Podcasts about BU

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  • 2,738PODCASTS
  • 21,888EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
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  • Dec 8, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about BU

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Latest podcast episodes about BU

CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez
On Athletics Club's Olli Hoare After Breaking The Australian Indoor 5,000 Meter Record (13:09), The Evolution of the 1,500 Meters + Why Coffee Club Is #GoodForTheSport

CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 78:26


Olli Hoare is an Australian Olympic finalist in the 1,500 meters who runs professionally for the On Athletics Club under coach Dathan Ritzenhein in Boulder. Before turning pro, he was a stud at Wisconsin where he won the 2018 NCAA title in the 1,500 meters. In 2021, he set personal bests of 3:32 for the 1,500 meters both indoors and outdoors. He ran 3:51 for the mile and 3:50 for the mile on the roads. He ran 13:22 for the 5K outdoors and then just ran 13:09 this past weekend in Boston. He finished 11th in the Olympic 1,500 meter final. We touch on that race, his run at BU, what's his view for how the 1,500 meters has evolved and much more. Olli is also the host of the Coffee Club Podcast that he co-hosts with his teammates and training partners so be sure to check that out. We talk podcaster-to-podcaster a bit at the start before my co-host Mac Fleet chimes in to talk athlete-to-former athlete. All of that plus, your listener questions. SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS TRACKSMITH has come up with a very creative way to celebrate our sport by hosting a New Years' Eve spectacular in New York City. All proceeds from the Midnight Mile at the New Balance Track & Field Center at The Armory will go to support the Tracksmith Foundation. If you're not able to attend the Midnight Mile but would like to make a donation to the foundation, you can do so through the Tracksmith website. Listeners get 15% off their purchase using code CITIUS15 at checkout. Visit Tracksmith.com today. HOW TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST

Havadan Sudan
2021'in En Önemli 10 Teknolojik Gelişmesi

Havadan Sudan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 29:54


Bu bölümde konuştuğumuz konulara ait bağlantı ve videolar:Otoriterliğe kayan ülke sayısı artıyor, ABD de 'demokrasinin gerilediği' ülkeler arasındaSinekleri uzak tutan pijama (İngilizce)En rahat pantufSancıları başlayan Yeni Zelandalı Milletvekili bisikleti ile hastaneye giderek doğum yaptı2021'in en önemli 10 teknolojik gelişmesi (İngilizce)Dr. Oz Senatör adayı (İngilizce)Biiim hiç bir şey yapmamanın gerekli olduğunu söylüyor (İngilizce)Çocuklar için yeni bir “stream” kanalı (İngilizce)

Tom Shattuck's Burn Barrel
It Should All Just Kind Of Work Out EP 401

Tom Shattuck's Burn Barrel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 52:41


The Covid crowd is still at it, most recently pushing Alice "St Pauli Girl" Shattuck out of her gig and also announcing more mandatory boosters and restrictions. Also, former BU coed wants her $17,000 college loan balance forgiven. Find us at www.burnbarrelpodcast.com Email us: burnbarrelpodcast@gmail.com Follow on Parler: @burnbarrelpodcast On Gab: @burnbarrelpodcast Facebook: facebook.com/burnbarrelpodcast And Twitter: @burnbarrelpod Rumble: rumble.com/c/burnbarrelpodcast YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCWhLuhtutKdCmbHaWuGg_YQ Follow Tom on Twitter: @tomshattuck You can follow Alice too: @aliceshattuck More Tom stuff at www.tomshattuck.com Tom's "Insta" as the zoomers say: www.instagram.com/tomwshattuck/ Join us at Locals: burnbarrel.locals.com (subscriber based) Join us at Patreon: www.patreon.com/burnbarrel (subscriber based) The opening theme music is called Divine Intervention by Matthew Sweet. The closing theme music to this podcast C'est La Vie by Derek Clegg. Excelsior

Unsal Unlu
6 Aralık 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 59:13


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

East to West
Dec. 6, 2021: Using Data Science for Racial Equity, Student-Run Jewelry Brand Tchidite, 80th Annual Boston Holiday Tree Lighting

East to West

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 7:42


Last episode of the semester! Today on East to West, we cover a BU event on using data science for racial equity, the jewelry brand Tchidite, and the 80th annual Boston Holiday Tree Lighting. FEATURING: Veronica Thompson, Bailey Salimes, Jit Ping LeeWRITTEN BY: Veronica Thompson, Bailey Salimes, Jit Ping Lee, Cici Yu, Nellie MaloneyEDITED BY: Veronica ThompsonBASED ON DFP PIECES BY: Lindsay Shachnow, Sean Young, Talia LissauerMUSIC:Acid Trumpet by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3340-acid-trumpet License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Backbay Lounge by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3408-backbay-lounge License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/  Ultralounge by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5010-ultralounge License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/  

Unsal Unlu
3 Aralık 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 52:08


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

Yoldayız Geliyor Musun?
Hayata Yön Vermek

Yoldayız Geliyor Musun?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 32:55


Ece bu bölümde dinleyicilerden gelen soruları cevaplıyor. Arkadaşlıklar, hayata yön vermek, arzularını elde etmek ve iş yerinde zorluklar gibi birçok farklı konuya değiniyor. Bu bölümün sponsoru Hiwell'den 10 Aralık'a kadar geçerli indirim kodun targit10 Flov Online'da düzenli olarak yenileri eklenen yüzlerce yoga ve meditasyon dersini sınırsız izlemek ve ay ritüellerine katılmak için www.online.flovstudio.com

Unsal Unlu
2 Aralık 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 42:56


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

Unsal Unlu
1 Aralık 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 50:50


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

EWN - Engineering With Nature
Applying EWN strategies at National Parks and Refuges

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 27:30


Climate change and the imperative to take action now is top of mind following the COP26 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels, changing temperature and precipitation patterns, wildfires  and many other changes impact vulnerable natural resources, including national parks and wildlife refuges. In this episode, host Sarah Thorne and Jeff King, Deputy Lead of the Engineering With Nature Program at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, are joined by Rebecca Beavers, Coastal Geology and Adaptation Coordinator for the National Park Service and Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist for Refuges within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Rebecca and Scott share a strong commitment to protecting our national parks and wildlife refuges by making them more resilient to the changing conditions exacerbated by climate change. Teddy Roosevelt established the National Wildlife Refuge System in 1903 at Pelican Island, Florida, originally a five-and-a-half-acre island dedicated to saving Brown Pelicans from being over-harvested for their feathers. Sea-level rise and erosion have reduced Pelican Island to about two acres. “Thanks to an Engineering With Nature solution put in place about 20 years ago, that trend has been reversed,” Scott says. Pelican Island now stands at about three acres.  Scott describes how climate change is affecting refuge management today: “Refuges are typically established with a specific purpose, like protecting waterfowl, but because of the impact of climate change, we may not have waterfowl there anymore. We really need to be shifting our mindset about how we are managing that specific refuge, looking from a broader context, thinking about things like biodiversity. We want to look at the shorebirds, the wading birds, or whatever species and habitats are in that particular area and plan for species that are probably going to be leaving the area and new species that will probably be coming because of the shifts in climate.” Rebecca sees similar threats in her work with the National Park Service: “Many of these parks are changing in tremendous ways. Drought in the west is often followed by wildfire and following wildfire we're seeing landscape changes from major debris flows–cascades of water and rocks that come down the hillsides. These can affect homes, infrastructure, along with the habitats of the plants and animals which are very much affected.” Rebecca adds that the effects on natural features can be significant, “A freshwater marsh may become brackish where it has some of the saltwater components, or it may become a fully saline marsh–what we call a saltmarsh.” These changing conditions add complexity to the challenge of protecting and preserving the parks, along with the many physical structures of historical significance. “We also have to look at some of the other stressors that we put on the landscape. In some of these places we built dams that are great for hydroelectric power, but it also has an impact of holding up sediment further up the watershed.” Rebecca and Scott share several examples of EWN approaches being used to protect parks and refuges and make them more resilient.  At Fort Pulaski National Monument, on the Savannah River in Georgia, and Fort Massachusetts, on the Gulf of Mexico coast of Mississippi, beneficial use (BU) of sediment reduces coastal erosion and returns beneficial sediment to the system. Thin layer placement (TLP) of dredged sediments builds up sinking wetlands at the Chafee Refuge in Rhode Island, and in turn, protects and preserves wildlife habitat. Scott says, “Sea level rise is starting to eat away at the marsh, and we're having some marsh die off, along with the plants. With TLP, we're taking some dredge materials and actually stacking it on top of the marsh to buy some time. We've added a little bit to the elevation, and that gives vegetation a shot in the arm.” Rebecca adds that TLP was used on the Big Egg Marsh Project in Jamacia Bay, Gateway National Recreation Area, New York in 2003.  The Marsh is currently being resurveyed to provide insight into the effectiveness of the project and natural adaptation.  Collaboration is a key theme throughout this episode.  The leading-edge work at the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and the adjacent Harriet Tubman Underground Railway Park in Maryland is a great example of NFS, NPS, USACE, and several other non-government organizations working together to protect the marsh and this important historical landmark.  According to Scott, “This is a really good demonstration project to show what you can do when you work together with what nature gives you.” In closing the show, Jeff notes, “I'm truly moved by the energy and the enthusiasm and the wonderful examples that have been shared. Thank you to the Wildlife Refuge System and the National Park Service for being wonderful partners throughout the years. Their work is really accelerating practice and will continue to do so.” In Episode 6, Rebecca, Scott, and Jeff return to talk about working together on adaptive management strategies for the parks and refuges, and what individuals can do to help protect and preserve these priceless resources.   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Jeff King at LinkedIn Jeff King at EWN Network of Engineering With Nature EWN Atlas Series Rebecca Beavers at LinkedIn National Park Service Coastal Adaptation Strategies Handbook Olympic National Park and the Elwha Valley Fort Pulaski National Monument Gulf Islands National Seashore Fort Massachusetts – Gulf Islands National Seashore Jamaica Bay National Wildlife Refuge Gateway National Recreation Area, Jamaica Bay Unit In the Field: Restoring Big Egg Marsh National Park Service Climate Change Response Program National Park Service Coastal Geology Program Scott Covington at LinkedIn Climate Adaptation Science Centers Climate Change Page at USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System National Wildlife Refuge System History Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge John H. Chafee National Wildlife Refuge Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Hurricane Hugo Hurricane Sandy EWN Podcast S3E4: Engineering With Nature for Safe and Livable Cities

Unsal Unlu
30 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 74:21


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

Havadan Sudan
Intel & Apple Savaşı

Havadan Sudan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 32:15


Bu bölümde konuştuğumuz konulara ait bağlantı ve videolar:AB'de azami sürat sınırını aşan otomobiller otomatik olarak yavaşlatılacakBelediye başkanları iklim değişikliğine karşı elektrikli araçları öncelikli olarak gündeme alıyorlar (İngilizce)Güney Kore, köpek eti tüketimini yasaklamak için çalışma grubu kurduAvrupa'nın ilk Omicron vakası Mısır'dan Belçika'ya Türkiye aktarmalı gelen kişide tespit edildiAB Komisyonu Başkan Yardımcısı Timmermans: İklim krizi herkes için kişisel bir sorunOura Yüzük (İngilizce)Bitkisel protein tozu: Mooless (İngilizce)Listelerin tepesinde ki 10 mobil oyun (İngilizce)Apple'ın M1 işlemcisi Intel'in pazar hakimiyetini zorlar mı? (İngilizce)

Unsal Unlu
29 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 60:06


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

Socrates FC
Socrates FC #96 | Edin Dzeko, Manchester United'ın Rangnick Hamlesi, Sacchi'nin Yeni Kitabı

Socrates FC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 46:21


Socrates FC'nin 96. bölümünde İnan Özdemir, İlhan Özgen ve Buğra Balaban, dergi sonu günlerinde Socrates ofisinde buluştular. Birlikte akşam yemeği yemek istediğimiz teknik direktörleri, Edin Dzeko'nun göremediği değeri, Arrigo Sacchi'nin 1989 sezonunu anlattığı kitabı The Immortals'ın güncel fiyatını konuştuğumuz bölümde, Manchester United'ın Ralf Rangnick hamlesini de Arhan Ata Pilavoğlu'yla beraber değerlendiriyoruz. / Ses Tasarımı: Vadi Sound

LONG HUONG PAGODA
Sự Vi Diệu Của Âm Dương - Bài 11: "Điều Hòa Âm Dương Của Hơi Thở Thân & Tâm" - TT. Thích Tuệ Hải

LONG HUONG PAGODA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 111:22


Kênh Youtube chính thức của CHÙA LONG HƯƠNG Sư Phụ trụ trì: Thượng Tọa THÍCH TUỆ HẢI Ngày 13.11.2021, Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải thuyết giảng Sự Vi Diệu Của Âm Dương - Bài 11: "Điều Hòa Âm Dương Của Hơi Thở Thân & Tâm" tại Tổ Đường Chùa Long Hương. ✔️ Đến với video "Điều Hòa Âm Dương Của Hơi Thở Thân & Tâm" này, TT. Thích Tuệ Hải chỉ cho chúng ta thấy rõ tâm cân bằng, tâm dương hướng đến những điều tích cực muốn làm lợi cho mọi người. Với tâm đó chúng ta sẽ thành tựu trên mọi lĩnh vực cuộc sống cũng như hoàn thiện chính mình trên con đường trở về bảo sở bản nguyên côi nguồn của mỗi con người. ✔️ Địa chỉ: Chùa Long Hương, Số 1141 Lý Thái Tổ, Ấp Long Hiệu, Xã Long Tân, Huyện Nhơn Trạch, Tỉnh Đồng Nai. Điện thoại: 0906 258 258 – 0911 258 258 Website: www.chualonghuong.org Email: banbientap@chualonghuong.org ✔️ Lưu ý: Chùa Long Hương duy trì việc Phát trực tiếp Livestream các bài giảng của Sư Phụ Trụ trì Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải vào các chủ nhật hàng tuần. Thời gian: Sáng 8h15 - 10h15 và Buổi chiều 13h00 - 15h00 ✔️ Quý vị nên chọn Subscribe (Đăng Ký) kênh Youtube "Chùa Long Hương" để nhận thông tin bài giảng Livestream trực tiếp của Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải và các bài giảng mới nhất được cập nhật liên tục. ✔️ Đây là kênh Youtube đăng tải các bài thuyết giảng Pháp của Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải trụ trì Chùa Long Hương, với tâm nguyện hoằng truyền Chánh Pháp đem lợi ích đến khắp tất cả mọi người, quý vị hãy theo dõi các trang của Chùa Long Hương: - https://chualonghuong.org/ - https://www.youtube.com/ChuaLongHuongDN - https://www.youtube.com/ThichTueHai - https://www.facebook.com/LongHuongFanpage ✔️ Trong nội dung video, có thể sử dụng những hình ảnh có chứa bản quyền theo luật sử dụng hợp lý Fair-use (https://bit.ly/fairuselonghuong). Nếu có bất cứ thắc mắc nào về bản quyền xin vui liên hệ: - Email: banbientap@chualonghuong.org - ĐT: 0931 085 085 #Thích_Tuệ_Hải #Thầy_Tuệ_Hải #Chùa_Long_Hương #Sự_Vi_Diệu_Của_Âm_Dương #Âm_Dương

LONG HUONG PAGODA
Sự Vi Diệu Của Âm Dương - Bài 10 :"Tâm Dương & Tâm Cân Bằng" - TT. Thích Tuệ Hải - Chùa Long Hương

LONG HUONG PAGODA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 108:27


Kênh Podcast chính thức của CHÙA LONG HƯƠNG Sư Phụ trụ trì: Thượng Tọa THÍCH TUỆ HẢI Ngày 13.11.2021, Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải thuyết giảng Sự Vi Diệu Của Âm Dương - Bài 10: "Tâm Dương & Tâm Cân Bằng" tại Tổ Đường Chùa Long Hương. ✔️ Đến với video "Tâm Dương & Tâm Cân Bằng" này, TT. Thích Tuệ Hải chỉ cho chúng ta thấy rõ tâm cân bằng, tâm dương hướng đến những điều tích cực muốn làm lợi cho mọi người. Với tâm đó chúng ta sẽ thành tựu trên mọi lĩnh vực cuộc sống cũng như hoàn thiện chính mình trên con đường trở về bảo sở bản nguyên côi nguồn của mỗi con người. ✔️ Địa chỉ: Chùa Long Hương, Số 1141 Lý Thái Tổ, Ấp Long Hiệu, Xã Long Tân, Huyện Nhơn Trạch, Tỉnh Đồng Nai. Điện thoại: 0906 258 258 – 0911 258 258 Website: www.chualonghuong.org Email: banbientap@chualonghuong.org ✔️ Lưu ý: Chùa Long Hương duy trì việc Phát trực tiếp Livestream các bài giảng của Sư Phụ Trụ trì Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải vào các chủ nhật hàng tuần. Thời gian: Sáng 8h15 - 10h15 và Buổi chiều 13h00 - 15h00 ✔️ Quý vị nên chọn Subscribe (Đăng Ký) kênh Youtube "Chùa Long Hương" để nhận thông tin bài giảng Livestream trực tiếp của Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải và các bài giảng mới nhất được cập nhật liên tục. ✔️ Đây là kênh Youtube đăng tải các bài thuyết giảng Pháp của Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải trụ trì Chùa Long Hương, với tâm nguyện hoằng truyền Chánh Pháp đem lợi ích đến khắp tất cả mọi người, quý vị hãy theo dõi các trang của Chùa Long Hương: - https://chualonghuong.org/ - https://www.youtube.com/ChuaLongHuongDN - https://www.youtube.com/ThichTueHai - https://www.facebook.com/LongHuongFanpage ✔️ Trong nội dung video, có thể sử dụng những hình ảnh có chứa bản quyền theo luật sử dụng hợp lý Fair-use (https://bit.ly/fairuselonghuong). Nếu có bất cứ thắc mắc nào về bản quyền xin vui liên hệ: - Email: banbientap@chualonghuong.org - ĐT: 0931 085 085 #Thích_Tuệ_Hải #Thầy_Tuệ_Hải #Chùa_Long_Hương #Sự_Vi_Diệu_Của_Âm_Dương #Âm_Dương

LONG HUONG PAGODA
Sự Vi Diệu Của Âm Dương -Bài 9: Định Nghĩa Âm Dương (tt) -TT.Thích Tuệ Hải -Khóa Dưỡng Sinh Nâng Cao

LONG HUONG PAGODA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 120:44


Kênh Podcast chính thức của CHÙA LONG HƯƠNG Sư Phụ trụ trì: Thượng Tọa THÍCH TUỆ HẢI Ngày 06.11.2021, Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải giảng dạy "Sự Vi Diệu Của Âm Dương" Phần " Định Nghĩa Âm Dương " cho lớp KHÓA HỌC DƯỠNG SINH NÂNG CAO tại Tổ Đường Chùa Long Hương. ✔️ Đến với video "Định Nghĩa Âm Dương" này, Sư Phụ trụ trì TT. Thích Tuệ Hải chỉ cho chúng ta hiểu từng bước nhận rõ "Âm Dương" trong đời sống, để chúng ta tự cân bằng thân tâm để đời sống khỏe mạnh an vui, phúc lạc và nâng tầng tâm để hoàn thiện chính mình. ✔️ Địa chỉ: Chùa Long Hương, Số 1141 Lý Thái Tổ, Ấp Long Hiệu, Xã Long Tân, Huyện Nhơn Trạch, Tỉnh Đồng Nai. Điện thoại: 0906 258 258 – 0911 258 258 Website: www.chualonghuong.org Email: banbientap@chualonghuong.org ✔️ Lưu ý: Chùa Long Hương duy trì việc Phát trực tiếp Livestream các bài giảng của Sư Phụ Trụ trì Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải vào các chủ nhật hàng tuần. Thời gian: Sáng 8h15 - 10h15 và Buổi chiều 13h00 - 15h00 ✔️ Quý vị nên chọn Subscribe (Đăng Ký) kênh Youtube "Chùa Long Hương" để nhận thông tin bài giảng Livestream trực tiếp của Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải và các bài giảng mới nhất được cập nhật liên tục. ✔️ Đây là kênh Youtube đăng tải các bài thuyết giảng Pháp của Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải trụ trì Chùa Long Hương, với tâm nguyện hoằng truyền Chánh Pháp đem lợi ích đến khắp tất cả mọi người, quý vị hãy theo dõi các trang của Chùa Long Hương: - https://chualonghuong.org/ - https://www.youtube.com/ChuaLongHuongDN - https://www.youtube.com/ThichTueHai - https://www.facebook.com/LongHuongFanpage ✔️ Trong nội dung video, có thể sử dụng những hình ảnh có chứa bản quyền theo luật sử dụng hợp lý Fair-use (https://bit.ly/fairuselonghuong). Nếu có bất cứ thắc mắc nào về bản quyền xin vui liên hệ: - Email: banbientap@chualonghuong.org - ĐT: 0931 085 085 #Thích_Tuệ_Hải #Thầy_Tuệ_Hải #Chùa_Long_Hương #Long_Huong_Pagoda #Sự_Vi_Diệu_Của_Âm_Dương #Âm_Dương

LONG HUONG PAGODA
Sự Vi Diệu Của Âm Dương - Bài 8 "Định Nghĩa Âm Dương" - TT. Thích Tuệ Hải - Khóa Dưỡng Sinh Nâng Cao

LONG HUONG PAGODA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 108:20


Kênh Podcast chính thức của CHÙA LONG HƯƠNG Sư Phụ trụ trì: Thượng Tọa THÍCH TUỆ HẢI Ngày 06.11.2021, Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải giảng dạy "Sự Vi Diệu Của Âm Dương" Phần " Định Nghĩa Âm Dương " cho lớp KHÓA HỌC DƯỠNG SINH NÂNG CAO tại Tổ Đường Chùa Long Hương. ✔️ Đến với video "Định Nghĩa Âm Dương" này, Sư Phụ trụ trì TT. Thích Tuệ Hải chỉ cho chúng ta hiểu từng bước nhận rõ "Âm Dương" trong đời sống, để chúng ta tự cân bằng thân tâm để đời sống khỏe mạnh an vui, phúc lạc và nâng tầng tâm để hoàn thiện chính mình. ✔️ Địa chỉ: Chùa Long Hương, Số 1141 Lý Thái Tổ, Ấp Long Hiệu, Xã Long Tân, Huyện Nhơn Trạch, Tỉnh Đồng Nai. Điện thoại: 0906 258 258 – 0911 258 258 Website: www.chualonghuong.org Email: banbientap@chualonghuong.org ✔️ Lưu ý: Chùa Long Hương duy trì việc Phát trực tiếp Livestream các bài giảng của Sư Phụ Trụ trì Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải vào các chủ nhật hàng tuần. Thời gian: Sáng 8h15 - 10h15 và Buổi chiều 13h00 - 15h00 ✔️ Quý vị nên chọn Subscribe (Đăng Ký) kênh Youtube "Chùa Long Hương" để nhận thông tin bài giảng Livestream trực tiếp của Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải và các bài giảng mới nhất được cập nhật liên tục. ✔️ Đây là kênh Youtube đăng tải các bài thuyết giảng Pháp của Thượng Tọa Thích Tuệ Hải trụ trì Chùa Long Hương, với tâm nguyện hoằng truyền Chánh Pháp đem lợi ích đến khắp tất cả mọi người, quý vị hãy theo dõi các trang của Chùa Long Hương: - https://chualonghuong.org/ - https://www.youtube.com/ChuaLongHuongDN - https://www.youtube.com/ThichTueHai - https://www.facebook.com/LongHuongFanpage ✔️ Trong nội dung video, có thể sử dụng những hình ảnh có chứa bản quyền theo luật sử dụng hợp lý Fair-use (https://bit.ly/fairuselonghuong). Nếu có bất cứ thắc mắc nào về bản quyền xin vui liên hệ: - Email: banbientap@chualonghuong.org - ĐT: 0931 085 085 #Thích_Tuệ_Hải #Thầy_Tuệ_Hải #Chùa_Long_Hương #Long_Huong_Pagoda #Sự_Vi_Diệu_Của_Âm_Dương #Âm_Dương

Politik Merkez - Robot Okuyucu Yayını
İklim Değişikliği ve COP26

Politik Merkez - Robot Okuyucu Yayını

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021


Bu yıl Glasgow'da düzenlenen Birleşmiş Milletler İklim Değişikliği Konferansı, Hükümetler Arası İklim Değişikliği Paneli'nin altıncı değerlendirme toplantısında (COP26) dünya liderleri daha önce belirlenen hedeflerle ilgili umut verici bazı yeni anlaşmalara imza attılar. Ancak bütün hoşgörülü ifadelere rağmen küresel sera gazı emisyonları şu ana kadar gezegenin ihtiyacı olan hızda azaltılmıyor. Diğer yandan bazı ülkelerin iklimle ilgili vaatleri güçlendirilirken, bunlara ulaşmak için somut önlemlerin eksikliği gerçek bir endişe kaynağıdır. Politik çıkar ve küresel canlanma arasında gidip gelen bir sorun var. Sanırım insanlık önce bunu aşmak zorundadır.

Unsal Unlu
Kasım 2021, serbest uçuş dertleşme...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 95:44


Bu sabah her ayın son Cuma günü yaptığımız gibi; tek bir gündem maddesine bağlı kalmadan, soru- cevap yoluyla konuşacağız.

Gerisi Hikaye Korku Konuşmaları
Yeti, Wendigo, Karakoncolos Bl. I- s09e08 – Gerisi Hikaye

Gerisi Hikaye Korku Konuşmaları

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 58:02


Yeti, Wendigo, Karakoncolos Bl. I Soğuğun Üç Canavarı Korku sineması ve korku edebiyatı denince akla gelen ilk podcast Gerisi Hikaye'nin yeni bölümüne hoş geldiniz. Ciddiyeti elden bırakmayan en eğlenceli programda bu hafta üç canavar daha konuşmaya başlıyoruz. Bu haftanın konukları Yeti ve Wendigo olacak. Himalayalar'ın kar kaplı zirvelerinden Kuzey Amerika'nın çetin ormanlarına doğru buz gibi […] The post Yeti, Wendigo, Karakoncolos Bl. I- s09e08 – Gerisi Hikaye appeared first on Gerisi Hikaye Korku Konuşmaları.

Kısa Dalga Podcast
BÜLTEN / "O BIÇAK TÜM KADINLARA ÇEKİLDİ"

Kısa Dalga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 10:32


Metroda kadınlara bıçakla saldıran Emrah Yılmaz tutuklandı, savcı “Bu saldırı tüm kadınlara” dedi... Genco Erkal alkışlarla hakim karşısında: Mizah var, hakaret yok... RTÜK'den Kafa Radyo'ya “IBAN” cezası... Avrupa İlaç Ajansı: Biontech 5 - 11 yaş için güvenli... Slovakya, 90 günlük OHAL ve 2 haftalık sokağa çıkma yasağı ilan etti... Merkez Bankası: Enflasyonun kısa vadede oynak seyir göstermesi bekleniyor... Asgari ücret maratonu başlıyor... Bülten yayında..

Evrim Ağacı ile Bilime Dair Her Şey!
Don, Kaç veya Savaş Tepkisi Nedir?

Evrim Ağacı ile Bilime Dair Her Şey!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 12:22


Don, kaç veya savaş tepkisi (İng: "freeze-fight-or-flight response"), insan da dâhil bütün hayvan türlerinin, stres veya ölüm korkusu gibi var oluşu tehdit edebilecek tehlikeli bir durumla karşılaştığında verdiği otomatik bir fizyolojik ve psikolojik savunma tepkisidir.[1] Bu tepkiler zinciri, vücudumuzda… Seslendiren: Buğrahan Vural

Unsal Unlu
25 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 50:53


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

Unsal Unlu
24 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:40


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

Kısa Dalga Podcast
NE? NASIL? | BİR ÇOCUĞUN BÜYÜME HAKKI VE DERİN YOKSULLUK

Kısa Dalga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 32:58


Rengin Arslan, Ne? Nasıl programında doların yükselmesiyle daha da kaçınılmaz hale gelen yoksulluğu, yükselen yoksulluk sınırı ve asgari ücretten vergi alınmasın konularını ele alıyor. TÜİK verilerine göre tüketici enflasyonu yüzde 20'lere dayanmış, Türk Lirası dolar karşısında 2021 yılının başından bu yana yüzde 30'dan fazla değer kaybetmişken yoksulluğun gündem olması kaçınılmaz. Her gün traktörüne haciz gelmiş çiftçilerin, pandemiden sonra belini doğrultamamış esnafın, düşük ücretlerle çalışan işçilerin, dolar kuru karşısında ezildiğini söyleyen işverenlerin, filesini adetle aldığı sebze meyveyle dolduran, kiralarını, faturalarını ödeyemeyen insanların hikayelerini duyuyoruz. Konumuz doların yükselmesiyle de daha da kaçınılmaz hale gelen yoksulluk.  Peki bu iş nasıl çözülecek? Derin Yoksulluk Ağı'ndan Selen Yüksel anlatıyor. Yoksulluk sınırı 10 bin lirayı aştı. Türkiye'de çalışanların yarısından fazlası asgari ücret karşılığında çalışıyor. Bu Avrupa'nın en yüksek asgari ücretli oranını da denk geliyor. Üstelik artan gıda fiyatları ve enflasyon nedeniyle asgari ücret Ekim ayında açlık sınırının bile altında kaldı. Türk-iş'in yayımladığı son veriler böyle diyor.  Üstelik asgari ücret dolar cinsinden hesaplandığında 2021 yılından beri tabiri caizse tamamen eridi. Ve Türkiye'deki işçiler dünyanın en ucuza çalışan iş gücü haline dönüştü. Bu dramatik tabloyu ve muhalefetin asgari ücretten vergi alınmasın önerisini sosyal politikalar uzmanı Aziz Çelik değerlendiriyor.

Ahval
Yavuz Aydın: 'AİHM, KHK'lı hukukçular için verdiği hak ihlali kararıyla darbe suçlamasını boşa düşürdü'

Ahval

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 27:29


Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (AİHM) 15 Temmuz darbe girişimi sonrası Kanun Hükmünde Kararnameyle görevden uzaklaştırılan bir grup hâkim ve savcı tarafından açılan davalarda hak ihlaline hükmetti. Aralarında eski Yargıtay ve Danıştay üyelerinin de bulunduğu toplam 427 hakim ve savcının, haklarındaki gözaltı kararlarının kanunsuzluğu temelinde açtıkları davalarla ilgili kararını bugün açıklayan AİHM, davacıların “özgürlük ve güvenlik” haklarının ihlal edildiği sonucuna vardı. Gerekçeli kararda, hakim ve savcıların, suçüstü halleri hariç, kanunla belirlenmiş özel bir usul ile görevden uzaklaştırılabileceği, davacılar için bu yolun izlenmediği not edildi. Davacıların gözaltına alındıkları tarihlerde 2802 sayılı Hakim ve Savcılar, 2797 sayılı Yargıtay ve 2575 sayılı Danıştay kanunlarına tabi olduklarını ancak bu kanun hükümlerine aykırı biçimde gözaltına alındıklarını kaydeden Mahkeme, bu durumun Avrupa İnsan Hakları Sözleşmesi'nin (AİHS) özgürlük ve güvenlik hakkını güvence altına alan maddesiyle bağdaşmadığı hükmünde bulundu. Bir dönem Türkiye'nin Avrupa Birliği nezdindeki daimi temsilciliğinde yargı ataşesi olarak görev almış bir isim olan Yavuz Aydın, Sıcak Takip'te AİHM'in kararını ve getireceği sonuçları değerlendirdi. Kararın çok gecikmeli bir hak ihlali kararı olduğunun altını çizen eski Hâkim Aydın, yine de hâkim ve savcıların hak arama mücadelesinde delil teşkil edecek bir karar olduğunu söylüyor. AİHM kararında dikkate alınan hususun, davacı hâkim ve savcıların ilk tutuklandıkları sürece ilişkin olduğuna dikkat çeken Aydın, şunları kaydediyor: “Bu insanların tutuklanması için makul şüphe teşkil edecek ne vardı, tutuklama kararlarında usule uyuldu mu, buna bakıldı. Karar, bu hâkim ve savcılara yöneltilen darbe girişimi suçlamasının bir deli saçması olduğunu da ortaya koyuyor. Zira AİHM, 15 Temmuz'dan bu yana yaptığı incelemeler neticesinde aldığı kararda, darbe suçlamasına dair tek bir delil dahi olmadığına hükmetti.” Aydın, söz konusu ihlal kararlarının ikiye katlanacağını belirtirken, kararda “derhal serbest bırakılmalı” gibi bir ifade bulunmadığı için Türkiye'deki karar mercilerinin şu an için tahliye kararı almalarını beklemediğini ifade ediyor ve ekliyor: “Ancak gelecekte yaşanabilecek olası bir hükümet değişikliğinde bu insanlar bu kararı bir delil olarak ortaya koyacaklardır ve haklarını alacaklardır.”

TR724 Podcasts
Mücahit, Prada Giyer! [Bülent Korucu]

TR724 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 4:02


Mücahit, Prada Giyer! [Bülent Korucu] by Tr724

Unsal Unlu
23 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 46:44


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Kısa Dalga Podcast
RUSYA, UKRAYNA'YI İŞGAL Mİ EDECEK?

Kısa Dalga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 12:37


Mühdan Sağlam, haftanın öne çıkan dış politika, ekonomi ve enerji gelişmelerine ilişkin haber dosyalarını Mercek'te ele alıyor. Bu hafta konu, Rusya Ukrayna işgal edebilir mi? ABD bu iddiayı neden ortaya attı? Rusya'nın buna cevabı ne? Mühdan Sağlam, benzer sorular ışığında merceği Rusya-Ukrayna ilişkilerine tutuyor.

Havadan Sudan
İki Milyar İneğin Yarattığı Metan Gazı Problemi

Havadan Sudan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 37:27


Bu bölümde konuştuğumuz konulara ait bağlantı ve videolar:İki milyar inekten çıkan metan gazı nasıl önlenecek tartışması: Maske mi takalım yosun mu yedirelim?Tarihte ilk kez bir hastaya 'iklim değişikliği' tanısı konulduAile ağacı nasıl bir katili yakaladı? (İngilizce)İki işli beyaz yakalılar (İngilizce)Lüks markaların üretim yaptığı yerde kendi ürününü çıkartan marka: Italic (İngilizce)CRISPR teknolojisi ile evde COVID testi (İngilizce)Evden çalışanlar nasıl sosyal çevre yaratıyor (İngilizce)

LiveWell Talk On...
156 - The Mailbag #1

LiveWell Talk On...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:48


In this edition of The Mailbag, Dr. Arnold answers questions from our listeners on the topics of varicose veins, burning mouth syndrome and influenza season. Do you have a question about a trending medical topic? Ask Dr. Arnold! Anything from COVID-19 to the latest technologies and procedures to general questions about a service provided at UnityPoint Health - Cedar Rapids. Submit your question and it may be answered by Dr. Arnold on the podcast! Submit your questions at: https://www.unitypoint.org/cedarrapids/submit-a-question-for-the-mailbag.aspx ***Please note this mailbag is not an alternative to a medical appointment. Any questions about personal symptoms or conditions need to be directed to your primary care provider or urgent care. In case of a medical emergency, call 911 or go to your closest Emergency Department.*** 

Unsal Unlu
22 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 61:36


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

East to West
Nov. 22, 2021: BU COVID-19 Rules for Thanksgiving Break, Wheelock Seminar on Generational Differences in Teachers, MFA workers strike

East to West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 10:01


Enjoy the break! Today on East to West, we cover BU's Thanksgiving Break COVID-19 guidelines, a Wheelock seminar on different generational teaching styles, MFA workers striking and more. FEATURING: Veronica Thompson, Jit Ping Lee, Taylor HawthorneWRITTEN BY: Veronica Thompson, Jit Ping Lee, Taylor Hawthorne, Nellie MaloneyEDITED BY: Nellie MaloneyBASED ON DFP PIECES BY: Jessie O'Leary, Carly Breland, Seamus Webster, Bella RamirezMUSIC:Acid Trumpet by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3340-acid-trumpet License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Backbay Lounge by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3408-backbay-lounge License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/  Ultralounge by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5010-ultralounge License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 

Kısa Dalga Podcast
ROBOSKİ İLE HELALLEŞMEK

Kısa Dalga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 28:33


CHP lideri Kemal Kılıçdaroğlu'nun "helalleşme" açıklamasında yer verdiği Roboski, bu topraklarda devlet etiketi taşıyan en acı olaylardan biri. “Kılıçdaroğlu'nun bu saydığı toplum kesimleri CHP ile helalleşecek miydi?” Bu soruya yanıt ararken “Roboski” başlığını özellikle seçtik. Çünkü Kılıçdaroğlu “resmi söylemden” farklı olarak “Uludere” veya “Ortasu” isimlerini kullanmıyor, doğrudan “Roboski” diyordu. Bu söylemden hareketle Roboski katliamında yakınlarını kaybeden eski HDP Milletvekili Ferhat Encü ve Kürt halkının nabzını iyi tuttuğunu düşündüğümüz eski Şırnak Baro Başkanı Nuşirevan Elçi'yle konuştuk. Ersan Atar'ın podcasti..

Socrates FC
Socrates FC #95 | Karadağ-Türkiye, Galatasaray-Fenerbahçe, Gerrard Aston Villa'da

Socrates FC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 42:40


Socrates FC'nin 95. bölümünde İnan Özdemir, Atahan Altınordu ve Buğra Balaban, ekonomiyle ilgili gelişmeleri ve milli takımın Dünya Kupası eleme grubuna yaptığı finali yorumluyorlar. Ardından pazar günü oynanacak derbiyi ve Steven Gerrard'ın Premier League'deki ilk menajerlik görevini konuşuyoruz. / Ses Tasarımı: Vadi Sound

Raport o stanie świata Dariusza Rosiaka
Raport o stanie świata - 20 listopada 2021

Raport o stanie świata Dariusza Rosiaka

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 126:09


Czy Talibom uda się opanować kryzys gospodarczy w Afganistanie, czy Zachód uzna nowe władze w kraju. Co z afgańskimi uchodźcami, których liczba będzie rosła w najbliższym czasie? Kolejna korespondencja naszego specjalnego wysłannika Michała Żakowskiego z Kabulu. Wspólna akcja Raportu o stanie świata i Radia 357 wchodzi w kulminacyjny etap. Chile szykuje się do wyborów, które mogą pogłębić kryzys w tym kraju. Dlaczego to do niedawna sprawne państwo pogrąża się w chaosie? W Bułgarii trzecie w tym roku wybory powszechne. Czy tym razem większości uda się rządzić krajem? Porozmawiamy również z laureatką Międzynarodowej Nagrody im. Witolda Pileckiego, jedną z najbardziej renomowanych współczesnych korespondentek wojennych o jej nowej – nagrodzonej właśnie – książce. Co wojna czyni z ciałem kobiety? A także: korupcja jako wirus, a może wulkan? Rozkład jazdy: (2:22) Michał Żakowski w Afganistanie #3 (46:22) Chico Trujilio - Loca (49:33) Świat z boku - Grzegorz Dobiecki o korupcji (54:39) Raport o książkach na żywo! (57:30) Podziękowania (1:02:15) Adrian Bąk o nadchodzących wyborach w Chile (1:15:41) Jacqueline Fuentes - Sinuoso Tropico (1:19:35) Jakub Pieńkowski o wyborach w Bułgarii (1:36:58) Christina Lamb o książce „Our Bodies Their Battlefield: What War Does to Women” (2:01:51) Do usłyszenia (2:03:04) Mariana Montalvo - India Song

Politik Merkez - Robot Okuyucu Yayını
Terörle Mücadeleyi Konuşmak

Politik Merkez - Robot Okuyucu Yayını

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021


PKK terörü konusu yaklaşık 40 yılda dallanıp budaklandı, bir yandan terör üretiyor diğer yandan politik bir araç haline geldi, uluslararası tarafları oluştu. Ancak terörü ve teröristi çok iyi anlatmak gerekiyor, politikadan iyi ayrıştırmak gerekiyor. Eğer bu ayrımı yaparken konuyla ilgili uzmanlar bile nerede durduklarını bilmezler ise buradan başlayarak politikacılara kadar karışıklıklar yaşanır. Bu kimin işine yarar? Burada çıkar için bulunan ilgili bütün güçlerin. Onların kaybedeceği bir şey yok. Çünkü aparatları yönetiyorlar.

Unsal Unlu
19 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 67:12


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

East to West
Nov. 19, 2021: Michelle Wu Sworn in as Mayor, BU Lecturers Demand Better Working Conditions, MBTA Opens New Green Line Stations

East to West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 12:54


This month's print edition is out now — pick up a copy today! Today on East to West, we cover Michelle Wu's mayoral induction, BU full-time lecturers demand better working conditions, the MBTA opening two new green line stations and more. FEATURING: Veronica Thompson, Taylor Hawthorne, Sophie JinWRITTEN BY: Veronica Thompson, Taylor Hawthorne, Sophie JinEDITED BY: Mia ParkerBASED ON DFP PIECES BY: Talia Lissauer, Emilia Wisniewski, Phoebe Chen, Jit Ping Lee, Zoe TsengMUSIC:Acid Trumpet by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3340-acid-trumpet License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Backbay Lounge by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3408-backbay-lounge License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/  Ultralounge by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5010-ultralounge License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/  

The Karen Kenney Show
What Color Are Your Eyes?

The Karen Kenney Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:53


Our identity is created through several different things but most often it all starts with our first experiences, and the environment we grow up in. Who we believe we are or the concept of ourselves, our ego; gets shaped between the ages of zero and eight. In our early years before the world gets its hands on us, we start out naturally knowing our full true Self; as children of God and extensions of Love. We are born pure, innocent, happy and peaceful beings; we enter the world in a place of wonder. Aware of our own brilliance and magnificence. Then slowly, the ego world takes hold and begins to imprint its version of “truth” on us. A mistaken truth which sadly many of us take as gospel. Today on The Karen Kenney Show, we're taking a look at the stories we take on, write and tell about ourselves. The kind of stories that have us believing we aren't good enough, that we're stupid, or we're broken or not lovable. When the reality is actually the opposite. There may have been pockets of time when maybe you were fumbling around trying to figure it all out, but no matter what you do, no one can take away your true identity. The identity where you are worthy, loveable and capable of loving. While our “ego personalities” could probably use some work (Ha!).... that doesn't mean we are broken and need to be fixed. Instead, we need to remember who we truly are, our real, capital S - Self, and work from a place of love and acceptance of who we came here to be. KK's Key Takeaways: • The Concept Of Identity (3:24) • Why Did I Think My Eyes Were Brown (8:24) • We All Have Things To Work On (16:07) • What Color Are Your Eyes (21:26) Karen Kenney Show Podcast. She's also the founder of THE NEST - an online spiritual membership & community. She's been a student & guide of A Course in Miracles for close to three decades, a yoga teacher for 20+ years and is a longtime practitioner of Passage Meditation. She's also a Gateless Writing Instructor & workshop facilitator and is currently working on a memoir. KK grew up in Lawrence & Boston, MA, and graduated from BU with a degree in Communications. She's known for her storytelling, her sense of humor, her love of the Divine and her “down-to-earth” practical approach to Spirituality. Her signature process: Your Story to Your Glory™ - helps people transform their old stories of victimization & suffering, so they can choose Love over fear, improve their most important relationships, deepen their connection to Self, Source & Spirit, and live from a place of forgiveness, flow, freedom & fun! A sought-after speaker, spiritual teacher, and thought leader for podcasts, shows, live events, and mastermind programs, Karen's been invited to speak & teach on various platforms, stages & retreat centers across the country, including the renowned Omega Institute for Holistic Studies. You can learn more & connect with KK at: www.karenkenney.com Thank you so much for listening! If you're digging the show, I'd be wicked grateful if you would go to Apple Podcasts, hit Follow and then leave a star rating & review. If something I shared from my heart today somehow landed in yours, I'd love to hear about it. So please tag me on Facebook or Instagram and let me know what your favorite part was or what you found most helpful. If you can think of someone that could benefit from hearing this episode, please share it with them & help me to spread the good word and the Love. xo

Unsal Unlu
18 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:38


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

Kısa Dalga Podcast
BÜLTEN / "KUR ARTIYOR, SİYASET GERİLİYOR"

Kısa Dalga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 9:40


Erdoğan, 50 artı 1 için Meclis'i işaret etti, faiz konusunda "Bu yolda ben, faizi savunanla beraber olamam" dedi... Kılıçdaroğlu ve Akşener'den "seçim çağrısı" geldi... Dolar 10.60'ı, Euro 12 lirayı gördü... Gözler Merkez Bankası'nın bugün vereceği faiz kararında... Avrupa'da kapanma geri döndü, Bilim Kurulu üyesi Türkiye için "Aralık" uyarısı yaptı... Frida Kahlo'nun otoportresi 34,9 milyon dolara satıldı... Bülten yayında...

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)
17.11.2021 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 15:03


Themen der Sendung: Kanzlerin Merkel fordert von Bund und Ländern konkrete Beschlüsse zu weiteren Corona-Maßnahmen, Neuer Höchststand mit 52.826 Neuinfektionen, Die Inzidenz liegt bei 319, Wieder Maskenpflicht für Schüler in Schleswig-Holstein und Baden-Württemberg, Bewerbungsfrist für weitere Kandidaten zum CDU-Vorsitz abgelaufen, Flüchtlingssituation: Menschen werden auf belarusischer Seite mit Bussen weggebracht, Opel-Werke in Rüsselsheim und Eisenach bleiben erhalten, Studie zur NS-Vergangenheit der Bundesanwaltschaft vorgestellt, Ausstellung über Sudetendeutsche in Tschechien eröffnet, Evangelische Christen feiern Buß- und Bettag, Art Cologne nach zweijähriger Pause wieder geöffnet, Die Lottozahlen, Das Wetter

Tagesschau (320x240)
17.11.2021 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (320x240)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 15:03


Themen der Sendung: Kanzlerin Merkel fordert von Bund und Ländern konkrete Beschlüsse zu weiteren Corona-Maßnahmen, Neuer Höchststand mit 52.826 Neuinfektionen, Die Inzidenz liegt bei 319, Wieder Maskenpflicht für Schüler in Schleswig-Holstein und Baden-Württemberg, Bewerbungsfrist für weitere Kandidaten zum CDU-Vorsitz abgelaufen, Flüchtlingssituation: Menschen werden auf belarusischer Seite mit Bussen weggebracht, Opel-Werke in Rüsselsheim und Eisenach bleiben erhalten, Studie zur NS-Vergangenheit der Bundesanwaltschaft vorgestellt, Ausstellung über Sudetendeutsche in Tschechien eröffnet, Evangelische Christen feiern Buß- und Bettag, Art Cologne nach zweijähriger Pause wieder geöffnet, Die Lottozahlen, Das Wetter

Unsal Unlu
17 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:28


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

Unsal Unlu
Çok uyardık efendim, çok... Peki sonra?

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:39


Bu cümlenin sonu tamamlanmadıkça, kurtarma yazılısı dışında bir anlam ifade etmez.

Unsal Unlu
16 Kasım 2021, gazetelerin yazdıkları- yazAmadıkları...

Unsal Unlu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 45:48


Bu sabah ulusal gazetelerin birinci sayfalarında hangi haberler var gelin birlikte bakalım.

The Bert Show
How Can She Be Honest With Her Bio Dad Who Abandoned Her Without Driving Him Away?

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 7:41


She is meeting her biological father for the first time and wants your help if you've been in the same situation before!Her AMAZING mother raised her solo, and she only has very distant memories of her dad who's not been in the picture since she was around 7 or 8. Over the years, she's heard nothing from him until this past Christmas when he sent her a card and some money. She wants to reconnect, but also wants to be honest about what's in her heart about what he's done to her, but is scared that will drive him away again.What should she do?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.