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Best podcasts about Holy Cross

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Latest podcast episodes about Holy Cross

Science Night
Tik Talking About Teaching with Dr. Andre Isaacs

Science Night

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 72:53


This week we're talking to chemist and tik tok star Dr. Andre Isaacs. We talked about mentorship, creating the proper learning environment, the importance of creating a more diverse and inclusive STEM landscape, and much much more. Plus we have a news segment covering oceans of open data, malleable metal, and creepy crawlers. Check out links to these stories and everything Dr. Isaacs talks about at scinight.com. Your Hosts] James Reed (https://twitter.com/James_Reed3) Steffi Diem (https://twitter.com/SteffiDiem) Jason Organ (https://twitter.com/OrganJM) Our Guest Dr. Andre Isaacs is an associate professor of organic chemistry at the College of the Holy Cross. He is also a pretty incredible creator on Tik Tok, where he shows that scientists can have fun, and that educators can do some serious educating without being so serious. By creating a strong sense of community in his classroom and lab, Andre is training the next generation of students to be confident in their work, and comfortable with being their authentic selves. Credits Editing-James Reed Mastering- James Reed Music: Intro and Outro- Wolf Moon by Unicorn Heads | https://unicornheads.com/ | Standard YouTube License Additional Sounds- Inside a Computer Chip by Doug Maxwell |https://www.mediarightproductions.com/ | Standard YouTube License The Science Night Podcast is a member of the Riverpower Podcast Mill (https://riverpower.xyz/) family

The Secret Teachings
The Secret Teachings 5/9/22 - Plowshares into Swords

The Secret Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 120:01


An image of what some are calling 'black magic' appeared on the side of a Ukrainian artillery headquarters last week. Upon detailed analysis, one can find the runes Sigel (victory, lightning, sun) and Kenaz/Kano (strength, protection, fire), along with serpents in the image. The Sigel had become known as the 'z' on the side of Russian tanks. The base of the 'black symbol' is found in the sigil of Jupiter/Zeus, the marking of the Solomonic demon Decarabia (gives knowledge of plants, herbs, and controls birds), and the signature of the Voodoo Loa Bossu Trois Cornes (a protector in war). A symbol of ancient Chinese sorcery, the KU, is also found in the same symbol, a practice using poisonous snakes like those within the sigil. In the image is also the word "zein", which is the 7th Hebrew letter for the word 'sword'. Zeins are also the most abundant protein found in corn. The Loa Bossu Trois Cornes clearly has the word 'corn' in his name. Seven is the number of the head and a sword alongside represents decapitation. Historically, agricultural societies 'killed the king' or decapitated a god in the fall and then turned crops into bread and wine. This god was resurrected in spring. Such a symbol could also represent an inversion of such tradition, decapitating the king of grain in the spring, which would lead to mass starvation. April-May is not only the culmination of the burning season of Beltane, leading to Walpurgis and May Day, but the planting season in Ukraine which is a breadbasket of the world. The overall themes are energy, like that of oil or food, victory, fire, and protection in times of war. From Z and Zeus/Jupiter to his brother Poseidon/Neptune, we find the Trident of the latter on the Ukrainian flag and that Ukraine also used Neptune missiles to sink a Russian ship supposedly carrying a piece of the cross of Christ. It seems that instead of turning plowshares into swords, the opposite is occurring as part of a larger ritual using occult symbols to bring about a cataclysm.

Chip Baker- The Success Chronicles
TSC S2 #132- Coach Freddie Quartlebaum Jr.

Chip Baker- The Success Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 44:58


Freddie Quartlebaum is the Director of Basketball Operations for the Kansas Jayhawks Men's Basketball Team. Quartlebaum played college basketball at Fordham where he was a four-year letter winner. The New York City native graduated from the Fordham with a degree in communications. He has coached at several colleges over his more than 20 yr career(Navy, Towson, Holy Cross, Fairfield, Notre Dame, North Carolina, Iowa State, St. John's and Kansas). He is the co-author of the book “The Positivity Tribe in the Locker Room” and 2022 NCAA National Basketball Champion. @qfit50 #coachq #kansas #ncaa #champion #college #basketball Social Media Links Youtube Channel youtube.com/c/ChipBakerTheSuccessChronicles LinkedIn http://linkedin.com/in/chip-baker-thesuccesschronicles-825887161 Facebook https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100014641035295 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/chipbakertsc/ Twitter twitter.com/chipbaker19 Linktree https://linktr.ee/ChipBakerTSC Online Store http://chip-baker-the-success-chronicles.square.site/

Mission-Driven
Chris Mann '00

Mission-Driven

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 80:58


Welcome to Season 3!  New episodes will be released througout the spring and summer of 2022. The first episode of season 3 features a conversation with Chris Mann '00.  Chris has built his career around making a difference in the lives of others.  He's joined in conversation with JP Cunningham '23.  They discuss Chris' time at Holy Cross and how he has carried the HC mission to serve others throughout his life and career. Interview originally recorded in November 2021. -- Chris: And so, I think you're seeing companies really say, "This is about our values and being clear on what our values are." Because our most important stakeholders, our people are saying that that's what matters to them and that's what they care about. And so, I think we just think about business differently. Maura: Welcome to Mission-Driven, where we speak with alumni who are leveraging their Holy Cross education to make a meaningful difference in the world around them. I'm your host Maura Sweeney from the class of 2007, Director of Alumni Career Development at Holy Cross. I'm delighted to welcome you to today's show. This episode features Chris Mann from the class of 2000. Maura: Chris's career has spanned roles that have one thing in common, making a positive impact on people and communities. He graduated from Holy Cross with a psychology major and art history minor. With this foundation, he joined the Dana-Farber and Jimmy Fund team, and his career flourished. Skilled at fundraising, event planning, marketing, and communications, Chris flexed his talents and roles at New Balance, Cone Communications, Reebok, and City Year. Maura: At the time this podcast was recorded, Chris worked as the Senior Vice President of Development for City Year. At the time this podcast is aired, Chris will have assumed a new role at Bain Capital as the first Vice President of Community Affairs, leading their philanthropy, employee volunteerism, events, and sponsorship. Chris is joined in conversation by JP Cunningham from the class of 2023. Maura: Their conversation is far-reaching but starts with the transformative years that Chris spent at Holy Cross, his time on the track and field team, and serving as senior class president, as well as his experiences during immersion programs and running summer orientation helped shape who he is today. Better yet, he can count the ways that the Holy Cross Alumni Network has supported him through each step in his career. A proud alumnus, Chris exemplifies the impact that one person can make by committing their talents to mission-driven work. JP: Hello, everyone. Thank you all for listening. I'm JP Cunningham. I'm a junior here at Holy Cross. And I'm joined by Chris Mann. Chris, how are you doing today? Chris: Hey, JP. I'm good. Good to be here with you today. JP: Thank you. So, yeah, I guess with that, we'll get right into it. I wanted to start with a little bit before your time at Holy Cross. So, my first question is, during your college search, what were some of the factors that drew you to the college? And was it your top choice? Yeah, if you can touch on that. Chris: Yeah, absolutely. So, like most high school students, I was looking at a lot of different schools. I didn't quite know what I wanted. I was the first and oldest child in my family, so I hadn't any brothers or sisters go through the college application process before. And at the time, this was in the mid-'90s, there wasn't as much information. It was kind of the glossy books you got in the mail and things like that, and word of mouth. But I knew a couple of things. Chris: I knew living in Andover, Massachusetts and growing up there, I wanted to be close enough to home that I could get back and forth. So, that kind of kept me looking at New England colleges for the most part. And as I started exploring, I knew about Holy Cross's reputation from an academic standpoint, but also had a couple of people at my high school, Andover High School, that I remember really respecting and looking up to in some ways that had gone to Holy Cross a couple of years before me. Chris: So, Chris Sintros, who was a class of '98, and Christine Anderson, class of '99. And I think it just piqued my interest to say, "Hey, those are people that I think I want to be like, and they chose this school." I actually got really fortunate to end up at Holy Cross. It was one of, I think, five schools I applied to, and I was waitlisted. So, I actually didn't know that I was going to get in until right to the end, and was really relieved and excited when I got in off the waitlist. Chris: And it ended up being a great scenario because I came on campus as the only person from my high school going to Holy Cross in that class. And I was matched up with three roommates in a quad in my freshman year. And it really helped me build some relationships and a network right away in a new place, new environment. JP: Awesome. That's really cool. Yeah, I can kind of relate to that, too, because both my dad and my sister went here, and then a lot of just friends and older classmates at my high school went to Holy Cross. And they're all just role models. And I felt the same way like, wow, this seems like a good place to be and that's what drew me there, too. So, it's great. Chris: Yeah. And I would say too, in visiting the school and seeing it, I mean, I certainly fell in love with the classic New England brick college, IV and setting, and it's a beautiful campus, as you know. And so, that, I was really excited about. And I started to get more and more of a field just as I came to visit a couple of different times. Chris: And as you started to read in and hear about the college's mission, and talking about being men and women for and with others, that all started to really resonate for me and felt a little different compared to some of the other schools that I had been visiting, and I loved that. I also really thought that the size was right for me. I was somewhat of a shy kid. I think I was trying to figure out where my place was. Chris: And I liked the idea of being in a school that felt a little smaller and where I wasn't going to get lost in the shuffle. And I think that ended up being a really big thing for me over the course of the four years, too. JP: Yeah, I couldn't agree more. I feel like people might say it's cliche, but I feel like at Holy Cross, the sense of community, just being on campus that first time, at least for me too, visiting that first time, there's something about it that really draws you and makes you feel like, "Hey, this is the place for me." Yes. I guess moving into the next question, after you became a student here, what were some of the things you were involved in during your time on the Hill? And was there one that you were most passionate about? Chris: I got to do a lot of different things, which was to our earlier point, the benefit of going to a smaller school with a lot of opportunities. Off the bat, athletics ended up being a big thing for me, which wasn't something I had planned. I had done sports in high school all three seasons. Really, I was passionate about basketball and track and field, but hadn't expected to be able to do that in college. Chris: And I showed up on campus and I remember, I think it was probably the first week of school, I got a phone call from Larry Napolitano who was the captain of the track team just saying, "Hey, we saw you did track and field in high school. Would you be interested in coming out and joining the team?" And I said, "Yes", and it was one of the great experiences of my time on the Hill being able to be part of that team. Chris: I certainly wasn't a phenomenal athlete or setting any records, but being part of that team environment, getting a chance to get into the daily routine that athletes do I think really benefited me. The structure was really helpful. I think it prepared me for life after college and having a busy schedule of going from weightlifting, to workouts, to classes, to other things. Chris: And just the relationships you build with teammates and coaches and the life lessons of athletics were really valuable and it helps cement a lifelong practice of fitness and health that exists to this day. So, that was foundational. That was a big one. And then, later in my time at Holy Cross, my senior year, I ended up getting encouraged to run for student government. And I ended up being elected president of the senior class of 2000. Chris: And that was a really powerful experience for me, too, so having a broader role in leading fellow students and thinking about our voice on campus. And to be honest, putting myself out there more publicly to run and be elected was not something I was very comfortable with or used to. So, building up that courage and having people believe in me to do that was also really important. And I think it started to show me that maybe I could do some things that I hadn't previously been confident enough to do or thought I could do. Chris: So, that was another big experience. And same thing, balancing those commitments with academics, with athletics really prepared me for life after college and the working world. JP: That's great. Yeah. I feel like balancing all those activities, being a full-time student athlete while being the president of your class can only help you in the long run and having that structure to your schedule and balancing different activities. Because I don't play any sports, but just balancing activities week by week with the schoolwork and all that, it definitely... I feel like it can only help you for after you graduate. JP: So, yeah, going off that, I guess a little more shifting towards the academics. One of the great things about Holy Cross in liberal arts education in general is that you really have the opportunity to major in anything that piques your interest, and then go out and succeed in business or whatever field you choose. So, I know you're a psychology and art history major. Were there any specific skills that you developed from your course of study that have helped you in your professional career? Chris: Yeah, it's interesting. It was another case of I didn't know what I wanted to study. When I came to Holy Cross, I started taking a few different classes in different areas to try and understand what resonated with me and that was what attracted... the liberal arts education attracted me to Holy Cross as well because I didn't know what I wanted to do. Chris: And I found myself really intrigued in the early psychology classes that I took, whether it was Intro to Psychology, or we had some ones later, behavioral psychology and other things, that just fascinated me between the... both the science and the depth of that field, but then also the ways in which humans interact and the way in which our environment influences us just fascinated me. And I really found myself loving that. Chris: And then, on the flip side, I ended up getting a minor in art history, similarly, because I just found myself interested and passionate in the subject matter and human experience behind that. I wouldn't have thought at the time that either of those would translate into a career path or job. I wasn't going to be a psychologist. I certainly wasn't an artist, but I have found over time that I think there are some lessons in the specifics of that. Chris: And in my current job in previous iterations where I'm a fundraiser, and in essence, I sell people on City Year's mission and investing in City Year's mission, some of the experiences and the lessons from psychology come out there, and understanding how you engage and connect with and influence people. So, that is certainly there. Chris: But more broadly, I just think the liberal arts' approach and specifically Holy Cross and the rigor of the academics forced me to really get tight and concise with my thinking, with how to make an argument, with how to take in information, synthesize that and consolidate it and communicate in a really effective, clear way, both verbally, written, visually, et cetera. Those are things I lean on on a daily basis. And I don't think I appreciated it at the time. Chris: But in talking with friends and colleagues and others whose college experiences were very different, either giant lecture halls or other things, the time, the attention, the rigor of the academics was really valuable. And I don't think I realized it until much later. JP: Yeah, I agree. I feel like everyone... and that's also one of the things that drew me to the liberal arts education is the fact that people say, obviously, you study what's interesting to you, but then being able to develop those skills like critical thinking, communication, and just being able to use those skills effectively go a long way in the professional world. So, you touched on some of the activities you were involved in when you are here at Holy Cross. JP: And since you graduated, there have been a number of new programs, activities. For example, the Ciocca Center for Business, Ethics, and Society was established in 2006. Are there any programs or activities happening now that you've become aware of at Holy Cross that stand out to you or you wish were around when you were a student? Chris: I think the Ciocca Center would have been something I would have really enjoyed getting a chance to participate in. I think this idea of business and ethics and where those intersect, and how companies can have an impact on society has been the centerpiece of my career and the different jobs that I've had. So, I think I would have really enjoyed going deeper there in a more formal way, for sure. Chris: I also really appreciate what the college has done in the last few years as we think about diversity at Holy Cross and how is the Holy Cross experience accessible to all. That is, I think, one takeaway from my time. Certainly, we had some level of diversity when I was at Holy Cross, but it was not nearly what it needs to be and what it should be going forward. And I think particularly for fellow classmates that were of color or came from different backgrounds and the majority of students, I think it was a really challenging thing for them and continues to be. Chris: And so, I think the idea of having a college community that does have more representation, does have more diversity across all levels and spectrums of how diversity shows up is valuable because I think, to be honest, it creates a better learning environment, it creates better dialogue, it creates better understanding. And I think that was a challenge, to be honest, during my time at Holy Cross. Many of the students were just like me coming from the same families, communities, et cetera. Chris: And so, that's something that I've been very encouraged to see over the last few years. JP: Yeah, absolutely. I feel like as a student for me and talking to alumni like yourself and just other people I've spoken to, people just say it's awesome to see the way the college is changing for the better, both academically and socially, like you just touched on. Moving a little away from strictly Holy Cross, can you maybe run through your career or professional path starting after you graduated from the college? Chris: Yeah. So, I was really lucky, and this is an area where I talk to current students or students that are considering Holy Cross, and the network of alumni really stepped up and helped me start my career and pursue the opportunities I've had. And I've been really fortunate to come across Holy Cross graduates at every role, every organization that I've been in, which speaks to the power of even the network of a small school overall. Chris: So, I was trying to decide what I wanted to do after graduation. As we mentioned, I had done activities in track and field. I was big into sports, so I was thinking sports marketing and those areas. I also got a chance, while I was on campus, to do a couple of spring break trips via Habitat for Humanity and build some houses down in Tallahassee, Florida for two spring breaks in a row. Chris: That and an internship at the Special Olympics while I was a student started to spark my interest in having a job where I can actually give back and support causes I cared about, and earn beyond a paycheck feel like I was having an impact on a daily basis in my work. So, that was interesting to me. And we had also run and started summer orientations program, the Gateway Summer Orientation Program. Chris: I was fortunate to be part of that first summer orientation program as a leader and then later, one of the co-leads of it. And I found myself really liking and being attracted by events and the planning that would go into preparing for an orientation program or some other event, and then seeing that come together and seeing people have a great time interacting and being part of that event. So, I was looking at sports marketing. I was looking at event management. I was thinking about nonprofits and exploring different things. Chris: And I was talking with John Hayes, who's class of '91. And he was the director of Holy Cross Fund at the time. He was our advisor for our Senior Class Gift. And John said, "Hey, you should really go talk to my friend Cynthia Carton O'Brien now, a class of '93, who was working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund." And so, he connected me to Cindy via informational interview. I went and learn more about Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund, and just loved the idea of it. Chris: It was a cancer hospital, obviously in Boston, doing amazing work for patients and their families, but also had this deep connection in history to the Red Sox. So, as a sports fan, I was excited about that. And I ended up applying for a couple of different jobs there coming out of school. And on the fundraising side, one was potentially to work in plan giving, so helping people think about their giving benefiting those beyond their lifetimes and resourcing the organization for the future. Chris: And then, the other one was going to be a rotational role, which was going to work on different areas of fundraising, the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk, donor advance and stewardship events, and then also cause marketing, which at the time was a fairly new thing that companies were starting to do. And so, I ended up getting that second job on the rotation. And it was just a phenomenal opportunity experience to get to learn different parts of fundraising and to work with some really, really great team. Chris: So, when I think about advice for people coming out of school and what to think about, I think finding a job where you can learn as much as possible and get exposed to as many different things as you can certainly really worked out for me. And it gave me a chance to understand what parts of fundraising and events that I really liked and what worked well for me. And I was also really lucky to work with just some amazing people. Chris: In particular, my first boss and my first teams on the Jimmy Fund Walk, which later included a couple of Holy Cross grads in the years after me that we hired as well, was just a perfect first start into the working world, for sure. JP: Definitely. So, you may have just answered this next question, but I'll still pose it to you. I know you talked about your experience with the Gateway's orientation. So, would you say that was something that from your time at Holy Cross that greatly influenced your post-grad experience and career? Or were there few other things? Chris: Gateways did influence me mostly in that I realized that I really enjoyed working in a team environment and it was with a lot of students from across different grades that I hadn't met or didn't know before. And I think that idea of working in a team that had some diversity in their experiences, et cetera, is definitely something that's resonated longer term and I've realized leads to a great work environment and a great end product in that Gateway's orientation. Chris: I definitely love the event planning piece of it. And so, I think that steered me towards my first job, for sure. As I got older, I realized I didn't love the always on and the stress of the event planning and so I've since moved to other areas. But I think the idea of that camaraderie and coming together to build something bigger than yourselves was really valuable for me. And I also loved being able to share my experiences with others and with other students. Chris: And so, getting a chance to really talk to people and help share my experience was something that I valued. I think it was probably an early stage mentorship. I don't think I realized it at the time, but I think that's what drew me to it was being able to work with students who were coming into a Holy Cross environment, nervous about it, not sure what to do, and really saying, "Hey, this is going to be a great experience for you. And here's all the reasons why or here are some things to look at." Chris: I realized I think later that that idea of being a mentor and having that mentoring relationship is something that I really value and enjoying doing. But again, I don't think I realized it at the time. But I think it was one of those foundational things, for sure, at least in the early jobs. JP: Absolutely. Yeah, that's awesome. I feel like it's cool to think back on the different ways certain events or activities that you took or spend so much time participating in can go such a long way in your life and the decisions you made, and things like that. Chris: I think so. I think other experiences, too, that I had probably more steered in that direction of what I wanted to do for career, I think having the opportunity to do an internship during my junior year with the Special Olympics of Massachusetts and help to do the marketing and recruitment for a Polar Plunge event that they did sparked an interest in, "Oh, you can do marketing, and you can do these types of business things that I want to do that have an impact for our cause." Chris: And Special Olympics was near and dear to my heart because my mom was a special education teacher. And so, I saw firsthand the power that that can have when you have inclusive opportunities for all young people, and give them a chance to participate in athletics and have those same experiences and lessons that I did from it was really valuable. So, I think the idea and the spark of having a job that can have an impact started there. Chris: And then, I had a summer experience in between my junior and senior years at Holy Cross, where I worked in an educational camp for kids called Super Camp and spent a few weeks on a college campus working with students that were struggling academically. And what we learned in the process when you get to meet these kids and work with them is that, in most cases, it wasn't because they didn't have the ability to learn or to do those that work. Chris: It was because there were other things going on in their lives that were either being a distraction or creating additional challenges that made it hard for them to show up in the education environment or in school in the way that they could or they should. And I think that in hindsight really is why I find myself loving the work that we do at City Year right now. And it's come full circle in that way because we see that talent is absolutely equally distributed and it's everywhere, but access and opportunity are not equally distributed. Chris: So, that's part of what we get to do at City Years is to say, "How can we make sure that every student gets the opportunities that they deserve to really tap into their talent and see success in their futures?" And I think that experience at Super Camp really gave me the first understanding of what education can look like when it works for everyone. JP: Yeah, absolutely. So, while we're looking in hindsight and reflecting on your experience post-Holy Cross, I know there's a lot to say about the strength of Holy Cross's Alumni Network. Could you tell a little bit about how that network has influenced your professional career? Chris: Yeah, it's influenced my professional career because I've been lucky to work with Holy Cross grads in every step of the way in every job almost that I can think of. So, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, we hired Joe Robertson, who was a track and field classmate of mine, class of '02, Rebecca Manikian in the year before, '01. So, I got to work with both of them on the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk and had a community and a shared experience with the two of them. Chris: Worked with Kristina Coppola Timmins at Cone Communications. And Rebecca and Joe also were ended up being Cone alumni at different points. And then, now, a huge number of Holy Cross grads, past and present, that I have worked through, including my current boss, AnnMaura Connolly, class of '86. So, I think at every step, I've seen Holy Cross alumni show up both in the work environment and help in the broader network. Chris: There's not a question that I would have or a connection I'd be trying to make that I couldn't reach out to somebody at Holy Cross and just say, "Hey, we share this background. Can you help?" And there's been countless times where I've had Holy Cross grads that I either know or don't know be willing to offer advice or make a connection, no questions asked and right away all the time. And I think that's fairly rare, at least in my experience. Chris: And it always surprises me how we'll be having a conversation and somebody will say, "Oh, they went to Holy Cross." It's amazing I think how people show up, particularly in the space that I'm in where you're working in the nonprofit field or in other jobs that are trying to have an impact on society. I think that's where the Jesuit teachings I think resonate for folks. And they really internalized that learning and those values, and I think it shows up in their career choices, and it certainly did for me. JP: Definitely. Yeah. Even for me as a student, I feel like something everyone can agree on is the strength of the Holy Cross alumni network. And something I always think about, even before I became a student here, just like walking around, wearing either a Holy Cross hat or that purple shirt, I was surprised and people would be surprised based on how many times you would get stopped, like, "Oh, you went to Holy Cross. I was a grad from this class." And I think that's something really special about that network. Chris: Happens all the time. And you see it in families, too. I mean, you're seeing it in your own with your sister being a grad. And I'm hopeful that my kids will end up being graduates as well. But I think you see that legacy in a lot of ways among families, among communities, where that becomes more than just an individual experience. It's a shared family experience, which is a pretty special thing. JP: Yeah, definitely. And even the fact that, like you mentioned, even just being a student, the fact that any alumni you either reach out to or you meet, they're just so willing to sit down and talk for as long as you need and give you advice or whatever the purpose is for that phone call or that meeting. They really just sit down and are willing to help in any way possible. So, I think that's something that's awesome about the college. JP: So, moving along, I think one of the great things about this podcast is that it highlights and showcases the different ways that Holy Cross mission of men and women for others can play into so many different careers and stories of different alumni. So, I guess just to start, what mission or values fuel your professional work today? Chris: Yeah. It's interesting, I think I've been fortunate to work at this intersection of companies and causes coming together to drive better business and greater good. And it's happened throughout my career and gone full circle starting on the nonprofit side at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund and moving over to the corporate side at New Balance Athletic Shoe and later Reebok, and then now in my current role at City Year. Chris: Seeing how companies can work with nonprofits and advising some of them on how to do that, when I was at Cone Communications and advising clients on those pieces, it's just always fascinated me that you can have a social impact. And it doesn't have to just be about charity, it doesn't have to be just about volunteerism or working in a nonprofit that there's all kinds of ways in which everybody can do that individually and collectively. Chris: Companies have a tremendous opportunity and tremendous power to be able to do that. And so, for me, I realized early on through those internships, experiences that I knew I was motivated by doing something kind of more than earning a paycheck, that I wanted to see that impact. Personally, I want to have a job that at the end of the day, I could feel like we were doing something bigger. And I think that was always a core value. Chris: I think, for me, that came from my parents. I think my example was seeing my mom be a special education teacher and work with students to give them that opportunity and to address some of that inequity and make sure that education was tailored to their needs and their situation, paired with my dad who was an executive in an enterprise rent a car for his whole career, high powered, highly growing business, and getting to see that side of it. Chris: And I think those two sensibilities really steered what I was looking for and seeing it as an example. I wanted to dig into business problems. I love the how do you think deeply about that? How do you try and solve those? How do you get somebody to buy your product or support your company or do something? So, the marketing and advertising and those pieces of it were fascinating to me intellectually, but I wanted to see an impact at the same time. Chris: And so, I think I was searching for that through each role of saying, "How do we combine those two things? And how does that show up?" In my time at the Jimmy Fund, it was really good for two things. I think my first job there was working a lot with families that were participating in the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. And what I realized really quickly was, it was such a huge crash course in empathy and in building relationships and in listening. Chris: Because in most cases, I was just helping people that were participating in the event get registered, get their team organized and set up, get the T-shirts for the event, help them with their fundraising, things like that. But in most cases, I was talking with people that were either in the midst of the worst experience of their life because they were having somebody in their family facing cancer, or they were remembering the worst experience of their life and having lost somebody to cancer. Chris: And so, I think what I found is, you'd have a lot of conversations where people would get frustrated or they'd be angry or emotional, all rightfully so because they were dealing with really hard things. And I think I learned to be able to pick up on that and to connect with them and to try and find ways to encourage and support. And I think it was just a hugely valuable early experience in saying, "How do you connect with people and how do you build relationships?" Chris: "And how do you not take for granted both your own health and good fortune, but also how you'd be there when somebody else is struggling and understand what they're dealing with? And can you lift that load in some small way?" And I certainly was not doing anything significant in that regard and in that role, but I could make their day a little bit easier or solve a problem for them, et cetera. I started to really get excited about the ability to do that. And I found that was really motivating for me. Chris: So, the idea of having a purpose and being able to help somebody in a process during that day was, I think, started to become foundational. I think it also gave me a lot of perspective. You could be having a rough day in your job or something else going on. You could walk down the hall to the Jimmy Fund clinic and see the kids there that are coming in for treatment. It puts it in perspective pretty quick on your challenges and what's tough in your life when you're seeing that with a kid. Chris: So, for me, I think it helped build an immense sense of both opportunity to have an impact but then also an immense sense of gratitude for how fortunate I was. And I think those were two foundational pieces of that experience. And then, later, the second big lesson that I learned and this sparked the longer term career path was, I started to work more with the companies that were participating in the Jimmy Fund Walk, either that were sponsoring the event in different ways or they were getting their employees actively walking and fundraising. Chris: And that gave me a different side of it. It gave me exposure to stuff that I hadn't thought of, which was why would businesses do these types of things? Why would businesses want to have some sort of impact socially, which at the time was still relatively, I wouldn't say uncommon, but it wasn't as clear and upfront as it is today. Philanthropy was something that companies did on the side. It was nice to do because they wanted to be good citizens. But it wasn't a business strategy. Chris: It wasn't something that people were asking them about on a daily basis. It wasn't something that they thought about as part of their broader work as an organization and in their community. And so, that just fascinated me was like, why would companies want to do this outside of a classic kind of capitalist structure where they just have to add value for shareholders in the old Adam Smith lessons and things like that? Chris: And what I realized was, there was so much potential and so many resources that companies could bring to bear to help solve social issues. They had incredible skill and knowledge and power behind what they were doing in a lot of cases, really sophisticated ways to do things as businesses. Two, they had amazing people that they can deploy to have an impact in different ways, whether that was volunteering their time or giving access to their customers, things like that. Chris: And then, three, they can really tell a powerful story. Many companies can reach huge numbers of people and customers in a way that nonprofits can't and don't have the dollars or the access to be able to do. So, they could raise awareness and shine a light on different issues and get people to engage and support in a way that no nonprofit could ever hope to do. And I just became fascinated by that, on what a company could potentially do to have an impact in their community. Chris: And so, I think that job gave me two foundational experiences that I think have started to show up in each of the subsequent jobs that I started to have and really got me on that path. So, I think that's where the kind of being men and women for others started to show up for me was it was like a light went on, like, "Oh, this is how I can do that. This is where I can kind of have that be part of my daily life." JP: Yeah, that's amazing. I think what stuck out to me there was the perspective that you gained and you're sharing with us today is going back to at work or at school, you could be having a really bad day and that's that. I mean, obviously, no one enjoys having a bad day and it happens. But being able to just realize that oftentimes it could be way worse, and there's people, there are children and other people struggling, and they may be having a way worse day than you, I think that's a really important perspective for people to develop and take with them day by day. Chris: Yeah, I think so. Now, we have to acknowledge that that's easy for me to do as a white male, heterosexual, affluent, man of privilege in every possible dimension you can probably think of. I've had every advantage I could possibly have. And so, I think it's easy to say, "Have gratitude and appreciate those things when your life is what my life has been." And that doesn't mean we haven't had challenges and I haven't face things that have been tough, but I think it does give you a bit of a perspective. Chris: And I think gratitude and appreciation for those advantages and those experiences I've had is something that's driven a lot of the work for me and the why. But I would say within that, it's not uncommon, people come to try to have a social impact in many ways because of either guilt or a feeling of charity, like, "This is something I should pay it back. I should give back," and I certainly did. I think that was my perspective. I've been given a lot of opportunity. Chris: I owe it to others to give back in that way. I think when you start to do the work and you start to get proximate and really work on different issues, whatever it is, whether it's education or hunger or any way in which racism shows up in all of our systems, you start to realize that you move on the scale from charity to social justice, and really saying, "This isn't about me giving back or appreciating the opportunities I've had. This is about changing a system that is not just." Chris: "And it's my responsibility to play a deeper role there and to do what I can with the resources I have to drive some change there." So, I think you move from charity to social justice as you start to get proximate and more exposed to issues. And I think Holy Cross planted the ideas behind it and the early experiences, whether it was Habitat or other areas where I could start to see and get exposed to that. Chris: But I think later in my career and particularly at City Year, I started to see that more clearly and I think that's why my career has moved more in that direction. JP: Definitely. Yeah. So, I think you also, with those remarks you made, answered the next question I had, but I wanted to just emphasize. Is there something specific that drives you to work hard each and every day? And my takeaway from all you've just said is, I feel like the common theme of impact and purpose. That's what I picked up on, just whether it's you impacting someone or something, or the company you're working for, or just being able to realize the impact that someone else is having or that greater company is having on a specific cause. JP: That was my takeaway. And I think that's awesome just from a professional standpoint, being able to live by those themes of purpose and impact. That's really great. Chris: I think that's right. I think purpose and impact is the right way to frame it. I do think about that, hopefully, every day. Am I having a purpose and am I having an impact? In the day to day, I think you don't probably get up and get out of bed and think about that immediately. But I do think, as I thought about how I want to work and what jobs I want to take and what organizations I want to be at, I think in those times of reflection, certainly grounding back into purpose and impact has absolutely been the question I asked myself. Chris: Where can I feel connected and closest to a purpose? And where can I have the greatest impact in either my experience or in an organization that's working on a really hard problem? So, certainly, when I thought about coming to City Year and in my most recent role, that's absolutely what I was thinking about is, I had missed being close to the impact in a way that I had at Dana-Farber. Chris: And even at New Balance where I was on the corporate side but working closely with a lot of our nonprofit partners, I got to see that impact on a daily basis. When I moved into Cone Communications and advising nonprofit clients and business clients on their programs and their impact, I loved it. It was mentally fascinating and rigorous and an amazing training ground on all kinds of things around strategy and marketing and communications. Chris: Really tremendous skills and experience. But I found myself too far away from the people that we were serving, and I missed that. I wanted to get closer and back to that. And I think that's what drew me back to the nonprofit side at City Year was a chance to really work among people that were having that level of idealism and impact on a daily basis. Chris: And I also felt like it was a chance to take experiences and skills that I gained from other jobs and put them to really good use in helping, so you think about how we work with companies. Yeah. And I think the working hard piece to our earlier conversation, I think the rigor of Holy Cross academically and then all the other things that I got to be involved in really built that work habit in to where you show up and you do the work every day. Chris: And I think good things happen if you consistently spend the time and put in the effort. And again, I would say I had great examples, whether it's my parents or whether it's coaches and others, that really ingrain that work ethic and constantly trying to move forward for something bigger, whether it was a team that you were part of or whether it was the organization and the issue you were trying to support. JP: Definitely. Yeah. So, I guess to shift gears a little bit here, I wanted to talk about the Boston Marathon. Correct me if I'm wrong here, but you ran the Boston Marathon not once, not twice, but three times. Is that- Chris: Four actually. JP: Four, okay. So, the Boston Marathon, four times. At least in my opinion, being able to run the marathon one time is one heck of an achievement. So, could you tell me a little bit about what drove you to do that again and again and again and again? Chris: Yeah, yeah. It was working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute really was the big thing in our first event. And that I got to work on the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. I got exposed to the course because there was a fundraising walk along the route of the Boston Marathon. And we'd have thousands of people walk and fundraise for Dana-Farber along the route. So, I got to know the marathon course, its history. Chris: I got a really good opportunity to work with people like Dave McGillivray, the director of the Boston Marathon, and get to know him and his amazing team and learn from them. And just started to fall in love with that event. I would volunteer at the marathon and see it. And as a former track and field athlete, I wasn't a distance runner by any means, but I started to get it into my head that it would be a really challenging athletic experience. And so, that was interesting. Chris: To be honest, it was my wife that steered me in that direction. She ran the marathon first a couple of times for Dana-Farber and fundraise for them. And so, I got to see her experience doing that. And I'm kind of a competitive guy, so I decided that I wanted to do it myself. And I couldn't just let her have all the fun. So, I did, I signed up and ran for Dana-Farber. I actually got a chance to run that first marathon with my wife who, God bless her, waited for me and dragged me along those last few miles because I was struggling, and she was kind and carried me along. Chris: And then, I had a chance to do it a couple more times, which was great, including when I didn't finish, which was a huge disappointment and a physical struggle. But I got to come back in another year and completed, and it's some of my greatest memories and experiences of participating in that event and being part of fundraising for Dana-Farber, for City Year as part of that. The marathon is a really special event for Boston. Chris: And I think what you learn in that event is that people are always surprised and super like you were complimentary about being able to run that marathon. I fully believe that most people can run a marathon, and I've seen it firsthand on the course. I think what it gets to is our earlier conversation about how do you go pursue your goals and do those things. And anybody that's run a marathon can tell you that the race day is the reward. Chris: It's the thing at the end, it's the countless hours, the 16 weeks before where you're going and you're running three, four, five, six, depending on what your training schedule is, days a week. And putting in countless miles in good weather, bad weather, darkness, snow, rain, cold, your ability to get up and do that each day and keep consistently growing the mileage and keeping the training, that's what leads to the marathon and the success at the end. Chris: So, it's really about, can you do that work on a daily basis? And can you progress over time by sticking with it through the ups and the downs? And then, I was really lucky to train with great groups of people each time. And I think that's another lesson of it is, it's pretty hard thing to go train by yourself and go run a marathon by yourself. Most people that do it have done their training with a group of friends and other people that are running that helped motivate them, support them, and inspire them. Chris: And then, day off, all the people that are out there are cheering you on, supporting you, helping you get to that day. It's truly a team effort. So, I just got to get the rewards of doing it four times. JP: Yeah, that's an awesome achievement. And I have a ton of respect for you and anyone who does that. In fact, one of my buddies here at Holy Cross, Colman Benson, he's a sophomore, and he ran this past marathon. And just seeing him go through that training earlier in the fall, I'd be like, "Oh, what are you doing tomorrow?" He's like, "Oh, I'm running 12 miles in the morning, then I'm going to class." And I just think that's very impressive and definitely an awesome achievement. Chris: Yeah, it's not too late, JP. You can start training, too. JP: Yeah. So, I read in a previous interview that one of your most memorable achievements is your support of Susan G. Komen for the Cure while you're with New Balance. Can you speak a little to that? Chris: Yeah. So, after my first couple jobs at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, I mentioned I found myself just becoming so fascinated by what companies could do. And I realized that I really wanted to experience it from a company's perspective. I wanted to get over to that side of the work. Around that time, I also decided that I wanted to go deeper into business. I was working with companies. Chris: I was asking them to support us, but I didn't really understand business in a deep way. And so, I ended up going back to graduate school at night to get my MBA while I was working at Dana-Farber. And I ended up making the switch over to New Balance and taking a job there really that was the opposite or the flip side of what I had been doing at the Jimmy Fund. Chris: So, instead of asking companies to support us and asking them to sponsor and have their employees participate in our events, and have an impact in that way, I was helping to guide New Balance's investment in different nonprofits in the community and thinking about how we showed up with our dollars, with our products, with our people to support those efforts. And so, the job was to manage what New Balance called their cause marketing work at the time. Chris: I sat in the marketing department at New Balance. I was measured in the same ways that other marketers were on driving awareness of New Balance's brand, consideration of our product and trying on footwear and apparel and things like that, and then ultimately sales of that product, which was great. And I loved it because I got a chance to really get into the marketing and science of that, which was fascinating, and do it at a brand and in a field of athletic footwear and apparel that I was personally passionate about as a runner and as an athlete. Chris: So, best of both worlds there. And it was just a great opportunity to take what I knew from the nonprofit side and bring that sensibility into the corporate environment into how we showed up and work with our nonprofit partners, whether it was Susan G. Komen for the Cure or Girls on the Run, which was our other major partner. And I just loved it. And I think that really crystallized, this is the career path for me. Chris: I can work with cool products and in areas that I really liked, but I can have an impact in that way. And it just opened my eyes to what was possible for companies. New Balance was such a special place because it was a privately held, family-owned company, had a tremendous number of people that I worked there for years. It really felt like a community of people in ways that the Jimmy Fund and Holy Cross actually felt very similar to me, and that's what I loved about being there at the time. Chris: And we got to do some really cool things, whether it was working on all the different Komen events. I had a chance to meet Joe Biden, President Biden, when he was vice president at the time at an event for Komen and New Balance, which was amazing. We got to do great things, marketing our products, and attending different events, and meeting celebrities. I went on The Ellen Show to give away million dollars for breast cancer research and got to have the big chat out there and hand that to Ellen. Chris: So, amazing, unique experiences that I wouldn't have other ever anticipated getting a chance to do as a result of that job. It's a really special company. And later, I got a chance to really go deep and work with Girls on the Run after my time at New Balance. After I left New Balance, I had a chance to join the board of Girls on the Run and serve on their board and chair their board for a few years. Chris: And to get to work with that amazing nonprofit that focuses on women's leadership development and girls empowerment through a running curriculum and really social-emotional skill building curriculum was just an amazing experience to, again, work for another world-class nonprofit and get a chance to see it grow. So, another really fortunate opportunity for me. JP: Yeah, that's incredible. That seems like such an overall special, I guess, group of things that you got, meeting the president and going on The Ellen Show. That's awesome. So, I guess, it seems like it's hard to top those experiences. But has anything changed in terms of your most memorable milestone since then in your career? Chris: I think you start to look at what are the skills and experiences and most importantly, the relationships you build over your career. And each of those are really cool memories and experiences. But I think what matters is the relationships that you start to have and build over time. So, when I think about those different jobs, it's more about the people that I got a chance to work with and get to learn from. Chris: And I think City Year as my current job and organization now for the last eight years, that's what I start to think about and focus on is how have I gotten the chance to work with and learn from really great people, and continued. I think, even in this kind of midway through my career and later in my career, I feel like I'm still learning and growing on a daily basis, and getting better both at what I do tangibly functionally in my work. Chris: But also as a manager, as a boss, as a co-worker, as a parent, I think you start to pick up those lessons. And I think for City Year in particular, it's by far the most powerful place that I've ever seen as far as helping people really build connection to one another and to help us really explore who we are and how do we show up as our full selves at work on a daily basis. And how do we do that for other people, whether it's our co-workers or whether it's the students we work with in the schools we serve in. Chris: I think that's the amazing lesson and opportunity of City Year. So, I would say I hope I haven't hit the highlights of the careers. I got a lot of work left to do. And I think we've got a lot more to accomplish and learn. So, I'm excited about that. JP: Definitely. The best is yet to come. All right. So, now, to shift over, I know earlier, you talked about the idea of cause marketing and how that plays into your career. And I know that's been around for quite some time now and is becoming increasingly popular and being leveraged by businesses and nonprofits. So, for those who are listening who might not know a lot about it, could you speak a little about cause marketing and what that means to your career, past, present and future? Chris: Yes. It's interesting, you've seen a real change over the decades in how companies think about their responsibility and impact to society. And early on, it was very much about volunteerism and employees coming out doing different things. Or it might be about the company writing a check and the CEO handing it over to an organization. There wasn't really a business strategy. It was, "Hey, we recognize we're part of this community. We want to support our community and we find ways to do that." Chris: And then, what you started to see late into the '90s, early 2000s is companies started to read realize this could actually have a deeper business impact. People want to support companies that are doing good things in their communities. And we can tell that story via our marketing, our public relations efforts, via sponsorships and other things, kind of classic marketing and sales approaches. And so, they started to integrate cause into that. Chris: And so, you start to see opportunities like buy this product, we'll donate XYZ. And then, you started to see buy one, give one like TOMS and other new models of cause marketing come in. But in the early days, it was still very much kind of a business strategy using cause to drive it. So, it was, "We know people care about this cause. And if we talk about being associated with it, it would get them to buy our product or get them to take this action." Chris: And what we've seen over the last decade plus is that's really evolving and going deeper. I think what we started to see, particularly when I was working at Cone Communications and advising clients, we started to say, "What's unique about your company and the work that you do, the industry that you're in, the expertise that you have? And how could you connect your philanthropy to an issue that is aligned with your business?" Chris: "So, if you're in the pharmaceutical industry or other areas, how do you align with health and determinants of health? If you're working in other areas, like cable and telephone and others, how do you think about connectivity and digital connectivity being something that you can provide and connect to?" And so, how do you align the strategy and the impact you can have with your business so that those two things are working in harmony in reinforcing one another? Chris: And so, I think there was an understanding that it can actually drive business. And it's not just a nice thing to do that's over on the side, it's an important strategy to drive business. And so, during my time at New Balance and Cone and later at Reebok, I think we were more in that era of saying, "How do we integrate it into the business? And how do we really see it as a unique business driving strategy?" Chris: Now, I think you're in an even different environment, both with young people like yourselves coming into work and into the environment and being aware of social issues in a way that is deeper and more common than I think it was maybe of my generation and earlier, really wanting to have a purpose at work, and looking at your companies and saying, "How are you helping me do that?" And I only want to be here if I'm having a chance to put my passion and my values front and center in a way that was different than I think previous generations thought about work. Chris: And then, two, I think we're realizing, particularly over the last two years with the pandemic, with the murder of George Floyd, certainly the cracks in our system and how it is not equitable, how racism really shows up across all kinds of dimensions to prevent others from having opportunity that they should, and saying, "That's not okay." And people are saying, "We expect to both individually have an opportunity to affect that." Chris: "And we expect companies to be vocal and to step up and to show what their values are. And if you're not, then that's not going to be a company that I'm going to invest my time in personally as an employee. Or I'm not going to invest my dollars in as a customer." And I think you're seeing a whole new era of companies leading and being vocal in a lot of ways around social issues and taking a stand. Chris: And if they're not, people kind of questioning what's going on and why not. So, I think it's been really impressive and powerful to see. There's a lot that still needs to be done, right? There's a tremendous amount of inequity even within companies. And we see examples every day of bad behavior or other things that companies need to do better and need to do differently. Chris: But I will say, in working with many different Fortune 100 companies on a daily basis, the understanding of issues, the way they talk about social issues, the way they talk about their own diversity, equity, and inclusion and belonging efforts within the company is a huge sea change compared to what I saw even five, 10 years ago, which gives me a lot of hope for where we're going. I think we're realizing that capitalism is an amazing system of value creation. It's done tremendous things to grow and build our company. Chris: And the kind of American dream did a tremendous number of things, certainly for my family and many others, but that that's no longer the case for everyone and it probably never was, to be honest. And so, how do we own that and how do we address that? And I think companies are wrestling with that in a more authentic way. And I hope they continue to do that. It's part of what I think my life's work is, is to try and help companies do that. JP: Yeah, definitely. I feel like that, in my opinion, that idea of cause marketing is something that's... I feel like that's got to be something that's just going to become, I guess, take over in terms of marketing. And just seeing it present today, I guess I've been seeing it firsthand with the new Worcester Red Sox at Polar Park in terms of sports marketing. Their whole thing is... I think the program is like In Debt to a Vet. JP: So, they're marketing that product of going to the game and all. And then, every strike out at home, they donate X amount of money to veterans. And then, they also have just other organizations like fighting food insecurity and things like that. So, I feel like I've just been learning more and more about that. And I feel like that's got to be something like revolutionary in terms of marketing and business today. Chris: Yeah. And do you find yourself deciding who to buy from and who to work with as a result of that? Do you see it show up in the decisions you make? JP: Yeah. Definitely, I feel like these days, I see, even buying clothing and things like that, some... off the top of my head, I can't think of any. And shoes too, especially I've been seeing. They advertise the materials they make their shoes out of and stuff like that. And X percent of the money they take in goes to this cause or that cause. So, yeah, I've definitely been seeing it become more and more present today. Chris: I think it's true. I think as a marketer, and I don't even like the term cause marketing anymore because it feels so transactional, and we're well beyond that. I mean, it is a strategy that is useful and valuable, and company should still do. But I think what you've seen is now that you interact with a company and their products and a brand all the time, whether it's in social media or online or in other places, it used to be such a tightly controlled thing. Chris: You kind of created a marketing message, you put it out there in a campaign. You spent weeks developing it and controlling the advertising message and putting it out there. That's just not how we market and how customers engage anymore. It's year round, minute to minute brand building and engagement. It's a very different thing. And so, what you've seen is companies have to evolve to respond to that and say, "Okay, we need to be talking about not just cause marketing, but it's about what are our values." Chris: "And how do those show up in every action that we do, because it's not just the messaging that we put out from a marketing or an advertising standpoint. It's how somebody experienced us in the store, or an interaction they had with an employee, or something our CEO said, or some way they experienced our product." And it's 24-7-365. And so, I think you're seeing companies really say, "This is about our values, and being clear on what our values are." Chris: Because our most important stakeholders, our people are saying that that's what matters to them and that's what they care about. And so, I think we just think about business differently. JP: Absolutely, yeah. And actually, even aside from just that marketing aspect, the whole idea of impact investing and companies just needing to evolve now based on ESG and sustainability and things like that, it's just becoming more and more just the norm. And I feel like more and more businesses have no choice but to evolve and match what other businesses are doing because that's such a pressing topic in today's time as well. Chris: A hundred percent. And you have to, to compete, to succeed. And all the data tells you that companies that invest and do deep things and are high performing when it comes to the environmental, social, and governance measures outperform other companies and succeed. So, it's not just a nice thing to do, an important thing to do for the planet, a good thing to do. It's an imperative. If you want to continue to build a business and have it thrive, you have to lean in those areas. JP: Definitely. So, could you speak about the back and forth relationship you've seen between business and nonprofits throughout the span of your professional career? Chris: Absolutely. That's a great question. I think to our earlier conversation, early on, I think it was more transactional. It was kind of checkbook philanthropy. And we developed some relationships, and hopefully we get some money. And what we've seen, certainly in my time at City Year and why I was excited to come to City Year and work on it, is that changed. And companies were increasingly looking at a much deeper and holistic way to support issues. Chris: And so, they wanted certainly the branding and the visibility, and being able to talk about themselves as being good citizens, and for nonprofits to help validate and help them have opportunities to do that. They wanted to have employees actively volunteering and spending time, whether that was doing different kind of done-in-a-day volunteer projects or weeks of service, days of service, things like that. Chris: Or deeper ongoing skills-based volunteerism where I can share my expertise in marketing or somebody can share their expertise in web design or other things with the nonprofit and help that nonprofit build its capabilities or its skills. And really being able to set ambitious goals, which is what we're seeing a lot of companies do now, and to say, "This is what we care about from a social impact standpoint. Here's how we're going to try and have some impact. And here's some ways we're going to hold ourselves accountable and measure against it." Chris: And so, now, nonprofits are more partners in that process. And certainly, there's a dynamic of where the dollars come. And we certainly are trying to raise money from companies and have contractual pieces of what we do. But in many ways, we're sitting at the table with our corporate partners, and they view us as experts in the space that help them, at least for City Year, understand education, understand urban education, understand racial issues and how those show up in the education space, and are looking for our help and our guidance on how they can have a deeper impact. Chris: And we often think collaboratively and advise and coach them on some of the things they're thinking about. And in many cases, they can offer tremendous support to help us do different things. We've been fortunate to work with Deloitte Consulting as an example at City Year for decades now, and have benefited from having pro bono case teams and others really come and think about how do we grow City Year as an organization. Chris: So, I would say it's much less of a transactional thing and much more of a collaborative partnership, which has been amazing to see. And I think that's the part that I've been fortunate to have worked on the nonprofit side, the corporate side, the agency side, and seeing that from all angles that I think it hopefully helps me be a better partner to our colleagues. But I think there's such a willingness to say, "These are huge social issues that cannot be solved by any individual nonprofit, any individual organization." Chris: And we have to come together and figure out how we work collectively on them to change them. So, I think the level of expertise sharing, information sharing, and collaboration is greater than it's ever been. So, I'm excited about that. JP: Cool, yeah. Thank yo

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Everyday Holiness Podcast: Fr. John DeRiso, CSC

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Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 62:52


Our seventh season opens with Fr. John DeRiso, CSC, as he shares the stories of his life and priestly ministry assignments, including flourishing in parish life, opening a shrine in France, and serving as Director of Vocations for the Congregation of Holy Cross.

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S3E13 Catch Up with Declan Cronin

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Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 28:35


Kevin Gehl talks with minor league pitcher and Holy Cross alum, Declan Cronin '19, to talk about the MLB Draft, life in the minors and what his experience at Holy Cross meant to him.

Next Shift - More Than A Hockey Podcast
Episode #103 - Ryan Holt - The Voice of the Bakersfield Condors

Next Shift - More Than A Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 41:24


This week on the Next Shift Hockey Podcast we are joined by Massachusetts native, Holy Cross Alum, and current play-by-play broadcaster for the American Hockey League's Bakersfield Condors, Ryan Holt. In this episode, Ryan chatted with us about wacky hockey jerseys, the viral pregame moment of a live Condor going rogue on the ice, his path from Holy Cross to the AHL as a broadcaster and some great life advice. Thanks for joining the show Ryan!

The One Percent Project
Episode 45: James Keyes- Leadership through adversity

The One Percent Project

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 28:26


About James Keyes:My next guest on the One Percent Project is James W Keyes. James served as the Chief Executive Officer of 7-Eleven and chairman and CEO of Blockbuster. James graduated cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa with a bachelor's degree from the College of the Holy Cross. He also obtained an MBA from Columbia Business School in 1980. James is the founder of the 'Education is Freedom' foundationJoin our No-Spam WhatsApp groupIn this conversation, he talks about:How curiosity and adversity have helped him lead organisations such as 7-Eleven and Blockbuster?The need for entrepreneurial thinking within a corporation.The art of negotiation and its tenets. How has 7-Eleven been able to keep itself ahead of the curve, and why others have not been able to replicate its growth model. Why did he choose to join Blockbuster?Would Blockbuster be a different company if it had accepted to buy Netflix?Are the principles of leadership being disrupted by the new generation of leaders?Some Key Highlights:When you are hit by adversity, you can respond in two ways: You can have your head down and become the victim, or keep your head up and say I'll get through this and get to the other side. Most of the time, there's hidden learning, and there's a strength that comes from knowing that you were able to make it through to the other side. This gives you the quiet advantage over someone who hasn't had to endure the adversity.The idea of a corporate entrepreneur is almost an oxymoron. Unfortunately, many corporate cultures believe in conformity and force people into a norm, discouraging the outliers. The very definition of an entrepreneur is someone who sets out on their own as an individual and breaks the norms. In contrast, the definition of a corporation is coming together as one; it's a body, not an individual.Leadership is about adapting to change, and change happens every day. So whatever you learned about leadership last week, you might have to change it next week based on a new set of facts, people or circumstances.

'Sader Stories
S3E12 Catch up with Brett Nelson

'Sader Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 31:00


Kevin Gehl catches up with men's basketball coach Brett Nelson to talk about his path to Holy Cross, his first few years on The Hill, and the preparation for the upcoming season.

Every Moment His
Good Friday 2022 - Examined by the 10 Commandments

Every Moment His

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 25:48


Good Friday 2022 Holy Cross was led in a meditation on the 10 commandments in order to be rid of sins in Jesus name. The congregation then received individual forgiveness spoken by the pastors of Holy Cross and the sign of the cross upon their heads completing the journey of Lent which began with ashes in the sign of the cross placed upon their heads.

The Scoot Show with Scoot
Is the Bible factually accurate? Leading theologian says yes!

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 14:45


Scoot talks to Dr. Todd Amick, a Professor of Theology at the University of Holy Cross, about the fascinating nature of the stories of the Bible

Monkey Mind Podcast
Episode 91: JR Butler (Founder of Shift Group & former Division I Hockey Player at Holy Cross)

Monkey Mind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 38:32


On today's episode, I sat down with JR Butler who is the Founder of Shift Group, a company that educates and sets up former athletes for careers in the tech industry. We discussed Monkey Mind's new partnership with Shift Group, JR's career in hockey as well as his sobriety from drugs and alcohol and what works for him to maintain the healthy lifestyle he leads. Enjoy! Work with Shift Group at: https://monkeymindathletes.com/partners Daily Dose CBD promo code: "monkeymind15" for 15% off at https://www.dailydosecbdinc.com/?ref=36 Monkey Mind's website: https://monkeymindathletes.com/ Monkey Mind's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/monkeymindathletes/ Monkey Mind merchandise: http://monkeymindathletes.ussportsandapparel.com/ Watch this episode on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJLKZQb6vBgxlWvCLj_5jhQ

Pat Gray Unleashed
Nobody Likes You, Joe | 4/6/22

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 94:53


Joe Biden was in full bumbling display at a recent speech. He's also still referring to himself as vice president to Barack Obama. At the end, everybody wanted to shake Obama's hand and nobody really wanted to talk to Biden. There's a new magnetic slime that may be able to help retrieve objects in humans. Zelenskyy spoke to the U.N. and detailed the war crimes that have been happening in Ukraine. How much money has the U.S. given to Ukraine? The Grammy viewership is low … but not its lowest! It looks like Tiger Woods will be playing in the Masters tournament tomorrow. Buy me some peanuts and "Cracker Jill"? The College of the Holy Cross is dedicating a science building to Anthony Fauci. Parents in Baltimore, Maryland, are filing a lawsuit against the city over the failing education system. Congress is trying to pass a bill that would legalize marijuana nationwide. Cricket girl tries to send the crickets a message, but the message is too strong. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wilson County News
GAME WATCH

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 2:47


Baseball  Apr. 8 East Central v Judson* 7 p.m. Apr. 8 Falls City @ Charlotte* 7 p.m. Apr. 8 Floresville @ Southside* 7 p.m. Apr. 8 La Vernia v Holy Cross 7 p.m. Apr. 8 Nixon-Smiley @ Randolph* 4 p.m. Apr. 8 Poth v Cotulla* 7 p.m. Apr. 8 Stockdale v SA Cole* 7 p.m. Apr. 11 Floresville v Southwest Legacy* 7 p.m. Apr. 11 La Vernia v Gonzales* 7 p.m. Apr. 11 Nixon-Smiley BYE Apr. 11 Stockdale @ Luling* 7 p.m. Apr. 12 East Central v New Braunfels* 7 p.m. Apr. 12 Falls City @ Sabinal* 7 p.m. Apr....Article Link

Frederica Here and Now
Cross Veneration and Annunciation

Frederica Here and Now

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 13:42


Frederica Mathewes-Green shares reflections about the Annunciation on the weekend of the Feast of the Holy Cross.

The Scoot Show with Scoot
All you can eat crawfish for $25 tomorrow - we'll tell you how!

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 3:23


Scoot talks to Matt Picard from the University of Holy Cross about how crawfish lovers can get in on the action this Saturday at their first ever Crawfish Boil Cook-Off

The Todd Herman Show
Government Schools Pedophiles Welcome - Episode 88 - Hour 2 Two Government Schools

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 59:32


THE THESIS: When you prep an environment for adults to talk about all forms of sexual activity with children, you will attract adults who want to engage in all forms of sexual behavior with children. THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Matthew 18:5-7   5 And whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me.   Causing to Stumble 6 “If anyone causes one of these little ones—those who believe in me—to stumble, it would be better for them to have a large millstone hung around their neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea. 7 Woe to the world because of the things that cause people to stumble! Such things must come, but woe to the person through whom they come!   THE NEWS & COMMENT:   I've obtained video from inside Disney's all-hands meeting about the Florida parental rights bill, in which executive producer Latoya Raveneau says her team has implemented a "not-at-all-secret gay agenda" and is regularly "adding queerness" to children's programming.   Disney to Remove All Mentions of Traditional Gender Roles at Theme Parks   Cursing alert! She's getting gender reassignment surgery because some of her identities are male. We have a serious mental health crisis in this country.   Many aren't “born this way” but we are “made” to be this way.   Cursing alert! Teachers are DESPERATE to talk to little kids about sex. It's a disorder   Libs of Tik Tok @libsoftiktok. This was all in one day. Oregon needs to be shut down until we can figure out what's going on.   How can we fight this as a people of God when our so-called “leaders” are afraid to speak Yahawe's name into these battles? Look at this, from a supposed Christian academic: Why does the author of this piece put baptize and disciple in quotes? Also, as a professor at one would believe to be a Christian college--”College of the Holy Cross”--how can he seriously ask if making disciples of Christ is important?   What is the Great Commission and why is it so controversial? - Mathew Schmalz Professor of Religious Studies, College of the Holy Cross   The Great Commission refers to several passages in the Gospel of Matthew, where Jesus Christ urges his apostles to make “disciples of all the nations” and “baptize” them. The word “disciple,” which is “mathetes” in Greek, literally means “pupil” but also “follower,” as in “follower of Jesus.” “Baptize” refers to the Christian practice of using water to remove the “original sin,” an inherent fault that Christians believe marks all human beings at birth. Baptism is an important sign of entrance into the Christian faith. The Great Commission, therefore, is usually interpreted to mean spreading the Christian message and converting others to Christianity.   . . . Converting others to Christianity raises a fundamental question about whether religious diversity is a reality to be celebrated or an obstacle to be overcome. Given the complex history of missionary activity, the meaning of the Great Commission will continue to be a subject of debate as Christianity confronts a rapidly changing world.   THE LISTENERS:   Jan:   Todd, enough about your shoulder injury, surgery, pain, etc.   Jan   ---   ---   ---   Hi Todd (from Jennifer):   This is in response to your podcast about contentment.        Almost 15 years ago I was diagnosed with breast cancer.  2 days before my 39th birthday I received the diagnosis and was told that I needed to have a mastectomy of my left breast.  I experienced the fear, sorrow, anger and all the emotions that a woman experiences when she's told she has cancer and will have one of her breasts removed.        But then one day I was talking to a friend of mine at church and I was wondering why this happened to me and she said, "why not?"  "Why do we get to float through life without ever facing adversity or challenges?"  And she was right.  It's through adversity that if we allow him, God reveals himself and works in our lives.        In surrendering to him I felt his grace more than at any other time in my life.  I found myself being thankful for my cancer.  I was blessed because God used me to help other women who were also diagnosed with breast cancer.  I was able to be there to give them hope that they could do more than just survive, they could thrive!  I had the opportunity to visit a woman in the hospital just after she had her mastectomy.  She was in her 20s and was scared to look at her incisions.  After spending some time with her she got up the courage to face her body and come to terms with what she had lost.        The biggest blessing that I have experienced since my cancer diagnosis was when my father in law was diagnosed with stomach cancer.  I was the only one in the family who had experienced cancer so he was able to talk to me in a way that he couldn't with the other family members.  I made a binder for all of his paperwork just like the one I made for myself, I gave him tips that helped get through treatment and I didn't talk to him in a grim manner like most people did.  He got through his treatment and is doing well.       Cancer is certainly something I don't want to experience a second time, but I'm not sorry I got it.  I wouldn't ever want to give up the blessings that I received, and the way that God used me to bless others,  as a result of my diagnosis.        You'll come back from your injury and think of how God can use this to his glory!  That's what I pray for you. God bless,   ---   ---   ---   --- Deb B.:   Finding contentment. Listening to your podcast right now. You encourage us to ask God to please draw JoeBiden to Him but that's not how some of us pray. After 60 years of walking with the Lord, I've learned to say Thy will be done. Period. Because I've only found true contentment in the center of God's will and although I know we can ask, I also know my request could be wrong. Jesus showed us in Gethsemane how and what to ask for: it's simply His Will - not mine. I go where He leads, whether I'm in a wonderfully surprising place or a dark, sad or lonely place, and once I get past "what are You thinking????" there is a peace that passeth understanding and contentment. He may want an unstable, demented, seriously sinful person leading this nation for such a time as this but only God truly knows the greater good. Surrendering to His will and His will alone makes us part of that goodness I think but it is definitely a path to a contented life. Thank you for your program - it is a blessing.   ---   ---   ---   Dean - Greensboro, NC   Hello Todd (not Mr. Herman per your request),   I am a loyal listener to your podcast.  As a confession, when hearing your voice instead of Rush (God rest his soul), I tuned out most or all of the time.  Nothing against you or any of the other fill-in hosts, but Rush was the real impetus behind listening to his show.  However, with your podcast having God as the center, I am drawn to it daily.  Thank you for using God's gifts to glorify Him.  Love me some Jesus Christ.   Wanted to give you and those behind your show a shout of encouragement to keep fighting the fight.   Thank you for including the 365 verses of God telling His believers/needers to not be afraid.  I had heard this many times in the past, but never seen links to all of them.  These verses are a wonderful reminder of our omniscient, omnipresent, and omnipotent God.   I find it interesting to note that in one of the verses God tells us to 'not be afraid', but to also 'be afraid'.   Matthew 10:28 Do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather, be afraid of the One who can destroy both soul and body in hell.    Don't be afraid of those who are in the world but be afraid of the One who made the world, the One with REAL power and authority.  A sober reminder to those who are not Jesus-needers.   As is:  Hebrews 10:31 It is a dreadful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.   As Jesus-believers/needers, we don't need to be afraid of our Father as we are washed in His Son's blood!   If I do not see you on this side of the dirt, I will definitely contact you in our Father's house.   God bless you and yours,   Dean  - Greensboro, NC   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Saints Homilies
The Cross: Our Healing, Victory, and Peace

All Saints Homilies

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 25:19


Fr. Pat's homily delivered on the Sunday of the Holy Cross, 2008.

'Sader Stories
S3E11 Celebrating Women's History Month

'Sader Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 26:11


Kevin Gehl talks with mother/daughter duo, Amy and Anne Comcowich about their experiences at Holy Cross and get their thoughts on the growth of women in sport.

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Christian Church Lexington, Ma Podcast
The Cross: The Symbol and The Prayer - Youth Sermon

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Christian Church Lexington, Ma Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 7:32


The Third Sunday of Great Lent is of the Holy Cross.  Why?  What is the Cross for us?  Did you know that it can also be a prayer?  Listen for more

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Christian Church Lexington, Ma Podcast
The Holy Cross and the Crosses We Bear - Main Sermon 3/27/22

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Christian Church Lexington, Ma Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 14:10


We have been quite comfortable with Crucifixion, yet at the time of Christ it was seen as utter humiliation, a cruel and unusual form of punishment.  Yet what about our cross that we are to take up and follow Christ?   This cross that we take up requires time and endurance and it can bring pain and suffering as well and sometimes we might want to cut our cross down (see image for example).  Yet we do not take up our cross to reject life but rather to save life.  Listen for more.

The Freeing Energy Podcast
Bryan Hannegan: Can the electric utility industry reinvent itself? One small utility in Colorado is proving it can.

The Freeing Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 51:29


Listen in as host Bill Nussey talks with Bryan Hannegan, President and CEO of Holy Cross Energy, the Electric Membership Cooperative serving Western Colorado, including the famous ski resorts of Vail and Aspen. Holy Cross Energy is well on its way to achieving an aggressive goal of 100% clean energy by 2030. And, Bryan shares how Holy Cross is making local energy a central part of its strategy and dramatically reimagining its relationship with its customers.

Eastern Christian Insights
The Cross Serves No Earthly Goal

Eastern Christian Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 7:44


We do not adore the Holy Cross today because it is useful for serving any personal, cultural, or political agenda. We do so because the Savior has brought eternal life to the world through His victory over the corrupting power of sin and death.

Backpacker Radio
#142 | Peter Bergman

Backpacker Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 135:49


In today's episode of Backpacker Radio presented by The Trek, we are joined by Peter Bergman.  In a nutshell, Peter is the ultimate wildcard.  His hiking resume, which includes a completed section hike of the PCT and a cross country hike from his front door in Denver to Mt. of the Holy Cross- doesn't even begin to tell his story.  We learn about the life of an art professor, some of most ridiculous projects, which toes the line between art and prank, and his latest release, PaCT, a series of projects related to his two-part section hike of the PCT, the first chunk as a 23-year-old, and the rest at twice the age of 46.  Chaunce and Badger were thoroughly entertained during this one, you will be too. We wrap the show with a special triple crown, Elise edition, some surprise birthday wishes to Chaunce - including a voicemail that had us LMAO'ing, and much more. Gossamer Gear: Use code “littledonkeygirl” for 15% off at gossamergear.com.  Organifi: Use code “backpacker” for 20% off at organifi.com/backpacker. Enlightened Equipment: Use code “ultralight10” for 10% off Enlightened Equipment's Stock Revelation Quilt or Torrid Jacket at enlightenedequipment.com.  Bedrock Sandals: Head to bedrocksandals.com today! [divider] Interview with Peter Bergman An Address: Institute of Sociometry is PRESS Website is PRESS Instagram PaCT Website  PaCT Report Instagram Time stamps & Questions 00:04:38 - QOTD: What is something every junk drawer must have in order to be considered a proper junk drawer? 00:09:03 - BPR Announcements: Denver Hiker Meetup April 5, New Intern 00:13:30 - Introducing Peter 00:13:36 - What's your elevator pitch? 00:14:53 - Tell us about being a professor. 00:15:54 - What percentage of your students would you say are garbage people? 00:16:58 - What is your favorite course to teach? 00:17:57 - What's the most memorable art project you've seen while teaching? 00:20:20 - What's your take on the Van Gogh exhibit? 00:20:51 - What's your take on Meow Wolf? 00:21:51 - What's your overall experience as an artist? 00:27:18 - Would you say there's a theme among Cabriolet owners? 00:28:33 - Tell us about the postcards. 00:31:49 - How did you not get shot? 00:33:28 - How do you differentiate between art and entertainment? 00:33:58 - What's the name of the documentary? 00:34:38 - What was it like during/in the pre-Jackass, Southern California, skate-punk scene? 00:36:20 - What about skateboarding created that culture? 00:38:17 - What's your take on Jackass? 00:38:57 - Discussion about free library project. 00:43:38 - Are you currently in the midst of any pranks? 00:51:15 - Tell us about the PCT section in 1996. 00:55:10 - Discussion about deciding to finish the trail in 2019. 00:56:06 - Discussion about hike from Denver to Mt. Holy Cross. 00:56:40 - How much of that route was off-trail vs. on roads? 00:56:58 - Discussion about returning to the PCT in 2019. 00:57:17 - How do Peter and Elise know each other? 00:58:25 - How did you end up with two feet of Dylan's hair around your neck? 00:59:25 - Discussion about the hair collection. 01:02:16 - Discussion about the time capsule. 01:08:10 - Discussion about getting off trail in 1996. 01:12:14 - With your exciting hobbies off-trail, how did you keep yourself entertained on trail? 01:16:06 - As someone who is a professor, how would you assign an on-trail project to hikers as if they were students? 01:19:27 - Walk us through the flipbook, zine, and book. 01:21:25 - Discussion about book printing. 01:24:20 - Discussion about the time between 1996 and 2019. 01:25:09 - How did your dad respond to the book? 01:25:34 - How many books are left? 01:25:53 - Discussion about badgers. 01:28:29 - Tell us about the snowstorm. 01:34:20 - Discussion about completing the trail in 2019. 01:37:12 - What were the primary differences between the two hikes? 01:41:43 - What was your gear like in 1996? 01:43:57 - What's your poop story? 01:49:22 - Thank you! SEGMENTS Trek Propaganda Matthew “Odie” Norman to Retire from Hiker Yearbook Project by Penina Satlow Triple Crown of Elise Chaunce's Birthday Well-Wishes 5 Star Review [divider] Check out our sound guy @paulyonthedrums Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes (and please leave us a review)! Find us on Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. Support us on Patreon to get bonus content. Advertise on Backpacker Radio Follow The Trek, Chaunce, Badger, and Trail Correspondents on Instagram. Follow The Trek and Chaunce on YouTube. Follow Backpacker Radio on Tik Tok.  A super big thank you to our Chuck Norris Award winner(s) from Patreon: Andrew, Austen McDaniel, Jason Lawrence, Christopher Marshburn, Sawyer Products, Brad and Blair (Thirteen Adventures), Patrick Cianciolo, Matt Soukup, and Jason Snailer. A big thank you to our Cinnamon Connection Champions from Patreon: Liz Seger, Cynthia Voth, Emily Brown, Dcnerdlet, Jeff LaFranier, Peter Ellenberg, Jacob Northrup, Peter Leven.

OrthoAnalytika
Homily - The Cross Goes in Your Heart

OrthoAnalytika

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 21:13


In this meditation on the Sunday of the Holy Cross, Fr. Anthony riffs on St. Paul's warning that the Cross could be of no effect (1 Corinthians 1:17 and Philippians 3:18-21), warning us not to use the cross as a talisman or even as a balm to ease the pain, but rather to allow Christ to plant it in the garden of temple of our heart.  Enjoy the show!

Sermons from St. Sophia, Bellingham, Washington
Your Choice and Your Cross: Mid- Lent and the Veneration of the Holy Cross

Sermons from St. Sophia, Bellingham, Washington

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 11:27


Epistle Reading: Hebrews 4:14-16;5:1-6 BRETHREN, since we have a high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we have not a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need. For every high priest chosen from among men is appointed to act on behalf of men in relation to God, to offer gifts and sacrifices for sins. He can deal gently with the ignorant and wayward, since he himself is beset with weakness. Because of this he is bound to offer sacrifice for his own sins as well as for those of the people. And one does not take the honor upon himself, but he is called by God, just as Aaron was. So also Christ did not exalt himself to be made a high priest, but was appointed by him who said to him, "Thou art my Son, today I have begotten thee"; as he says also in another place, "Thou art a priest for ever, after the order of Melchizedek." Gospel Reading: Mark 8:34-38; 9:1 The Lord said: "If anyone wishes to come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it; and whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospel's will save it. For what does it profit a man, to gain the whole world and forfeit his life? For what can a man give in return for his life? For whoever is ashamed of me and my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of him will the Son of man also be ashamed, when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels." And he said to them, "Truly, I say to you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the kingdom of God come with power."

Prayer for Everyone
The Message (Number 9) Mothering Sunday

Prayer for Everyone

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 14:36


Here is Jo Trickey (curate at Holy Cross) sermon podcast on Mothering Sunday 2022 Stay encouraged! #TheMessage

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Home School Conference in Carlisle, IA

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 11:20


Rev. Kevin Johnson, pastor of Holy Cross Lutheran Church in Carlisle, Iowa, and the Holy Cross Lutheran Homeschool Co-op, joins Andy and Sarah to talk about why his congregation supports homeschool families, how they are able to provide this support, the details of the upcoming Home School Conference at Holy Cross, and what attendees need to know about this free resource conference. Learn more and register at holycrosscarlisle.org.

Catholic Momcast
Encouraging and Inspiring Kids With Books #183

Catholic Momcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 25:38


Katie Broussard and Paul Mitchell are a dynamic sibling duo who together produce beautiful Catholic books for kids. This week, they sit down with host Danielle Bean to discuss their newest project: Sorin Starts a School. This book tells the story of Fr. Sorin, a priest with the Congregation of Holy Cross. who founded the University of Notre Dame. The charming illustrations will draw you in, and the beautiful text will teach you the story and inspire important conversations with you and your kids. Find the book. Explore Katie's website. Check out Audacious Ignatius, another children's book by Paul Mitchell and Katie Broussard.  

Tending the Garden of our Hearts
The Sunday of the Holy Cross

Tending the Garden of our Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 6:37


This week begins with the Sunday of the Holy Cross. We will hear the story of how the holy Cross of Christ was found by St. Helena, as well as what happened and how the people reacted when it was found. We will also talk about why the Sunday of the Holy Cross is celebrated right in the middle of Great Lent. Find the Tending the Garden of Our Hearts: Daily Lenten Meditations for Families book, ebook, and audiobook at store.ancientfaith.com/tending-the-garden-of-our-hearts-daily-lenten-meditations-for-families. The downloadable activity book is available at etsy.com/listing/970766999/tending-the-garden-of-our-hearts-daily.

'Sader Stories
S3E10 Catch up with Kit Hughes

'Sader Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 49:10


Kevin Gehl talks with Director of Athletics Kit Hughes as he continues to settle into his new role at the College of the Holy Cross.

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio
Infants Are Rich in God's Kingdom

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 54:47


Rev. Dr. Adam Filipek, pastor at Holy Cross and Immanuel Lutheran Churches in Lidgerwood, ND, joins host Rev. Timothy Appel to study Luke 18:15-30. The humility of the tax collector in Jesus' previous parable is comparable to the helplessness of the infants being brought to Him. He rebukes His disciples when they attempt to stop these children from coming to Him, for only in such dependence upon the Lord will anyone enter into His kingdom. A ruler approaches Jesus with the opposite attitude. The ruler believes he has kept the Law, and so Jesus seeks to expose the man's false trust. The ruler's riches prove to be too great an idol, and he hears Jesus' call in sadness. In response, Jesus teaches how great an obstacle riches are to entering the kingdom of God; only the Lord Himself can overcome the human impossibility for salvation. Jesus has accomplished this salvation by His incarnation, death, resurrection, and ascension. “The Beloved Physician's Orderly Account” is a mini-series on Sharper Iron that goes through the Gospel according to St. Luke. The Evangelist wrote his well-researched account of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection so that Theophilus would have certainty concerning the things he had been taught. As we still read the Word of God recorded by St. Luke, our gracious Lord gives us that same certainty that Jesus is our Savior.

Duchovny Dom Monastery
Life Of The Cross (Sunday Of The Veneration Of The Holy Cross March 20th 2022 AD)

Duchovny Dom Monastery

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 19:00


Life Of The Cross (Sunday Of The Veneration Of The Holy Cross March 20th 2022 AD) by Duchovny Dom Monastery

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE
KIeran Suckling - Center for Biological Diversity - Third Interview

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 30:03


In this third interview, Kieran Suckling, Executive Director, and founder of the Center for Biological Diversity, talks about Cilmate Change and legislation CBD supports.. He studied computer science and mathematics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Columbia University and Stanford University. He holds degrees in philosophy from the State University of New York at Stonybrook (a master's) and College of the Holy Cross (a bachelor's) focused on Greek, continental, linguistic and environmental thought. In addition to overseeing the Center's conservation, finance, fundraising and administration programs, he writes and lectures on the threats to, preservation of, and relationships between cultural and biological diversity. He also maintains the most comprehensive endangered species research and management database in the United States. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=25149153)

Sacred Scandal
11. A Scapegoat

Sacred Scandal

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 53:49


Melanie and Paula look back on their conversation at the monastery and, as new theories emerge, they try to piece together the truth about what happened at Holy Cross. If you want to get in touch, email us on hello@sacredscandalpodcast.com. And for behind-the-scenes photos and videos follow us on Instagram @SacredScandal To help support the people of Ukraine at this time, visit https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/ukraine-crisis-relief-fund/ If you're concerned about or have experienced abuse in your own place of worship contact the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP) https://www.snapnetwork.org/ If you liked the original music from this series, you can listen to it on Spotify or Apple Music. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends
James Townsend - Amazing Coach who is Freaky Strong both Mentally and Physically

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 64:42


James tells us about growing up in a very poor section of New York, going to school in New Jersey because of his football ability however, still facing racism and struggles while being given favors to get on the football field. He talks about the depression he felt while people came out of the woodwork with handouts, and how he overcame all of this to become one of the best coaches in the Fitness industry and growing his strength through faith. TIMESTAMPS 0:00 Open 3:07 Grew up in the South Bronx 5:40 High School All-American 8:24 Michigan Fan 11:35 Faces Racism/Bigotry 13:30 Step up to the plate and be a dad 16:20 Choses Iowa 18:37 Suspended from Iowa moves to Rutgers 25:17 Becoming a Chicago Bear 26:33 The pressure was so thick I tried to take my own life 29:54 Jame's Faith Journey 32:00 I don't want Praise, that didn't get me anywhere 33:33 Change to Fitness Coach 35:53 GRID and Lindsey Valenzuela 38:19 Coaching Elite Athletes 42:02 Coaching your kids 44:37 Be Brave/Mindset 51:51 I'm a coach of the People 53:50 How strong is James 56:45 The Iowa Camp 1:02:10 Jame's Diet

The Treasury Career Corner
How to Become a Strategic Treasurer with Stephanie O'Leary

The Treasury Career Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 32:31


Getting to the top of your field isn't just about a bit of elbow grease. You need a good strategy. A strategy can help you harness your strongest capabilities and channel them into achieving both long and short-term treasury career goals. Stephanie O'Leary, the former Vice President of Treasury & Risk Management at Indigo Ag., joins this episode of the Treasury Career Corner to share snippets from her successful treasury journey. She also delves into the strategic nature of treasury and why it's important to embrace that wholly as you build your career. Stephanie is a trusted advisor to senior leaders and has been successful at providing vision and leadership for high-performance finance organisations. She combines over 25 years of in-depth technical expertise across the financial services industry with the recognised ability to think strategically, drive results, and reduce risks. Most recently, Stephanie was the first Treasurer for a unicorn "ag-tech" start-up, Indigo Ag, where she built the global Treasury and Risk Management infrastructure and secured a first-in-market IP insurance-backed credit facility in excess of $100M. Prior to Indigo, Stephanie spent 13 years at Wellington Management in the finance function, with promotions to Managing Director & Treasurer. She led their debt raising and capital structuring efforts, secured and maintained their S&P rating, developed and implemented a corporate investment portfolio, and oversaw insurance risk management. Her background also includes roles as a divisional CFO for AIG, a management consultant in the financial institutions group at A.T. Kearney, and a bank examiner for the FDIC. Stephanie holds an MBA in Finance and Strategic Management from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and an AB in English cum laude from the College of the Holy Cross. On the podcast we discussed… How Stephanie discovered the world of finance and treasury What Stephanie found appealing about treasury Stephanie's treasury ethos Why treasury is more strategic than other business functions Why execution and delivery are important in a treasury career Stephanie's advice to aspiring treasurers You can connect with Stephanie on https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephanie-oleary/ (LinkedIn). Are you interested in pursuing a career within Treasury? Whether you've recently graduated, or you want to search for new job opportunities to help develop your treasury career, The Treasury Recruitment Company can help you in your search for the perfect job. https://treasuryrecruitment.com/jobs (Find out more here). Or, send us your CV and let us help you in your next career move! If you're enjoying the show please rate and review us on whatever podcast app you listen to us on, for Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-treasury-career-corner/id1436647162#see-all/reviews (click here)!

The Thomas Green Podcast
Spreading Happiness With Mark & John Cronin

The Thomas Green Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2022 46:07


Spread #Happiness With Mark & John CroninConnect with Mark & John:https://johnscrazysocks.com/ Connect with EMS: Need some help? http://ethicalmarketingservice.com Books: http://ethicalmarketingservice.com/book Want to be a guest?  https://ethicalmarketingservice.com/guest/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EMS_Worthing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ethicalmarketingservice Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thomas-green-18655b97/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ethicalmarketingservice/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/emservice/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@ethicalmarketingservice Pricing: https://ethicalmarketingservice.co.uk Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/c/EthicalMarketingService Apple Podcasts: https://www.ethicalmarketingservice.co.uk/apple Spotify: https://www.ethicalmarketingservice.co.uk/spotify Stitcher: https://www.ethicalmarketingservice.co.uk/stitcher Mark's Bio:Mark X. Cronin is the co-founder, along with his son John, of John's Crazy Socks, a social enterprise with a mission to spread happiness. His leadership has demonstrated that pursuing social goals – demonstrating what people with differing abilities can achieve and giving back – makes for good business. Mark advocates for the rights of differently abled people. His advocacy work has seen Mark testify before Congress twice, speak at the UN and make numerous trips to Capitol Hill. Mark is a sought-after speaker having spoken at events across the U.S., Canada and Mexico.  Mark is part of the U.S. State Department's Speakers' Bureau and the CEO Commission for Disability Employment. Mark served as the Chief Operating officer of multiple health care management and technology firms, founded a software company, organized political campaigns and worked as a Congressional aide. Mark began his career as a schoolteacher and has taught in graduate schools as well. Mark has an undergraduate degree from Holy Cross and a Masters of Public Policy from the Kennedy School at Harvard University. He has been named an EY Entrepreneur of the Year and is a Board member for the Long Island Chapter of the Entrepreneurs Organization.

'Sader Stories
S3E9 Celebrating Black History Month Part Two

'Sader Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 19:59


Kevin Gehl talks with Class of '74 alumnus, Schone Malliet, about how Holy Cross helped him grow into who he is today.

The CPG Guys
Every Brand Needs to be a Media Company with Wakeup Water's Tyler Dooley

The CPG Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 42:07


The CPG Guys, PVSB and Sri are joined in this episode by Tyler Dooley, the founder & CEO of Wakeup Water, a purpose-driven health and wellness company that believes your happiness starts with what you put into your body. Follow Tyler Dooley on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tyler-dooley-a62317125/Follow Wakeup Water on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/wakeupwater/ Follow Wakeup Water online at: https://drinkwakeupwater.com/  Tyler answers these questions:1) Your story starts at College of Holy Cross, then you touched finance, logistics and even real estate, eventually founding wakupwater. Decompose this for our audience and tell us how all this came to be.2) What is the primary mission of wakeupwater and how has fundraising been in these times? What are most investors interested in understanding about your business model?3) What about supply chain? In these times getting raw material seems to get harder and harder, then there's manufacturing. How do you manage that for success?4) You launched DTC - how hard is that for a beverage brand at these price points? What's the store model & plan?5) Why is digital commerce a priority for you in these times? How are you working to ensure wakeupwater is ecommerce & omnichannel ready = what are specific initiatives or actions you have taken?6) How are you focused on building a team and what does your team specifically focus on - is it revenue or capabilities or both? Are their specific functions that are challenging to fill in this employment market?7) How important is user experience in this journey and how do you help shoppers get that top tier UX? 8) What's next for wakeupwater and you? How do you scale this?CPG Guys Website: http://CPGGuys.comFMCG Guys Website: http://fmcgguys.comRetailWit Website: http://retailwit.com DISCLAIMER: The content in this podcast episode is provided for general informational purposes only. By listening to our episode, you understand that no information contained in this episode should be construed as advice from CPGGUYS, LLC or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for research on any subject matter. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by CPGGUYS, LLC. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent.  CPGGUYS LLC expressly disclaims any and all liability or responsibility for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, consequential or other damages arising out of any individual's use of, reference to, or inability to use this podcast or the information we presented in this podcast.

Sing Second Sports
21-22 Season Ep22 [Feb 21 '22] "Hang Another N-star on the Yardarm!"

Sing Second Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 38:47


Welcome to the Sing Second Sports Podcast! A podcast covering the physical mission of the U.S. Naval Academy, and featuring the athletes, coaches and staff at USNA. We break down the ins and outs of the weekend that was. A sweep for Navy Lacrosse in Long Island. Swimming and Diving Patriot League titles. Oh...and a little N Star for Wrestling as the defeated Army Friday night. We discuss those results and many more. Mike Heary comes aboard for a discussion about the Navy Basketball team's four-game win streak coming to a halt in the form of a loss to Holy Cross. Should Coach D's boys be worried about the Patriot League tournament? Mike and Wags break it down. Share feedback on Twitter @wesingsecond...slide into our DMs or tweet at us directly. BEAT ARMY!

Sacred Scandal
9. On Transcarpathian Time

Sacred Scandal

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 52:22


Determined to speak to the priests from Holy Cross, Paula and Melanie go on a 5,000-mile mission to find them. Wanna get in touch? Email us at hello@sacredscandalpodcast.com or follow us on Instagram @SacredScandal. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Coast to Coast Hoops
2/21/2022-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 95:10


Greg recaps Sunday's college basketball results, talks to Jim Root of the Three Man Weave to look at Monday's big games & Greg picks & analyzes EVERY Monday college basketball game. Podcast Highlights 1:16-Recap of Sunday's results 13:38-Interview with Jim Root 27:22-Picks & analysis for UTEP vs Mid Tennessee 30:06-DK Nation Pick Penn St vs Maryland 32:40-Picks & analysis for Louisville vs UNC 34:30-Picks & analysis for Florida St vs Boston College 36:32-Picks & analysis for GA Tech vs Syracuse 38:45-Picks & analysis for Indiana vs Ohio St 41:03-Picks & analysis for Marshall vs So Miss 42:54-Picks & analysis for So Utah vs Northern Arizona 44:59-Picks & analysis for Drexel vs Charleston 47:15-Picks & analysis for Loyola Chi vs Illinois St 49:38-Picks & analysis for West Virginia vs TCU 52:08-Picks & analysis for Idaho St vs Northern Colorado 54:16-Picks & analysis for Evansville vs Valparaiso 56:34-Picks & analysis for The Citadel vs Samford 58:38-Picks & analysis for Eastern IL vs SIU Edwardsville 1:00:38-Picks & analysis for Baylor vs Oklahoma St 1:02:49-Picks & analysis for Arizona St vs UCLA 1:05:05-Picks & analysis for San Francisco vs Pacific 1:07:35-Picks & analysis for New Mexico St vs Seattle 1:09:54-Start of extra game picks with American vs Colgate 1:11:20-Picks & analysis for Coppin St vs Howard 1:13:05-Picks & analysis for Holy Cross vs Lafayette 1:19:07-Picks & analysis for Howard vs MD Eastern Shore 1:14:46-Picks & analysis for Morgan St vs Norfolk St 1:16:45-Picks & analysis for Alabama A&M vs Florida A&M 1:18:41-Picks & analysis for MD Eastern Shore vs NC Central 1:20:50-Picks & analysis for Delaware St vs South Carolina St 1:22:40-Picks & analysis for Liberty vs Central Arkansas 1:24:30-Picks & analysis for Texas Southern vs Arkansas Pine Bluff 1:26:21-Picks & analysis for Prairie View vs MS Valley St 1:28:03-Picks & analysis for Alabama St vs Bethune Cookman Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

401(k) Fridays Podcast
What Happens When 401(k) Plans Catch-up With Technology?

401(k) Fridays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 53:30


Day by day, year by year, technology plays are bigger and more important role in our lives. When it comes to retirement savings, how could technology impact things? To share some insights, I am happy to welcome Dave Castellani, Operating Principal with the venture capital firm Brew Lane Ventures. Dave has a unique background as a technology guy who has done a few tours in the retirement world. During our conversation we hit on how development in technology could impact retirement plans, some great working definitions of machine learning, artificial intelligence, augmented reality, virtual reality and much more. We also hit on blockchain and close with a real whopper that could change everything that you will have to hear for yourself.    Guest Bio David brings 30+ years of technology and operating leadership across financial services and startups to Brewer Lane. Most recently, he was SVP and Head of Technology at New York Life, where he led the company's initiatives across digital transformation, data and analytics, and cyber. Previously, David held other operating executive roles at New York Life, Prudential, and Cigna. He has also co-founded two technology startups: Mi8, an early pioneer in hosted exchange services, and Qv21, a transportation management software provider.   David received his BA from the College of the Holy Cross.   401(k) Fridays Podcast Overview Struggling with a fiduciary issue, looking for strategies to improve employee retirement outcomes or curious about the impact of current events on your retirement plan? We've had conversations with retirement industry leaders to address these and other relevant topics! You can easily explore over 200 prior on-demand audio interviews here. Don't forget to subscribe as we release a new episode each Friday!  

Journeys of Hope | a Pilgrim Center of Hope podcast
Journey to the Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence, Italy

Journeys of Hope | a Pilgrim Center of Hope podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 48:27


Come on a journey with Mary Jane Fox and her guest, Debbie Garza, Ministry of Pilgrimage Group Leader for Pilgrim Center of Hope to the Basilica of Santa Croce (or Basilica of the Holy Cross) in Florence, Italy! This pilgrim destination has many connections to a multitude of famous artists, is the largest Franciscan church in the world, and is the final resting place of Michelangelo. During our journey, you will discover: The church that is called the Temple of Italian Glories, its history and some of its many famous works of art. What was the faith of the Renaissance artists like? How can sacred art greatly impact our daily spiritual journey? Visio Divina – a brief guide in contemplating art and more! Click here to see photos of the Basilica of Santa Croce, as well as a map view of its location! Jewel for the Journey: Painters, sculptors, and musicians, … photographers and poets, artists of every discipline, are called to shine beauty, especially where darkness or gray dominates everyday life. They are the custodians of beauty, heralds, and witnesses of hope for humanity. – Pope Francis We are so grateful to this month's sponsor, Kathleen O'Shea, who made this podcast episode possible. Featured Image: “Firenze – Basilica di Santa Croce” by Fred Romero from Paris, France, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons Learn more at PilgrimCenterOfHope.org/Journeys Help us spread hope! PilgrimCenterOfHope.org/Donate

Hidden Lives Podcast
Dr. Philip Mamalakis

Hidden Lives Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 54:59


Dr. Philip Mamalakis is an Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care at Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology. Dr. Mamalakis directs the field education program and teaches classes on pastoral care, marriage and family, grief, death and dying, and topics related to pastoral counseling. He has a private practice in Newton, Massachusetts, where he works with individuals, couples, and families. Dr. Mamalakis has an M.Div. from Holy Cross and a Ph.D. from Purdue University in child development and family studies, specializing in marriage and family therapy. He has been offering parenting courses and writing on parenting for 21 years. He is the author of the excellent Orthodox Parenting book titled, “Parenting Toward the Kingdom.” Dr. Mamalakis is married to his wife Georgia and together have seven children.CONNECT WITH OUR GUEST:Website: http://www.drmamalakis.comPurchase Book: https://store.ancientfaith.com/parenting-toward-the-kingdom/Learn More: https://www.ancientfaith.com/podcasts/everydayorthodox/meet_dr_philip_mamalakis————————————————CONNECT WITH ME:————————————————Instagram: @frchristiansiskosYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0E5bwsyXz01S95yEh6Gj3wWebsite: https://www.frchristiansiskos.com/hiddenlivesNewsletter: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/frchristiansiskos

Garaventa Center Podcast
Catholic Social Teaching as Antidote to Neoliberal Economics

Garaventa Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 58:51


The Trident Room Podcast
17 [1/2] – Marcus Antonellis – SWO 101

The Trident Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021


Episode 17, Segment 1 of 2 - Marcus Antonellis – SWO 101 Trident Room Host Luke Goorsky sits down and gets to know NPS student and fellow host, Marcus Antonellis. They discuss what inspired him to produce a podcast and the duties of a Surface Warfare Officer (SWO). This episode was recorded on May 10, 2021. MARCUS ANTONELLIS is pursuing a Master's Degree in Military Space Systems Operations at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. He is a current Naval Officer and graduate of The College of the Holy Cross located in Worcester, MA. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcus-antonellis-a3649655/ The Trident Room Podcast is brought to you by the Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association and the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation. npsfoundation.org/ For comments, suggestions, and critiques, please email us at TridentRoomPodcastHost@nps.edu, and find us online at nps.edu/tridentroompodcast. Thank you! The views expressed in this interview are those of the individuals and do not reflect the official policy or position of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, the US Navy, or the Naval Postgraduate School.

The Trident Room Podcast
17 [2/2] – Marcus Antonellis – The Space SWO

The Trident Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021


Episode 17, Segment 2 of 2 - Marcus Antonellis – The Space SWO Trident Room Host Luke Goorsky sits down and gets to know NPS student and fellow host, Marcus Antonellis. They discuss what it is like to be a Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) specializing in Space Systems Operations. This episode was recorded on May 10, 2021. MARCUS ANTONELLIS is pursuing a Master's Degree in Military Space Systems Operations at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. He is a current Naval Officer and graduate of The College of the Holy Cross located in Worcester, MA. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcus-antonellis-a3649655/ The Trident Room Podcast is brought to you by the Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association and the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation. npsfoundation.org/ For comments, suggestions, and critiques, please email us at TridentRoomPodcastHost@nps.edu, and find us online at nps.edu/tridentroompodcast. Thank you! The views expressed in this interview are those of the individuals and do not reflect the official policy or position of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, the US Navy, or the Naval Postgraduate School.

The God Minute
Sept 14- Exaltation of the Holy Cross (Justin)

The God Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 10:13


Jesus says in Scripture, "Anyone who is my disciple must take up their cross and follow me." Perhaps the hardest thing to do in the Christian life. But as Justin reflects today, wouldn't it be easier to do it together?