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Dedicated or set apart for the service or worship of a deity

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Latest podcast episodes about holy

Elliot In The Morning
EITM: Signing On 1/24/22

Elliot In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 4:54


Holy football!

Lifepoint Church: Audio Podcast

In the journey of living a grounded life, relationships are essential. Pastor Daniel reminds us that when we pursue meaningful relationships, we pursue a healthy future.

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Macedonian (ca. 430)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 2:01


He lived in asceticism in the wild hills outside Antioch. For forty-five years he had no tent or house of any kind, but wandered from place to place, living in caves or in clefts. In his old age, his disciples finally prevailed on him to build a small hut. Altogether he spent seventy years living in solitary ascesis.   Once a hunter met the recluse and asked him what he did in the mountains. The Saint answered 'Like you, I have come to the mountain to hunt. I am hunting for God, whom I long to see. I ardently desire to catch Him and will never tire of so excellent a chase!'   Once the people of Antioch rioted and tore down a pair of statues of the Emperor Theodosius and his wife. Two generals came from Constantinople, planning to inflict a bloody punishment on the people. Saint Macedonian, learning of this, came to the city and sought out the generals, asking them to take a message to the Emperor: that he, being human and subject to weakness like all men, should not be immoderately angry with other men; and that he should not, in return for the destruction of lifeless images, destroy those who are the very image of God.   During his lifetime Saint Macedonian was granted the gifts of spiritual insight and wonderworking, by which he worked many miracles of healing for the people of Antioch and its surroundings. He reposed in peace around 430, and was buried with honor in Antioch.

Locked On Steelers – Daily Podcast On The Pittsburgh Steelers
Keith Butler Retires, Steelers Interview Giants D.C. Patrick Graham / Teryl Austin Out? HOLY AFC QBs

Locked On Steelers – Daily Podcast On The Pittsburgh Steelers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 38:28


Chris Carter, NFL and NCAAF analyst, hosts the Locked on Steelers podcast. Pittsburgh Steelers defensive coordinator Keith Butler announced his retirement, but the Steelers are looking at Giants defensive coordinator Patrick Graham. What does this mean for Teryl Austin? Mike Tomlin has called the defense, but could he be looking for a new coordinator who can call those plays? Or does he want Austin or Graham to be similar to Butler in how they prepared the defense each week for him to call during the game? Also, what a wild weekend in the NFL with Patrick Mahomes and the Kansas City Chiefs outlasting the Josh Allen and the Buffalo Bills, along with the Los Angeles Rams surviving Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, while Joe Burrow led the Cincinnati Bengals over the Tennessee Titans and the San Francisco 49ers ousted Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers. But with all those games featuring big quarterback names and huge arms, does that mean the Steelers are doomed for the foreseeable future without finding its own superstar quarterback? Not necessarily, and Chris Carter explains why their plan doesn't necessarily need the team to sell the farm for one of those quarterbacks ... this season. Follow Chris Carter on Twitter: @CarterCritiques. Theme music is 'Soul Kick' by Ceddy P, and 'Too Easy' by Nerdboy. Both from their label Renaissance Music. Find more from their label here. This show is part of the Locked on Podcast Network. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! OnlineGambling.com This podcast is brought to you by onlinegambling.com; the place to be for all the latest gambling news and tips throughout the NFL Playoffs. Visit onlinegambling.com/NFL to get the edge over the competition throughout this year's Playoffs! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. Getupside Just download the FREE GetUpside App and use promo code TOUCHDOWN to get up to 50¢/gallon cash back on your first tank. StatHero StatHero is the first of its kind Daily Fantasy Sports platform where it's YOU vs. the HOUSE in head to head fantasy matchups - winner take all. Sign up for FREE - RIGHT NOW - at StatHero.com/LOCKEDON and use promo code LOCKEDON for a One Hundred Percent Deposit Match. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

New Life South Coast
Developing Holy Habits

New Life South Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 48:31


Founders
I read 66 biographies last year— Here are my top 10!

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 13:38


Subscribe to gain access to 235 full length episodes.Here are 10 episodes to start with: #168 Driven: An Autobiography by Larry Miller#171 The Billionaire Who Wasn't: How Chuck Feeney Secretly Made and Gave Away a Fortune#219 Anthony Bourdain: The Definitive Oral Biography#223 Unstoppable: Siggi Wilzig's Astonishing Journey from Auschwitz Survivor and Penniless Immigrant to Wall Street Legend#216 Authentic: A Memoir by the Founder of Vans#212 Michael Jordan: The Life#210 Stephen King On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft#193 Arnold: The Education of a Bodybuilder#185 Ritz & Escoffier: The Hotelier, The Chef, and the Rise of the Leisure Class#170 My Life in AdvertisingWHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to get access to every full episode. 

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 24 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022


Gen 48:1-49:33, Matt 15:29-16:12, Ps 20:1-9, Pr 4:20-27

Six Weeks To Fitness
How I went From Personal Trainer to CEO of Fit Body Boot Camp – Interview 190 with Bryce Henson

Six Weeks To Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 31:50


Bryce Henson is a fitness expert, coach, author, and inspirational leader. He is also the CEO of Fit Body Bootcamp. The world's fastest growing fitness bootcamp franchise. Having over 10 years of experience in the fitness industry and owning two Fit Body Bootcamp locations. Bryce's passion is spreading fitness to the world. He is mentoring fitness professionals on how to grow their fitness business and change more lives in their local communities. Bryce also co-leads a Fitness Body Bootcamp Mastermind Group. Vince Ferguson: Bryce, thank you for coming on the show and giving us some of your time. But before we discuss Fit Body Bootcamp, tell my listeners and viewers, where did you grow up and what was your childhood like? Bryce Henson: Yeah, so I'm a California guy now, but I grew up actually in the Midwest, in the state of Michigan and shoot, I feel blessed to be able to grow up in the first world, like probably most of your audience, but it was actually quite a turbulent young childhood. And actually I say that I'm from the Midwest. The first 10 years I spent in Atlanta, Georgia and living with my mom, my dad, and two other siblings so three kids. And my dad unfortunately, was a drug addict, an alcoholic and addicted to gambling. So not necessarily conducive to a good family upbringing Vince Ferguson: Yes. Bryce Henson: And the verbal abuse eventually became physical. So even though it was, or I guess at the time, I like to refer this as it was a blessing disguised as tragedy. As it turns out, the abuse became physical and my mom, by the grace of God, escaped with her life and her three kids. And we shot up to Michigan to live with her family, her mom, my grandmother for the better part of 10 years. Bryce Henson: And while that was a very challenging turbulent childhood, it taught me a lot of lessons on work ethic and on drive and family values. So that was kind of my base. And then eventually ended up graduating from college, moved to California and got into the fitness industry, which I'm sure we'll talk about. Vince Ferguson: Oh, most definitely. Well, was there a time in your life where you were not fit? You look great. Tell me. Bryce Henson: Well, thank you. Absolutely. And I guess that latter part of my childhood when we escaped, if you will, to Michigan in the Midwest. It's a great place to live incredible people, very compassionate, but not necessarily the fitness capital of the world. So I put myself through school. I'm a graduate of Michigan State and while I graduated, I took it seriously. I definitely was not a fitness guy. So my staple of my diet was Taco Bell, fast food, a lot of keg parties in youth. So as is common for college kids, but there I was about 21 years of age when I graduated and then ended up getting a job in Los Angeles which moved me to California. And at that point, we'll kind of talk about it, I'm sure, but I wasn't fit. While I was excited to be in California, the palm trees, the blue skies, the sunshine. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Bryce Henson: I was 21, had very little work experience, job experience. I had 20 pounds of body fat, very little muscle in my body. And if I'm being honest with you, Vince I had more dark days than good, just because of my lack of fitness. Vince Ferguson: Hmm. Wow. But what was the aha moment for you that put you on the path to getting healthy? Bryce Henson: Yeah. Yeah. Great question. So after I landed in Southern California and Los Angeles, and like I said, I mean, it wasn't all drear and career. Certainly there were some benefits, but because I went through a very challenging point. I wasn't confident, didn't have the assertiveness or the vibrancy, the energy that I do now. And it all came to a lack of fitness. So, after living in LA like that for probably about a year and a half, a fortuitous situation happened. A close friend of mine that I went to college with moved to Southern California, and we ended up living together. And it took me about probably a few months before I mustered up enough courage to say, "Hey, Adam, can you show me how to lift weights?" Because he wasn't on the cover of Men's Health, but he could have been. He had the six pack abs, the physique, the energy, the vibrance. All the girls loved him. I really looked up to that. Vince Ferguson: Oh yeah. Bryce Henson: So after living with him for a few months, he ended up taking me under wing his wing and that's actually what started my fitness transformation. Vince Ferguson: Nice. Nice. But now you are the CEO of Fit Body Bootcamp. How did that transition happen? Bryce Henson: Whoo! Well, that's a little bit more of a long-winded story, but if you have a few minutes, I'd be happy to share. Vince Ferguson: I'm interested. Bryce Henson: Yeah. So basically after I lived with Adam, I mustered enough courage. He said that he would work with me and introduce me to fitness, but he said, "I need you to commit to at least 90 days, Bryce, because I get this question asked so many times that very few people stick with me." So ended up committing to him. And if I'm being honest, Vince, part of me was thinking to myself in the little voice in the back of my mind, "I'm going to do what he says I'm going to do or needs me to do. And then when it doesn't work for me, at least I tried." Bryce Henson: But as it turns out, he introduced me to lifting weights, to circuit training, to clean eating, nutrition. But most importantly, which I know your viewers are getting a lot of value from, is the coaching and accountability. Because without that coaching, that accountability, that personal kind of training and accountability, I would like to look you in the eye and tell you I would be a fit guy, but I don't know if I would've. I can't do that. Bryce Henson: So as it turns out over that 90 day turned into about a six- month clip that I drastically transformed my physique. I dropped 20 pounds of fat put on 20 pounds of muscle. But more than the physique, it changed my life. I had energy, the confidence. I became the top performing sales rep in my company. And that was really the base and what introduced me to the fitness industry. But it wasn't until about two years later when I was at the gym and a couple guys came up to me and said, "Hey, man. How do you lift weights? Or what do you eat?" And a light bulb went on to me and I thought to myself, "Shoot, holy smokes, they're asking me kind of like how I leaned on Adam." Bryce Henson: So I did the logical thing and I ended up looking into a certified personal training credential through National Academy of Sports Medicine, because at the time, I never thought I would actually be a CEO of a major international fitness franchise or even go full professionally. I just thought I could keep my sales gig, which I went from the least performing sales rep to the highest performing rep, just because of my fitness transformation, which is a side story. But when people tell me, "Bryce, I can't afford to be fit." My response is, "You can't afford not to be fit. It's going to benefit every aspect of your life." Vince Ferguson: Thank you. Bryce Henson: So with that all said, after I went through that transformation, I became a certified personal trainer and I started training some clients in the nights and weekends. And I think I updated my Facebook profile to a personal trainer. And I started receiving ads from this gentleman named Bedros Keuilian. Who's now one of my dear friends and best friends. Who's the founder of Fit Body Bootcamp. And he was talking about how to grow your personal training experience and how to get more clients and get the better results. And so I started following his email probably for about two years. And it wasn't until the Spring of 2012 when I was coming back from California, because I took a little hiatus abroad. I lived in South America for a couple years, even though I was following along with the content that he was talking about Fit Body. Bryce Henson: And I decided actually, I was coming back to California. "I'm actually going to look into this fitness franchise called Fit Body Bootcamp that he's talking about." So I ended up doing the diligence and I think there was probably only about 15, 20 owners in our brand at the time, but I ended up calling every one of them and researching having conversations. And as it turns out, in the summer of 2012, decided to take a leap of faith and open my own studio, my own Fit Body Bootcamp location in Southern California. Bryce Henson: So that one location I'm happy to kind of provide more details, but was really the catalyst to me, owning multiple locations, becoming the vice president and now mid-year of last year of 2021 is when Bedros anointed me as his CEO so I can kind of continue to run and take that torch that he's built and really continue it to the future. Vince Ferguson: Wow. That's amazing, though. Congratulations on that success. Bryce Henson: Thank you. Vince Ferguson: Yes. But to be that successful, to even get the trust that you've got from Pedros, what did it take for you to get that kind of trust from him? Bryce Henson: That's an awesome question, Vince. Well, it first starts, I think, with work ethic and I learned that work ethic probably in my youth, but really developed it day in and day out at the gym. So again, that's another just really shining reason that fitness has so many other benefits of your life. Not only physically, but mentally, spiritually, emotionally. So I think that work ethic was instilled, but also accentuated through my fitness journey. I'm a guy that takes action. So, I like being in the fitness industry. Same with you, Vince, your clients, you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make them drink. You can show them the way, but they have to take action. They have to do their part too. Both of you do. And I'd like to think that I did my part. Bryce Henson: So Bedros welcomed me to the brand as an owner, I joined his Mastermind Coaching Group. He gave me some orders on how to grow business, how to sell, how to get clients better results and I took action. And I did that day in and day out, week in and week out, month in and month out. And, while I've had a lot of success, it wasn't all sunshine and rainbows either. I mean, I definitely had a lot of false starts and missteps and poor leadership decisions that I've learned from and really grown from. But over the years, ended up making a name for myself within the brand, ended up, again, being plugged into the Mastermind Group and really from a networking perspective, and really this is the name of the game is relationships, built a very strong relationship with Bedros. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Bryce Henson: So that way, fast forward to 2018, when the brand was growing like a hockey stick, he knew he needed more support and infrastructure. He already knew me, liked me, trusted me. I was his coaching client. I took action. I'd grown one gym turned into many. So because of that foundational trust from a relationship perspective, it was really the last reason, I think, that he made the call to bring me in as his VP. Bryce Henson: And then I put my head down from 2018 to 2021, of course, still this to this day, but with the support of my team, the support of the franchisees and clients, made some good decisions and added more value. And when the time came with Bedros wanted to kind of step out and still be the visionary and help market the company, but also had some few other interests, it just made sense from his mind to anoint me the VIP. Being I started as an owner. I know every aspect of the business. I'm a client. I go to bootcamp three times a week. I've been the janitor of our studio. So I've seen the business inside and out. And I think that's really a big reason that I was able to fall into this role. Vince Ferguson: Most definitely. Now, who are your ideal clients for Fit Body Bootcamp? Bryce Henson: Yeah. Great question. Well, I think it's interesting because fitness has a lot of different scope to it, right? You can be a body builder, you can be into yoga, you can be into circuit training. So, for Fit Body Bootcamp, the clients that we serve are, our avatar, we call her Mrs. Jones and we do serve male clients as well. But about 80% of our clients are female. Vince Ferguson: Okay. Bryce Henson: And we don't train fitness athletes or people that are trying to shave a second off their 40 to make the NFL combine. And there's a space for that, but that's not our clientele. Our clientele is the everyday Mrs. Jones. She has a couple kids. She's overweight, probably doesn't love working out even though she needs to. Her husband doesn't look at her the same anymore. And she needs that coaching, that accountability, support, and really that's the secret sauce to our program. Bryce Henson: We're able to bring in our client avatar, Mrs. Jones, welcome her in, give her good results. Our secret sauce of our interval training program is 30 minutes. So, we like to say, even like this podcast, you can do anything for a half an hour, right? 30 minutes. Vince Ferguson: Exactly. Right. Bryce Henson: And, from there, it's not magic. Our clientele has to do the work and they have to show up at least three times a week, but also from a nutrition coaching perspective between the high-intensity interval training, between the strength and between the cardio, in addition to nutrition coaching, we can get our clients really great results. And the theme of your podcast and your line of work is six weeks. And that's really the baseline what it takes in order to kind of start seeing the transformation. Vince Ferguson: Hmm. Awesome. So all this involves training, coaching, nutrition, the whole nine, everything. Bryce Henson: That's it. And our model is not, and there's a place for every type of model. But you think of a big box gym, which is just kind of you're really just renting access to weights, but you have to figure it out. That's not our model. Our model is definitely very much coaching. It's really personal training in a group setting. So you get all the value that you would when you're hiring a one-on-one personal trainer, which there's a ton, but you do it in a group setting. So you can provide more energy, more culture, more accountability, and then for a fraction of the price and really that's our model and that's how we're able to produce incredible weight loss results, and really transformations. Not only from a physique perspective, but as you know, Vince and your audience knows from a life perspective, is fitness just changes your life. Vince Ferguson: It does. Totally. Completely. Mentally, physically, like you said, even spiritually. Bryce Henson: Yep. Vince Ferguson: Now, any of your classes are virtual? Bryce Henson: So interestingly enough, I mean, and we're all kind of going through this, hopefully at the tail of the it, COVID, but previous to COVID they weren't, actually, but one of our core values at Fit Body Bootcamp is to embrace and drive change. And thankfully we had that mentality, so we were able to pivot the whole brand literally within 24 hours and we're shooting this in early 2022, but when everything went down in March of 2020, which I can't believe, and I know you probably can't either, Vince, it's almost two years ago, which is crazy. But when everything went down, we were able to pivot to online coaching. And while that's not our bread and butter, our bread and butter is still in the gym, physical, in-person relationship training. We have made that offering. We still have a good amount of clients that actually really enjoy our virtual sessions and that coaching. Vince Ferguson: Okay. But it's starting to open up where you're having more people in house now as well as that? Bryce Henson: Yeah, exactly. And in every state, unfortunately, well, fortunately or unfortunately, is a little bit different. Just obviously the lockdowns and the regulation are depending on state and the time of this videotaping, we have about 10% of our brand is in Canada and Canada just went on another wave of lockdown. So for our Canadian owners, they're streaming now virtually which we're thankful they're able to execute and really help support them in the back end. But here for the 90% of our brand here in the US, while we still offer virtual as a kind of an add-on and additional value, we're back in the studio. We're back to group training. And just depending on the state or local jurisdiction, there might be some intricacies in capacity, but for the most part we're back in and just cranking away. Vince Ferguson: Nice. And I just got back from Arizona. I was working out every day while I was there. Now I'm back in New York. You have mandates. If you're not vaccinated, you can't work out in the gym. I'm not sure how it is in California, but how is that impacting your franchisees? Bryce Henson: Yeah, unfortunately, I mean, it is. Certainly, it's interesting looking back at this, Vince, I know you're a New York guy and I'm here at California. There's about five states that I would not have wanted to been in, in this whole situation. One's New York. Second is California, Michigan, New Jersey, Washington, to name a few. So it really just depends on the local jurisdiction, but I know New York now with the additional mandates is even more stringent than California, but we're a close second. Bryce Henson: And unfortunately it is. I know this, unfortunately, it's became a political issue, which is just mind boggling and really sad to me. But at the end of the day, I genuinely think, Vince, I know you're going to be in the same wave length, we need to start changing the conversation about instead of fear and doom and gloom, the reality of the situation, statistically speaking, obesity is the biggest pandemic that we're going through. It's killed millions of people. The World Health Organization estimates it kills nearly 3 million people a year. It's done that for over a decade and it's continuing to rise. And, of course, we see COVID patients, the ones who are at the most risk have autoimmune or immune system compromised. And specifically speaking, they're obese. Because when you're obese, your whole body, your organs, your heart, have to work exponentially harder. So I would really love that our society starts talking about changing the conversation to health, to fitness, to activity because that, in my humble opinion, will drastically change our society way more than pushing vaccines left and right. And whatever your beliefs are, my whole message is let's focus on health and fitness and that should be the focus, not sickness. Vince Ferguson: Thank you. A hundred percent. I'm a believer. That's what I'm talking about. There's less talk on health and more talk on taking certain products. But I truly believe, man, that if people focus more on being healthy and strengthening their immune system, they will not be so susceptible to these certain type of issues. And what you're doing is great because you're speaking out about obesity and about health. What should people be doing? Can the Fit Body Bootcamp help people who are obese? Bryce Henson: Absolutely. And, shoot, we're here, you know, Vince, you and I are in the service business, right? We have a big heart. We want to help people. Fitness has impacted our lives. Granted, I'm sitting here looking at, you have a great physique. Health and fitness is a very big focal point of your life as it is mine. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Bryce Henson: And yeah, I mean, we definitely help all walks of life and all people. And we definitely have a vast majority, I shouldn't say a vast majority, but a significant amount of clients that are obese and we're the solution. We're the solution to that issue. And what my recommendations are is to get at least three times a week a full body workout where you're working both strength and cardiovascular. And cardio is really good, but especially for female clients, for whatever reason, there's this stigma that lifting weights and resistance training is going to turn our clientele into the Hulk, and that's just not the case. Guys have five times the amount of testosterone that women do on average and still have a hard time putting muscle on their body without continued focus. Bryce Henson: So, we want to welcome our clients in, get them on our program at least three times a week, a full body, if not, four. Increase their water, their hydration. Increase their sleep. Make some adjustments to nutrition. And, Vince, what I like to say is, is working out and getting in the studio is the cornerstone habit. I would like it actually, and you would think, if someone doesn't work out, interestingly enough, they should actually take more focus on their nutrition. But it's the opposite. Typically, human nature and you've probably encountered this all the time, a client's, "Oh, I don't work out. Well shoot. I can just eat a tub of ice cream then and it doesn't matter." But it's actually the opposite is true, but that's the reason it's so important to get your workouts as the cornerstone habit. Because when you work out, your physiology changes. You're more inclined to actually pick up that salad instead of that cheeseburger. You start drinking a little bit more water. You sleep better, you feel better the next day. And it's just rinse and repeat. So that's really, really important to get our society working out and shoot, Vince, if our society, if the North American continent worked out three times a week, cleaned up their nutrition, increased their hydration and got to sleep, a lot of these health issues that are in the mainstream media about doom and gloom, they would simply just go away. Vince Ferguson: Yes. I call it fear porn, they're putting out there, Bryce. Bryce Henson: Fear porn. I haven't heard that, but I'm going to use that. I'm going to take that, Vince, if you're okay with it, because that's exactly what it is. Vince Ferguson: It's fear porn and it's people like yourself, myself and others who are trying to spread faith over fear. You know what I mean? And also, fitness over fear. Basically. And I like what you're doing because you're spreading the word and your mission is to actually get out there and spread this word throughout the world. And you're doing it on podcasts. You have a speaking platform. You're really out there. Vince Ferguson: But let me ask you this, what is it going to take to get the world to listen to Bryce Henson about this? Bryce Henson: Holy smokes. So that's the million dollar question. I'm here, but don't have all the answers, Vince and I'm here you as a humble servant. But what I do know is this, fitness just drastically changed my life. It's drastically changed your life, your audience, and a network of people that have benefited from this. And I feel like I have a duty, obligation, responsibility to continue the charge and our mission at Fit Body Bootcamp. the purpose, the why we do what we do is to inspire fitness and it's to change lives every day. Bryce Henson: And how I can serve is by leading my team at headquarters, by training our franchisees better, by serving our clients, by getting on podcasts like yours and just really spreading the mission. And I love that, faith over fear. Fitness over fear. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Bryce Henson: I'm going to take that with me, if you'd be so kind and continue to evangelize that because we're on the same mission and we've come a long way, but we have a long way to go as a society and we're here taking action. Vince Ferguson: Definitely. And I think the more people like you and I who get together and collaborate, we will get that message out. Vince Ferguson: Now, how is Fitness Body Bootcamp growing? Are you seeing more franchisees coming to the table? Bryce Henson: We are. And holy smokes, 2020, as you would imagine, for our industry, for the rest of that industry, was not kind. So, there was definitely some contraction and it was definitely a challenging situation to go through, but we really pride ourselves in adding up, stepping value, creating an online coaching platform within 24 hours. We were able to pivot. Show our studio owners how to execute Zoom and virtual sessions in addition to prerecording a lot of sessions in the backend so we had a big virtual content library. So we're able to really continue afloat, even though many of our locations literally had to stop operations. And especially in New York, especially in California, for an extended period of time. So while 2020 was challenging, we're still feeling the effects of this even into early 2022. The light at the end of the tunnel is we awarded 10 times the amount of franchises we did in 2021 than the previous year. Bryce Henson: And, the interest is coming back. We're on the phone with perspective owners that are interested. We just hosted our January onsite university to a handful of new owners. And so we still have a long way to go and I'm hoping the dynamic of the country and the leadership of the country really changes in a positive way as we enter into 2022, which I have some question marks on that, but that's a topic for another day. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Bryce Henson: What I do know to be true is there is some faith being restored and we feel the tailwinds are back in our favor and after rebounding and having a strong 2021, we feel very optimistic on what 2022 is going to look like even from the last few weeks. Vince Ferguson: Nice. Do you have any locations, I know you mentioned something about having locations in New York, is that correct? Bryce Henson: We do. We do. Vince Ferguson: Okay. Great. And so I can find them online, correct? Bryce Henson: Yeah. You'd want to go to our website, which is fitbodybootcamp.com. That's fitbodybootcamp.com and for you or any of your listeners, whether you're in New York or whether you're listening to this in any part of North America, you can just put in your search where your address is and find the local fitness studio near you. We have hundreds of locations. About 90% are in the US. 10% are in Canada. So that's where you can find us. Vince Ferguson: Nice. Nice. I understand, Bryce that you hold citizenships in Portugal and the US. What's that about? Bryce Henson: Oh yeah. That's an interesting fact. So I'm American born and bred, as we discussed, but about in 2010 and I kind of talked about my fitness transformation journey and when I became a certified personal trainer. And I started coaching clients in the nights and weekends, as I mentioned, but there was a two-year gap from when I basically started that journey until I opened my first fitness studio. And as it turns out, I went on a two-year hiatus to South America. Ended up moving to a little island in Brazil called Florianopolis, Brazil, sight unseen. Growing up, I was a big sports fan and I loved Kobe Bryant. And interestingly enough, most people don't know, or many people, I should say, don't know this, but Kobe Bryant lived in Italy in his youth for six years. His dad played European ball. So he could speak fluent Italian. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Bryce Henson: And me living in Southern California, but also just being a big Kobe Bryant fan growing up, I would love it when I watched the games and watched the press conference and he'd give the interviews, but then the Italian press would stay after and they would interview him in Italian. And there Kobe Bryant is, one of the greatest basketball players of all time, speaking fluent Italian. And it really made a big impact on me. Bryce Henson: So I had that in the back of my mind that I wanted to learn a different language and I visited Brazil and I was, "You know what? This is it." So ended up moving there for two years. Through a crazy situation how the world is connected, was introduced to my wife who actually picked me up from the airport sight unseen. And that was kind of my entry to Brazil and lived there for two years, met a beautiful lady. Her name's Tatiana who became family with hers. And as it turns out, she's from Brazil, born and raised, but she has family lineage to Portugal because her family immigrated from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil decades ago. Because of that, because of our union, I was able to pick up Portuguese citizenship and have been to Portugal a few times as a result. So it's just kind of an interesting fun fact through my life travels was able to acquire that. Vince Ferguson: Lovely, lovely. So you've been to Lisbon? Bryce Henson: I've been to Lisbon, on a couple different occasions and then there's a city in the north, which is a three-hour train ride which is called Porto and it's next to the Spanish border. So both are lovely, both Lisbon and Porto. If I had to pick, I'd recommend Porto, but for your audience there, if you're looking for a European vacation, especially some of the other countries like Greece and London, very beautiful, but can be very pricey. Lisbon is a very affordable alternative. It has the beach. It has the seas. It's on the Iberian Peninsula, but I highly recommend it. Vince Ferguson: I love it, man. I heard a lot of great things about Portugal and that's why I asked. I was in Brazil many years ago, so I'm familiar with Portuguese, but you're a world traveler, man, which is great. Bryce Henson: You know what? I try and through that story, but before I moved to LA, I put myself on a flight. I enrolled in a study abroad program in Asia. I put myself on a flight when I was 20 years old at Tokyo, Japan. And that just freaking rocked my world. And because of that, I was inspired and I just wanted to dedicate my life to broadening my horizons, learning languages, meeting people, connecting with people. And, of course, fitness has been a huge aspect of that as well. Vince Ferguson: Most definitely. What advice would you give to someone listening to this podcast now who may be on the fence about their health and not sure if they want to take that leap into Fit Body Bootcamp? Bryce Henson: That's it. You just got to get started. One foot in front of the other. And it feels like, it's interesting, human nature, it's when we're anticipating something very challenging, we sometimes go into analysis by paralysis and we just kind of sit in the sidelines. But what happens is when you take that first step, the other misconception is when you take that first step, which is hard, which is challenging, which is uncomfortable, human nature thinks, "Okay, if this step is hard, all the steps are going to be hard." And the fact of the matter is, that's not the case. When you take one step, it's hard. Then you take the next step, it's a little less hard. And then eventually what happens is after you put one step in front of the other, you wake up and you realize, "Holy smokes. Yeah, it's still hard, but I'm stronger. I'm better. And it's way more manageable." Bryce Henson: So my message is, it's not as hard, long term as you think it is, but you have to take that step. You have to take action and when you do, what's the famous Isaac Newton who created the laws of physics, a body in motion stays in motion. The opposite also true. A body at rest stays at rest. So if you're sitting on the sideline, staying at rest, you are not going to get moving. However, if you take that one leap of faith, you put that one foot in front of the other, a body in motion stays in motion. You're going to wake up three months or six weeks from now, three months from now, six months from now, a year from now, being "Holy smokes, Vince. I'm a different person." And that's really what you and I are trying to accomplish here. Vince Ferguson: Love it. Exactly. Exactly. Now, where can my audience find out more about Bryce Henson and Fit Body Bootcamp? I know you mentioned it earlier. Mention it again. Bryce Henson: Absolutely. I'm actually going to give you a different handle, because that was our website that I referred you to. But if you want to follow me on social, all the handles from Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and my personal website is realbrycehenson.com. Not to be confused with fakebrycehenson, so realbrycehenson.com. That's my site. And then all my social handles are the same. realbrycehenson. So that's where you can find me. And we'd love to connect with you, Vince and your audience as well. Vince Ferguson: Most definitely. Where do you see yourself, Bryce in the next five to 10 years? Bryce Henson: Oh, my friend, we are just getting started. After a really challenging 2020, 2021, the tail winds are behind us and we just have a lot of health and fitness to inspire. So what I'm looking to do is, while we have hundreds of locations throughout North America, I'm looking to make even a bigger impact, really pour into my team who can pour into our owners and pour into our clients and really inspire fitness and change in lives and change lives every day, which is our mission, which is our purpose. But really to continue to make Fit Body Bootcamp a household name so that way we can help spread health and wellness together, which is really my mission and where I see myself in the next five to 10 years. Vince Ferguson: Wonderfully said, man. I believe you're going to do it. You know what I'm saying? Bryce Henson: I appreciate that, my friend. Vince Ferguson: You're definitely going to do it. Now, I just want to say Bryce Henson on behalf of my organization, Body Sculpt of New York, that's my nonprofit that we have in New York and Six Weeks of Fitness, I truly want to thank you for coming on my show today, Bryce Henson: Vince, it was a pleasure, man. I love your energy. I love your enthusiasm. And I love what you're doing. We're on the same path here. Maybe a few different channels, but we have our hearts in the right place and I really appreciate you having me on today. Vince Ferguson: Oh, it's my pleasure, man. And to my audience, I truly hope this program was encouraging and inspiring that you will continue tuning in to my Six Weeks of Fitness podcast. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions for the show, please leave them in the comments section below. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any future episodes and don't forget we don't stop exercising because we grow old. We grow old because we stop exercising.

Saint of the Day
Hieromartyr Clement of Ancyra, and Martyr Agathangelus (296)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 2:15


He was from Ancyra in Galatia, son of a pagan father and a Christian mother named Euphrosyne. His mother prophesied on her deathbed that he would suffer great torments for Christ over many years. After her death he was adopted and reared by a pious woman named Sophia. From the age of twelve, he began to fast and pray like the monks, so that he was soon ordained a deacon, and became Bishop of Ancyra at the age of twenty. His piety and zeal for the faith attracted the attention of the Imperial Governor of the region, who had him arrested. Thus began Clement's twenty-eight years of almost continuous suffering for the Faith. When he stood firm despite many tortures, he was sent to the Emperor Diocletian in Rome. The Emperor showed him a table set with costly vessels on one side, and another decked with instruments of torture on the other, and bade Clement to make his choice. The Saint replied: "These precious vessels remind how much more glorious must be the eternal good things of Paradise; and these instruments of torture remind me of the everlasting punishments of hell that await those who deny the Lord."   The Saint was viciously tortured, then transported to Nicomedia, where a converted pagan named Agathangelus ('good angel') became his companion. For many years they endured unspeakable torments alternating with long imprisonments, but nothing would move them to deny the precious Faith of Christ. After twenty-eight years of suffering, Agathangelus was beheaded; but Clement was briefly paroled and allowed to celebrate the services of Theophany and to give the holy Communion to his fellow-Christians. A few days later, as he was again celebrating the Divine Liturgy, some pagan soldiers burst into the church and beheaded him at the altar.

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 23 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022


Gen 46:1-47:31, Matt 15:1-28, Ps 19:1-14, Pr 4:14-19

Saint of the Day
Holy Martyr Anastasius of Persia (628)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 1:41


He was a Persian, the son of a Magus, a soldier in the Persian army under Chosroes II, who at that time was making inroads into the Christian Empire. His Persian name was Magundat. Chosroes captured Jerusalem in 614, and carried away the Precious Cross as a trophy. Magundat heard of this, and of all the miracles worked by the Cross; and he wondered why the ruins of an instrument of torture were so revered by the Christians. Seeking out Christian elders to answer his questions, he learned of the Incarnation, life, Crucifixion and Resurrection of the Christ, and with joy embraced the Christian Faith as Truth. He was baptized by St Modestus, Patriarch of Jerusalem, and given the name of Anastasius. At the same time, he took monastic vows. For a time he lived in a monastery in Jerusalem, but then went forth, found some Persian Magi at Caesarea, and chastised them for embracing delusions. Since he was in Persian territory (as he well knew), he was taken to the Persian governor, interrogated, imprisoned, and finally taken with other captives to Persia. There, despite many severe tortures, he refused to return to his former error, and was hanged by one hand, strangled, then beheaded.

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 22 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022


Gen 44:1-45:28, Matt 14:13-36, Ps 18:37-50, Pr 4:11-13

10 Minutes with Jesus
22-01-2022 Holy Madness - 10 Minutes with Jesus

10 Minutes with Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 10:56


#10MinuteswithJesus** Put yourself in the presence of God. Try talking to Him.** 10 minutes are 10 minutes. Even if you can get distracted, reach the end.** Be constant. The Holy Spirit acts "on low heat" and requires perseverance.10-Minute audios to help you pray.Daily sparks to ignite prayer: a passage from the gospel, an idea, an anecdote and a priest who speaks with you and with the Lord inviting you to share your intimacy with God.Find your moment, consider you are in His presence and click play.All the information is on our website: www.10minuteswithjesus.org.To receive your meditation every day, click here:WhatsApp: http://dozz.es/j3wnlApple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/10-minutes-whith-jesus/id1477350613?l=enTelegram: https://t.me/tenminuteswithjesusiVoox: https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-10-minutes-with-jesus_sq_f1744292_1.htmlYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsZttEgez26FgDqCO_s3tmqeKq7Pmlkr

Christian Natural Health
Dr. Donna Chacko: Faith and Health Connections

Christian Natural Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 32:04


Dr. Chacko is the new author of Amazon best seller Pilgrimage: A Doctor's Healing Journey. She practiced medicine for decades, first as a radiation oncologist and later as a family medicine doctor, caring for the poor in Washington, DC. Now Donna works in the ministry she founded, Serenity and Health, to promote health of body, mind, and spirit. Dr. Chacko will send Three Keys to A Holy, Happy and Healthy Life to listeners of the podcast when they sign up for her newsletter  and blog.To learn more or to purchase Pilgrimage, go to https://www.serenityandhealth.com/pilgrimage .

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran
Moed Katan 9 - January 21, 19 Shvat

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 49:14


Study Guide Moed Katan 9 Pictures Today’s daf is sponsored by Adina Polak in loving memory of Shlomit Bat Bessi. Today’s daf is sponsored by Leah Goldford in loving memory of her mother-in-law, Joyce Goldford, Zissel Pessel Bat Eliyahu Mordechai Ha-levi on her 11th yahrzeit. “Her motto was: “if you don't have anything good to say, say nothing." This wasn't a mere expression but the way she lived her life. Always having something nice to say with her soft voice, mild manner and beautiful smile, no Lashon hara ever came out of her mouth. I miss her and hold the sweet memories of her in my heart. I hope I have internalized her lessons and passed them on to my children and grandchildren. May her neshama have an Aliya and her memory be for a blessing.”  Today’s daf is sponsored by Gabrielle & Daniel Altman in loving memory of Hon, Myriam Altman z”l. “She was a trailblazer for women’s equality, who would have been immensely proud of her 6 family members who are learning the Daf, and probably would have been learning it herself.” Pictures What is the source that one cannot mix two smachot? They try to derive it from the verses in Kings 1 Chapter 8 that describe the sanctification of the Temple that took place in the seven days before the holiday. The proof is rejected and in the end, they learn it from a different part of the verse. When the Temple was dedicated, they did not celebrate Yom Kippur that year. They permitted it based on a kal vachomer from Shabbat and the Tabernacle. Why couldn’t they have also fasted and also celebrated the Temple sanctification? From where do we derive that Shabbat is overridden by the Tabernacle? A different source is brought to prove that the sanctification of the Temple overrode Yom Kippur. How do we know that they didn't celebrate Yom Kippur that year? How do we know that God approved of this? Why does the verse there describe all the good that God did for King David? When King Solomon tried to bring in the Ark, the gates of the Holy of Holies stick to each other and wouldn’t open? Only when he prayed and eventually asked for mercy on the merits of David, then the gates opened and it became clear that David was forgiven for his sin with Batsheva. Stories are told of students who went to be blessed by rabbis and received blessings that sounded more like curses, but in the end, others explained it to them in a positive manner. What types of makeup are women allowed to use on chol hamoed? Do the same rules apply to younger women and older women? The Gemara brings a braita that shows Rabbi Yehuda’s stringency regarding putting lime on one’s skin to be more limited than it appeared in the Mishna. Does Rabbi Yehuda really hold that one can do something now that is uncomfortable as long as on the holiday one will be happy from the results of that initial action? It seems to contradict his opinion elsewhere on a different topic. What types of depilatory creams did women use?

Saint of the Day
Holy Martyr Agnes of Rome (~304)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 1:39


She was a virgin of noble birth who lived in Rome during the reign of Diocletian. She was martyred at the age of twelve. From an early age she loved chastity ("Agne", the origin of her name, means "pure" or "chaste" in Greek.) Her purity became so well known that she was sought out by many women of Rome, whom she exhorted to accept Christ as the one true God, and to honor him with their chastity. For this she was in time arrested and brought before the City Prefect. When she refused to deny Christ, the Prefect had her handed over to a brothel; but everyone who attempted to violate her was mysteriously prevented, and one especially vicious and lewd attacker was miraculously struck dead. In front of the Prefect's soldiers, Agnes prayed to God and the dead man was restored to life. Many pagan spectators, and the Prefect himself, cried "Great is the power of the Christians!" But others claimed that Agnes had performed this wonder by sorcery and should be killed. The Prefect ordered that she be burned to death. She gave up her life serenely and with prayers on her lips. Some Christians gathered her relics and placed them in a tomb where a magnificent church was later built. Saint Agnes' holy relics remain a source of healing to this day.

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 21 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022


Gen 42:18-43:34, Matt 13:47-14:12, Ps 18:16-36, Pr 4:7-10

Bully and the Beast
Ep 154 "Holy Spit"

Bully and the Beast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 54:52


This week Wax joins Lore'l down south in Atlanta and give some raw advice to their listeners. During the episode they had a voicemail asking about dna test and the wrong baby dad, which happens to be the beast favorite topic! Next, they have an email from a listener who wants a girl but may not be ready, or as Wax said, "he wants an asisstant but not the boss yet". Moreover, for the Roundtable Talk starring Lore'l, you know they had to discuss the disturbing video of Pastor Michael Todd rubbing his mucus all over a churchgoer's face, and stay tuned for Wax's reaction from it!

Founders
The Essays of Warren Buffett

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 32:55


What I learned from reading The Essays of Warren Buffett by Warren Buffett and Lawrence Cunningham.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 235 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Saint of the Day
Our Venerable Father Euthymius the Great (473)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 2:06


'This Saint, who was from Melitine in Armenia, was the son of pious parents named Paul and Dionysia. He was born about 377. Since his mother had been barren, he was named Euthymius which means "good cheer" or "joy" for this is what his parents experienced at his birth. He studied under Eutroius, the Bishop of Melitene, by whom he was ordained and entrusted with the care of the monasteries of Melitene. Then, after he had come to Palestine about the year 406, he became the leader of a multitude of monks. Through him, a great tribe of Arabs was turned to piety, when he healed the ailing son of their leader Aspebetos. Aspebetos was baptized with all his people; he took the Christian name of Peter, and was later consecrated Bishop for his tribe, being called the "Bishop of the Tents." Saint Euthymius also fought against the Nestorians, Eutychians, and Manichaeans. When Eudocia, the widow of Saint Theodosius the Younger, had made her dwelling in Palestine, and had fallen into the heresy of the Monophysites which was championed in Palestine by a certain Theodosius, she sent envoys to Saint Symeon the Stylite in Syria (see Sept.1), asking him his opinion of Eutyches and the Council of Chalcedon which had condemned him; Saint Symeon, praising the holiness and Orthodoxy of Saint Euthymius near whom she dwelt, sent her to him to be delivered from her error (the holy Empress Eudocia is commemorated Aug. 13). He became the divine oracle of the Church, or rather, "the vessel of divine utterance," as a certain historian writes. He was the instructor and elder of Saint Sabbas the Sanctified. Having lived for ninety-six years, he reposed in 473, on January 20.' (Great Horologion)

In the Lord I Take Refuge: Daily Devotions Through the Psalms with Dane Ortlund

We today are led by the psalmist to “exalt the Lord our God”, but we do it with the greater knowledge that we are priests to the world—and this is true only because God sent his own Son to become the true and final great high priest, the priest who offered the ultimate sacrifice of his own life. Dane Ortlund is the author of In the Lord I Take Refuge: 150 Daily Devotions through the Psalms. Hardcover Audiobook Ebook

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 20 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022


Gen 41:17-42:17, Matt 13:24-46, Ps 18:1-15, Pr 4:1-6

Kwadwo Boateng Bempah
012 Empowered To Live Holy That Stops Leakages

Kwadwo Boateng Bempah

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 102:18


No Other Pod - Sporting KC & MLS
Episode 219 - A bunch of Sporting KC roster moves!

No Other Pod - Sporting KC & MLS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 49:05


Holy cow, we got some Sporting KC news! We had a plethora of signings, some rumors, some new coaches for SKCII, and more! We break down what all the roster news means for 2022, look forward to pre-season that starts THIS FRIDAY, and answer your questions. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @NoOtherPod, @DanKooser, and @JCMack03. No Other Pod merch available at https://bitly.com/nootherpod

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Macarius (Makarios)the Great (~390)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 3:25


He was born around 300 in Egypt and in his youth was a camel driver. While still living in his village, he withdrew to a small cell to devote himself exclusively to ascesis and prayer. When the people there wanted to make him a priest, he fled to another village. There a young woman who was discovered to be pregnant falsely accused Macarius of being the father. Macarius was seized, reviled and beaten, but made no effort to defend himself; instead he took on more work in order to provide for the mother and her child. When his innocence was finally discovered, the townspeople came to ask his forgiveness; but he fled to the desert of Sketis (now called Wadi Natrun). He was then thirty years old, and for the rest of his life he dwelt in the desert.   His humility and detachment from earthly things were so great that once, when he discovered a thief stealing his few possessions, he helped the man load them onto his camel, even pointing out to him the few things he had missed. Once a demon spoke to him thus: "Everything you do, I do too: you fast, but I never eat; you keep vigil, but I never sleep; you only exceed me in one way: your humility. Because of this I am helpless against you." The Saint said that the demons could be put in two categories: those who arouse passions such as anger, lust and greed; and others, much more dreadful, who deceive us by spiritual illusion, blasphemy and heresy.   Saint Macarius soon became known throughout Egypt, and many visitors came to his isolated home. He welcomed all with joy, judging no one and providing hospitality for all. His compassion extended to all, and he prayed even for the damned. Once he found the skull of a pagan priest, which addressed him, saying, "Each time you have pity on us who are in torment, immersed in fire and darkness, we receive a measure of comfort and are allowed to see the faces of our fellow sufferers."   Saint Macarius became a disciple of St Anthony the Great, and in his turn became the spiritual Father of many who came to live near him in the desert. He is considered the founder of the ancient and venerable monastic community at Sketis. At the age of forty he was ordained a priest at the urging of St Anthony, so that he and his brethren would not have to walk the forty miles of desert to Nitria to go to church.   Knowing that he was soon to die, he visited his disciples one last time, saying to them with tears in his eyes, "Let us weep, brethren, so that our eyes flow ceaselessly with tears, before we go to where our tears will scald our bodies." Soon thereafter he reposed. His relics now rest in the Coptic monastery that bears his name. The collection of fifty Spiritual Homilies attributed to St Macarius is a treasury of Orthodox spirituality.

The ChurchLeaders Podcast
Jackie Hill Perry: Why We Have the Wrong Idea About God's Holiness

The ChurchLeaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 26:22


Get notes on this podcast here:  https://churchleaders.com/podcast/415061-jackie-hill-perry-wrong-gods-holiness.html Jackie Hill Perry joins the Stetzer ChurchLeaders Podcast to share why the holiness of God is far more beautiful than we often think it is.   ► Listen on Apple: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-churchleaders-podcast/id988990685   ChurchLeaders brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on faith, ministry and leading the church. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive content. Visit ChurchLeaders Website: https://churchleaders.com Find ChurchLeaders on Facebook: https://facebook.com/churchleaders Follow ChurchLeaders on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChurchLead Follow ChurchLeaders on Instagram: https://instagram.com/churchlead/ Follow ChurchLeaders on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/churchleaders/

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 19 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022


Gen 39:1-41:16, Matt 12:46-13:23, Ps 17:1-15, Pr 3:33-35

Podcast Unlocked
Xbox Buys Activision Blizzard - Holy S&*%

Podcast Unlocked

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 78:11


Xbox continues its spending spree, buying Activision-Blizzard for almost $70 billion. We spent almost the entire podcast discussing it, from future game exclusivity to Microsoft's role in cleaning up Activision Blizzard's toxic workplace culture to whether or not so much consolidation is a good thing for the video game industry. Join us for the biggest Xbox story of the year (because we can't imagine anything else in 2022 topping this)!

Out of Bounds Podcast
Out Of Bounds – E184 – Freedle Coty, Todd Heath & David Wise

Out of Bounds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 196:31


Holy heck, this was a fun series of conversations. Don't forget, support independent print media by subscribing to BOMB SNOW HERE. Thanks to Freedle Coty, Todd Heath & David Wise for spending the time chatting w me.   Thank you to Woodchuck Cider, OnX Backcountry, Cannon Mountain, and Bern Helmets [...] The post Out Of Bounds – E184 – Freedle Coty, Todd Heath & David Wise appeared first on Out Of Collective.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

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Saint of the Day
Our Holy Fathers Athanasius the Great (373) and Cyril (444), Patriarchs of Alexandria

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 4:32


Saint Athanasius, pillar of Orthodoxy and Father of the Church, was born in Alexandria in 275, to pious Christian parents. Even as a child, his piety and devotion to the Faith were so notable that Alexander, the Patriarch of the city, took Athanasius under his protection. As a student, he acquired a thorough education, but was more interested in the things of God than in secular learning, and withdrew for a time into the desert to sit at the feet of Saint Anthony (January 17), whose disciple he became and whose biography he later wrote. On returning to Alexandria, he was ordained to the diaconate and began his public labors for the Church. He wrote his treatise On the Incarnation, when he was only twenty. (It contains a phrase, still often quoted today, that express in a few words some of the depths of the Mystery of the Incarnation: God became man that man might become god.)   Just at this time Arius, a priest in Alexandria, was promoting his enticing view that the Son and Word of God is not of one essence with the Father, but a divine creation of the Father. This view, which (as Athanasius realized) strikes at the very possibility of mankind's salvation, gained wide acceptance and seemed for a time to threaten the Christian Faith itself. In 325, the Emperor Constantine the Great convoked a Council of the Church at Nicaea to settle the turmoil that the Arian teaching had spread through the Church. Athanasius attended the Council, and defended the Orthodox view so powerfully that he won the admiration of the Orthodox and the undying enmity of the Arians. From that time forth his life was founded on the defense of the true consubstantiality (homoousia) of the Son with the Father.   In 326, not long before his death, Patriarch Alexander appointed Athanasius to be his successor, and Athanasius was duly elevated to the patriarchal throne. He was active in his pastoral role, traveling throughout Egypt, visiting churches and monasteries, and working tirelessly not only to put down the Arian heresy, but to resolve various schisms and moral declines that affected his territory.   Though the Arian heresy had apparently been condemned once and for all at Nicea, Arius had many powerful allies throughout the Empire, even in the Imperial court, and Athanasius was soon subjected to many kinds of persecution, some local, some coming from the Imperial throne itself. Though he was Patriarch of Alexandria for more than forty years, a large amount of that time was spent in hiding from powerful enemies who threatened him with imprisonment or death. Twice he fled to Rome for protection by the Pope, who in the early centuries of the Church was a consistent champion of Orthodoxy against its various enemies. From his various hiding places, Athanasius issued tracts, treatises and epistles which helped to rally the faithful throughout Christendom to the Orthodox cause.   In 366, the Emperor Valens, fearing a revolt of the Egyptians on behalf of their beloved Archbishop, officially restored Athanasius to favor, and he was able to spend the last seven years of his life in peace. Of his forty-seven years as Patriarch, about seventeen were spent in hiding or exile. He reposed in peace in 373, having given his entire adult life, at great suffering, to the defense of the Faith of Christ.

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 18 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


Gen 37:1-38:30, Matt 12:22-45, Ps 16:1-11, Pr 3:27-32

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 17 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022


Gen 35:1-36:43, Matt 12:1-21, Ps 15:1-5, Pr 3:21-26

1 Year Daily Audio Bible
DAB January 16 - 2022

1 Year Daily Audio Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022


Gen 32:13-34:31, Matt 11:7-30, Ps 14:1-7, Pr 3:19-20