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Best podcasts about Oracle

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Latest podcast episodes about Oracle

The Goddess Factory - Motivation, Inspiration, Spirituality
Temple of Lovers: Goddess Oracle Deck

The Goddess Factory - Motivation, Inspiration, Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:58


African Goddess Rising Oracle Deck Celebration continues...

The Goddess Factory - Motivation, Inspiration, Spirituality
Temple of Lovers: Goddess Oracle Deck - Audio

The Goddess Factory - Motivation, Inspiration, Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:58


African Goddess Rising Oracle Deck Celebration continues...

Rocketship.fm
Antitrust: (Mis)information

Rocketship.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 34:58


Today we're going to explore how the internet has evolved to both democratize access to information, leading to incredible breakthroughs, and be a platform for spreading mass misinformation at rates and scales we've never seen before.  At times, the internet represents the best part of humanity on display. One country releases the genetic sequence of a virus that's spreading globally and scientists around the world get to work creating a never-before-created vaccine using technology that has never been used to produce a vaccine before.  However, it also helped the spread of misinformation about that very vaccine, false information that is preventing almost 30% of the population in the United States from receiving it.  The business of fake news has been around for hundreds of years, but now Google's display ad network allows for these sites to easily monetize the millions of eyeballs searching for answers, especially at an unprecedented time like we're seeing during this ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. And the thing is… it doesn't matter if that eyeball believes what they're reading or if they're reading it in disbelief. If that article is being talked about it's making money. So where do we go from here? That and more in today's episode of Rocketship.fm *** This episode is brought to you by: Vidyard: The Top Video Tool for SaaS Marketing and Sales http://vidyard.com/rocketship NetSuite: NetSuite by Oracle is a scalable solution to run all of your key back office operations. Go to netsuite.com/rocketship today. Blinkist: Rocketship.fm is now on Blinkist! Listen to 12 minute episodes with no ads! Get seven days free when you check out Blinkist. Indeed: Indeed is the job site that makes hiring as easy as 1-2-3. Get started with a free $75 sponsored job credit at indeed.com/rocketship. BetterHelp: Unlimited Professional Counseling via Online Chat, Video or Phone Anytime, Anywhere. Get 10% off when you visit betterhelp.com/rocketship. Fundrise: Fundrise makes investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks, bonds, or mutual funds. Go to fundrise.com/rocketship today. Airfocus: The home for products and the people who build them. Airfocus is an easy-to-use and flexible product management platform that combines product strategy superpowers with modularity. Visit airfocus.com/rocketship and try it for free today. WIX: When your agency partners with Wix, you unlock an entire digital ecosystem for creating, managing and growing your business online. Head over to Wix.com/Partners and reimagine what your agency can accomplish. *** This show is a part of the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. We encourage you to visit the website and sign up for our newsletter for more information about our shows, launches, and events. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy.    Since you're listening to Rocketship, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows surrounding entrepreneurship, business, and careers like Creative Elements and Freelance to Founder. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sex Magic Podcast
Episode 604: Tarot as a Guide for Love, Sex, and Magic with Amanda Yates Garcia

Sex Magic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 65:23


A new episode of the podcast awaits and you, and this conversation will inspire, delight, and invoke a deeper connection with the Goddess through the keys…On today's episode of the podcast, Toska had the pleasure of sitting down to chat with Amanda Yates Garcia. Amanda Yates Garcia is a writer, witch, and the Oracle of Los Angeles. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, The LA Times, The SF Chronicle, The London Times, and many more. She has led rituals, classes and workshops on magic and witchcraft at UCLA, MOCA Los Angeles, LACMA, The Getty, and many other venues. Amanda hosts the popular Between the Worlds podcast, and her first book, Initiated: Memoir of a Witch, has been translated into six languages. In this episode, Amanda shares both her experience and expertise on magic, the spiritual journey as a hereditary witch, and how tarot is a guide, a force, and practice to deepen our relationship with love, life, intimacy, and beyond. This episode offers so much insight for both baby witches and more experienced practitioners - be sure to tune in! Amanda's Links & Socials You can find Amanda on Instagram: @OracleofLA or via her website www.oracleoflosangeles.com Purchase Amanda's book here: https://amzn.to/2YOTOTS Links & Socials Stay in touch ~ www.sexmagicsociety.com Access our online courses ~ https://sex-magic-podcast-s-school.teachable.com/ Join our community ~ www.patreon.com/sexmagicpodcast Connect on social media ~ www.instagram.com/sexmagicpodcast
 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sex-magic-podcast/support

All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett
AB 368: Unification Not Integration with Katrina Gosek VP - Product Strategy, Sales Portfolio, Oracle Advertising & CX

All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:53


The sales process is always evolving, but COVID accelerated it and changed the process. Instead of in-person sales calls, almost everything is done virtually. In this episode, Jeffrey sits down with Katrina Gosek, Vice President - Product Strategy, Sales Portfolio, Oracle Advertising, and Customer Experience, talking about how COVID retrained the sellers, how to use customer behavior to your advantage, and gaining an edge with data and AI during your next sales call. If you want to learn more about where sales is going next, this episode of "All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett" is a must-listen. Join the C-Suite Network: https://c-suitenetwork.com/executive-membership Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Small Business Show
Valuing Your Time and the Short & Long Productivity System

The Small Business Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:17


Managing your time as a Small Business owner is a critical part of each day. Join us today as your hosts Shannon Jean and Dave Hamilton discuss how to identify when your time becomes more valuable than the task you are working on and how to delegate so you can more effectively apply your skills to another task. We also introduce a new Long & Short productivity system that Shannon has been developing to help him "eat the frog" in the most productive manner as possible. 00:00:00 Small Business Show #349 for Wednesday, October 13, 2021 00:03:02 Timing Your Inspiration The People's Tycoon (Henry Ford) “All you got is life time.” – Henry Rollins British Airways Chase Visa Signature Card Sponsors 00:09:51 SPONSOR: Novo: Get Your Free business banking account in just 10 minutes at BankNovo.com/SBS. 00:11:45 SPONSOR: NetSuite. NetSuite by Oracle is the #1 Financial System - no matter how big your business grows. NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program only for those ready to switch today! Head to NetSuite.com/sbs 00:12:57 Valuing Your Time Garry VonMyhr's 85% Rule Planning Your Time SBS 169 – The Power of Saying NO SBS 121 – Learning to Say NO Pomodoro Method with Bob LeVitus Set end times for EVERY meeting (and no chairs!) Don't let other people control your time 00:31:43 Short-Term vs. Long-Term Systems Focused Podcast - Eat the frog first thing in the morning What's On Your To-Did List? Quartet On-Desk Whiteboard Mr. Pen Dry Erase Markers LinkBro Dry Erase Markers 00:43:25 SBS 349 Outtro feedback@businessshow.co

Founders
Hard Drive: Bill Gates and The Making of the Microsoft Empire

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:58


What I learned from reading Hard Drive: Bill Gates and The Making of the Microsoft Empire by James Wallace and Jim Erickson.Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get lifetime access to every full episode. You will: Immediately unlock 218 full length episodes that are available no where else.Get access to every future episode.Learn from history's greatest entrepreneurs and apply their ideas to your work.Tap this link on a mobile device so you can install your private podcast feed into your favorite podcast player. It takes less than 30 seconds to set up. If you prefer to subscribe monthly you can do that here. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."GET LIFETIME ACCESS TO FOUNDERSIf you prefer to subscribe monthly you can do that here. 

HR Leaders
HR in the East: How Kevin Reynolds went from Ninjutsu to HR

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:12


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest Kevin Reynolds, leadership coach and author of The Practical Leader and The Practical HR Business Partner.Thanks to Oracle for Supporting the show!Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auEpisode Highlights00:00 - Intro03:11- Japan from a cultural perspective06:04- How Kevin went from Ninjutsu to HR08:05- The state of HR in Japan15:42- Advice for HR moving to Japan19:05 - On the inspiration for his books27:27 - What's nextIf you enjoyed the podcast be sure to subscribe for more content like this and visit our website to access resources mentioned: www.hrleaders.co/podcastSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Critshow
The Wrigley Casino, Part 1 (S4, E11)

The Critshow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 49:54


After scoping out their next heist, our heroes spring into action to collect their next artifact and rescue a friend. Kim chances trusting someone with a secret. Jake makes a magical connection between the group. Tass gets word about a monstrous fight club. Megan tests her B&E skills. If they each complete their portion of the plan correctly, they could knock out two birds with one stone. But if any one of them fails, the rest will surely fall. ------  You can support The Critshow through our Patreon to get more weekly TTRPG Actual Play content, access to our discord community, and much more! Follow The Critshow on twitter, join our subreddit, and follow us on Instagram.  Get a free MotW mystery and some Keeper tips from Rev by signing up on our website!  And don't forget to check out our wonderful sponsors! This episode of The Critshow featured Jake as the Wizard, Kim as the Oracle, Megan as the Hunter, Tass as the Tainted, and Rev as The Keeper.  This episode was edited by Brandon (Rev) Wentz with music by Jake Pierle. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hamilton Perkins Collection
Episode 102: William and Mary Online MBA Conversation - Zero to Many Turning a Sustainability Solution Into a Sustainable Business

Hamilton Perkins Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:31


In 2014, Hamilton Perkins founded Hamilton Perkins Collection, an independent brand that designs and produces unique and award-winning bags and accessories made from recycled materials. Each bag is made from recycled plastic water bottles, billboard vinyl, pineapple leaf fiber, upcycled fabric banners, and other advertising waste. Perkins was the winner of the Virginia Velocity Tour hosted by the Governor of Virginia. The non-profit B Lab honored Hamilton Perkins Collection as a "Best for the World Overall" B Corporation in 2017. Perkins was voted to Inside Business' 40 under 40 and Old Dominion University Alumni Association's 40 under 40 lists. Perkins has been mentioned in Forbes, Fast Company, The New York Times, Money Magazine, and The Washington Post. Select past client work includes Hewlett-Packard, Nordstrom, Target, Dow Chemical, Oracle, Salesforce, Barnes and Noble, West Elm, Holt Renfrew, Salesforce, C.F. Martin & Company, Imerys, Leesa Sleep, Zappos, Paramount Pictures, and Ellen. The brand is currently offered in nearly 150 leading department stores and specialty stores in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Hamilton Perkins Collection's e-commerce store is available at hamiltonperkins.com. Perkins serves on the executive advisory council board at Old Dominion University's Strome College of Business.

Screaming in the Cloud
Changing the Way We Interview with Emma Bostian

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:30


About EmmaEmma Bostian is a Software Engineer at Spotify in Stockholm. She is also a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast, author of Decoding The Technical Interview Process, and an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters.Links: Ladybug Podcast: https://www.ladybug.dev LinkedIn Learning: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/emma-bostian Frontend Masters: https://frontendmasters.com/teachers/emma-bostian/ Decoding the Technical Interview Process: https://technicalinterviews.dev Twitter: https://twitter.com/emmabostian TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the weird things that I've found in the course of, well, the last five years or so is that I went from absolute obscurity to everyone thinking that I know everyone else because I have thoughts and opinions on Twitter. Today, my guest also has thoughts and opinions on Twitter. The difference is that what she has to say is actually helpful to people. My guest is Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify, which is probably, if we can be honest about it, one of the least interesting things about you. Thanks for joining me.Emma: Thanks for having me. That was quite the intro. I loved it.Corey: I do my best and I never prepare them, which is a blessing and a curse. When ADHD is how you go through life and you suck at preparation, you've got to be good at improv. So, you're a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast. Let's start there. What is that podcast? And what's it about?Emma: So, that podcast is just my three friends and I chatting about career and technology. We all come from different backgrounds, have different journeys into tech. I went the quote-unquote, “Traditional” computer science degree route, but Ali is self-taught and works for AWS, and Kelly she has, like, a master's in psychology and human public health and runs her own company. And then Sydney is an awesome developer looking for her next role. So, we all come from different places and we just chat about career in tech.Corey: You're also an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters. I'm going to guess just based upon the name that you are something of a frontend person, which is a skill set that has constantly eluded me for 20 years, as given evidence by every time I've tried to build something that even remotely touches frontend or JavaScript in any sense.Emma: Yeah, to my dad's disdain, I have stuck with the frontend; he really wanted me to stay backend. I did an internship at IBM in Python, and you know, I learned all about assembly language and database, but frontend is what really captures my heart.Corey: There's an entire school of thought out there from a constituency of Twitter that I will generously refer to as shitheads that believe, “Oh, frontend is easy and it's somehow less than.” And I would challenge anyone who holds that perspective to wind up building an interface that doesn't look like crap first, then come and talk to me. Spoiler, you will not say that after attempting to go down that rabbit hole. If you disagree with this, you can go ahead and yell at me on Twitter so I know where you're hiding, so I can block you. Now, that's all well and good, but one of the most interesting things that you've done that aligns with topics near and dear to my heart is you wrote a book.Now, that's not what's near and dear to my heart; I have the attention span to write a tweet most days. But the book was called Decoding the Technical Interview Process. Technical interviewing is one of those weird things that comes up from time to time, here and everywhere else because it's sort of this stylized ritual where we evaluate people on a number of skills that generally don't reflect in their day-to-day; it's really only a series of skills that you get better by practicing, and you only really get to practice them when you're interviewing for other jobs. That's been my philosophy, but again, I've written a tweet on this; you've written a book. What's the book about and what drove you to write it?Emma: So, the book covers everything from an overview of the interview process, to how do you negotiate a job offer, to systems design, and talks about load balancing and cache partitioning, it talks about what skills you need from the frontend side of things to do well on your JavaScript interviews. I will say this, I don't teach HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in-depth in the book because there are plenty of other resources for that. And some guy got mad at me about that the other day and wanted a refund because I didn't teach the skills, but I don't need to. [laugh]. And then it covers data structures and algorithms.They're all written in JavaScript, they have easy to comprehend diagrams. What drove me to write this is that I had just accepted a job offer in Stockholm for a web developer position at Spotify. I had also just passed my Google technical interviews, and I finally realized, holy crap, maybe I do know what I'm doing in an interview now. And this was at the peak of when people were getting laid off due to COVID and I said, “You know what? I have a lot of knowledge. And if I have a computer science degree and I was able to get through some of the hardest technical interviews, I think I should share that with the community.”Because some people didn't go through a CS degree and don't understand what a linked list is. And that's not their fault. It's just unfortunately, there weren't a lot of great resources—especially for web developers out there—to learn these concepts. Cracking the Coding Interview is a great book, but it's written in backend language and it's a little bit hard to digest as a frontend developer. So, I decided to write my own.Corey: How much of the book is around the technical interview process as far as ask, “Here's how you wind up reversing linked lists,” or, “Inverting a binary tree,” or whatever it is where you're tracing things around without using a pointer, how do you wind up detecting a loop in a recursive whatever it is—yeah, as you can tell, I'm not a computer science person at all—versus how much of it is, effectively, interview 101 style skills for folks who are even in non-technical roles could absorb?Emma: My goal was, I wanted this to be approachable by anyone without extensive technical knowledge. So, it's very beginner-friendly. That being said, I cover the basic data structures, talking about what traditional methods you would see on them, how do you code that, what does that look like from a visual perspective with fake data? I don't necessarily talk about how do you reverse a binary tree, but I do talk about how do you balance it if you remove a node? What if it's not a leaf node? What if it has children? Things like that.It's about [sigh] I would say 60/40, where 40% is coding and technical stuff, but maybe—eh, it's a little bit closer to 50/50; it kind of depends. I do talk about the take-home assessment and tips for that. When I do a take-home assessment, I like to include a readme with things I would have done if I had more time, or these are performance trade-offs that I made; here's why. So, there's a lot of explanation as to how you can improve your chances at moving on to the next round. So yeah, I guess it's 50/50.I also include a section on tips for hiring managers, how to create an inclusive and comfortable environment for your candidates. But it's definitely geared towards candidates, and I would say it's about 50/50 coding tech and process stuff.Corey: One of the problems I've always had with this entire industry is it feels like we're one of the only industries that does this, where we bring people in, and oh, you've been an engineer for 15 years at a whole bunch of companies I've recognized, showing career progression, getting promoted at some of them transitioning from high-level role to high-level role. “Great, we are so glad that you came in to interview. Now, up to the whiteboard, please, and implement FizzBuzz because I have this working theory that you don't actually know how to code, and despite the fact that you've been able to fake your way through it at big companies for 15 years, I'm the one that's going to catch you out with some sort of weird trivia question.” It's this adversarial, almost condescending approach and I don't see it in any other discipline than tech. Is that just because I'm not well-traveled enough? Is that because I'm misunderstanding the purpose of all of these things? Or, what is this?Emma: I think partially it was a gatekeeping solution for a while, for people who are comfortable in their roles and may be threatened by people who have come through different paths to get to tech. Because software engineer used to be an accredited title that you needed a degree or certification to get. And in some countries it still is, so you'll see this debate sometimes about calling yourself a software engineer if you don't have that accreditation. But in this day and age, people go through boot camps, they can come from other industries, they can be self-taught. You don't need a computer science degree, and I think the interview process has not caught up with that.I will say [laugh] the worst interview I had was at IBM when I was already working there. I was already a web developer there, full-time. I was interviewing for a role, and I walked into the room and there were five guys sitting at a table and they were like, “Get up to the whiteboard.” It was for a web development job and they quizzed me about Java. And I was like, “Um, sir, I have not done Java since college.” And they were like, “We don't care.”Corey: Oh, yeah, coding on a whiteboard in front of five people who already know the answer—Emma: Horrifying.Corey: —during a—for them, it's any given Tuesday, and for you, it is a, this will potentially determine the course that your career takes from this point forward. There's a level of stress that goes into that never exists in our day-to-day of building things out.Emma: Well, I also think it's an artificial environment. And why, though? Like, why is this necessary? One of the best interviews I had was actually with Gatsby. It was for an open-source maintainer role, and they essentially let me try the product before I bought it.Like, they let me try out doing the job. It was a paid process, they didn't expect me to do it for free. I got to choose alternatives if I wanted to do one thing or another, answer one question or another, and this was such an exemplary process that I always bring it up because that is a modern interview process, when you are letting people try the position. Now granted, not everyone can do this, right? We've got parents, we've got people working two jobs, and not everyone can afford to take the time to try out a job.But who can also afford a five-stage interview process that still warrants taking vacation days? So, I think at least—at the very least—pay your candidates if you can.Corey: Oh, yeah. One of the best interviews I've ever had was at a company called Three Rings Design, which is now defunct, unfortunately, but it was fairly typical ops questions of, “Yeah, here's an AWS account. Spin up a couple EC2 instances, load balance between them, have another one monitored. You know, standard op stuff. And because we don't believe in asking people to work for free, we'll pay you $300 upon completion of the challenge.”Which, again, it's not huge money for doing stuff like that, but it's also, this shows a level of respect for my time. And instead of giving me a hard deadline of when it was due, they asked me, “When can we expect this by?” Which is a great question in its own right because it informs you about a candidate's ability to set realistic deadlines and then meet them, which is one of those useful work things. And they—unlike most other companies I spoke with in that era—were focused on making it as accommodating for the candidate as possible. They said, “We're welcome to interview you during the workday; we can also stay after hours and have a chat then, if that's more convenient for your work schedule.”Because they knew I was working somewhere else; an awful lot of candidates are. And they just bent over backwards to be as accommodating as possible. I see there's a lot of debate these days in various places about the proper way to interview candidates. No take-home because biases for people who don't have family obligations or other commitments outside of work hours. “Okay, great, so I'm going to come in interview during the day?” “No. That biases people who can't take time off.” And, on some level, it almost seems to distill down to no one likes any way that there is of interviewing candidates, and figuring out a way that accommodates everyone is a sort of a fool's errand. It seems like there is no way that won't get you yelled at.Emma: I think there needs to be almost like a choose your own adventure. What is going to set you up for success and also allow you to see if you want to even work that kind of a job in the first place? Because I thought on paper, open-source maintainer sounds awesome. And upon looking into the challenges, I'm like, “You know what? I think I'd hate this job.”And I pulled out and I didn't waste their time and they didn't waste mine. So, when you get down to it, honestly, I wish I didn't have to write this book. Did it bring me a lot of benefit? Yeah. Let's not sugarcoat that. It allowed me to pay off my medical debt and move across a continent, but that being said, I wish that we were at a point in time where that did not need to exist.Corey: One of the things that absolutely just still gnaws at me even years later, is I interviewed at Google twice, and I didn't get an offer either time, I didn't really pass their technical screen either time. The second one that really sticks out in my mind where it was, “Hey, write some code in a Google Doc while we watch remotely,” and don't give you any context or hints on this. And just it was—the entire process was sitting there listening to them basically, like, “Nope, not what I'm thinking about. Nope, nope, nope.” It was… by the end of that conversation, I realized that if they were going to move forward—which they didn't—I wasn't going to because I didn't want to work with people that were that condescending and rude.And I've held by it; I swore I would never apply there again and I haven't. And it's one of those areas where, did I have the ability to do the job? I can say in hindsight, mostly. Were there things I was going to learn as I went? Absolutely, but that's every job.And I'm realizing as I see more and more across the ecosystem, that they were an outlier in a potentially good way because in so many other places, there's no equivalent of the book that you have written that is given to the other side of the table: how to effectively interview candidates. People lose sight of the fact that it's a sales conversation; it's a two-way sale, they have to convince you to hire them, but you also have to convince them to work with you. And even in the event that you pass on them, you still want them to say nice things about you because it's a small industry, all things considered. And instead, it's just been awful.Emma: I had a really shitty interview, and let me tell you, they have asked me subsequently if I would re-interview with them. Which sucks; it's a product that I know and love, and I've talked about this, but I had the worst experience. Let me clarify, I had a great first interview with them, and I was like, “I'm just not ready to move to Australia.” Which is where the job was. And then they contacted me again a year later, and it was the worst experience of my life—same recruiter—it was the ego came out.And I will tell you what, if you treat your candidates like shit, they will remember and they will never recommend people interview for you. [laugh]. I also wanted to mention about accessibility because—so we talked about, oh, give candidates the choice, which I think the whole point of an interview should be setting your candidates up for success to show you what they can do. And I talked with [Stephen 00:14:09]—oh, my gosh, I can't remember his last name—but he is a quadriplegic and he types with a mouthstick. And he was saying he would go to technical interviews and they would not be prepared to set him up for success.And they would want to do these pair programming, or, like, writing on a whiteboard. And it's not that he can't pair program, it's that he was not set up for success. He needed a mouthstick to type and they were not prepared to help them with that. So, it's not just about the commitment that people need. It's also about making sure that you are giving candidates what they need to give the best interview possible in an artificial environment.Corey: One approach that people have taken is, “Ah, I'm going to shortcut this and instead of asking people to write code, I'm going to look at their work on GitHub.” Which is, in some cases, a great way to analyze what folks are capable of doing. On the other, well, there's a lot of things that play into that. What if they're working in environment where they don't have the opportunity to open-source their work? What if people consider this a job rather than an all-consuming passion?I know, perish the thought. We don't want to hire people like that. Grow up. It's not useful, and it's not helpful. It's not something that applies universally, and there's an awful lot of reasons why someone's code on GitHub might be materially better—or worse—than their work product. I think that's fine. It's just a different path toward it.Emma: I don't use GitHub for largely anything except just keeping repositories that I need. I don't actively update it. And I have, like, a few thousand followers; I'm like, “Why the hell do you guys follow me? I don't do anything.” It's honestly a terrible representation.That being said, you don't need to have a GitHub repository—an active one—to showcase your skills. There are many other ways that you can show a potential employer, “Hey, I have a lot of skills that aren't necessarily showcased on my resume, but I like to write blogs, I like to give tech talks, I like to make YouTube videos,” things of that nature.Corey: I had a manager once who refused to interview anyone who didn't have a built-out LinkedIn profile, which is also one of these bizarre things. It's, yeah, a lot of people don't feel the need to have a LinkedIn profile, and that's fine. But the idea that, “Oh, yeah, they have this profile they haven't updated in a couple years, it's clearly they're not interested in looking for work.” It's, yeah. Maybe—just a thought here—your ability to construct a resume and build it out in the way that you were expecting is completely orthogonal to how effective they might be in the role. The idea that someone not having a LinkedIn profile somehow implies that they're sketchy is the wrong lesson to take from all of this. That site is terrible.Emma: Especially when you consider the fact that LinkedIn is primarily used in the United States as a social—not social networking—professional networking tool. In Germany, they use Xing as a platform; it's very similar to LinkedIn, but my point is, if you're solely looking at someone's LinkedIn as a representation of their ability to do a job, you're missing out on many candidates from all over the world. And also those who, yeah, frankly, just don't—like, they have more important things to be doing than updating their LinkedIn profile. [laugh].Corey: On some level, it's the idea of looking at a consultant, especially independent consultant type, when their website is glorious and up-to-date and everything's perfect, it's, oh, you don't really have any customers, do you? As opposed to the consultants you know who are effectively sitting there with a waiting list, their website looks like crap. It's like, “Is this Geocities?” No. It's just that they're too busy working on the things that bring the money instead of the things that bring in business, in some respects.Let's face it, websites don't. For an awful lot of consulting work, it's word of mouth. I very rarely get people finding me off of Google, clicking a link, and, “Hey, my AWS bill is terrible. Can you help us with it?” It happens, but it's not something that happens so frequently that we want to optimize for it because that's not where the best customers have been coming from. Historically, it's referrals, it's word of mouth, it's people seeing the aggressive shitposting I engage in on Twitter and saying, “Oh, that's someone that should help me with my Amazon bill.” Which I don't pretend to understand, but I'm still going to roll with it.Emma: You had mentioned something about passion earlier, and I just want to say, if you're a hiring manager or recruiter, you shouldn't solely be looking at candidates who superficially look like they're passionate about what they do. Yes, that is—it's important, but it's not something that—like, I don't necessarily choose one candidate over the other because they push commits, and open pull requests on GitHub, and open-source, and stuff. You can be passionate about your job, but at the end of the day, it's still a job. For me, would I be working if I had to? No. I'd be opening a bookstore because that's what I would really love to be doing. But that doesn't mean I'm not passionate about my job. I just show it in different ways. So, just wanted to put that out there.Corey: Oh, yeah. The idea that you must eat, sleep, live, and breathe is—hell with that. One of the reasons that we get people to work here at The Duckbill Group is, yeah, we care about getting the job done. We don't care about how long it takes or when you work; it's oh, you're not feeling well? Take the day off.We have very few things that are ‘must be done today' style of things. Most of those tend to fall on me because it's giving a talk at a conference; they will not reschedule the conference for you. I've checked. So yeah, that's important, but that's not most days.Emma: Yeah. It's like programming is my job, it's not my identity. And it's okay if it is your primary hobby if that is how you identify, but for me, I'm a person with actual hobbies, and, you know, a personality, and programming is just a job for me. I like my job, but it's just a job.Corey: And on the side, you do interesting things like wrote a book. You mentioned earlier that it wound up paying off some debt and helping cover your move across an ocean. Let's talk a little bit about that because I'm amenable to the idea of side projects that accidentally have a way of making money. That's what this podcast started out as. If I'm being perfectly honest, and started out as something even more self-serving than that.It's, well if I reach out to people in this industry that are doing interesting things and ask them to grab a cup of coffee, they'll basically block me, whereas if I ask them to, would you like to appear on my podcast, they'll clear time on their schedule. I almost didn't care if my microphone was on or not when I was doing these just because it was a chance to talk to really interesting people and borrow their brain, people reached out asking they can sponsor it, along with the newsletter and the rest, and it's you want to give me money? Of course, you can give me money. How much money? And that sort of turned into a snowball effect over time.Five years in, it's turned into something that I would never have predicted or expected. But it's weird to me still, how effective doing something you're actually passionate about as a side project can sort of grow wings on its own. Where do you stand on that?Emma: Yeah, it's funny because with the exception of the online courses that I've worked with—I mentioned LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters, which I knew were paid opportunities—none of my side projects started out for financial reasonings. The podcast that we started was purely for fun, and the sponsors came to us. Now, I will say right up front, we all had pretty big social media followings, and my first piece of advice to anyone looking to get into side projects is, don't focus so much on making money at the get-go. Yes, to your point, Corey, focus on the stuff you're passionate about. Focus on engaging with people on social media, build up your social media, and at that point, okay, monetization will slowly find its way to you.But yeah, I say if you can monetize the heck out of your work, go for it. But also, free content is also great. I like to balance my paid content with my free content because I recognize that not everyone can afford to pay for some of this information. So, I generally always have free alternatives. And for this book that we published, one of the things that was really important to me was keeping it affordable.The first publish I did was $10 for the book. It was like a 250-page book. It was, like, $10 because again, I was not in it for the money. And when I redid the book with the egghead.io team, the same team that did Epic React with Kent C. Dodds, I said, “I want to keep this affordable.” So, we made sure it was still affordable, but also that we had—what's it called? Parity pricing? Pricing parity, where depending on your geographic location, the price is going to accommodate for how the currency is doing. So, yes, I would agree. Side project income for me allows me to do incredible stuff, but it wasn't why I got into it in the first place. It was genuinely just a nice-to-have.Corey: I haven't really done anything that asks people for money directly. I mean, yeah, I sell t-shirts on the website, and mugs, and drink umbrellas—don't get me started—but other than that and the charity t-shirt drive I do every year, I tend to not be good at selling things that don't have a comma in the price tag. For me, it was about absolutely building an audience. I tend to view my Twitter follower count as something of a proxy for it, but the number I actually care about, the audience that I'm focused on cultivating, is newsletter subscribers because no social media platform that we've ever seen has lasted forever. And I have to imagine that Twitter will one day wane as well.But email has been here since longer than we'd been alive, and by having a list of email addresses and ways I can reach out to people on an ongoing basis, I can monetize that audience in a more direct way, at some point should I need them to. And my approach has been, well, one, it's a valuable audience for some sponsors, so I've always taken the asking corporate people for money is easier than asking people for personal money, plus it's a valuable audience to them, so it tends to blow out a number of the metrics that you would normally expect of, oh, for this audience size, you should generally be charging Y dollars. Great. That makes sense if you're slinging mattresses or free web hosting, but when it's instead, huh, these people buy SaaS enterprise software and implement it at their companies, all of economics tend to start blowing apart. Same story with you in many respects.The audience that you're building is functionally developers. That is a lucrative market for the types of sponsors that are wise enough to understand that—in a lot of cases these days—which product a company is going to deploy is not dictated by their exec so much as it is the bottom-up adoption path of engineers who like the product.Emma: Mm-hm. Yeah, and I think once I got to maybe around 10,000 Twitter followers is when I changed my mentality and I stopped caring so much about follower count, and instead I just started caring about the people that I was following. And the number is a nice-to-have but to be honest, I don't think so much about it. And I do understand, yes, at that point, it is definitely a privilege that I have this quote-unquote, “Platform,” but I never see it as an audience, and I never think about that “Audience,” quote-unquote, as a marketing platform. But it's funny because there's no right or wrong. People will always come to you and be like, “You shouldn't monetize your stuff.” And it's like—Corey: “Cool. Who's going to pay me then? Not you, apparently.”Emma: Yeah. It's also funny because when I originally sold the book, it was $10 and I got so many people being like, “This is way too cheap. You should be charging more.” And I'm like, “But I don't care about the money.” I care about all the people who are unemployed and not able to survive, and they have families, and they need to get a job and they don't know how.That's what I care about. And I ended up giving away a lot of free books. My mantra was like, hey if you've been laid off, DM me. No questions asked, I'll give it to you for free. And it was nice because a lot of people came back, even though I never asked for it, they came back and they wanted to purchase it after the fact, after they'd gotten a job.And to me that was like… that was the most rewarding piece. Not getting their money; I don't care about that, but it was like, “Oh, okay. I was actually able to help you.” That is what's really the most rewarding. But yeah, certainly—and back really quickly to your email point, I highly agree, and one of the first things that I would recommend to anyone looking to start a side product, create free content so that you have a backlog that people can look at to… kind of build trust.Corey: Give it away for free, but also get emails from people, like a trade for that. So, it's like, “Hey, here's a free guide on how to start a podcast from scratch. It's free, but all I would like is your email.” And then when it comes time to publish a course on picking the best audio and visual equipment for that podcast, you have people who've already been interested in this topic that you can now market to.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I'm not sitting here trying to judge anyone for the choices that they make at all. There are a lot of different paths to it. I'm right there with you. One of the challenges I had when I was thinking about, do I charge companies or do I charge people was that if I'm viewing it through a lens of audience growth, well, what stuff do I gate behind a paywall? What stuff don't I? Well, what if I just—Emma: Mm-hm.Corey: —gave it all away? And that way I don't have to worry about the entire class of problems that you just alluded to of, well, how do I make sure this is fair? Because a cup of coffee in San Francisco is, what, $14 in some cases? Whereas that is significant in places that aren't built on an economy of foolishness. How do you solve for that problem? How do you deal with the customer service slash piracy issues slash all the other nonsense? And it's just easier.Emma: Yeah.Corey: Something I've found, too, is that when you're charging enough money to companies, you don't have to deal with an entire class of customer service problem. You just alluded to the other day that well, you had someone who bought your book and was displeased that it wasn't a how to write code from scratch tutorial, despite the fact that he were very clear on what it is and what it isn't. I don't pretend to understand that level of entitlement. If I spend 10 or 20 bucks on an ebook, and it's not very good, let's see, do I wind up demanding a refund from the author and making them feel bad about it, or do I say, “The hell with it.” And in my case, I—there is privilege baked into this; I get that, but it's I don't want to make people feel bad about what they've built. If I think there's enough value to spend money on it I view that as a one-way transaction, rather than chasing someone down for three months, trying to get a $20 refund.Emma: Yeah, and I think honestly, I don't care so much about giving refunds at all. We have a 30-day money-back guarantee and we don't ask any questions. I just asked this person for feedback, like, “Oh, what was not up to par?” And it was just, kind of like, BS response of like, “Oh, I didn't read the website and I guess it's not what I wanted.” But the end of the day, they still keep the product.The thing is, you can't police all of the people who are going to try to get your content for free if you're charging for it; it's part of it. And I knew that when I got into it, and honestly, my thing is, if you are circulating a book that helps you get a job in tech and you're sending it to all your friends, I'm not going to ask any questions because it's very much the sa—and this is just my morals here, but if I saw someone stealing food from a grocery store, I wouldn't tell on them because at the end of the day, if you're s—Corey: Same story. You ever see someone's stealing baby formula from a store? No, you didn't.Emma: Right.Corey: Keep walking. Mind your business.Emma: Exactly. Exactly. So, at the end of the day, I didn't necessarily care that—people are like, “Oh, people are going to share your book around. It's a PDF.” I'm like, “I don't care. Let them. It is what it is. And the people who wants to support and can, will.” But I'm not asking.I still have free blogs on data structures, and algorithms, and the interview stuff. I do still have content for free, but if you want more, if you want my illustrated diagrams that took me forever with my Apple Pencil, fair enough. That would be great if you could support me. If not, I'm still happy to give you the stuff for free. It is what it is.Corey: One thing that I think is underappreciated is that my resume doesn't look great. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education, and I don't have any big tech names on my resume. I have a bunch of relatively short stints; until I started this place, I've never lasted more than two years anywhere. If I apply through the front door the way most people do for a job, I will get laughed out of the room by the applicant tracking system, automatically. It'll never see a human.And by doing all these side projects, it's weird, but let's say that I shut down the company for some reason, and decide, ah, I'm going to go get a job now, my interview process—more or less, and it sounds incredibly arrogant, but roll with it for a minute—is, “Don't you know who I am? Haven't you heard of me before?” It's, “Here's my website. Here's all the stuff I've been doing. Ask anyone in your engineering group who I am and you'll see what pops up.”You're in that same boat at this point where your resume is the side projects that you've done and the audience you've built by doing it. That's something that I think is underappreciated. Even if neither one of us made a dime through direct monetization of things that we did, the reputational boost to who we are and what we do professionally seems to be one of those things that pays dividends far beyond any relatively small monetary gain from it.Emma: Absolutely, yeah. I actually landed my job interview with Spotify through Twitter. I was contacted by a design systems manager. And I was in the interview process for them, and I ended up saying, “You know, I'm not ready to move to Stockholm. I just moved to Germany.”And a year later, I circled back and I said, “Hey, are there any openings?” And I ended up re-interviewing, and guess what? Now, I have a beautiful home with my soulmate and we're having a child. And it's funny how things work out this way because I had a Twitter account. And so don't undervalue [laugh] social media as a tool in lieu of a resume because I don't think anyone at Spotify even saw my resume until it actually accepted the job offer, and it was just a formality.So yeah, absolutely. You can get a job through social media. It's one of the easiest ways. And that's why if I ever see anyone looking for a job on Twitter, I will retweet, and vouch for them if I know their work because I think that's one of the quickest ways to finding an awesome candidate.Corey: Back in, I don't know, 2010, 2011-ish. I was deep in the IRC weed. I was network staff on the old freenode network—not the new terrible one. The old, good one—and I was helping people out with various things. I was hanging out in the Postfix channel and email server software thing that most people have the good sense not to need to know anything about.And someone showed up and was asking questions about their config, and I was working with them, and teasing them, and help them out with it. And at the end of it, his comment was, “Wow, you're really good at this. Any chance you'd be interested in looking for jobs?” And the answer was, “Well, sure, but it's a global network. Where are you?”Well, he was based in Germany, but he was working remotely for Spotify in Stockholm. A series of conversations later, I flew out to Stockholm and interviewed for a role that they decided I was not a fit for—and again, they're probably right—and I often wonder how my life would have gone differently if the decision had gone the other way. I mean, no hard feelings, please don't get me wrong, but absolutely, helping people out, interacting with people over social networks, or their old school geeky analogs are absolutely the sorts of things that change lives. I would never have thought to apply to a role like that if I had been sitting here looking at job ads because who in the world would pick up someone with relatively paltry experience and move them halfway around the world? This was like a fantasy, not a reality.Emma: [laugh].Corey: It's the people you get to know—Emma: Yeah.Corey: —through these social interactions on various networks that are worth… they're worth gold. There's no way to describe it other than that.Emma: Yeah, absolutely. And if you're listening to this, and you're discouraged because you got turned down for a job, we've all been there, first of all, but I remember being disappointed because I didn't pass my first round of interviews of Google the first time I interviewed with them, and being, like, “Oh, crap, now I can't move to Munich. What am I going to do with my life?” Well, guess what, look where I am today. If I had gotten that job that I thought was it for me, I wouldn't be in the happiest phase of my life.And so if you're going through it—obviously, in normal circumstances where you're not frantically searching for a job; if you're in more of a casual life job search—and you've been let go from the process, just realize that there's probably something bigger and better out there for you, and just focus on your networking online. Yeah, it's an invaluable tool.Corey: One time when giving a conference talk, I asked, “All right, raise your hand if you have never gone through a job interview process and then not been offered the job.” And a few people did. “Great. If your hand is up, aim higher. Try harder. Take more risks.”Because fundamentally, job interviews are two-way streets and if you are only going for the sure thing jobs, great, stretch yourself, see what else is out there. There's no perfect attendance prize. Even back in school there wasn't. It's the idea of, “Well, I've only ever taken the easy path because I don't want to break my streak.” Get over it. Go out and interview more. It's a skill, unlike most others that you don't get to get better at unless you practice it.So, you've been in a job for ten years, and then it's time to move on—I've talked to candidates like this—their interview skills are extremely rusty. It takes a little bit of time to get back in the groove. I like to interview every three to six months back when I was on the job market. Now that I, you know, own the company and have employees, it looks super weird if I do it, but I miss it. I miss those conversations. I miss the aspects—Emma: Yes.Corey: —of exploring what the industry cares about.Emma: Absolutely. And don't underplay the importance of studying the foundational language concepts. I see this a lot in candidates where they're so focused on the newest and latest technologies and frameworks, that they forgot foundational JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. Many companies are focused primarily on these plain language concepts, so just make sure that when you are ready to get back into interviewing and enhance that skill, that you don't neglect the foundation languages that the web is built on if you're a web developer.Corey: I'd also take one last look around and realize that every person you admire, every person who has an audience, who is a known entity in the space only has that position because someone, somewhere did them a favor. Probably lots of someones with lots of favors. And you can't ever pay those favors back. All you can do is pay it forward. I repeatedly encourage people to reach out to me if there's something I can do to help. And the only thing that surprises me is how few people in the audience take me up on that. I'm talking to you, listener. Please, if I can help you with something, please reach out. I get a kick out of doing that sort of thing.Emma: Absolutely. I agree.Corey: Emma, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Emma: Well, you can find me on Twitter. It's just @EmmaBostian, I'm, you know, shitposting over there on the regular. But sometimes I do tweet out helpful things, so yeah, feel free to engage with me over there. [laugh].Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:35:42]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I appreciate it.Emma: Yeah. Thanks for having me.Corey: Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify and oh, so very much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an incoherent ranting comment mentioning that this podcast as well failed to completely teach you JavaScript.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach
Real Test of Any Choice Is Doing It Twice - 10/11/2021: A Phil Svitek Vlog

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 14:59


In The Matrix Revolutions, the Oracle says, "The real test for any choice is having to make the same choice again, knowing full well what it might cost – I guess I feel pretty good about that choice, 'cause here I am, at it again." I like this quote as it applies to my choice of moving forward and making my 2nd feature film. In this vlog, I discuss the final preparations for the movie. Things like, negative visualization (https://philsvitek.com/negative-visualization/) and the creative solutions I've been considering, Covid procedures, finalizing tickets to events, pre packing, etc. Plus I discuss the difference between a mistake and a choice from an artistic standpoint. There's lots of nuggets in there for you to utilize, so enjoy. Thanks for tuning in. Also, feel free to ask questions or offer opinions of your own, whether down in the comment section or by hitting me up on social media @PhilSvitek. Lastly, for more free resources from your 360 creative coach, check out my website at http://philsvitek.com. RESOURCES/LINKS: -Coach or Consultant Services: https://philsvitek.com/lets-work-together/ -Podcast Services: http://philsvitek.com/podcastservices -Love Market Film (available now): https://www.amazon.com/Love-Market-Amy-Cassandra-Martinez/dp/B09DFS3FTZ/ref=sr_1_14 -Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/philsvitek -Merchandise: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/phil-svitek---360-creative-coach/ -Instagram: http://instagram.com/philsvitek -Facebook: http://facebook.com/philippsvitek -Twitter: http://twitter.com/philsvitek -Financially Fit Foundation: http://financiallyfitfoundation.org -Master Mental Fortitude Book: http://mastermentalfortitude.com -Elan, Elan Book: http://philsvitek.com/elan-elan -In Search of Sunrise Film: http://philsvitek.com/in-search-of-sunrise

HR Leaders
Leading in Real Time: How to Drive Success in a Radically Changing World

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:24


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest Michelle Ray, CEO & Founder of Lead Yourself First Enterprises and Author.Thanks to Oracle for Supporting the show!Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auEpisode Highlights01:02 - About Pablo04:34 - What he loves about HR06:33 - Lessons learned over the past year08:50 - Pablo on his purpose10:22 - How the pandemic changed HR12:25 - HR's biggest challenge moving forward...19:16 - ... and it's biggest opportunities28:16 - How he relaxes outside of work29:20 - On the worst times of Pablo's career32:41 - Could he ever leave the function?33:19 - What held him back from success35:55 - The best business advice he's been givenIf you enjoyed the podcast be sure to subscribe for more content like this and visit our website to access resources mentioned: www.hrleaders.co/podcastSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

Today I have the great honor and pleasure of speaking with two luminaries in the field of privacy: Michelle Finneran Dennedy and Melanie Ensign. Between them, they have decades of experience managing privacy processes, policies, technology and communications within dozens of big name tech companies. I get their unique perspective on data privacy and the evolution of how these companies approach the problem of collecting and managing your data. Are things getting better or worse? How can companies earn the trust of their customers? Is data the new oil? And is it an asset or a liability? How can we have social media like Facebook and privacy at the same time? NOTE: I captured WAY more content from these two than I could fit into this one podcast. To get the full interview, become a patron! (And nab yourself a kick-butt challenge coin, too!) Michelle Dennedy was the first CPO for many global IT infrastructure companies including Oracle, McAfee, Intel & Cisco. Michelle is now a partner at Privatus.online and CEO at a Privacy Engineering startup in stealth mode. She is the co-author of The Privacy Engineer's Manifesto and The Privacy Engineer's Companion.  Melanie Ensign is the CEO of Discernible, helping cybersecurity & privacy teams better communicate with business leaders and consumers. She is also part of the DEF CON leadership team. Further Info Discernable: https://discernibleinc.com/ Privatus: https://privatus.online/ The Privacy Engineer's Manifesto: https://www.amazon.com/Privacy-Engineers-Manifesto-Getting-Policy/dp/1430263555 The Rise of Privacy Tech (TROPT): https://www.riseofprivacytech.com/ Privacy is Power (book): https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/privacy-is-power-review/ The Social Dilemma: https://www.thesocialdilemma.com/ The challenge coin promotion is BACK!! https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/my-challenge-coins-are-back/Would you like me to speak to your group about security and/privacy? http://bit.ly/Firewalls-SpeakerGenerate secure passphrases! https://d20key.com/#/

Founders
Stephen King On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 38:28


What I learned from reading Stephen King On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get lifetime access to every full episode. You will: Immediately unlock 218 full length episodes that are available no where else.Get access to every future episode.Learn from history's greatest entrepreneurs and apply their ideas to your work.Tap this link on a mobile device so you can install your private podcast feed into your favorite podcast player. It takes less than 30 seconds to set up. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."GET LIFETIME ACCESS TO FOUNDERS

CPQ Podcast
Interview with Charan Singh, Quote-to-Cash US Capability Leader at Deloitte Digital

CPQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 27:29


n this episode you hear from Charan Singh the Quote-to-Cash US Capability Leader of Deloitte Digital. Charan has 20+ years of business experience and is based in Seattle, WA. His teams are located in the US and India. Here he talks about his end-to-end lead-to-cash responsibilities, CPQ Partners they work with, CPQ integrations with eCommerce, Billing, Sales Compensation, visualization, price optimization, top business requirements they see and much more. LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/charan-singh-1576a13/  

Jumpers Jump
EP. 47 - THE AFTERLIFE THEORY, MANIFESTATION, & USING ANPHANTASIA w/ Emson Mallari

Jumpers Jump

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 84:00


Jump in with Carlos Juico and special guest Emson Mallari on Episode 47 of JUMPERS JUMP. This episode we discuss The IPhone Conspiracy, The Afterlife Theory, Manifestation, Oracle's Alien prophecy, The Lightbulb Theory, using Aphantasia, Drake vs Kanye, reliving past lives, and much more!

Final Show Films Aggregate Feed
On Trails Of Stardust - Episode 3: The Oracle‘s Prophecy

Final Show Films Aggregate Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 142:39


William: DM Jeremy: Kendall Fairchild - Eladrin Warlock John: Koltarn - Orc Artificer Holly: Mystal - Invaran Rogue Jack: Tyll Wayland - Avion Monk Koty: Varuzh Alruk - Loxodon Void Keeper Craig: Bees - Nocturnan Torchbee Ranger Kamil: Gideon Eaglin - Avion Rogue ----- Thanks to all of our supporters at patreon.com/fsfilms for making this possible! Especially our $25+ Donors: Drevian Alexander Kat Waterflame L Rowan Parker Samantha Bates

Final Show Films Actual Plays
On Trails Of Stardust - Episode 3: The Oracle's Prophecy

Final Show Films Actual Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


William: DM Jeremy: Kendall Fairchild - Eladrin Warlock John: Koltarn - Orc Artificer Holly: Mystal - Invaran Rogue Jack: Tyll Wayland - Avion Monk Koty: Varuzh Alruk - Loxodon Void Keeper Craig: Bees - Nocturnan Torchbee Ranger Kamil: Gideon Eaglin - Avion Rogue Thanks to all of our supporters at patreon.com/fsfilms for making this possible! Especially our $25+ Donors: Drevian Alexander Kat Waterflame L Rowan Parker Samantha Bates

The Torture Cast
Episode 242: Sound from NLDS Game 1

The Torture Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 3:33


This is Chad King from Torturecast with a few notes and sounds from last night's 4-0 victory over the LA dodgers in game 1 of the National League division series at Oracle park. Logan Webb reminded all of us of Tim Lincecum's postseason debut against the Braves in game 1 of the NLDS in 2010. Webb threw 7 ⅔ scoreless innings while striking out 10 and issuing zero walks. The offense was powered by a 2 run opposite field home run in the first by Buster Posey, followed by solo shots by Kris Bryant in the 7th and Brandon Crawford in the 8th. Tyler Rogers got one out in the 8th and Camilo Doval retired the side in order in the 9th.Our friend Ryan Leong from Bay Area sports wrap was at Oracle last night and kindly shared some audio with us. The first is Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford talking about how Logan Webb has improved in his abilities over the last two years. Giants starting and winning pitcher Logan Webb says says it's always been his goal since he was a child to pitch in a playoff game Dodgers manager Dave Roberts says his team kept the same approach at the plate and Logan Webb exploited their weaknesses Dodgers losing pitcher Walker Buehler says he didn't do his job and he takes the blame for the loss. A big thanks to Ryan Leong from Bay Area sports wrap, go follow him over on Twitter @ryanleong Well, the Giants and Dodgers will do it again tonight at ORacle when Kevin Gausman faces 20 game winner Julio Urias. Hopefully the Giants can put their foot on the Dodgers' throats by going up 2-0. I'll be in the bleachers with the rowdy crowd tonight. It should be fun. Don't forget to follow us on twitter @Torturecast, like us on Facebook and check out our site at Torturecast.com. Just yesterday KTVU ran a story about Torturecast and Giants fandom featuring yours truly. The video is up on torturecast.com. Have a great day, and Go Giants! Boom!

Real Estate Radio LIVE
RERL-1764- Is California bad for business?

Real Estate Radio LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 44:21


After many decades of finding talent and reaping success in California, Larry Ellison packed up Oracle and headed for Texas – and he's not the only one. Charles Schwab followed suit and now Elon Musk has confirmed Tesla will also be finding a new home in Austin. Those are three big blows to California that has others wondering if these moves are more than coincidence. California's advantages seem to be dissolving around us and the last thing we want to do is wake up one day and ask ourselves how we did we not see this coming. Joe Cucchiara and Jack Russo discuss how California went from being a big draw to the place you probably don't want to run your business from.     To learn more, simply visit www.RERadioLive.com. All the information in this podcast is broadcast in good faith and for general information purpose only. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. Any action you take upon the information on our website is strictly at your own risk.  We will not be liable for any losses and damages in connection with the use of associated information. www.reradiolive.com All Rights Reserved. Copyright 2015. Joe Cucchiara MLO 273084 This is not a commitment to lend. Our team fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. For more information, please visit: http://portal.hud.gov/.

Old Capital Real Estate Investing Podcast with Michael Becker & Paul Peebles
Episode 251 - JP Conklin- Where are interest rates headed on commercial real estate loans?

Old Capital Real Estate Investing Podcast with Michael Becker & Paul Peebles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 32:04


You've heard of the ORACLE of OMAHA, right? Warren Buffet. Well…. Meet the Oracle of North Carolina! JP Conklin with Pensford. JP is the ‘interest rate fortune teller.' Pensford is a financial consulting group that gives real estate investors the ability to hedge interest rates. JP gives you the inside track on where interest rates are at today and where they are potentially going. Financing an apartment today; should you consider floating with an adjustable rate OR locking into a long-term fixed rate? Many loans are tied to the 10-year treasury…that has been rising recently…so this is a timely conversation in your decision. You don't want to miss this discussion. Are you interested in learning more about how Multifamily Syndications work? Please visit www.spiadvisory.com to learn more about Michael Becker's Real Estate Syndication business with SPI Advisory LLC. Please leave us a 5 STAR RATING on iTunes; if you enjoyed this podcast.

Often Imitated
The Power of Feedback with Craig Walker, Founder and CEO, Dialpad

Often Imitated

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 26:12


Unfortunately, less-than-stellar CX is commonplace. It's a problem as old as time. Even back in 1750 AD, merchants were scamming their peers out of quality goods and running off with their money. Artifacts still exist today that show shipping merchant Ea-Nasir was notorious for some of the worst customer experiences in Mesopotamia. His reviews are in...and they're abysmal.As CX leaders, we'd rather not have our legacy be 3,000 years of terrible reviews. So it's important to hear what our customers are saying and act accordingly to correct our course. To learn more about how to value customer feedback, we talked with Craig Walker, Founder and CEO of Dialpad. He'll share how to incorporate feedback into your product and improve your CX across the board. --------"At the end of the day, you're not just selling to a business customer—you're selling to a person." - Craig Walker, Founder and CEO, Dialpad--------Time Stamps* (0:00) The hottest gossip of 1750 BC* (5:10) The inspiration behind Dialpad* (10:27) Prioritizing user feedback* (12:37) What Dialpad does today* (16:10) How AI can help improve your CX* (19:08) Turning hold music into a delightful experience--------SponsorThis podcast is presented by Oracle CX. Hear more executive perspectives on CX transformation at Oracle.com/cx/perspectives--------LinksConnect with Craig on LinkedInCheck out Dialpad

Sales Secrets From The Top 1%
What To Do When You're Stuck In Business

Sales Secrets From The Top 1%

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 1:30


SUBSCRIBE TO SALES SECRETS PODCAST:ITUNES ► https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/s...​SPOTIFY ► https://open.spotify.com/show/1BKYsQo...​YOUTUBE ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVUh...​THIS EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY SEAMLESS.AI - THE WORLD'S BEST SALES LEADS:WEBSITE ► https://www.seamless.ai/LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/seamlessai/JOIN FOR FREE TODAY ► https://login.seamless.ai/invite/podcastBrandon Bornancin is a serial salesperson, entrepreneur and founder of Seamless.AI. Twice a week, Brandon interviews the world's top sales experts like Jill Konrath, Aaron Ross, John Barrows, Trish Bertuzzi, Mark Hunter, Anthony Iannarino and many more -- to uncover actionable strategies, playbooks, tips and insights you can use to generate more revenue and close more business. If you want to learn the most powerful sales secrets from the top sales experts in the world, Sales Secrets From The Top 1% is the place to find them.SALES SECRET FROM THE TOP 1%WEBSITE ► https://www.secretsalesbook.com/LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/sales-secret-book/ABOUT BRANDONBrandon Bornancin is a serial salesperson (over $100M in sales deals), multi-million dollar sales tech entrepreneur, motivational sales speaker, international sales DJ (DJ NoQ5) and sales author who is obsessed with helping you maximize your sales success.Mr. Bornancin is currently the CEO & Founder at Seamless.ai delivering the world's best sales leads. Over 10,000+ companies use Seamless.ai to generate millions in sales at companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook, Slack, Dell, Oracle & many others.Mr. Bornancin is also the author of "Sales Secrets From The Top 1%" where the world's best sales experts share their secrets to sales success and author of “The Ultimate Guide To Overcoming Sales Objections.”FOLLOW BRANDON:LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonbornancin/INSTAGRAM ► https://www.instagram.com/brandonbornancinofficial/FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/SeamlessAITWITTER ► https://twitter.com/BBornancin

Past Lives & the Divine
Interview: Sarah LouWho & Past Life Regression

Past Lives & the Divine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 63:04


Our conversation meanders all over and covers how she got into hypnosis, why she wanted to learn how to facilitate these sessions, how it's influenced her life, how she taps into her own intuition and how we've both evolved when it comes to haunted spaces and being able to clear them with less fear.Sarah is a beauty and skin care influencer, a hypnotist, and a tech communications company leader, world traveler and more!More about Sarah and her gifts:Website: https://www.sarahlouwho.comInstagram: @Sarah_LouWho.  .  .  .  .  .You can support the podcast if you're feeling giving or thankful:Leave a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts.Share this episode with a friend who would be interested in this conversation.Thank you for listening, your emails sharing parts of your stories, and for the reviews. I am so thankful for these conversations and for you!About Jina Seavall  / /  Jina has been helping people feel more in tune with their true nature and vitality since 2002. Using hypnosis and regression, Jina guides clients to experience and learn from Past Lives and their Spirit Guides so they can make the most of this life. More resources for you below! Grab Your At-Home Past Life Journey (Free!): https://www.pastlivesandthedivine.com/past-life-journey-at-homeVirtual Sessions // work 1-on-1 with me: https://www.pastlivesandthedivine.com/schedulePeruse the shop! Hypnosis at home: https://www.pastlivesandthedivine.com/shopHave a Question? Submit it anonymously here, and I will work to answer it in a future episode! https://www.pastlivesandthedivine.com/ask-a-questionFollow Jina on Instagram: @pastlives.tourguideCheck the Hypnosis Shop!I've made the hypnosis shop more inclusive and aligned with my beliefs and values. This process of making things in my business more inclusive is ongoing and this is the latest.For those who identify as BIPOC, L.G.B.T.Q.I.A.+, or are experiencing financial hardship, you can use coupon code PEACEFUL for a discount on the hypnosis tracks in the shop. Tell your friends! :)

HR Leaders
Pablo Maison on Purpose, Lessons Learned, & the Changing Landscape of HR

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 40:00


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest Pablo Maison, Chief Human Resources Officer at Grupo Perez Companc.Thanks to Oracle for Supporting the show!Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auEpisode Highlights01:02 - About Pablo04:34 - What he loves about HR06:33 - Lessons learned over the past year08:50 - Pablo on his purpose10:22 - How the pandemic changed HR12:25 - HR's biggest challenge moving forward...19:16 - ... and it's biggest opportunities28:16 - How he relaxes outside of work29:20 - On the worst times of Pablo's career32:41 - Could he ever leave the function?33:19 - What held him back from success35:55 - The best business advice he's been givenIf you enjoyed the podcast be sure to subscribe for more content like this and visit our website to access resources mentioned: www.hrleaders.co/podcastSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Channel 9
Migrating to SQL: Introduction to Database Schema Conversion Toolkit (DSCT) (Ep. 9) | Data Exposed

Channel 9

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 14:00


Looking for a cross-platform Oracle schema conversion solution? Join Alexandra Ciortea, Alexander Ivanov, and Anna Hoffman to learn about the new experience we are building in Azure Data Studio. This feature is currently available in Insiders build of Azure Data Studio and will soon be available in the mainstream as well.[00:25] Introduction[01:15] What is DSCT[02:41] Demo[10:09] What to know when getting started[11:39] Scenarios[12:38] Roadmap Resources:Azure Data Studio – InsidersMigrating to SQL series playlist

HR Leaders
HR Leaders Summit 7/7: The Next Great Disruption Is Hybrid Work: How to Build a Future-Proof Organisation?

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:30


This is a special episode of the HR Leaders podcast, you are listening to the seventh session from the HR Leaders Online Summit aired on October 4th.We are joined by Lisa Calicchio, Chief HR Officer at WCG, Corina Carbonne-Stephens, VP HR, Organization & Services at ENI, Sarah Chartrand, SVP Global Talent & Diversity at Ahold Delhaize, and Zaina Orbai, Chief People Officer at The RealReal.Thanks to Oracle for partnering with us to make this possible.Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auNever miss an event, follow HR Leaders on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/hrleadersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HR Leaders
HR Leaders Summit 6/7: Leadership Evolution: Developing the Hybrid Leader to Deliver in the Disrupted 21st Century?

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 55:47


This is a special episode of the HR Leaders podcast, you are listening to the sixth session from the HR Leaders Online Summit aired on October 4th.We are joined by Moderator: Christopher Lind, Chief Learning Officer at ChenMed, Anne Jaeckin, Chief HR Officer at Coty, Simon Brown, Chief Learning Officer at Novartis, Theresa Cook, Head of EMEA Talent Development at TikTok, Michael Fors, Senior Global Director, Workforce Development at Boeing, and Sanyin Siang, #1 Exec Coach by Thinkers50 and Professor at Duke University.Thanks to Oracle for partnering with us to make this possible.Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auNever miss an event, follow HR Leaders on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/hrleadersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HR Leaders
HR Leaders Summit 5/7: How the Next Frontier of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion goes beyond HR & Talent

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 22:44


This is a special episode of the HR Leaders podcast, you are listening to the fifth session from the HR Leaders Online Summit aired on October 4th.We are joined by Moderator: James Cheng, Global Chief Diversity Officer at Zimmer Biomet, Traci Wade, Senior Director, Diversity & Inclusion at Oracle, LaQuenta Jacobs, Chief Diversity Officer at XPO Logistics, Denise Reed Lamoreaux, Worldwide Learning Director at Microsoft, Ricki Wax, Global Diversity, Equity, Inclusion Program Manager at Google, Mara Zavagno, and Chief D&I Officer and VP Talent, Engagement & Rewards at Konecranes.Thanks to Oracle for partnering with us to make this possible.Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auNever miss an event, follow HR Leaders on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/hrleadersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HR Leaders
HR Leaders Summit 4/7: People Analytics: How to Dissect Complex HR Data into Digestible & Actionable Insights?

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:17


This is a special episode of the HR Leaders podcast, you are listening to the fourth session from the HR Leaders Online Summit aired on October 4th.We are joined by Allie Boddington, Executive Director HR Transformation at Oracle, and Caroline Gladwin, Executive Solution Director at Oracle.Thanks to Oracle for partnering with us to make this possible.Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auNever miss an event, follow HR Leaders on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/hrleadersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HR Leaders
HR Leaders Summit 3/7: Workforce, Workplace & Wellbeing: How to Create a ‘Culture of Care'?

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 49:26


This is a special episode of the HR Leaders podcast, you are listening to the third session from the HR Leaders Online Summit aired on October 4th.We are joined by Moderator: Adrian Gostick, Best Selling Author of “Anxiety at Work”, Andy Holmes, Global Head of Wellbeing at Reckitt, Nabeela Ixtabalan, EVP & Chief People Officer at Walmart, Julie Spurlin, SVP HR at Software AG, Kally Kang-Kersey, VP HR at Zebra Technologies and Lina Donnaruma, and Head of HR & Organization at ITT.Thanks to Oracle for partnering with us to make this possible.Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auNever miss an event, follow HR Leaders on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/hrleadersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HR Leaders
HR Leaders Summit 2/7: How can we Build the Skills and Leaders for the Future, Now?

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:48


This is a special episode of the HR Leaders podcast, you are listening to the first second from the HR Leaders Online Summit aired on October 4th.We are joined by Mark Skinner, Chief People Officer at William Hill, Keith Keating, Head of Global Learning Network at General Motors, Marco Serrao, VP HR Europe at Deutsche Telekom, Ditte Marstrand Wulf, Chief HR Officer at Covetrus, Theresa Zeller, and Global Head Integrated Learning Experiences at Merck.Thanks to Oracle for partnering with us to make this possible.Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auNever miss an event, follow HR Leaders on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/hrleadersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HR Leaders
HR Leaders Summit 1/7: How to Shape the Future Employee Experience in the Work From Anywhere Age

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 41:32


This is a special episode of the HR Leaders podcast, you are listening to the first session from the HR Leaders Online Summit aired on October 4th.We are joined by Mark Skinner, Chief People Officer at William Hill, Keith Keating, Head of Global Learning Network at General Motors, Marco Serrao, VP HR Europe at Deutsche Telekom, Ditte Marstrand Wulf, Chief HR Officer at Covetrus, Theresa Zeller and Global Head Integrated Learning Experiences at Merck.Thanks to Oracle for partnering with us to make this possible.Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auNever miss an event, follow HR Leaders on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/hrleadersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sales Secrets From The Top 1%
Distributive Content Strategy

Sales Secrets From The Top 1%

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 2:35


SUBSCRIBE TO SALES SECRETS PODCAST:ITUNES ► https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/s...​SPOTIFY ► https://open.spotify.com/show/1BKYsQo...​YOUTUBE ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVUh...​THIS EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY SEAMLESS.AI - THE WORLD'S BEST SALES LEADS:WEBSITE ► https://www.seamless.ai/LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/seamlessai/JOIN FOR FREE TODAY ► https://login.seamless.ai/invite/podcastBrandon Bornancin is a serial salesperson, entrepreneur and founder of Seamless.AI. Twice a week, Brandon interviews the world's top sales experts like Jill Konrath, Aaron Ross, John Barrows, Trish Bertuzzi, Mark Hunter, Anthony Iannarino and many more -- to uncover actionable strategies, playbooks, tips and insights you can use to generate more revenue and close more business. If you want to learn the most powerful sales secrets from the top sales experts in the world, Sales Secrets From The Top 1% is the place to find them.SALES SECRET FROM THE TOP 1%WEBSITE ► https://www.secretsalesbook.com/LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/sales-secret-book/ABOUT BRANDONBrandon Bornancin is a serial salesperson (over $100M in sales deals), multi-million dollar sales tech entrepreneur, motivational sales speaker, international sales DJ (DJ NoQ5) and sales author who is obsessed with helping you maximize your sales success.Mr. Bornancin is currently the CEO & Founder at Seamless.ai delivering the world's best sales leads. Over 10,000+ companies use Seamless.ai to generate millions in sales at companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook, Slack, Dell, Oracle & many others.Mr. Bornancin is also the author of "Sales Secrets From The Top 1%" where the world's best sales experts share their secrets to sales success and author of “The Ultimate Guide To Overcoming Sales Objections.”FOLLOW BRANDON:LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonbornancin/INSTAGRAM ► https://www.instagram.com/brandonbornancinofficial/FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/SeamlessAITWITTER ► https://twitter.com/BBornancin

Rocketship.fm
Antitrust: The Lawsuits

Rocketship.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:46


Technology's rapid advance has undermined society's foundations. As misinformation spreads, privacy vanishes, and counterfeit goods proliferate, science promises us further advances, from stronger artificial intelligence to neuralink implants and quantum computing. More upheaval is on its way. But the same advances that have created these hard problems have also connected people the world over, democratized information access, and let small businesses expand nationally and even globally. And without cutting-edge technologies, we wouldn't have the mRNA vaccines that are helping to curb a global pandemic. This season we're looking at the good, the bad, and the ugly of technology and examining the potential effects of governments attempting to rein in some of the largest companies' global influence. *** This episode is brought to you by: Vidyard: The Top Video Tool for SaaS Marketing and Sales http://vidyard.com/rocketship NetSuite: NetSuite by Oracle is a scalable solution to run all of your key back office operations. Go to netsuite.com/rocketship today. Blinkist: Rocketship.fm is now on Blinkist! Listen to 12 minute episodes with no ads! Get seven days free when you check out Blinkist. Indeed: Indeed is the job site that makes hiring as easy as 1-2-3. Get started with a free $75 sponsored job credit at indeed.com/rocketship. BetterHelp: Unlimited Professional Counseling via Online Chat, Video or Phone Anytime, Anywhere. Get 10% off when you visit betterhelp.com/rocketship. Fundrise: Fundrise makes investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks, bonds, or mutual funds. Go to fundrise.com/rocketship today. Airfocus: The home for products and the people who build them. Airfocus is an easy-to-use and flexible product management platform that combines product strategy superpowers with modularity. Visit airfocus.com/rocketship and try it for free today. WIX: When your agency partners with Wix, you unlock an entire digital ecosystem for creating, managing and growing your business online. Head over to Wix.com/Partners and reimagine what your agency can accomplish. *** This show is a part of the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. We encourage you to visit the website and sign up for our newsletter for more information about our shows, launches, and events. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy.    Since you're listening to Rocketship, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows surrounding entrepreneurship, business, and careers like Creative Elements and Freelance to Founder. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Founders
Steven Spielberg: A Biography

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 29:50


What I learned from reading Steven Spielberg: A Biography by Joseph McBride. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode. You will unlock 217 full length episodes and get lifetime access to every future episode.You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."GET LIFETIME ACCESS TO FOUNDERS

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey
Ep 501 | Forced Vasectomies For All?

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 33:52


We start today by talking about the Left's rabid desire to get Joe Biden's "Build Back Better" spending package passed. Several activists followed Arizona Senator Kyrsten Sinema into a restroom to harass her for having reservations about the bill. Then, we discuss another proposed bill from a Democrat that would require vasectomies for "inseminators" once they have three kids or turn 40. The best part is, they really think it makes some kind of profound point about the "tyranny" of pro-life legislation. --- Today's Sponsors: Annie's Kit Clubs have an amazing selection of hobbies to choose from: crocheting, knitting, cardmaking, jewelry-making, quilting, & sewing. There's never been a better time to try it out! Go to AnniesKitClubs.com/ALLIE & save 50% on your first kit! Good Ranchers safely delivers American craft beef & better-than-organic chicken, right to your door. Go to GoodRanchers.com/ALLIE & save $20 off when using promo code 'ALLIE', plus get free shipping on one-time orders. Or save 20% when you subscribe! NetSuite by Oracle is the #1 financial system - gives you visibility & control of your finanials, inventory, HR, eCommerce, & more. Right now, they're offering a one-of-a-kind financing program only for those ready to switch today! Go to NetSuite.com/ALLIE right now! --- Show Links: CBS News: "What's In the $3.5 Trillion Reconciliation Bill"? https://cbsn.ws/3BlCLqB The Hill: "Biden: 'Not Appropriate' for Protesters to Follow Sinema Into Bathroom" https://bit.ly/3mo9164 National Review: "Chasing Kyrsten Sinema Into a Bathroom Is Not Normal" https://bit.ly/3Dg1H3o Sen. Kyrsten Sinema's statement about the bathroom incident: https://bit.ly/302lEwm Washington Free Beacon: "Dem Legislator Calls for Forced Vasectomies" https://bit.ly/3lh5DuF The Cut: "Giving Birth in the End Times" https://bit.ly/3Dj7pla Jameela Jamila's IG post: https://bit.ly/2YzSqEu --- Buy Allie's book, You're Not Enough (& That's Okay): Escaping the Toxic Culture of Self-Love: https://alliebethstuckey.com/book Relatable merchandise: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

HR Leaders
Building an Inclusive Workplace Where Everyone has an Opportunity to Thrive

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 21:51


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest Louisa Gregory Vice President, Culture, Change and Diversity at Colt Technology Services.Thanks to Oracle for Supporting the show! Download their Definitive Guide to People Analytics 2021: https://bit.ly/3meS3auEpisode Highlights00:00 - Her personal journey moving from Australia to Singapore to now residing here in the UK02:26 - A look at her role and how it's progressed over the years04:01 - How they are creating a culture of inclusion at Colt07:44 - Her thoughts on the great resignation10:13 - What she would change about the world of work11:55 -The effect hybrid is having on DEI13:41 - How they are preparing their people to return to work16:19 - What allyship means to her17:51 - The biggest learning she gained during her role18:26 - What she is most excited about going forward19:57 - HR Leaders Quick Fire RoundIf you enjoyed the podcast be sure to subscribe for more content like this and visit our website to access resources mentioned: www.hrleaders.co/podcastSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Small Business Show
Choosing Accounting Software and the Best Books and Podcasts for Small Business Owners

The Small Business Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 43:45


How do you choose the best accounting software for your Small Business? What's right for one business may not fit the needs of another. Today on The Small Business Show we talk Accounting software during our introduction and then it's on to books and Podcasts! What business books are your hosts Shannon Jean and Dave Hamilton reading? Join us today to learn about the books that have made an impact on the Small Business success of your hosts. Dave and Shannon also dive into their current favorite Podcasts that they are listening to. Listen in and learn! 00:00:00 Small Business Show #348 for Wednesday, October 6, 2021 00:01:00 Quick Bambee Discussion 00:01:26 Selling Your Business… To the Government? 00:05:09 1202 Small Business Stock Gains Exclusion 00:07:50 What Accounting Software Do You Use for Your Business's Bookkeeping? QuickBooks FreshBooks AccountEdge (formerly MYOB) feedback@businessshow.co What features does my business need? FileMaker Server for Linux FMPHost 00:17:53 SPONSOR: NetSuite. NetSuite by Oracle is the #1 Financial System - no matter how big your business grows. NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program only for those ready to switch today! Head to NetSuite.com/sbs 00:19:26 SPONSOR: Bambee – Let Bambee help with your dedicated HR Manager! Go to Bambee.com/SMALL right now to schedule your free HR audit. 00:21:16 Business Books and Podcasts 00:21:20 Book: The Slight Edge by Jeff Olson 00:22:59 Podcast: Marketing Over Coffee – Christopher Penn and John Wall. Link-building, SEO, and Mailing Lists! Moves fast, and the hosts stay right with each other. Great stuff! Tip: LinkedIn 60-seconds, 3x/day, 5 days. Fixed! 00:25:08 Book: The Power of Positive Thinking by Norman Vincent Peale 00:26:36 Podcast: The Business of Story – Park Howell understands the (super!) power of story, and interviews folks who have lived the same. He often talks about “living into” your story. 00:28:29 Book: The E-Myth by Michael Gerber — Learn how to work on your business, not in your business. Create an org chart for every job you do! 00:30:01 Podcast: As Told By Nomads — Tayo Rockson interviews folks with a global, big picture. Good for inspiration and also for zooming out and seeing the world from outside of our little bubbles. Hustle, innovation, and the importance of marketing are recurring topics here. 00:32:02 Biography Books: Andrew Carnegie, Biography by David Nasaw; The People's Tycoon (Henry Ford) 00:35:19 Podcast: Focused — David Sparks and Mike Schmitz are as obsessed with being productive-not-busy as we are, and they attack it from efficiency angles twice a month. Awesome stuff. 00:37:02 Book: Influence — The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert Cialdini - Focusing on Reciprocity, Social proof, Scarcity, and more. 00:38:34 Book: The Dilbert Principle by Scott Adams — Great inspiration for solo-preneurs, persuasion. 00:42:24 SBS 348 Outtro BusinessShow.co/survey

Sales Secrets From The Top 1%
The 5 Pillars Of Success

Sales Secrets From The Top 1%

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 2:01


SUBSCRIBE TO SALES SECRETS PODCASTITUNES ► https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/s...​SPOTIFY ► https://open.spotify.com/show/1BKYsQo...​YOUTUBE ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVUh...​THIS EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY SEAMLESS.AI - THE WORLD'S BEST SALES LEADSWEBSITE ► https://www.seamless.ai/LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/seamlessai/JOIN FOR FREE TODAY ► https://login.seamless.ai/invite/podcastBrandon Bornancin is a serial salesperson, entrepreneur and founder of Seamless.AI. Twice a week, Brandon interviews the world's top sales experts like Jill Konrath, Aaron Ross, John Barrows, Trish Bertuzzi, Mark Hunter, Anthony Iannarino and many more -- to uncover actionable strategies, playbooks, tips and insights you can use to generate more revenue and close more business. If you want to learn the most powerful sales secrets from the top sales experts in the world, Sales Secrets From The Top 1% is the place to find them.SALES SECRET FROM THE TOP 1%WEBSITE ► https://www.secretsalesbook.com/LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/sales-secret-book/ABOUT BRANDONBrandon Bornancin is a serial salesperson (over $100M in sales deals), multi-million dollar sales tech entrepreneur, motivational sales speaker, international sales DJ (DJ NoQ5) and sales author who is obsessed with helping you maximize your sales success.Mr. Bornancin is currently the CEO & Founder at Seamless.ai delivering the world's best sales leads. Over 10,000+ companies use Seamless.ai to generate millions in sales at companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook, Slack, Dell, Oracle & many others.Mr. Bornancin is also the author of "Sales Secrets From The Top 1%" where the world's best sales experts share their secrets to sales success and author of “The Ultimate Guide To Overcoming Sales Objections.”FOLLOW BRANDONLINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonbornancin/INSTAGRAM ► https://www.instagram.com/brandonbornancinofficial/FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/SeamlessAITWITTER ► https://twitter.com/BBornancin

Rockstar Confidence
How to Get Out of That Struggle Loop

Rockstar Confidence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 24:42


Last week we acknowledged what's keeping us on the struggle bus, stuck in that repeating loop.   Today, we're talking about tangible steps and strategies to get you OUT!   If this episode RESONATES ;) and you enjoy it, please help the show grow and share the love! Take a screenshot or screenflow, share it to your social media, tag me, and let me know what you liked most!   Join the Quantum Soul Activation Mastermind here!!   Watch the webinar to learn more about Quantum Soul Activation!   If you're ready to try a virtual Reiki session and really release energy blocks and gain CLARITY, to move energy on a SOUL level, click here to book one! (**Card pulls always included with Reiki sessions!)   Purchase a 3-card or 8-card Oracle reading here! (All done via email. Please allow up to 24-48 hours for a response.)   Join The Energy Within Facebook group!   Follow me on Instagram! (Message me here if you're interested in talking about doing some shadow work sessions!!)   Follow Kristin Kacisnki on Instagram!   Follow me on Facebook!   Visit my blog!   Download your FREE Abundance Meditation here!   Create your own positive affirmations without feeling cheesy or fake with the Affirmations Workbook!   Get the Confidence-Boosting Meditation Collection: 12 Guided Meditations to Increase Mindfulness and Focus, Reconnect to Yourself, and Build True Confidence   Support Operation Underground Railroad and stop child sex trafficking! Listen to Tim Ballard, founder of OUR, on the Jordan Harbinger Show!

The Critshow
Card Sharks Wolves (S4,E10)

The Critshow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 55:42


Our heroes finally have a stretch of good luck as they split up to finish their tasks. Tass makes good on a promise. Jake learns about Mother. Megan tests a bizarre, magic wall. Kim makes a quick getaway. While they are riding high on their success, they set their eyes on a new target… a casino run by werewolves. ------  You can support The Critshow through our Patreon to get more weekly TTRPG Actual Play content, access to our discord community, and much more! Follow The Critshow on twitter, join our subreddit, and follow us on Instagram.  Get a free MotW mystery and some Keeper tips from Rev by signing up on our website!  And don't forget to check out our wonderful sponsors! This episode of The Critshow featured Jake as the Wizard, Kim as the Oracle, Megan as the Hunter, Tass as the Tainted, and Rev as The Keeper.  This episode was edited by Brandon (Rev) Wentz with music by Jake Pierle. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Java Off-Heap
OffHeap 66. Faster LTS releases? And A new Java license you say? How...peculiar

Java Off-Heap

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 70:36


So aside from being all giddy about Java 17 LTS release, we take now a deep dive on the changes that Oracle announced on their release schedule and Licensing. WANL (We are not Lawyers) but that didn't stop us from discussing what could it mean, and where would it go! Faster LTS, we are onboard. It's fun to be able to jump from LTS to LTS, but what does that mean for older releases and maintainability (as Oracle longstanding policy is to sunset the "oldest" of LTS when a new one comes out). We see the interesting dynamics on this with the new "Oracle No Fee Terms and Conditions", and what does that mean for Big Red's plan for our favorite programming language. In all, an interesting episode to pay attention to (and to know what's important). Like all Licenses, do talk to a real lawyer before adopting a new license (we really are just code monkeys that managed to wrestle a microphone). Or go with another Java open source binary provider on the standard licenses (Like Adoptium!) http://www.javaoffheap.com/datadog We thank DataDogHQ for sponsoring this podcast episode DO follow us on twitter @offheap http://www.twitter.com/offheap Events: SpringOne Videos Available https://springone.io/ EclipseCon - October 25-28 https://www.eclipsecon.org/2021 Jakarta One - December 7 https://jakartaone.org/ Jconf.dev - December 8 - 10 https://2021.jconf.dev/ The new Dev.java https://dev.java/ FooJay.io https://foojay.io/ Intellij Updates https://www.jetbrains.com/idea/whatsnew/ Netbeans 12.5 Released https://netbeans.apache.org/download/nb125/index.html Reactive Summit - November 2-3 https://www.reactivesummit.org/ Oracle Developer Live - October 26-27 https://developer.oracle.com/developer-live/java-innovations-sep-2021/ jChampions - January 2022 https://jchampionsconf.com/ DevNexus - April 2022 https://devnexus.org/ Java Is Still Free! https://medium.com/@javachampions/java-is-still-free-3-0-0-ocrt-2021-bca75c88d23b Oracle Java 17 Licenses https://www.oracle.com/java/technologies/javase/jdk-faqs.html  

Alles auf Aktien
Netflix-Knüller und die Wahrheit über die Superreichen

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 15:11


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Finanzjournalisten Daniel Eckert und Anja Ettel über das Comeback der Wachstumsaktien, medizinische Airpods und den #Uptober für den Bitcoin. Außerdem geht es um Infineon, HelloFresh und Deutsche Bank, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Pinduoduo, Nvidia, Disney, Facebook, Tesla, LVMH, Oracle, Alphabet, Berkshire Hathaway, Microsoft, Amplifon, Vonova, Demant A/S. "Alles auf Aktien" ist der tägliche Börsen-Shot aus der WELT-Wirtschaftsredaktion. Die Wirtschafts- und Finanzjournalisten Holger Zschäpitz, Anja Ettel, Philipp Vetter, Daniel Eckert und Nando Sommerfeld diskutieren im Wechsel über die wichtigsten News an den Märkten und das Finanzthema des Tages. Außerdem gibt es jeden Tag eine Inspiration, die das Leben leichter machen soll. In nur zehn Minuten geht es um alles, was man aktuell über Aktien, ETFs, Fonds und erfolgreiche Geldanlage wissen sollte. Für erfahrene Anleger und Neueinsteiger. Montag bis Freitag, ab 6 Uhr morgens. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören.

Screaming in the Cloud
Non-Incidentally Keeping Tabs on the Internet with Courtney Nash

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 33:40


About CourtneyCourtney Nash is a researcher focused on system safety and failures in complex sociotechnical systems. An erstwhile cognitive neuroscientist, she has always been fascinated by how people learn, and the ways memory influences how they solve problems. Over the past two decades, she's held a variety of editorial, program management, research, and management roles at Holloway, Fastly, O'Reilly Media, Microsoft, and Amazon. She lives in the mountains where she skis, rides bikes, and herds dogs and kids.Links: Verica: https://www.verica.io Twitter: https://twitter.com/courtneynash Email: courtney@verica.io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at the Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimizeapplications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: VMware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Periodically, websites like to fall into the sea and explode. And it's sort of a thing that we've accepted happens. Well, most of us have. My guest today is Courtney Nash, Internet Incident Librarian at Verica. Courtney, thank you for joining me.Courtney: Hi, Corey. Thanks so much for having me.Corey: So, I'm going to assume that my intro is somewhat accurate, that we've sort of accepted that sites will crash into the sea, the internet will break, and then everyone tears their hair out and complains on Twitter, assuming that's not the thing that fell over this time—Courtney: [laugh].Corey: —but what does an Internet Incident Librarian do?Courtney: Yeah, I'll come back to the first part about how—some people have accepted it and some people haven't, I think is the interesting part. So technically, I think my official real title is, like, research analyst or something really boring, but I have a background in the cognitive sciences and also in technology, and I'm really—have always been fascinated by how these socio-technical systems work. And so as an Internet Incident Librarian, I am doing a number of things to try to better understand—both for myself and, obviously, the company I work for, but for the industry as a whole—what do we really know about how incidents happen, why they happen, when they happen, and what do we do when they happen? And how do we learn from that? So, one of the first things that I'm doing along those lines is actually collecting a database of all of the public write-ups of incidents that happened at companies that are software-related.So, there's already bodies of work of people who collect airline incidents and other kinds of things. And we don't have that [laugh] as an industry, which I think is—I want to solve that problem because I think other industries that have spent some time introspecting about why things fall down, or when things fall down and how they fall down. Take the airline industry for example; planes don't really fall out of the sky very often.Corey: No. When it does, it makes news and everyone's scared about flying, but at the same time, it's yeah, do you have any idea how many people die in car crashes in a given hour?Courtney: Yeah, yeah. And we'll come back to how the media covers things in a minute because that is definitely something I have opinions about. But, I'm not trying to say I want to create the NTSB of the internet; I don't think that's quite the same thing, and I really want something in the spirit of software, and the internet, and open-source that's more collaborative and it's very open to all of us. So, the first step is to just get them in one place. There is no single place where you could go and say, “Oh, where all of the X incident reports? Where all the ones that Microsoft's written, and also Amazon, or Google, or, you know, whoever.”Corey: They have them, but they hide them so thoroughly. It turns out that they don't really put that in big letters on their corporate blog with links to it. And when you look at one incident report, they don't say, “Here, look at our previous incident reports.” They really—Courtney: Yeah.Corey: —should but no one does.Courtney: And I think that's fascinating because there's a precedent. So, there's two precedents, and I just gave you basically one side of the two, which is, the airline industry has done this and it's not like people don't fly, right? So, a lot of internet companies, a lot of software-based companies, seem to be afraid of what their customers, or what the stock market, or what folks will think. Mind you, these are publicly traded [laugh] airline companies. People aren't going to stop using Amazon just because you give more of this information out.And so I think that piece is—I would love to see that stop being the case. Because the flip side of the coin is that this is a rising tide lifts all boats kind of thing, which granted, not all companies agree on, especially really big ones because their boats already mowing all the little ones out of the ocean. But that's another story.Corey: Sure, but also, it's easy to hide an outage. “Our site is down for you can say three days. Great, if a customer didn't try to access the site at all during those three days, was the site really down in the first place?”Courtney: Oh, the tree in the forest of internet outages. Yes, it's true, although I think that companies are—they know that people go complain on social media, right? I think there's more and more of that happening now. It's not like you can hide it as easily as you could have before Twitter or Instagram or—Corey: Right. Whereas a plane falls out of the sky, generally it's one of those things that people notice.Courtney: Yeah. Even if you weren't interested in that flight at all.Corey: Right. When it lands in your garden, you sort of have a comment on this.Courtney: [laugh]. Yeah. Pieces fall out of the sky. That has happened. But I think the other flip side of the coin I already mentioned is the safety of airline industry has increased so significantly over the past, you know, whatever, 30, 40 years because of this concerted effort.And the other piece of it, then, as an industry, as technologists, as people who use software to run their businesses, some of those things are now safety-critical. And this comes back to the whole software is running the world now. Planes now actually could fall out of the sky because of software, not just because of hardware failures. And nuclear power plants are [laugh] run by software, and your electronic grid, and your health care systems, heart rate monitors, insulin pumps. There are a lot of really critical things, and now our phone services and our internet stuff is so entwined in our lives, that people can't be on their Zoom calls, people can't run their businesses. So, this stuff has a massive impact on people's lives. It's no longer just pictures of cats on the internet, which admittedly, we've really honed the machine for that.Corey: No, but now when software goes down, the biggest arguments people make, the stories people tell is, “Oh, well, it meant that the company lost this much money during that timeframe.” And great, maybe. We can argue about is that really true or is it not? It depends entirely on the company's business model, but I don't like to tend to accept those things at face value. But yeah, that's the small-scale thing, especially when you start getting to these massive platform providers. There are a lot of second and third-order effects that are a lot more interesting slash important to people's lives, than, well, we couldn't show ads to people for an hour and a half.Courtney: Right. Yes. Absolutely. So, T-Mobile had this outage, what is it, how is time—time is still not working very well, for me. I'm trying to remember if it was earlier this year, or if it was in—it was last year. I think it was 2020. And you're like, T-Mobile, oh okay, whatever. You know, like, cell phones, yadda, yadda. 911 stopped working. [laugh].And it was a fascinating outage because these are now actually regulated industries that are heavily software-backed. There was a government investigation into that the same way we have NTSB investigations into airline accidents, and they looked at all of those, kind of, second or third-order effects of people who—you know, a grandma who was stranded on the road, people who couldn't call 911, those kinds of things that are really significant impacts on people's lives. And the second-order effect is, oh, yeah, AWS goes down—like you said—and Amazon or people like to say, Jeff Bezos—I guess, now, are they going to complain about how much money Andy loses? I guess so—but [laugh] what lives on AWS, that's crazy to think about, right?Corey: Yeah, the more I learn the answer to that question, the more disturbed I become.Courtney: Well, you'd probably know a better answer to that question [laugh] than a lot of people.Corey: They have the big companies they can talk about. What's really interesting is the companies that they don't and can't. An easy example: financial services is an industry that is notorious for never granting logo rights. Like, at some point, they'll begrudgingly admit, “Yes, our multinational bank does use computers.” But it's always like pulling teeth, and I get it on some level; the entire philosophy of a lot of these companies is risk-mitigation, rather than growth and advancing the current awareness of knowledge. But it does become a problem.Courtney: Yeah. It's interesting, I need more data, which we'll get to—help me, people—but I am able to start seeing some of those interesting graphs of, kind of these cascading effects of these kinds of outages. And so I strongly believe that we need to talk about them more, that more companies need to write them up, and publish them, and be a lot more transparent about it. And I think there's a number of companies that are showing the way there that—and it has to do with your first question which is, we've all sort of accepted this, right? But I disagree with that.I think those of us who are super close to these kinds of complex, dynamic distributed systems totally know that they're going to fail, and that's not shocking, nor the case of incompetence. We are building systems that are so big and so complex, no one person, no 10X engineer out there could possibly model or hold the whole thing in their head. Especially because it's not even just your systems… we were just talking about, right? Your stuff's on GitHub; it's on AWS; there's, like, three other upstream providers; there's this API from over there. These systems are too intricate, too complex; they're going to fail.Corey: So, we're back to why all these things failed simultaneously and it comes out it's a Northern woods, middle of nowhere backhoe incident. That's right, if we look at the natural food chain of things, fiber optic cable has a natural predator in the form of a backhoe. To the point where if I'm ever lost in the woods, I will drop a length of fiber, kick some dirt over it, wait a few minutes; a backhoe will be along to sever it. Then I can follow the backhoe back to civilization. They don't teach that one and the boy scout manual, but they really should.Courtney: Yeah. Oh, my gosh. There was a beaver outage in Canada, which is the—[laugh] God, that's the most Canadian thing ever.Corey: Can you come up with a more Canadian—Courtney: No.Corey: —story than that? I would posit you could not, but give it a shot.Courtney: No, probably not. Anyhoo. So, I think, like I was saying, those of us close to it accept that, understand it, and are trying to now think about, okay, well, how do we change our approach and our philosophy about this, knowing that things will fall down? But I think if you look at a lot of the rest of the world, people are still like, “What are those idiots doing over there? Why did their site fall down?”Corey: Oh, my God—Courtney: Right?Corey: —the general population is the worst on stuff like this. The absolute worst.Courtney: The media is the worst. [laugh].Corey: It's, “How did they wind up to going down?” “Yeah, because this stuff is complicated.” Back when I was getting started in tech, I thought the whole thing worked on magic, so I started figuring out different pieces of it worked. And now I'm convinced; it runs on magic. The most amazing thing is this all works together. Because—Courtney: Yeah.Corey: —spit and duct tape and baling wire holding this stuff together would be an upgrade from a lot of the stuff that currently exists in the real world. And it's amazing.Courtney: I know the secret, Corey. You know what holds it all together?Corey: Hit me with it. Hope? Tears?Courtney: People.Corey: Mmm.Courtney: Technology is Soylent Green, Corey. It's Soylent Green. It's made of people.Corey: And that's the thing that always bugs me on Twitter. The whole HugOps movement has it right. When you see a big provider taking an outage, all their competitors are immediately there with, “Man, hope things get back together soon. Best of luck. Let us know if we can help.” And that's super reassuring because today is their outage; tomorrow it's yours.Courtney: Yep.Corey: And once in a blue moon, you see someone who's relatively new to the industry starting trying to market their stuff based on someone else's outage, and they basically get their butts fed to them, just because it's this—it's not what you do, and it's not how we operate. And it's one of the few moments where I look at this and realize that maybe people's inherent nature isn't all terrible.Courtney: [laugh]. Oh. Oh, I would hope that would be something that comes out of all of this.Corey: Yeah.Courtney: No one goes to work at their day job doing what we do, to suck. [laugh]. Right? To do a bad job.Corey: Right. Unless you're in Facebook's ethics department, I completely agree with you.Courtney: Okay. Yes. All right. There are a few caveats to that, probably. But you know, we all want to show up and do good stuff. So, nobody's going in trying to take the site down, barring bad actor stuff that's not relevant.Corey: When Azure takes an outage, AWS is not sitting there going, “Ah, we're going to win more cloud deals because of this,” because they're smarter than that. It's, no, people are going to look at this and say, “Ah, see. Told you the cloud was dangerous.” It sets the entire industry back.Courtney: Yeah. That's why we need to talk about it more, and we need to just normalize that these things happen and that we can all level up as an industry if we get a lot smarter about how we, A) think about that, and B) how we react to them. And we will develop much more useful models of our safety boundaries, right? That's really it. You don't know—no one at any of these companies hardly knows if you're five steps from the cliff, five feet, driving a Ferrari 90 miles an hour towards the edge of it.Like, we don't know, it's amazing to me just how much in the dark we are as an industry and how much of the world we're running. So, I think this is one tiny, first little step in what could be sort of a sea change about how all of this works. So, that's a big part of why I'm doing what I'm doing.Corey: Well, let's talk about something else you're doing. So, tell me a little bit about VOID?Courtney: Yeah. So, that's the first iteration of this. So, it's the [Verica Open Incident Database 00:14:10]. I feel like I have to say this almost every time John Allspaw would like me to say that it's the Verica Open Incident Report Database, but VOID is way cooler than—Corey: VOIRD?Courtney: VOIRD.Corey: Yeah, that sounds like you're trying to make fun of someone ineffectively.Courtney: Yeah. And there's a reason why he's not in marketing. But what this is is a collection of all of the publicly available incident reports in one place, easily searchable. You can search by company, you can search by technology, you can filter things by the types of, sort of, kinds of failure modes that we're seeing. And it's, I hope, valuable to a wide swath of folks, both technologists and otherwise: researchers, media and press types, analysts, and whatnot.And my biggest desire is that people will look at it, realize how incomplete it is, and then help me fill it. [laugh]. Help me fill the VOID, people. I think I have right now, at the time we're talking, about 1700, maybe 1800 of these. And they run the gamut. And I know some people who like to quibble about language—and I am one of those people having been an editor in various flavors of my life—not all of these are what a lot of people directly related to these, sort of, incident management and whatnot would call ‘incident reports.'I wanted to collect a corpus that reflects all of the public information about software-related incidents. So, it's anything from tweets—either from a company or just from people—to a status page, to a media article, a news article, an online article, to a full-blown deep-dive retrospective or post-mortem from a company that really does go into detail. It's the whole gamut. It's all of those things. I have no opinionated take on that.I want that all to be available to people. And we've collected some metadata on all of the incidents as well. So, we're collecting the obvious things like when did it happen? What date was it, if we can figure it out, or if it's explicit—how long was it? And those kinds of things and then we collect some metadata, like I said. We add some tags: was this a complete production outage, was it a partial outage? Those kinds of things.And this is all directly just taken from the language of the report. And we're not trying—like I said—we're trying not to have any sort of really subjective takes on any of that, but a bit of metadata that helps people spelunk some of this stuff. So, if it is the kind of report—these are usually from a status page, or a company post about it—what kinds of things were involved in this outage? So, sometimes you'll get lucky and the company will tell you, “It was DNS,” because, you know, it's always DNS.Corey: On some level, it always is. That's why—Courtney: It always is.Corey: —DNS is my database. It's a database problem.Courtney: It's a database problem. And sometimes you get even more detail. And so we will put as much of that that's in the report into a set of metadata about these things. So, I think there's some fascinating, really easy things that I've already seen from some of these data, and we kind of hit on one of these, which is the way that companies themselves talk about these outages versus the way that press and media and other types of organizations talk about these things. So, I think there's a whole bunch of really fascinating analysis that's going to be available to nerdy research-minded type folks like myself.I think it's a place, though, where technologists can also go and spelunk things that they're interested in, looking for patterns, anything that's really—there's an opportunity for experts in the field to add insights to what we can discern from these public incident reports. They are, like, two orders abstracted from what happened internally, but I think there's still a lot that we can learn from those. So, the first iteration of the VOID will allow people to get a first look at some of the data and to help me, hopefully, add to it, grow that corpus over time, and we'll see where that goes.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I love the idea of having a centralized place where outages, post-mortems, root cause analyses—I'll let you tear into that in a minute—and other things that are all tied to where can I find a list of outages. Because companies list these on their websites, they put them in blog posts, and it's always very begrudging; they don't link them from any other place, you have to know the magic incantation to find the buried link on their site. Having something that is easily searchable for outages is really something that's kind of valuable.Courtney: Yeah. And I mean, some of them are like—I'm looking at you, Microsoft—I like you for a lot of reasons, but hey, I have to scroll your status page. I can't link directly to their write-ups, and—this is Azure—and it [laugh] please stop. Make it easier. [laugh]. You're driving me crazy; I don't even have a data model to figure out how to make this work for people, other than, like, taking screenshots of them.So yeah, so there's shades of grey and black in how much they'll share, or how easy it is to find these things. So, it'll be interesting to see if there's any less-than-positive [laugh] reactions to all of this being available in one place. I'm anticipating at least a little bit of that.There is one other type of metadata that we collect for the VOID. And that is the type of analysis that is conducted if it is clear what that type of analysis is. And there, some companies explicitly say, or call it an RCA, “We did a Root Cause Analysis.” There's a few other types; some people talk about having a Contributing Factors Analysis. Most people don't consider a formal analysis type, but I am trying to collect and categorize these because I do think there are some fascinating implications buried therein, and I would like to see if I can keep track of whether or not those change over time. And yes, you've hit on one of my favorite hot-take soapbox things, which is root cause.Corey: Please, take it away.Courtney: Yeah. Well, and anyone who's close to these systems and has watched these things fall down has the inherent sense that there is no root cause. Like—[laugh]—let's—great. One of my favorite ones: human error. We don't have enough hours for this, Corey. I'm sorry. That's one of my favorite other ones. But let's say somebody fat-fingers a config change. Which happens—Corey: That was fundamentally the S3 service disruption back in—Courtney: Yes.Corey: —2017 that took down S3 for hours on end.Courtney: And took down so many other people that relied on S3.Corey: Everything was tied to that. And that's an interesting question; when something like that hits, does that mean that everything it takes down get its own entry in VOID?Courtney: I hope so. If everybody writes them up, then yes. [laugh]. So, if S3 goes down, and you go down, and you write it up, and you put it in the VOID, then we can see those things, which would be so cool. But let's go back to the fat-fingered config file—which if you haven't ever done, you're lying, first of all—Corey: Or you haven't been allowed to touch anything large and breakable yet, which, either way, you're lying on some level. So, please—Courtney: Yeah. I mean, I took down [Halloway's 00:20:53] homepage when it was on Hacker News because of YAML. So, anywho. Even if you fat-finger a config change, that's not the root cause because you have this system wherein a fat-fingered configure change can take down S3. That is a very big, complex, and I might add, socio-technical system.There are decisions that were made long ago about why it was structured that way, or why this happens that way, or what kinds of checks and balances you have. It's just, get over it people. There is no root cause. These are complex, highly dynamic systems that when they fail, they fail in unpredictable and weird ways because we've built them that way. They're complex because you're successful at pushing the envelope and your safety boundaries.So, if we could get past the root cause thing as an industry, I mean, I could probably just retire happy, honestly. [laugh]. I'm a simple woman; could we just get one thing, people? [laugh]. First of all, then it gives non-technologists, people outside of our bubble, the media, you can't hang it on these things anymore. We all have to then grapple with the complexity, which admittedly humans, not big fans of, but—Corey: People want simple stories, simple narratives. When people say, “Oh, remember the S3 outage?” They don't want to sit there and have to recount 50,000 different details. They want to say, “Oh, yeah. It took down a few big sites like Instagram, United Airlines, and it was a real mess.” The end. They want something that fits in a tweet, not something that fits in a thesis.Courtney: Well, and if you have a single root cause, then you can fix the root cause and it will never happen again. Right?Corey: That's the theory. If we're just a little bit more careful, we're never going to have outages anymore.Courtney: Yeah, if we could just train those humans to not try to make the best possible high-quality decision they could possibly make in that situation given the information they have at the time, then we'll do better. But I mean, that's why your system stay up most of the time, if you think about it. It's shocking how well these things actually work the vast majority of the time. And that's what we could learn from this, too. We could, you know—oh if we would write near-misses up, please.I mean, if I could have one more wish, I think one of the coolest things the airline industry and the government side of that did was start writing up near-misses. It's, wow, what do we learn from when we're successful, versus trying to, like, spelunk and nitpick the failures.Corey: Most of us aren't so good at the whole introspection part. We need failures, we need painful outages to really force us to make difficult, introspective, soul-searching decisions and learn from them.Courtney: Yeah. And I don't disagree with that. I just wish one of the things we would learn is that we should study our successes, too. There's more to be mined from our successes, if we can figure out how to do that, then there is from our failures. So, I have a metadata category in the VOID called ‘near-miss.'And oh man, I really wish people would write those up more. I mean, I think there's, like, five things in there that I've found so far. Because the humans hold these systems together. We make these things work the vast majority of the time. That's why there is no root cause, and even when we're involved in these things, we're also involved in preventing them, or solving them, or remediating them. So, yeah, there's no root cause. Humans aren't the problem. Those are my big hot button ones.Corey: I really wish more places would embrace that. Even Amazon uses the ‘root cause' terminology internally, and I'm not going to sit here and tell them how to run large things at scale; that's what I pay them to figure out for me. But I can't shake the feeling that by using that somewhat reductive terminology that they're glossing over an awful lot of things the rest of us could really benefit from.Courtney: Well, so the question then—one of the other things that I look at is, personally when I read and analyze these incident reports, these public ones a lot, I always ask myself, “Who's the audience for this?” And there are different audiences for different types of incident reports and different things. The vast majority of them are for customers, partners, investors.Corey: The stock market. Yes. Yes.Courtney: They're not actually for the organization. There's usually an internal one that we don't get to see—maybe—that's for the organization. But a lot of places feel that if you have a process, and a template, and a checklist, and a list of action items at the end, then you've done the right thing. You've had your incident, you've talked about it, you've got your action items. Move on.Corey: Right, and it always seems with companies, that as you get further into the company, the more honest and transparent the actual analysis is. Like, at some point, you wind up with the, like, they're very public and very cagey, and under NDA, they open up a little bit more, and a little bit more, and finally, when you work there, their executive team, it turns out, the actual thing was, “Well, Dewey was carrying arm full of boxes in the data center, tripped, went cascading face-first into the EPO cutoff switch that cut power to the entire facility.” The cagier they get, the—I guess, not to be unkind here—but the more ridiculous whatever the actual answer is. It's one of those things where, “Really? Someone tripped and hit a button. You didn't have a plan for that?” “Well, not really. We sort of assumed that people would”—Courtney: Why would you have a plan for that, right?Corey: Right.Courtney: I mean like—[laugh].Corey: Why would you have a plan for that, the first time?Courtney: Yeah. I mean, so imagine this exercise: sitting down in a room with a bunch of people and going, “What are all the things that could go wrong?” I mean, [laugh] ain't nobody got time for that? That's not how it works. You all have other jobs to do, too, and systems to build, and pressures, and customers, and partners, and features to build, so admit and acknowledge that you just won't know all of the antecedents and how do you respond when things happen?Which is a whole other, you know—I know you told me you recorded an episode with Dr. Christina Maslach on burnout, which I'm so happy you did, and there's a whole ‘nother piece of incidents and incident response, and burning people out, and blaming people, and all that stuff that's a whole ‘nother pod—it sounds like you might—you know, probably not incidents with her. But still, these things take a toll on people. And people who, like I said, show up every day really hoping to do their best job, and go up a ladder, and get a promotion, and whatever. So, I think not just treating those things as checklists has broader implications as well, just for the wellbeing of your organization.Corey: On some level, the biggest problem that I think we've run into is that, as you said, it all comes down to people. Unfortunately, legally, we can't patch those. Yet.Courtney: No, [laugh]. No, no. Not most kinds of patches, no. And that's messy. And I know some people are like, “Everyone should learn to code.” And I'm like, “Actually, everyone should get a liberal arts degree.” Come on, help me out people. Because there's so much of these socio-technical systems where the socio part of it is more relevant than the actual technical part.Corey: I believe you're right, for better or worse; there's no way around it. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where can they find you? And we will, of course, throw a link to VOID in the [show notes 00:28:06].Courtney: Yeah, I also like to talk on Twitter, like you do. I'm not as good at it as you are, but I try. So yeah, I'm @courtneynash on Twitter. And at Verica, you can find me at Verica as well, courtney@verica.io. And those are the best ways to find me, I would say. And yeah, please people, write up your incidents, send them to the VOID and let's all learn and get better together, please.Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really do appreciate it.Courtney: Thank you for having me on. I know—do people say this: I'm like, “Yeah, big fan,” but I am. I'm a [laugh] big fan [laugh] of the podcast.Corey: Oh, dear Lord, find better things to listen to. My God.Courtney: [laugh]. But it's been a treat. Thank you.Corey: Courtney Nash, Internet Incident Librarian at Verica. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment making it very clear that for whatever reason the website is down, it is most certainly not your fault.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need the Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Beyond the Uniform
BTU #409 - Investing in Cybersecurity (Ken Gonzalez)

Beyond the Uniform

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 40:57


Why Listen: Ken is an absolute Rockstar. His career includes working at some of the most iconic brands in Silicon Valley; Siebel Systems, McAfee, AVAST Software, FireEye, and now founding and running his own investment firm, NightDragon. Here are six different things to keep an ear out for in this episode. First of all, why veterans should consider a career in cybersecurity and what the characteristics of this industry are. Second, what life is like as a mid to late-stage investor. Third, the one thing everyone overlooks when it comes to networking. Fourth, using the lens of fun learning and money to evaluate career shifts. Fifth, why you should always take a job interview even if you're happy at your current job. And sixth, an overview of the corporate development role, something we've never talked about on the show. As always at beyondtheuniform.org you'll find the show notes for this episode with links to everything we discussed, as well as 408 other episodes just like this all provided for free. About Ken: Ken Gonzalez is the Managing Director of NightDragon, an investment and advisory firm focused on investing in growth and late-stage companies within the cybersecurity, safety, security, and privacy industry. Prior to NightDragon, Ken was the Managing Director of ForgePoint Capital. Previously, he led the strategy and corporate business development functions at FireEye, AVAST Software, McAfee, and Siebel Systems (now part of Oracle) and was responsible for acquisition target selection, deal negotiation, and post-merger integration. He also served in the United States Army as an infantry officer with the 82nd Airborne Division and the 75th Ranger Regiment.

The Cloud Pod
136: Take us to your Google Cloud Digital Leader

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:58


On The Cloud Pod this week, the whole team definitely isn't completely exhausted. Meanwhile, Amazon releases MSK Connect, Google offers the Google Cloud Digital Leader certification, and DORA's 2021 State of DevOps report has arrived.  A big thanks to this week's sponsors: Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. JumpCloud, which offers a complete platform for identity, access, and device management — no matter where your users and devices are located.  This week's highlights

Path 11 Podcast
353 Wild Hearts Rise Up with Molly Mandelberg

Path 11 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:37


Molly Mandelberg is the Founder of Wild Hearts Rise Up, Creator of “Magnetic Influencer Collective” and also the writer and illustrator of "The Wild Hearts Rise Up Oracle Deck". She is the host of both “Tactical Magic” Podcast and “Reveal the Game of Life” Podcast. After spending years mastering content creation and online marketing, Molly finds her bliss in bridging the worlds of heart-centered healing and transformation, with the practical business strategies of leveraging a message into a global movement. She is a certified NLP Coach, an Access Consciousness Bars Facilitator, a Transformational Leadership Coach and a full time Nomad. Molly works with coaches, healers, and conscious leaders to broadcast their messages with ease, so they can reach more people, and make more money with less time spent. She travels the world full-time and runs her 6-figure business out of her self-converted sprinter van tiny-home. Molly loves helping her clients to systemize their work and master the magnetics of marketing, so they can experience more freedom and make an even bigger difference. Oracle deck https://wildheartsriseup.mykajabi.com/oracle-deck-and-guidebook?ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwildheartsriseup.mykajabi.com%2Fa%2F2147491289%2FxoB5FbFe Peace with with money https://wildheartsriseup.mykajabi.com/peace-with-money?ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwildheartsriseup.mykajabi.com%2Fa%2F2147489806%2FxoB5FbFe Free offerings for Path 11 Podcast listeners: http://wildheartsriseup.com/offerings http://wildheartsriseup.com/quiz -------------------------------

Ho Ho Hong Kong
Psychic Entertainer Stuart Palm on performing Mentalism and Reading Mo and Vivek's tawdry futures.

Ho Ho Hong Kong

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:53


Stuart Palm is an international psychic entertainer, artist, hypnotist, illustrator, seer, reader, mentalist and father. He joins us to talk about his upcoming show “World of Wonders,” his new tarot cards “Palm's Oracle”; the amazing variety of uses for Hypnosis, and performing Mentalism in Hong Kong and around the world. This episode was aired live on Shopstream. Get the Shopstream app here: https://qrco.de/bcP1HA join us on Patreon for weekly bonus eps every Thursday: https://www.patreon.com/hohopod Follow Mohammed on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theothermohammed/ Follow Vivek on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/funnyvivek Follow Stuart Palm on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/psychicentertainer/ Get tickets to Stuart's show on Oct 8: https://www.ticketflap.com/bsc-stuart-palm