytelling. His relationship with his father or lack thereof when he was younger, his unlikely friendship with the cheerleader. And that friendship coming about through a tragedy through Teddy, it helped show the struggle, his struggle and perhaps others in the Deaf community. And I've never heard another filmmaker saying, I'm glad it took 12 years to get a film made, but I'm glad it took five years to get a film made. Sheilah Kast Amaree, how did Matt approach you about being in his movie? Amaree McKinstry Hall Well, to be honest, you know, Matt asked me about it and just told me that he wasn't, he was on my side. He wanted me to be able to tell my own story about becoming a man, and he wanted me to just get it all out. You know, the whole story and that it was a way for me to have some healing happen in that way. He just emphasized that he wanted other people to be able to relate to those frustrations and everything that I've been through. I mentioned it to a counselor and just described what the experience was going to be like, and I agreed with everybody else that it would be a perfect opportunity. I'm not sure how to describe that. Yeah. Sheilah Kast Amaree, that loss to the school from Texas. How did that moment feel? Amaree McKinstry Hall So, you know, that loss to Texas was so unexpected. You know, I just always had complete confidence that we would do what we needed to do, that they would do something wrong that we can add such pride in the Maryland school for the Deaf. And that moment that we lost, I was completely enraged. I mean, I wanted to start beating the ground. I wanted to get out of there. I just wanted to escape. I felt ashamed, just embarrassed to have it happen. But it was such a learning experience that I could apply it to the rest of my life. If something's getting in the way of me being successful somewhere else, if something happens on my job, I can't just walk away. You just can't just give up like that. So it was really it really threw me being at the real school for the Deaf and having that loss. Sheilah Kast You and your teammates are very close. What did you do to not let that loss weigh you down? Amaree McKinstry Hall After we had the loss, I just knew we needed to regroup. We had to do some exploration. We had to figure out how to grow from it. We'd go to practices. We might start at three o'clock and before then we would right at five o'clock sharp, just all walk away. And we decided, you know, we're not going to quit at exactly five. We're going to do what it takes. We're gonna stay late if that's what we need and just get back in the game and see if we can get back into a championship rating. So. It made me happy to have that happen because we saw that we could come back from it. We actually only had that one loss. We had nine more wins, so it wasn't as big of a deal as we thought it was definitely didn't give up. Sheilah Kast Matt, there are lots of personal moments in this film, conversations about dating, friends dancing at a party. What did you do to earn the trust of these teens? Matt Ogens Going back for 12 years. Obviously, they were just kids, but I think in general, going back every year because I'd go visit. I live in Los Angeles now, going back to visit my family in Maryland. Every year, every other year, I'd pop into the school and say, Hi, meet the new kids. And I think coming back over and over and really being invited in. Also, I met Amaree when he was a junior and and Lira. So, you know, I had a year of talking to them and actually, I didn't know there was a person named Teddy. They told me that story when I met them. I assume because they wanted to share that. And so I didn't know that. I think just showing up and talking to them and doing a lot more listening than talking. I mean, I'd say at the end of the day, I don't know that Amaree and them learned anything from me. I hope I was just a conduit for them to tell their story and created a space, a safe space for it to be about them. It's not an observational film, it's that it's their film. And I learned a lot from them. Sheilah Kast Amaree, Matt mentioned Teddy, Teddy Webster. You endured the death of your friend and fellow football player. He died by suicide in 2017. Tell us about Teddy. Amaree McKinstry Hall I'd be happy to. Teddy. He died in November 2017. And he was my best friend. We grew up together, we were at the Columbia campus of the Maryland school together up until eighth grade. We got our education together, and he was my best friend just because of all the experiences we had together, all the fun that we had. We didn't see ourselves as being any different from each other. He was so funny. He loved acting. He loved everything about Hollywood. Everybody knew him well. Everybody knew his name. It was one of those kind of kids. You wanted to go to some Ivy League school like Yale, Harvard or something like that. He had big goals in his life and we all knew he was capable. And then suddenly he was gone and died by suicide. Sheilah Kast You wrote Teddy's name on your wristband before the big homecoming game. Why? Amaree McKinstry Hall I did that was just to reinforce his memory you so many people actually didn't want to say his name when he actually died just because it's too painful, too painful to remember, too painful to think about. But I mean, we knew each other since we were little kids. So to me, I wanted to keep that, even after he was dead and gone. I feel like people who die by suicide leave behind friends and family who have a lot to work through when it comes to trying to understand why they felt the need for that. Teddy was the last person I would have guessed for someone to do something like that. So that's why I wanted his name on my wrist. Sheilah Kast This is On the Record on WYPR. I'm Sheilah Kast, speaking with Amaree McKinstry Hall, who graduated from the Maryland School for the Deaf in 2020, Anessa Hughes, an American sign language interpreter, is assisting. Also with us is filmmaker Matt Ogens, who directed "Audible," a coming of age film about Amaree and his peers. "Audible" was recently nominated for an Oscar. Matt, how did you approach the sound design for this film? Matt Ogens I knew I wanted to do something special with sound and make it a character kind of for obvious reasons way before I made the film. And lucky enough to have an A-list sound team, I mean way more than I can afford, but they really connected with the material. Our sound designers and sound mixers, our composer. I wanted to. There's a few reasons. One, I wanted for the hearing audience for them to, they'll never fully what it's like to be Deaf, but to be able to feel something. And so to show that spectrum of sound from silence like the very first frame to very vibrant and saturated, especially from different points of view, like, for example, a pretty important scene is a memory in the kitchen at his family home, and he's the only one that's Deaf and they're all talking around him. And so you switch to his point of view where it's very distant and muffled. So the audience, at least the hearing audience, can try to come close to putting themselves in his shoes. And then he leaves and goes upstairs and really playing with that. I did a lot of research, and that research mainly was talking to Amaree and his friends. What music do you listen to? How do you feel things. All of that they talk about in the film. So you'll hear a lot of the sounds having a lot of bassey sounds, a lot of distortion underneath. So if you turn up the volume, you're actually going to kind of feel something. And even if not, you sort of feel it emotionally in your gut. So that was sort of the idea. Also, something that I learned from Amaree and his friends in the Deaf community is that, their their minds, their worlds are not silent. I mean, certainly go in the locker room with Amaree before the game. There's nothing silent about that. They're not silent on the field and they have a voice and they have something to say. But also being Deaf is not, there's a spectrum of that. You know, Amaree's level of hearing is different than someone else. I also wanted to show that. Sheilah Kast Amaree, you talk in the movie about moments of isolation as a Deaf person out in the world and even in your own family, as Matt mentioned. Tell us more about that. Amaree McKinstry Hall Well, as Matt just described, you know, even in my own family, in the house, everybody, I can see their lips moving. People chatting and laughing, and I don't have access to any of that. So when everybody's chatting with each other, it's kind of exhausting to try to even figure out what's going on. Somebody says something and then another person laughs, and nobody's letting me in on what's going on. So, often I just want to get away from it. I'll go up to my room. I'll turn up the music, get the bass going, play a game, watch TV or something like that. Or especially, you know, face time with my friends and be able to communicate that way. Sheilah Kast Were you nervous about sharing those feelings on camera or worried that your family, how your family would react to knowing that you feel isolation? Amaree McKinstry Hall No, I wasn't nervous, actually. I wanted to be really open about that. I know that, you know, my mom honestly doesn't understand Deaf culture. She doesn't have the awareness. I wish she had. So I looked at it as a great opportunity for her to watch the film, and through the production of the film, get to see it from my side and then consider what had been going on in my family up until this point. And it's great exposure for any family, any hearing family who has a Deaf child to understand that they need to make things visual, especially when they get together. They need to have their hands up and signing, communicating with each other. If they're not doing that, they're excluding somebody in their family. Sheilah Kast I read, Amaree, that you are not only a football player, you also did track and field - the discus and javelin throw. Is that right? Amaree McKinstry Hall Right, I did discuss and it was actually one of my favorite sports. Then the javelin throw, that was a real way to get out some aggression. You know, just frustration just to let it all out. And sports in general, I really depended on. I know that's an individual thing. Not everybody has that feeling, but I love having something in my hands, like the discus or the javelin and being able to measure how I'm doing, how far I can throw it. Sheilah Kast Amaree, you graduated from high school two years ago. What are you doing now? Amaree McKinstry Hall After high school, I moved to Indiana, I've since moved to Minnesota, and I really wanted to start my own YouTube channel. I wanted to blog and I wanted to record more things about my life. I wanted to keep the film-making going. Then, when things didn't really work out in Indiana, no offense to Indiana, but there just wasn't a whole lot going on in the town I was living in. I'm not used to being so far out in the country. I decided to move to Minnesota because I could be on the Deaf Olympics wrestling team, Greco-Roman wrestling. So that way, you know, it was a sport where I could have my whole body involved, it's a head to toe kind of sport, and we'll be competing in 2022 in Brazil. Sheilah Kast Wow! And you have made one film and it was Oscar nominated, so more films might be in your future. Amaree McKinstry Hall I hope so. I love it. Yes, I don't have any expectation, but I'd love for that to happen. Matt Ogens I would, too. Sheilah Kast And Matt, what what are you working on next? Matt Ogens I can't say too much, but I'm currently directing a feature documentary that shoots in Nigeria and England about a ballet dancer. Amaree McKinstry Hall Go Matt! Sheilah Kast Good luck. Matt Ogens Thank you. Sheilah Kast Matt Ogens directed the documentary Audible. Amaree McKinstry Hall starred in the film. He graduated from the Maryland School for the Deaf in 2020. We spoke with the assistance of Anessa Hughes, an American sign language interpreter from the Centralized Interpreter Referral Service. Matt, Amaree, thank you and good luck. Matt Ogens Thank you, Sheilah. Thanks for having us. Amazing. Amaree McKinstry Hall That's great, thanks. Sheilah Kast Audible is available on Netflix. The Academy Awards air Sunday, March 27th. This is On the Record. I'm Sheilah Kast, short break now and then a Stoop Story. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Local Color: A Baltimore Podcast
Episode 101 - Lafontaine Oliver

Local Color: A Baltimore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 30:46


Episode 101 marks the beginning of a new journey for the podcast. First and foremost, I'm publishing on Wednesdays now :D Second, I'm partnering with Baltimore's NPR station, 88.1 WYPR who will distribute the podcast on their digital platform, "Your Public Studios". Before my first episode is "officially" launched on the platform, I had the opportunity to talk to WYPR's President and General Manager, Lafontaine Oliver (thanks Jamyla!). He talks about growing up in southeast DC, climbing the ranks of commercial and public radio, and we also talk about the goal of their podcast platform, and how my and other locally produced podcasts will help achieve that goal.

On The Record on WYPR
Celebrating Baltimore's public radio history

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 25:17


WYPR is celebrating its 20th anniversary! The festival includes a new podcast - Wavelength: Baltimore's Public Radio Journey - with interviews reflecting the diverse landscape of local public media.WYPR Digital Content Director Jamyla Krempel traces YPR's roots as a student-run station at Johns Hopkins and tales collected from current and former radio staffers.Listen to the first episode here. Check out the WYPR timeline here.Then--WYPR's first morning-show interview,Dr. Marisela Gomez, on why she fought for the community's voice to be heard in redevelopment 20 years ago, and why it still matters. Learn more about VOLAR - Village of Love and Resistance. The East Baltimore Historical Library works to preserve the community's history. On Sunday it will hold a storytellers' brunch on Facebook Live from 2:30 to 4:30 pm. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On The Record on WYPR
Environmental proposals to watch in the Maryland General Assembly

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 25:07


Advocates are renewing a push in Annapolis to amend Maryland's constitution so that it would guarantee a right to a healthful environment--and a right to sue over threats to the environment.Staci Hartwell, climate-justice chair for the NAACP Maryland State Conference, says it's about racial justice. Monica Brooks tells how an amendment might have boosted citizen efforts in Wicomico County to block a high-intensity animal feeding facility. And Shashawnda Campbell of the South Baltimore Community Land Trust recounts the health impacts of multiple pollution sources. Learn more about the Maryland Campaign for Environmental Human Rights. Watch the 2022 Maryland Environmental Summit, hosted by the Maryland League of Conservation Voters and Citizens Campaign for the Environment. Then, WYPR's Joel McCord, on what else lawmakers are looking at for the environment. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big Ponder
The Big Ponder #25: The Night

The Big Ponder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 26:11


To newborns, there is no discernable difference between night and day. Evening and morning blur together in this piece as Katie Marquette rocks her baby to sleep, contemplating the night. 

Your Child's Brain
The Neuroscience Of Learning

Your Child's Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 9:01


On the second episode of Your Child's Brain, a podcast series about the mysteries of the developing brain, we discuss the neuroscience of education. Featuring:  Dr. Lisa Carey, Assistant Director, Center for Innovation and Leadership in Special Education, Kennedy Krieger Institute. Dr. Linda Myers, Vice President of School Autism Services, Kennedy Krieger Institute. Dr. Aaron Parsons, Vice President of School Programs, Kennedy Krieger Institute. Your Child's Brain is produced by Kennedy Krieger Institute, with assistance from WYPR. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Everyman Theatre's Resident Ghost Company
Everyman Theatre's Resident Ghost Company trailer

Everyman Theatre's Resident Ghost Company

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 0:30


“In 2014 I saw a ghost backstage of a performance and soon discovered I wasn’t alone.” Everyman Theatre's Resident Ghost Company is a paranormal, true-crime documentary podcast produced and hosted by Everyman Theatre Resident Acting Company member Danny Gavigan. With interviews from Everyman Theatre's company of artists, paranormal experts, and Baltimore historians, Danny pieces together corroborating firsthand accounts, expert analysis, and revelatory newspaper clippings to uncover the history behind the ghost he encountered backstage at the haunted Baltimore theater. Part documentary and part suspenseful radio drama, Everyman Theatre's Resident Ghost Company explores how the supernatural connects us all. This content is produced by Danny Gavigan and distributed by WYPR.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Everyman Theatre's Resident Ghost Company

Conversations concerning the paranormal typically lend themselves to the sensational, but Danny has discovered they can also open deeper discussions about trauma, the afterlife, and a region’s rich history. Danny looks back on some of the other ghostly happenings at Everyman Theatre's historic space and explores the rich history of Baltimore’s Bromo Arts District, particularly Lexington market, to learn how the past still haunts the present with UMBC American Studies professor Dr. Nicole King. Heard on this episode Yaegel Welch Resident Acting CoClinton Brandhagen Former Resident Acting Co MemberHelen Hedman Resident Acting CoDeborah HazleI Resident Acting CoBeth Hylton Resident Acting CoBruce Randolph Nelson Resident Acting CoAndrew Gaylin Audio EngineerMegan Anderson Resident Acting CoCorey Frier-Ritsch Associate Director of Marketing and Strategic CommunicationsShammah Moore Porter at Everyman TheatreMandy Hall Director of ProductionBrenna Horner Former Lead Teaching Artist at Everyman TheatreJason McIntosh Actor (Radio Golf, Sweat, Fences)Tony Nam Resident Acting CoVincent M. Lancisi Founder, Artistic DirectorDonald Hicken Former Theater Head of Baltimore School for the ArtsDr. Nicole King Associate Professor and American Studies Dept. Chair, UMBCPaige Hernandez Associate Artistic Director This content is produced by Danny Gavigan and distributed by WYPR.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Everyman Theatre's Resident Ghost Company
Episode 3: FBI's Ghost Wanted

Everyman Theatre's Resident Ghost Company

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 25:49


Everyman Theatre's porter, Shammah Moore, has had more than his fair share of ghostly experiences at the theater and attributes them to a shootout that occurred there back in 1953. Danny and Company unfold the events of that fateful day through anecdotes and revelatory newspaper clippings. Heard on this episode Shammah Moore Porter at Everyman TheatreMegan Anderson Resident Acting CoCorey Frier-Ritsch Associate Director of Marketing and Strategic CommunicationsBrenna Horner Former Lead Teaching Arts at EverymanTony Nam Resident Acting CoDonald Hicken Former Head of Theatre at Baltimore School for the ArtsVincent M. Lancisi Founder, Artistic DirectorMandy Hall Director of ProductionAndrew Gaylin Audio EngineerBeth Hylton Resident Acting Co This content is produced by Danny Gavigan and distributed by WYPR.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.