On The Record on WYPR

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Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR's Morning Edition. We'll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artist…

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    • Sep 28, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
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    Latest episodes from On The Record on WYPR

    'Food for Thought': Praise for Food Service Workers!

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 16:10


    Since March 2020, most of us have a deeper grasp of who is an “essential worker.” The Baltimore Museum of Industry is featuring a show about those who are indispensable to our young people: Baltimore City school food-service workers. Like Sheila Alston, who helped feed students for more than 30 years: “We are part of the learning process with the kids. Because a child cannot learn if they're hungry.” We learn more about the audio-visual exhibit from the B-M-I's director of interpretation Beth Maloney, and from photographer J.M. Giordano who created the black and white portraits: “These are people who do a fantastically important job, so I wanted to make them look like superheroes almost.” Links: Food for Thought, online at BMI, J.M. Giordano, Night Work at Goucher College Rosenberg Gallery.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The path from reentry to entrepreneurship

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 16:54


    Why would someone coming out of prison, with all the challenges they face, take on the task of starting their own business? Partly because employers pass them over, says Vanessa Bright, founder of the Maryland Reentry Resource Center. And some are natural risk-takers, she says. We talk to Lamont Bell, who runs three businesses he started since leaving prison and Chris Taylor, a retired business executive who now advises entrepreneurs.  The Maryland Reentry Entrepreneurship & Networking Conference will be held on Saturday, October 1st at the Maritime Conference Center. Details here. Find a business mentor through SCORE.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Documentarian Stanley Nelson on two Maryland icons of freedom: Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 16:26


    Where would our country be, what would it be without Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman? Award-winning documentarian Stanley Nelson evokes new insights into how each pushed to freedom from slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore. In the film MPT premiers next week, Nelson traces Tubman's visions, which she took as direct guidance from God. Then Nelson shows Frederick Douglass reinventing himself again and again on his quest to demand respect for his people. Learn more about these two documentaries. Harriet Tubman: Visions of Freedom will debut on Maryland Public Television and PBS stations nationwide next Tuesday, Oct. 4. Becoming Frederick Douglass, which will debut the following Tuesday, Oct. 11.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Double Scoop Stoop! Jessica Murphy Garrett and Arianne Rice

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 16:08


    Storytelling is at the core of what we do here at WYPR. So today, as a special fund-drive treat, we're offering up a double scoop of Stoop Stories! Arianne Rice, a newly ordained priest facing a crisis, talks about what she wished she'd learned in seminary and Jessica Murphy Garrett, who heard her biological clock ticking at age 35, tells how she decided to take matters into her own hands: “And I thought the right thing to do is to give him first right of refusal on being the sperm donor, basically, and I said, you know, ‘Since we're married I don't know if that's something you want.' And he said, romantically and wistfully, ‘Nah, I'm good.' Links: Stoopstorytelling, LIVE Stoop Tales from the Crypt, Stoop podcasts.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Superhero inspiration with a big band sound

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 15:26


    Imagine iconic characters like Batman or Daredevil. How would their personalities sound, if presented in the Big Band style? Stephen Philip Harvey's latest album, the debut of his jazz orchestra, is SMASH! He drew inspiration from superheroes he watched in Saturday morning cartoons, and translated brooding heroes and scheming villains into jazz melodies and harmonies. Check out his upcoming performances here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Understanding the spectrum of autism through DNA

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 16:30


    SPARK -- a large database of DNA from people with autism and their families -- offers insight into the spectrum of the disorder. Neuropsychologist Ericka Wodka of Kennedy Krieger Institute explains how the enormous number of SPARK participants helps researchers investigate other conditions that commonly affect people with autism. And Angie Auldridge, whose son, Mark, has autism, tells how genetic testing revealed a rare mutation and set his treatment on a different path.  Connect with SPARK through Kennedy Krieger Institute.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    UMMS ACE: A fix for the nursing shortage?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 24:20


    A nursing shortage still grips U.S. healthcare. How can the system onboard students faster … while making sure they grasp all they need to know about patient care? Lisa Rowen, System Chief Nurse Executive for the University of Maryland Medical System, hopes the Academy of Clinical Essentials, or ACE, will begin to address that challenge.  “With ACE the nursing students are able to see the continuum of care for a 12-hour shift. It is a realistic insight into hospital care of patients.”  Then Liz Cushing, a trauma nurse and ACE instructor, and nursing student Naseem Ahmadi, on why more hours of hands-on instruction -- at regular intervals -- better prepare new nurses for what they'll face.  Links: The UMMS Academy of Clinical EssentialsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Employees with disabilities bring value to the workplace

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 22:55


    Some factors in the economy are slowing--but not the job market. “Help wanted” signs are everywhere. Some employers are brainstorming how to hire the talent they need. Penn-Mar Human Services, a nonprofit that offers a range of supports for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities, works with businesses that want to analyze whether some part of their workflow would fit a person with a disability. Greg Miller is Penn-Mar's CEO: “It is not a charity, it is not something where we expect an employee or a business to lower expectations. It is trying to find the right job in the right business for the right person.And we meet Tim O'Neill, a Penn-Mar client who has worked at Bank of America's Hunt Valley campus for two decades, .. and his manager, Joseph Waldron.Links: Penn Mar Customized Employment ProgramSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Stories from the Stoop: Rachel Micah Jones

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 9:15


    Here's a Stoop Story from Rachel Micah Jones about fighting for migrant worker rights.  Want more Stoop Storytelling Series? Listen to the podcast or find information about upcoming Stoop shows.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Gun violence mars the start of the school year in Baltimore

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 15:22


    Gun violence, leading to the deaths of two Baltimore students, cast a shadow over the start of the school year. Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins ‘Center for Safe and Healthy Schools,' is a former principal--and the parent of three teens in Baltimore City public schools. She says violence prevention starts with positive relationships, “Our young people may not always connect with their classroom teacher, but it may be a lunchroom aide, it may be the custodian, it may be the school secretary that they connect with. We need to have enough caring adults trained in the building to help our young people connect and learn how to diffuse conflict.” Check out this Hopkins' Hub article on preventing gun violence.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    B360: Beyond dirt bikes, it teaches kids STEM subjects and community

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 25:03


    Brittany Young's non-profit, B360, gives kids hands-on STEM experience through dirt bikes. As they ride them, fix them and even design them … they learn science, technology, engineering and math. Young knows dirt bike riding has a reputation … and she intends to transform that, along with the lives of young people. Five years in, her dream is within sight: to create a permanent multi-acre campus:  “I just need people, even if you don't understand it,  to have a bit more empathy, a bit more compassion. Because there are kids that don't want to be in the streets they want to be in programming -- we know, because we work with them every summer! And so we need a space for us.”  Then we hear all about the buzz around B360 camp! Links: B360, Ride4Change See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Comptroller candidate Brooke Lierman on becoming "the people's advocate"

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 24:34


    In November, Maryland voters will elect a new chief financial officer, the state comptroller. State Delegate Brooke Lierman is the Democratic nominee. To her, it's an opportunity to build a more transparent and financially resilient state. Another priority: ensuring Maryland has the revenue to fund the multi-billion dollar Blueprint for Education. Lierman hopes to use the comptroller's statewide bully pulpit to address the burden of student loans and the economic consequences of gun violence.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inheritance: An Autobiography of Whiteness

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 24:21


    Journalist Baynard Woods grew up in the last quarter of the 20th century, son of white parents raised in the Jim Crow South, descendant of forebears who had enslaved hundreds of Black people in South Carolina. His memoir Inheritance: An Autobiography of Whiteness, traces his dawning awareness of the crimes and outrages of his dead ancestors, … and his parents'  failure to confront that history and the privileges it created. Woods identifies whiteness as the problem, and calls for it to be dismantled. “Our skin is the place that's part world and part us. It's where we meet the world. And similarly, whiteness is where our subjective experience, our mental state, merges with the structures of power around us.” Links: 'Inheritance: An Autobiography of Whiteness'See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The future of the Bay Bridge

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 24:19


    Seven decades ago, the construction of the Bay Bridge was the largest public-works project in Maryland's history. It knitted the Western and Eastern Shores together, and paved the way for economic growth in the nine eastern counties.  Lydia Woolever, a senior editor for Baltimore Magazine, tells us about the crossing's impact. Read her story, How The Chesapeake Bay Bridge Changed Maryland Forever. Then, Maryland Transportation Authority Executive Director William Pines breaks down the steps in a multi-year study of ways to alleviate congestion at and around the bridge. Tomorrow, an open house will be hosted at Broadneck High School in Annapolis. Submit public comment here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    A 'Banner' update on Baltimore's food scene

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 24:24


    The resiliency of restaurant owners and workers is impressive. Christina Tkacik covers food news for The Baltimore Banner. In the wake of the pandemic, restaurants are dealing with the pressures of inflation, supply-chain delays, and the labor shortage. These pressure may be reflected on menus, "So if you've gone to a restaurant and you've noticed, ‘Oh, this restaurant only has like five items on their menu,' there's a lot of cost savings that comes with having a short menu.”  Plus: at restaurants across the city, chefs and crew share a staff meal before dinner service. Banner reporter John-John Williams takes us behind the scenes of “family meal,” and the talented cooks serving up homestyle dishes. Read the full story here, and check out photos of family meals being prepared.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Barry Glassman, Republican running for Maryland Comptroller

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 24:56


    Harford County Executive Barry Glassman, a Republican, has served in public office for 32 years straight. Now he's running for comptroller, the only one of the three Republicans campaigning  statewide who is not a fan of Donald Trump. Glassman is counting on his moderate philosophy and hands-on budget experience to draw voters from the middle, and maybe the left.. We ask about his priorities if elected, his plans to update the comptroller's office  … and where he differs from his progressive Democratic opponent's broad policy agenda: “You'd see me more working on the primary duties of a fiscal manager than a partisan or someone that's going to be a little more active in various issues that I think are outside of the purview of the comptroller.”  Links: Barry Glassman for Comptroller, Maryland Matters article, MDElections2022.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    What Biden's student loan forgiveness plan means for Marylanders

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 23:27


    Most people with federal student loans are eligible for some forgiveness, under the plan President Biden announced last month: up to $20,000 for low-income recipients of Pell Grants, $10,000 for other borrowers. What does this mean for Marylanders? Tisa Silver Canady founded the non-profit Maryland Center for Collegiate Financial Wellness. She says this plan moves toward addressing the failures of the federal financing system. Plus, two graduates share their student loan experiences. Links:FACT SHEET: President Biden Announces Student Loan Relief for Borrowers Who Need It MostThe Biden-Harris Administration's Student Debt Relief Plan ExplainedSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Reconnecting incarcerated parents with their kids

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 24:38


    Twenty thousand Baltimore children have a parent behind bars or on parole or probation. A new program called B'More Reconnects aims to solidify the bonds between a parent and child and reduce trauma. Kate Sweeney co-directs the Parent, Infant, Early Childhood Program at the Institute for Innovation and Implementation at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. She describes B'More Reconnects' group parenting classes, which will start pre-release and continue for six months after. Then Deputy Mayor Faith Leach shares her connection to this initiative. After her mother was released from prison, they rebuilt their relationship, and Leach saw her mother return to college: "My mom's story is the illustration of why we can't ever - and let me repeat that - we can't ever give up on our neighbors that are returning home." And Kimberly Haven, executive director of Reproductive Justice Inside, talks about her experience as a mother in prison.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The science of attachment: How to make friends

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 24:15


    We may grow up thinking friendships just happen--because they often do, for kids. NOT, usually, for adults. You have to reach out; if you spot someone you'd like to know better, suggest getting together. University of Maryland psychology professor Marisa Franco says research shows we underestimate how welcome an overture will be. Franco's book, Platonic, is filled with ideas for making friends and being a better friend. It adds up to a lot of work--like the effort we put into romantic relationships--and Franco argues it's worth it:  “We are social creatures. We need connection to be at homeostasis. For our mood to be regulated for us to feel like our very selves. And when we lack that connection it's really devastating on both our minds and our bodies.”  Links: 92nd Y St. Sept. 8, 7:30p virtual conversation, Marisa Franco, Platonic.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    How the Fort McHenry Guard brings history to life

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 17:04


    As inspiring as the story of the Star-Spangled Banner is-- 25 hours of British bombardment failing to ravage the Stars-n-Stripes!--it's not the only memorable tale from Fort McHenry. Four decades ago, park ranger Scott Sheads thought much of the fort's story was not coming alive for visitors. So, with others, he started the Fort McHenry Guard, of rangers and volunteers, to tell of the people behind the history.  And we meet Kordell Kemp, who started playing in the Guard's fife-and-drum corps when he was 11! Fort McHenry will be bursting with activities next weekend to celebrate Defenders Day. There's a parade next Friday night along Fort Avenue at 7 p.m. A week from tomorrow, at noon, the Guard's Fife and Drum Corps will perform. Other military bands will perform throughout the weekend. That Saturday night, Sept. 10, there will be concert with a ship-to-shore bombardment at dusk … and when it's dark -- fireworks! Check out the guard on Facebook. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Stoop stories from summer camp

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 6:29


    Randi Benesh shares a sweet Stoop story about summer love. And Tom Jub talks about his camp counselor hijinx. Want more Stoop? Find information about upcoming live events or take a listen to the Stoop podcast.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Clubhouse offers alternatives and strengthens families

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 24:18


    About half of teens will try alcohol or an illegal drug by the time they graduate. A new center in Harford County is engaging at-risk young people in alternatives to substance use. The Clubhouse by Ashley Addiction Treatment is a safe space for adolescents--and their families--to connect, communicate and gain interpersonal skills. We hear how it works from its director, Laura Dahl, and from Nicole Ross, a “Young Adult Peer Recovery Support Specialist.” In recovery herself, Ross is a role model and relates to participants: “You can still be successful in this life. And your past doesn't represent who you are presently. You are not your past, you are not your poor choices. We focus on today and moving forward.” Links: Ashley Addiction Treatment, The Clubhouse, more clubhouse and recovery resources in Maryland, More resources for parents and teens from NIDA.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Three centuries of Americans' evolving views on faith and science

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 24:03


    The exhibit, "Discovery and Revelation," at the Smithsonian examines three centuries of Americans' evolving views on the relationship between faith and science. Peter Manseau, who directs the museum's Center for the Understanding of Religion in American History, talks about the artifacts displayed. One, a portrait of Henrietta Lacks--a Baltimore woman whose cancer cells were taken for research--depicts her as a religious icon. Manseau says the painting points to one of the exhibit's themes: ‘What do we owe each other?' Original air date: June 24, 2022.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Baltimore rides the recent wave of union organizing

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 24:23


    MOM's Organic Market, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Maryland Institute College of Art. What do they have in common? Their employees voted to unionize. Huffington Post labor reporter Dave Jamieson gives us the national picture of this rise in labor organizing. In the wake of the pandemic, what protections do workers seek? How are employers responding? Then, Starbucks barista Violet Sovine and Apple employee Chaya Barrett reflect on their organizing experiences. Barrett says the risks of the pandemic were a motivator, “I think that was something that really radicalized a lot of us in thinking that we needed to make a change that was going to help us keep our families and keep ourselves safe.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Politically and socially progressive healthcare

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 24:45


    Who is the American health system for? A new book, Health for Everyone, edited by primary-care physician and bioethicist Dr. Zackary Berger--calls for revolutionizing the system by putting patients at its center.His Johns-Hopkins colleague, adolescent-and-child psychiatrist Hal Kronsberg, told of a young Baltimore man who stayed strong for his family when his mother was murdered, without processing guilt and grief. Better than treating the eventual depression, Kronsberg said, would have been to keep the trauma from happening.Does it ask too much to expect doctors to solve social and political problems? Berger says no:“If we're stepping outside our lane it's not like we're giving up our magical powers, We don't have magical powers, right? We need to figure out how best to work together and solve problems.” Links: Sept. 1, 2022 Book launch via zoom, Bird in Hand book talk Sept. 22.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Stories from The Stoop: Louis Hughes

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 7:19


    Here's a Stoop Story from Louis Hughes about his decades of activism. Want more Stoop? Take a listen to the podcast or find out about upcoming live events.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Jazz musician Todd Marcus creates a portrait of modern Egypt

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 16:52


    Baltimore musician Todd Marcus' latest album, “In the Valley,'' celebrates his Egyptian heritage. The bass clarinetist and bandleader drew on his visits in the country to craft a unique sound that matches Egypt's bustle and grandeur.  We ask Marcus why blending American jazz harmonies and Middle Eastern melodies posed a challenge, and hear how audiences in the two countries respond differently to performances. Watch the Todd Marcus Jazz Orchestra perform, "Horus." Todd Marcus' will perform at Takoma Station Tavern on September 10th. Details here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The invasive Spotted Lanternfly and Park Students in the Arctic

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 24:59


    Maryland has been invaded. Again. This time the Spotted Lanternfly is the enemy, endangering the nutrient systems of plants. Mike Raupp, Professor Emeritus of Entomology and Extension Specialist at The University of Maryland, talks about what's being done to keep the insect in check. Plus, The Park School of Baltimore citizen scientists have been hard at work in the arctic! Biology teacher Vicki Mathew and Park Upper School science department chair Julie Rogers talk about the program, now in its 17th year. Rogers says: “It's churning out some scientists for sure, but it's also just churning out students who have had an opportunity that they thought they would never have and it has helped them dream big.” Links: Spotted Lanternfly at The Bug Guy, Maryland Extension Spotted Lanternfly information, International Student-led Arctic Monitoring and Research program, See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    From radicalization to violence: mapping political hostility in the United States

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 24:39


    American politics seems more divided than ever. That division can lead to extreme views about political opponents, that they are evil or less than human. Hopkins political scientist Lilliana Mason says these attitudes can be a precursor to violence, like the attack on the U.S. Capitol. Her latest book, co-authored with Louisiana State professor Nathan Kalmoe, is “Radical American Partisanship.” How widespread is the acceptance of political violence? What are the consequences for democracy?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    How do experiences of wonder and awe affect us?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 21:47


    Remember the buzz about--and from!-- Brood X cicadas last summer? That  phenomenon prompted On the Record producer Melissa Gerr to explore the powerful feelings associated with awe and wonder, and how they affect us.  She talked with an astrophysicist, a naturalist, a spirituality researcher and also with David B. Yaden, Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working in ‘The Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research'. One of his experiences of awe, he said, came from thinking about vastness: “That vastness can be perceptual, like looking out on a large expanse like the Grand Canyon, or it can be conceptual, like when you imagine the magnitude of the size of the galaxy.” Links: The Goethe Institut's Big Ponder listening series. *Originally produced for the Goethe Institut's The Big Ponder transatlantic listening series.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Baltimore socialite turned World War II spy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 22:58


    Even as she was growing up in a posh Baltimore family a century ago, Virginia Hall defied convention. Still, no one--especially after a hunting accident forced amputation of her lower left leg-- could imagine she'd become one of the most intrepid spies of World War II.  Rejected as a junior diplomat by the U.S., Hall got a field job in a fledgling British spy operation. It sent her to France to support the resistance against the Nazis. She took alarming risks, adroitly dodging betrayal.   “She would constantly change her address. She would constantly change her looks, putting little rubber slivers in her cheeks so the shape of her face changed. But that was largely what she had between her and capture.”  Author Sonia Purnell on her spell-binding book A Woman of No Importance.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Stories from The Stoop: Roy Taff

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 8:07


    Here is a Stoop Story from Roy Taff about his haunting experience aboard the USS Constellation. Want more of the Stoop Storytelling Series? Check out the podcast. Find information about upcoming live events.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    A coming-of-age story set at the Maryland School for the Deaf

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 17:26


    Amaree McKenstry-Hall was in his senior year at the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick. Football, Homecoming, and his future weighed on his mind. That's why filmmaker Matt Ogens made Amaree the heart of his coming-of-age documentary, “Audible.” "Audible" was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary - Short Subject. You can stream the film on Netflix. This interview originally aired on March 11, 2022. Transcript available here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Pass the Mic: LGBTQ Power!

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 25:25


    Today we Pass the Mic to LGBTQ advocate and educator Jabari Lyles. His guest -- Londyn Smith de Richelieu, Baltimore City's new Director of LGBTQ Affairs -- talks about the need to change the culture and attitude toward trans folks from within City Hall.Then Lyles is joined by Legacy Forte, head of BMORE BLXCK , talking about resources they provide for Black trans youth and Toby, a trans tenth-grader at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, on the message he picks up from youth-centered anti-trans legislation across the US: “They want to send the message to younger people because they want to tell them when they're young: your existence is wrong. You shouldn't feel safe in your existence. You shouldn't feel ok with your existence.” Links: Baltimore Office of LGBTQ Affairs, BMORE BLXCK, Trans Maryland resources, The PRIDE Center of Maryland, Monkeypox resources. Original airdate: 6.14.22See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    How an education from Goucher College opens the door for returning citizens

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 25:10


    Since 2012, the Goucher Prison Education Partnership has offered college courses to men and women at two Maryland prisons. Executive Director Eliza Cornejo describes how Goucher stays in touch even after participants leave prison to help them continue their studies or find work.  And William Freeman, a graduate, now pursuing a Master's degree from Johns Hopkins University, says signing up for GPEP was a no-brainer, "One, I had the time, and two, there were other individuals who were in close proximity to me that I could witness on any day studying in small groups. And I used to see the level of intent and purpose that they seemed to have with the material and with one another, and I wanted it." Watch Freeman's 2020 Commencement speech here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Value add: Employees with disabilities

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 23:06


    Some factors in the economy are slowing--but not the job market. “Help wanted” signs are everywhere. Some employers are brainstorming how to hire the talent they need. Penn-Mar Human Services, a nonprofit that offers a range of supports for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities, works with businesses that want to analyze whether some part of their workflow would fit a person with a disability. Greg Miller is Penn-Mar's CEO: “It is not a charity, it is not something where we expect an employee or a business to lower expectations. It is trying to find the right job in the right business for the right person.And we meet Tim O'Neill, a Penn-Mar client who has worked at Bank of America's Hunt Valley campus for two decades, .. and his manager, Joseph Waldron. Links: Penn Mar Customized Employment ProgramSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    A mother's grief, a son's poetry

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 23:43


    Even in pre-school, Jessie Dunleavy's son Paul struggled to learn. His disabilities forced him to switch schools over and over. He turned to poetry, and eventually, after several mental-health diagnoses, to drugs. After he died of an overdose, his mother found a poem alluding to his addiction as a moral disgrace. Dunleavy said it broke her heart, "I would do anything to change that, because I think the shame drives you further into the addiction and into seeking the escape.” In the memoir, "Cover My Dreams In Ink," Dunleavy recounts the sobering lessons she learned from Paul's life and death. Find Dunleavy's blog here. This interview first aired on January 25, 2021.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Baltimore's newest Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 16:09


    Newspapers in the US have been closing at the rate of about two each week since 2005. But journalism may be on the rise for Baltimore. We talk with Teri Henderson, Arts and culture editor for Baltimore Beat, the city's latest edition to local news coverage. And with editor in chief Lisa Snowden, who describes what she thinks the paper can become: “My vision is news that is accessible for everybody. So physically accessible, which means that we have a physical paper, we have a website with no paywalls, But also, that serves everybody.”  Links: Baltimore Beat, Baltimore Beat Launch partySee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Stories from the Stoop: Elijah McBride

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 8:54


    Here's a Stoop Story from Elijah McBride about the difference between just hearing someone … and really listening to them. You can hear his story and others at Stoopstorytelling.com.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Journalist Baynard Woods reckons with whiteness

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 24:39


    Journalist Baynard Woods grew up in the last quarter of the 20th century, son of white parents raised in the Jim Crow South, descendant of forebears who had enslaved hundreds of Black people in South Carolina. His memoir, "Inheritance: An Autobiography of Whiteness," traces his dawning awareness of the crimes and outrages of his dead ancestors, and his parents' failure to confront that history and the privileges it created. Woods identifies whiteness as the problem, and calls for it to be dismantled. On Thursday, August 25, the Ivy Bookshop will host a conversation between Baynard Woods and Leslie Gray Streeter. Details here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Organ donation myths and realities

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 24:37


    More than one hundred thousand Americans await an organ transplant … and most organ donations come from deceased donors. Ieesha Johnson, executive director of community outreach at the Living Legacy Foundation of Maryland, works to dispel myths and educate the public about what it means to be an organ donor. And Danette Ragin, an organ recipient and relative of deceased organ donors, talks about how somebody's decision to donate a kidney has profoundly changed her life: “Until the shoe is on the other foot, you really probably won't know the true significance of it. But if you have any reservations, I pray that my testimonial will help you come to a decision to at least try to help someone.” Links: Donor law changes: update your Maryland license donor status; Living Legacy Foundation of Maryland, On Sat. Aug. 27th, Living Legacy Foundation commemorates National Minority Donor Awareness month with local in person events, information can be found here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Beat the heat with new films and cult classics

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 25:09


    When it's too hot for the park or the pool, grab some popcorn and turn on a movie! Max Weiss, editor-in-chief of Baltimore Magazine, talks about her favorite new films, from a sci-fi western to the "Top Gun" sequel.  Then, Beyond Video is a volunteer-run video library in Baltimore. Co-owner Eric Hatch shares indie hits and cult classics. Check out Max Weiss' reviews:NopeTop Gun: MaverickElvisMarcel the Shell with Shoes OnFire of LoveEric Hatch's recommendations:AscensionDevil in a Blue DressStrawberry MansionFaya DayiLa PiscineThe SwimmerThiefSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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