Podcasts about African

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Best podcasts about African

Show all podcasts related to african

Latest podcast episodes about African

All About African Violets
All About African Violets – Episode 4.05 – More Grooming!

All About African Violets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 32:07


Welcome to my Sunroom Welcome to my Sunroom, you guys!!!  Fall is definitely here in Chicagoland! I would like to thank those of you who have found the podcast important enough to you that you have supported it monetarily. I […] The post All About African Violets – Episode 4.05 – More Grooming! appeared first on All About African Violets.

Freedom Sounds Radio
Lightning and Thunder: Keeping You Warm in this Stormy October

Freedom Sounds Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


Songs about Bad Weather, Vampires, and Ghosts!(Storm Sounds)In the Rain - Keith HudsonRainy Night in Portland - Watty BurnettRain From the Skies - Delroy WilsonWhen the Lights Are Low - Joya LandisBreezin' - Mikey ChungAfter a Storm - Justin Hinds/DominoesStorm Warning - Lynn TaitRainfall - Baba BrooksRed Moon - Dynamites/King TubbysLightning and Thunder - Bim ShermanRain All Night -Don CarlosStormy Night - Roland BurrellLeaving Rome - Jo Jo BennettRoman Dub - King Tubbys Dragon's Paradise - Byron LeeVampire - UpsettersVampire - Devon IronsBandits Take Over - Screechy Dan/FrightnrsGhostbusters - Hughie IssacharScare Him - MaytalsGhostrider - Musical DoctorsGhost Town - SpecialsThrone of Blood - Prince JammyDuppy Conqueror - WailersSun is Shining - Upsetters(OUT) KFSR STORMY OCTOBER 

Unearthed: Memphis
Season 2: Episode Eight: Memphis Hoodoo & St. Paul’s Spiritual Holy Temple

Unearthed: Memphis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 40:53


Since it's spooky season, I thought we could talk a little about a Memphis urban legend… What do you think is one of the most well known urban legends? I'd probably say, Voodoo Village.  That's exactly what I was thinking. And I think pretty much everyone who grew up here or has lived here for any amount of time has heard about or even ventured out to the community known to locals as Voodoo Village. So what are some of the rumors you've heard about this place? I've heard that when you drive there, they pull a school bus behind your car so you can't leave. They come out and chase you with bats and machetes. There are dead animals hanging from trees. There are weird yard art objects and masonic and voodoo symbols all around the property. It's all just very strange and spooky.  I've heard all those things too, and even believed them for a very long time. Admittedly, I was too freaked out to actually go all the way there to see for myself. I believe it was my friend Neeraj and I who ventured that way late one night, but we eventually turned around and came home.  But years later, I had read a little about the so called “Voodoo Village” and learned it was actually called St. Paul's Spiritual Holy Temple. I have also read it as St. Peter's, but I do believe it's St. Paul's.  As it turns out, the history behind St. Paul's is more complicated than we thought. To understand it, we have to start with Memphis's beginnings. But I promise we'll get back to it.  Most of the information I got for this episode was from a book by Tony Kail called, appropriately, “A Secret History of Memphis Hoodoo”. This really is a fantastic book. It's informative and a quick read. It made me want to dig deeper into the subject, thus this episode's topic. It's a really cool book. I suggest checking it out. You can find it in the local section at Novel. Memphis is known by many names. The Bluff City. The Home of the Blues. The Birthplace of Rock n Roll. The Cotton Capital of the World. The BBQ Capital of the World. But it's also called Mojo City.  The word “mojo” comes from an object used within the practice of Hoodoo. Memphis's Hoodoo history is not extremely well known or frankly understood, that is of course, unless you're actually in the know.  So we started this episode talking about voodoo and now we're talking about hoodoo. What is the difference? Voodoo (Vodou), meaning spirit, is considered a religion or religious practice. It is similar to Hoodoo, and in one video I watched, it said that Hoodoo was born out of Voodoo. It was brought from Africa, through Haiti, and then to America during the slave trade. It is a blend of Catholicism and African cultural and traditional beliefs. The type of voodoo we are going to be talking about for this episode is what is generally practiced in New Orleans.  There is structure and hierarchy in Voodoo. There is one God, but they do not interfere with life. But there are numerous spirits that do, and they call these spirits Loa or Lwa. Each Loa has its own area of life that it is responsible for, for example agriculture or money. Practitioners connect with these spirits when they need their assistance.  There are priestesses and priests in Voodoo. A popular Voodoo priestess was Marie Laveau. She made a name for herself by helping people from all walks of life in New Orleans. She was a hairdresser by day, but her other “side hustle” was to help people achieve their desires through her voodoo practice. She was known to help black, white, rich and poor people.  And even in her death, she is still helping people. There is a rumor that if you make a wish on her grave, and your wish comes true, you owe her a present. I, admittedly, made a wish on her tomb, and while it took some years, that wish did come true. So I actually owe her a present the next time we're in New Orleans. I'm sure many people have heard of this famous Voodoo Priestess.

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix
Episode 163: HAITIAN ALL-STARZ RADIO - WBAI 99.5 FM - EPISODE #159 - HARD HITTIN HARRY

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 119:42


Tune in! @djhardhittinharry & @DJayCeenyc presents another brand new episode of @haitian_all_starz Radio Podcast on @wbai995 & WBAI.ORG 2am - 4am late Monday/early Tuesday. Also streaming on @itunes @googleplaymusic @amazonpodcasts @iheartradio @mixcloud @soundcloud

Truth's Table
We Gon' Learn Today: Fugitive Pedagogy with Jarvis R. Givens

Truth's Table

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 55:31


In this episode, Ekemini and Christina are sitting at the table with Jarvis R. Givens to learn about his book, Fugitive Pedagogy:Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching. What is fugitive pedagogy? Why does it matter? How is it still in operation today? Dr. Givens takes us to school, y'all! So pull up a chair and have a seat at the table with us. Jarvis R. Givens, a native of Compton, California, is an assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, a faculty affiliate in the department of African & African American Studies, and the Suzanne Young Murray assistant professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Givens earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a Mellon Mays, Ford Foundation, and Gates Fellow. Jarvis Givens is a co-director of a major new research project called The Black Teacher Archive with Imani Perry, PhD, of Princeton University. Givens is also the co-editor of We Dare Say Love: Supporting Achievement in the Education Life of Black Boys. He lives in Roxbury, Massachusetts. About the Fugitive Pedagogy: A fundamental part of black education during slavery and in the post-Emancipation period—centered on African Americans concealing important elements of their learning and masking their true intentions for education. In Fugitive Pedagogy, Jarvis R. Givens chronicles the efforts of Carter G. Woodson—a veteran schoolteacher during the Jim Crow era—as an iconic example of how African Americans strategically subverted an anti-black school system even as they were coerced to comply with white authority. Woodson, who went on to found Black History Month, spent his career fighting the “mis-education of the Negro" by helping teachers and students to see themselves and their mission as set apart from an anti-black world. Follow: Jarvis R. Givens Twitter: JarvisRGivens Facebook: Jarvis Givens Purchase Fugitive Pedagogy here: https://bookshop.org/books/fugitive-pedagogy-carter-g-woodson-and-the-art-of-black-teaching/9780674983687 Truth's Table Listeners can purchase Beasts of Prey by Ayana Gray here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/673322/beasts-of-prey-by-ayana-gray/ Black Women, join Truth's Table Black Women's Discipleship Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/truthstablediscipleship Support Truth's Table: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TruthsTable PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/TruthsTable Merchandise: https://www.teespring.com/truthstable

Wanda's Picks
Wanda's Picks Radio Show Rebroadcast Oct. 14 with Tongo Eisen Martin; Margo Hall

Wanda's Picks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 74:00


This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay! 1. Margo Hall, Artistic Director, Lorraine Hansberry Theatre and Traci Tolmarie, join us to talk about SFBATCO Theatre Festival this weekend, Oct. 16-17 @ Brava Theater in SF's Mission District. Visit https://www.sfbatco.org/schedule 2. Black Fire @The Magic Theatre in San Francisco's Ft. Mason Center, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. PT, with Tongo Eisen-Martin and Ahkeel Mestayer. Visit www.magictheatre.org or call the box office: (415) 441-8822. 

STORIES TELLING STORIES
SPOOKTOBER 2021 ep3: "The Man in the Black Suit" by Stephen King

STORIES TELLING STORIES

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:00


One of the most recognized tales in American folklore has Mississippi roots. The story has many names, including “The Delta Legend,” “The Deal with the Devil,” and “The Deal at the Crossroads,” among others. Yet each tells a similar story that centers on a midnight meeting between a frustrated guitarist and Satan himselfScholars disagree over the origins of the Crossroads myth. Some maintain that the story originated in Africa, with Satan representing an African trickster deity such as the Dahomean Legba or Yoruba Eshu. This interpretation places the tale in a broader cultural context and elevates the musician to spiritual status. Other folklorists argue that the tale possesses many Western elements and reflects slavery's impact on African American life. Regardless of its precise origins, the myth has become most associated with early twentieth-century bluesman Robert Johnson.But take the bluesman and the Mississippi Delta out of the story, and you're left with a familiar and repeating myth that has echoed throughout modern human history… drawing its closest western parallel to the German myth about Faust… who is a highly successful man yet is dissatisfied with his life, which leads him to make a pact with the Devil at a crossroads, exchanging his soul for unlimited knowledge and worldly pleasures. The Faust legend has been the basis for many literary, artistic, cinematic, and musical works that have recycled and reinterpreted the basic story through the ages. "Faust" and the adjective "Faustian" imply sacrificing spiritual values for power, knowledge, or material gain.  But if you take another step back, you can see that all these Faustian myths share similar structure with the Theophilus legend, recorded in the 13th century, in which a saintly figure makes a bargain with the keeper of the infernal world, but is rescued from paying his debt to society through the mercy of the Blessed Virgin… which itself can be traced back to Saint Theophilus the Penitent or Theophilus of Adana, who was a cleric in the sixth century Church and is said to have made a deal with the Devil to gain an ecclesiastical position.   His story is significant as it is one of the oldest popular stories of a pact with the devil and was an inspiration for the Thelphilus legend, which inspired Faust legend… which in turn may have inspired the crossroads myth of the Mississippi Delta and cemented the legacy of one Robert Johnson.Except… this explanation of western religion says nothing about the similarities existing for centuries within the previously mentioned myths stemming from African folklore... Could it be that 6th Century historians simply appropriated this piece of African cultural heritage?  It wouldn't be the first time… or perhaps we're digging too deep and the answer is something simpler… something more… sinister… the Devil is in the details… and perhaps we've been witness to the same story, the same Satan, playing the same con on unwitting men throughout all of recorded history… This is… The Man in the Black Suit… by Stephen King...INTRODUCTION AND NARRATION BY: Eric R Hill

Guerrilla History
Electoral Theory and Strategy of Marx and Lenin w/ August Nimtz

Guerrilla History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 136:23


In this episode of Guerrilla History, we bring on Professor August Nimtz to talk about his book, The Ballot, The Streets, or Both? From Marx and Engels to Lenin and the October Revolution.  This book takes a look at the theoretical and strategic groundings and evolution of electoralism via the writings of Marx/Engels and Lenin.  A conversation that will add a lot of historical nuance to the debates that we have every election season in the "western democratic" countries! August Nimtz professor of political science and African American and African studies at the University of Minnesota.  His book The Ballot, The Streets, or Both? is available from Haymarket Books: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1385-the-ballot-the-streets-or-both.  His other books include Marx and Engels: Their Contribution to the Democratic Breakthrough (SUNY Press), Marx, Tocqueville, and Race in America: The 'Absolute Democracy' or 'Defiled Republic'  (Lexington Books), and Marxism versus Liberalism: Comparative Real-Time Political Analysis (Palgrave Macmillan).   Guerrilla History is the podcast that acts as a reconnaissance report of global proletarian history, and aims to use the lessons of history to analyze the present.  If you have any questions or guest/topic suggestions, email them to us at guerrillahistorypod@gmail.com. Your hosts are immunobiologist Henry Hakamaki, Professor Adnan Husain, historian and Director of the School of Religion at Queens University, and Revolutionary Left Radio's Breht O'Shea.   Follow us on social media!  Our podcast can be found on twitter @guerrilla_pod, and can be supported on patreon at https://www.patreon.com/guerrillahistory.  Your contributions will make the show possible to continue and succeed! To follow the hosts, Henry can be found on twitter @huck1995, and also has a patreon to help support himself through the pandemic where he breaks down science and public health research and news at https://www.patreon.com/huck1995.  Adnan can be followed on twitter @adnanahusain, and also runs The Majlis Podcast, which can be found at https://anchor.fm/the-majlis, and the Muslim Societies-Global Perspectives group at Queens University, https://www.facebook.com/MSGPQU/.   Breht is the host of Revolutionary Left Radio, which can be followed on twitter @RevLeftRadio and cohost of The Red Menace Podcast, which can be followed on twitter @Red_Menace_Pod.  Follow and support these shows on patreon, and find them at https://www.revolutionaryleftradio.com/.     Thanks to Ryan Hakamaki, who designed and created the podcast's artwork, and Kevin MacLeod, who creates royalty-free music.

Call Your Girlfriend
The Silent but Deadly Fart of Racism

Call Your Girlfriend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:22


George McCalman is an artist, a writer, an illustrator, and a designer. This man does it ALL. He spent many years as a magazine creative director, shaping the look and feel of publications such as Mother Jones, Readymade, Afar. Then he opened up his own studio, McCalman Co, where he collaborates on branding, design, and editorial projects. This year his work was nominated for a National Design Award for communication design. He's a writer. He shows his fine art in galleries. He created the Observed column for the San Francisco Chronicle, in which he illustrated his observations of the city's cultural life. Recently, he worked on chef Bryant Terry's new book, Black Food, which is a gorgeous tribute to the foodways of the African diaspora and is out next week. George is also deep in the work of creating Illustrated Black History: Honoring the Iconic and the Unseen, which will be out next year. LINKS McCalman.co Return to Sender / Tell Me Three Things I Can Do Illustrated Black History Black Food See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The China in Africa Podcast
Lightning Round: Africa-France Summit, FOCAC & UK Port Deal

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:49


An often contentious leaderless summit took place last in Montepellier where African youth activists did not hold back in telling French President Emmanuel Macron what they thought needed to be done to improve ties between the two regions. Eric & Cobus look at what lessons China, the U.S., and others can take away from the heated exchanges that took place.Plus, a preview of what might be on the agenda at the upcoming Forum on China-Africa Cooperation summit that is expected to take place next month in the Senegalese capital Dakar and the guys dive into a billion port development deal led by the UK and the United Arab Emirates.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesqueJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Good Morning Africa
Meet the CEO: We Cash Up CEO - Cedric Atangana

Good Morning Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 9:10


We Cash Up has been hailed as the  largest pan-African payment gateway. In this episode we speak to the co-founder Cedric Atangana.  

The High Performance Podcast
BITESIZE #38 | Ric Lewis: Don't confuse activity with productivity

The High Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:22


Today's bitesize brilliance is with leading businessman Ric Lewis, a massive highlight of Series 5. Ric was ranked first in the UK's 2019 Powerlist, an annual list of the UK's most influential people with African or Afro-Caribbean heritage. This episode had an enormous reaction. And we've just highlighted a few principles Ric shared that really resonated. Challenge the people around you to see who gets in your circle. And don't confuse activity with productivity. Jake and Damian look back and offer further insight in Ric's principles. Listen to his full episode. Guiding principles for business, life and happiness: https://pod.fo/e/dd561 (Damian references in this ep are: Eat That Frog! by Brian Tracy & The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch). . . . . . . Get a special signed copy of our book - ‘Lessons from the Best on Becoming Your Best' : htps://bit.ly/3kCqhFpPre-order our book: http://smarturl.it/hv0sdzPre-order our audiobook: https://adbl.co/3xQQSCF Only a few tickets left for book tour in December. Come see us!

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – October 14, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 155:26


Brian Laundrie's new look, Joe Rogan v Sanjay Gupta, Kyrie Irving speaks, don't talk about Jonah Hill or Lizzo's weight, a Bonerline, Maz checks in, Pete Rose killed Ray Fosse, and CBS gets our sloppy seconds.Listen to your "safe for work" show on WLLZ this and every weekend.Show Health: Drew's hip hurts. Marc can't see. Brandon doesn't go to the dentist. Don't even get us started on Trudi.Drew has been binging Dave & Chuck the Freak in preparation of his WATP appearance tomorrow.Storytime with Seth Rogen is the latest celebrity podcast.Jonah Hill is very insecure about his body. He doesn't want bad OR good comments. Lizzo was... but apparently is no longer insecure about her body.Kyrie Irving breaks his silence about not getting the covid vaccine. Twitter is mad that he did an Instagram Live during a WNBA game.Jerkmate (NSFW link) brings you a brand-new Bonerline. Dial or text 209-66-Boner.Curtis Smith is making the rounds. We had him FIRST!Manchester schools and parents cannot meet in the middle about masks, but some people need to learn how TV interviews are conducted.Mellissa Carone wants to be a politician now.Hail to the Victims. Dr. Nassar victims join the Dr. Anderson victims protesting outside the UofM President's house.Chick-fil-A is about to cause joy and havoc in Woodhaven.Where the hell is Ronald McDonald?If your African cats get loose more than once then: No more cats for you!Ramzu Yunus seems to be the only guy that has ever "won" a standoff. Also, don't accept a deed from him.4 Northland Mall security guards are being charged in the 2014 death of McKenzie Cochran.We interrupt Tom Mazawey's show prep to chat Jon Gruden fallout, defend murderer OJ Simpson, the softness of high school soccer, comment on Kyrie Irving and preview the weekend sporgy.RIP Ray Fosse. Some people are saying Pete Rose should be arrested for murder.Colin Kaepernick is ready for his NFL comeback. Where is Cam Newton going to land?Special Agent Gibbs is leaving NCIS and we dial up Count David Wimp to see if he's ok.Laundrie List: Dog the Bounty Hunter and John Walsh are receiving heat. Brian's sister is getting death threats. Internet sleuths believe Brian Laundrie looks like Paul Rudd now. Joe Rogan is angry CNN said he took "horse de-wormer" and he took it out on Sanjay Gupta.Tis the season for schools to cancel Halloween.Jim Bakker is still selling Doomsday products.Check out what Charlie LeDuff and ML Elrick are up to.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

With Good Reason
Abolishing the Death Penalty

With Good Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 52:00


Earlier this year, Virginia made headlines when it became the latest state to abolish the death penalty. Sabrina Butler-Smith is the first woman to be exonerated from death row. She says she's living, breathing proof of why the capital punishment should be a thing of the past. Also: Deirdre Enright is probably best known for her work as the founding director of the Innocence Project and her passionate voice on the first season of the hit podcast, Serial. But before all that, she spent decades as a capital defense lawyer. She says she attended one of her clients' executions and it changed her life forever. Later in the show: Since 1976, 17 women have been executed in the United States. Mary Atwell says women facing the death penalty are often subjected to harsher sentencing due to gender bias within the criminal justice system. Plus: In 1951, seven Black men from Martinsville, Virginia were executed for allegedly raping a white woman. Two months ago, Virginia governor Ralph Northam issued pardons to each of the Martinsville 7. Peter Wallenstein says the Martinsville 7 case brings into sharp focus the racial disparities of capital punishment in Virginia.

Dave & Chuck the Freak Podcast
Thursday, October 14th 2021 Dave & Chuck the Freak Podcast

Dave & Chuck the Freak Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 203:49


Dave and Chuck the Freak talk about getting cut a break from cops if you're honest with them, Shatner became oldest man to go into space, an elderly man arrested after locking a family in a tennis court, a group of carjackers stopped by a MMA trained owner & manual trans, a nude woman skipping through an airport asking travelers where they were from, sounds from TV & movies that are trademarked, a real estate agent that interrupted a porn shoot in a home that was listed on Airbnb, a large African caracal cat escaped & prowled a neighborhood, 150 bee hives stolen in a heist, those crazy robot ‘dogs' are now armed, Guinness World Record tallest woman alive, a fast food chain putting corporate employees to work in restaurant, and more!

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
10/14 5-1 African Zombie Drug

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 21:17


No, thanks!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Policy and Pound Cake
Policy and Pound Cake - Capitalism is FREEDOM

Policy and Pound Cake

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:59


In this archived episode of Policy and Pound Cake #TheBassSisters read from the inaugural speech of James Garfield to talk about capitalism.  By celebrating the dignity of humans to own the product of their labor,  Garfield cut to the core of capitalism.  Politicians and pundits who say that slavery is capitalist are dead wrong.  Capitalism is the ultimate definition of freedom.  Because capitalism is freedom, The Bass Sisters make the argument that enslaving Africans held America back morally and economically.THE MESSAGE MARK IS FAIRNESS:  It is fair that people own the fruits of their labor.Servitium esto damnatum [Slavery Be Damned].Be sure to share, like and follow.

The Gateway
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - Ranky Tanky is putting a modern twist on old music

The Gateway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:03


The Grammy Award-winning band plays a fusion of Gospel, blues and music from the Gullah culture of enslaved Africans who lived in South Carolina. A member of the band what it means to interpret the music for a contemporary audience.

Afropop Worldwide
The Black History Of The Banjo

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:00


We trace the history of this most American of instruments from its ancestors in West Africa through the Caribbean and American South and into the present, as a new generation of Black women artists reclaim the banjo as their own. Rhiannon Giddens, Bassekou Kouyate, Bela Fleck and more talk claw-hammers, trad jazz, Appalachian folk, African ancestors and the on-going story of American music, which would be woefully incomplete without a Black history of the banjo. Produced by Ben Richmond

Dance Boss Podcast
Anxiety Around Niching Down in Your Online Dance Business

Dance Boss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 21:46


Do you have anxiety around niching down? It's like in dance class when a student isn't executing a tendu devant property... Example 1:  Teacher: point your toe hard Student:

Leadership Junkies Podcast
153. Shannon Prince | Be A World Crafter: Strategies and Mindsets for Crafting Cultures of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Leadership Junkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 72:19


Do you want to better understand ways to create diverse, equitable, inclusive and anti-racist cultures and organizations? Are you looking for practical tools to achieve this objective? Are you ready to take on the challenges of diversity, equity and inclusion in your organization?   Our special guest Dr. Shannon Prince answers these and other questions about leadership, diversity, equity and inclusion, world crafting, and creating anti-racist cultures and organizations.   Shannon Prince is an attorney, legal commentator, and speaker. She earned her doctorate in African and African American Studies and her master's degree in English from Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, her law degree from Yale Law School, and her bachelor's degree magna cum laude from Dartmouth College.    She drafted best practice language on policing policies for the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, represented plaintiffs in CCJEF v. Rell, a high-profile landmark education adequacy lawsuit, and is currently representing the Cherokee Nation in their lawsuit against pharmaceutical distributors and pharmacies for their role in the opioid crisis that the tribe is suffering. She is a member of her firm's Firm Diversity Council and is a Legal Council on Legal Diversity Pathfinder. Her writing has been published in The Hill, Transition Magazine, Science, and Jezebel among other venues, and she's the author of Tactics for Racial Justice due out in January 2022.   The Leadership Junkies Podcast is brought to you by Cardivera.com. Show Notes Episode highlights… Moving beyond words and getting into diversity, equity and inclusion action Differently understanding systemic racism (getting beyond the idea that racism is about bad people) Understanding the realities of racism in business today Using metrics to track disparities in impact Making changes in diversity, equity and inclusion requires a focus on practices more than intentions Understanding intersectionality in biases Fundamentals of DEI training Training doesn't work in the absence of other diversity initiatives Navigating the “we hire the best people” concept in light of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives (understanding the role of unconscious biases) The reality that more diverse companies outperform less diverse companies Different practices you can use to increase your diversity, equity and inclusion The importance of hiring for diversity, equity and inclusion mindsets The of recruitment changes to build a more diverse, equitable and inclusive organization Understanding the role of bias interrupting in creating more diverse and inclusive organizations The importance of being more aware of your biases and assumptions (cultural metacognition) Exploring ways that bias has an unintended impact on the lack of diversity Ways that anti-racism initiatives are needed beyond diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives Ways to amplify your communication and conversations about diversity, equity and inclusion issues What you can do to create a safe place for your team to have open conversations about diversity, equity and inclusion The role of vulnerability in diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives and conversations Practicing world crafting by thinking like an ancestor … what future will you help create Resources: Shannon Prince Boies Schiller Flexner Law Firm Website Tactics for Racial Justice: Building and Anti-Racist Organizations and Community book by Dr. Shannon Prince (due out in January 2022) (LEADERSHIP JUNKIES DISCOUNT CODE: FLY21) The Leadership Junkies Podcast Cardivera Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

My African Clichés / African History, Daily
The unbearable authenticity of Kojo T Houenou, the francophone Marcus Garvey

My African Clichés / African History, Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:30


To close this third season, whose frequency of episodes has been somewhat disturbed by the writing of the book on African pioneers, I would like to tell you about an article, that was published in the New York Times in August 1923, which dealt with the movie “ The Birth of a Nation ” by D. W Griffiths released in 1915. A technically groundbreaking film, the first film shot in the White House, but terribly racist, described by some as the most racist film in the history of cinema. Incidentally a great box office success in its time.  Why did France, which was also responsible of inhuman exploitation in its colonies, ban a film that paid tribute to white superiority?  

Wanda's Picks
Wanda's Picks Radio Show Special-- 6th Annual Black Sustainablity Summit, 10/14

Wanda's Picks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 105:00


This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay! 1. Sis. Afia Raina Turner-Greenlea, joins us to talk about the 5th Annual Virtual Black Sustainability Summit, 10/23-25, 2020, as a teaser for this year's conference which begins tomorrow. For the $20 discount tix link. She is followed by an interview with Andrew Woods, Founder and Executive Director of the SF International Arts Festival and Nkechi Emeruwa. The Festival this year is Wed.-Sunday, Oct. 20-24 with in person and online performances. 3. With close with another reprise interview with Ms. Akilah Jaramogi who is Environmental Consultant, FACRP Co-Founder and CEO, Merikin Heritage Foundation CEO, Director - Maroon Women's Chamber of Cooperation. She talks to us about the Maroon Gathering or conference next month.       

Africa Daily
Is Congolese rumba being put on the map?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:10


People have been dancing the night away to the congolese rumba for more than 70 years. Now the Democratic Republic of Congo and The Republic of Congo have launched a joint campaign to get the genre recognised internationally. They want UNESCO to include it on a list of intangible cultural heritage. For many people, Congolese rumba remains at the core of African music. So, how did it become so beloved? Host: Karnie Sharp (@KarnieSharp) Guest: Gabrielle Mitch (@MitchNina) #AfricaDaily

Good Morning Africa
Are some countries spending way above their means?

Good Morning Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:45


In this episode we look at the fiscal spending of African governments and how to get it back to pre-pandemic levels.

Your Brain on Facts
Twins Remix (ep. 169)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:04


Twins, synchronicity, science, anomalies, and dark mysteries. Support the show Merch, book Music by Kevin MacLeod  Read the full script. Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email.     In 1940, a pair of twin boys, only three weeks old, were put up for adoption in Ohio.  Separate families adopted each boy and coincidentally named both James, calling them Jim for short.  They grew up never knowing anything about one another, but their lives were bizarrely similar.  They each had a dog named Toy and in elementary school, each both was good at math, showed talent in woodshop, but struggled with spelling.  But it was as they moved into adulthood that coincidences really started to pile up.  My name... If one is good, two must be better, so today we were talking about twin on the first of a pair of twin episodes.  Let's start with a quick review.  Fraternal twins occur when two eggs are separately fertilized.  They are genetically distinct, basically regular siblings that happened to be conceived at the same time.  Or not.  There's a rare circumstance called superfetation, where a woman ovulates while already pregnant and the second egg also gets fertilized.  Multiple eggs being released during ovulation can sometimes result in heteropaternal superfecundation, meaning the eggs were fertilized by different men's sperm, creating fraternal twins with different fathers.  Identical twins occur when a fertilized egg splits, creating two zygotes with the same cells.  The splitting ovum usually produces identical twins, but if the split comes after about a week of development, it can result in mirror-image twins.  Conjoined twins, what we used to call Siamese twins, can result from eggs that split most of the way, but not complete.  Twins account for 1.5% of all pregnancies or 3% of the population.  The rate of twinning has risen 50% in the last 20 years.  Several factors can make having twins more likely, such as fertility therapy, advanced age, heredity, number of previous pregnancies, and race, with African women have the highest incidence of twins, while Asian women have the lowest.    Twins have always been of great interest to scientists.  There's simply no better way to test variable vs control than to have two people with identical DNA.  Identical twins share all of their genes, while fraternal twins only share 50%.  If a trait is more common among identical twins than fraternal twins, it suggests genetic factors are at work.  "Twins studies are the only real way of doing natural experiments in humans," says Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at Kings College, London. "By studying twins, you can learn a great deal about what makes us tick, what makes us different, and particularly the roles of nature versus nature that you just can't get any other way.”   NASA was presented with a unique opportunity in the Kelly brothers, identical twins Scott, a current astronaut, and Mark, a retired astronaut.  As part of the "Year in Space" project, which would see Scott spend 340 on the ISS, the brothers provided blood, saliva, and urine samples, as well as undergoing a battery of physical and psychological tests designed to study the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.  According to Dr Spector, twin studies are currently underway in over 100 countries.  Working with data and biological samples in the TwinsUK Registry, Spector's team has found more than 600 published papers showing a clear genetic basis for common diseases like osteoarthritis, cataracts and even back pain.  "When I started in this field, it was thought that only 'sexy' diseases [such as cancer] were genetic," Spector says. "Our findings changed that perception."   Back on our side of the pond, the Michigan State University Twin Registry was founded in 2001 to study genetic and environmental influences on a wide range of psychiatric and medical disorders.  One of their more surprising findings is that many eating disorders such as anorexia may not be wholly to blame on societal pressured by may actually have a genetic component to them.  "Because of twins studies,” says co-director Kelly Klump, “we now know that genes account for the same amount of variability in eating disorders as they do in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We would have never known that without twins studies."  On the topic of body-fat, a LSU study by Claude Bouchard in 1990 overfed a dozen young male twins by 1,000 calories a day for three months.  Although every participant gained weight, the amount of weight, and more importantly for the study, fat varied considerably, from 9-29lbs/4-13kg.  Twins tended to gain a similar amount of weight and in the same places as each other, but each pair differed from the other pairs in the test.   While some twin studies, like Year In Space, are famous, others are infamous.   If you're worried where this topic is going, don't be.  We're not talking about Joseph Mengele or the Russian conjoined twins, Masha and Dasha, though they may show up next week.  Twin studies helped create the thinking and even the word “eugenics.”  Francis Galton, a half-cousin of Charles Darwin, was one of the first people to recognize the value of twins to study inherited traits.  In his 1875 paper, "The History of Twins," Galton used twins to estimate the relative effects of nature versus nature, a term he is credited with coining.  Unfortunately, his firm belief that intelligence is a matter of nature led him to become a vocal proponent of the idea that "a highly gifted race of men" could be produced through selective breeding and that unsuitable people should be prevented from reproducing.  The word “eugenics” came up a lot during the Nuremberg trials, if it wasn't already clear with adherents to the idea had in mind.  More recently, in 2003, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia reviewed the research on the heritability of I.Q.  He noticed that most of the studies that declared that I.Q. is genetic involved twins from middle-class backgrounds.  When he looked at twins from poorer families, he found that the I.Q.s of identical twins varied just as much as the I.Q.s of fraternal twins.  In other words, the impact of growing up poor can overwhelm a child's natural intelligence.   Bonus fact: The trope of the evil twin can be traced back as far as 300 BCE, to the Zurvanite branch of Zoroastrianism, the world's oldest continuously-observed religion.    Of all the things inherent to and special about twins, one of the most fascinating is twin language.  You might have seen the adorable viral video of a pair of toddlers having an animated conversation in their twin language.  If you want to bust out your Latin, it's cryptophasia, a form of idioglossia, an idiosyncratic language invented and spoken by only one person or very few people.  It was a struggle not to throw myself head-first down the idioglossia rabbit hole; maybe for a later episode.  Twin speak, or even sibling speak has existed, for as long as human language, but has only been seriously studied for the last few decades, not only to determine how the languages develop but to see if speaking a twin language could hamper the children learning their parents' language.  The reason twins are more likely than other sibling pairs to create their own language is less interesting than psychic phenomena - twins spend a lot of time together, being built-in companions, and are at the same developmental stage.  They unconsciously work together to build their language by imitating and pretending to understand one another, reinforcing their use of the language.  This can weaken their incentive to learn to speak to everyone else--they already have someone to talk to.  Some researchers advocate treating cryptophasia as early as possible.  According to Oxford neuropsychologist Dorothy Bishop, twins often get less intervention from speech therapists than nontwins. “People often assume that it's normal for twins to have funny language, and so they don't get a proper assessment and diagnosis. And then, when they are identified, they are often treated together as a unit, and so each gets half the attention of the professionals working with them.”   When doctors first began examining cryptophasic children, they discovered that the language isn't created out of nothing, but is made up of mispronounced words they've heard or references that only work inside their family.  It's usually not a language at all.  According to Karen Thorpe, a psychologist with Queensland University of Technology, you can think of it like “conversations between married couples where words are invented and abbreviated or restricted codes are used because full explanations are redundant.”  That absolutely happens here.  My husband and I talk like kids in a tree fort clubhouse.  But sometimes, just sometimes, a full-blown language does develop, complete with syntax and totally independent of the language spoken at home.  The syntax of a true twin language doesn't arise from mistakes made while learning the family's language.  It's similar to the syntax seen in deaf children who create their own sign language when not taught to sign.  This syntax could “gives us a potential insight into the nature of language” and mankind's “first language,” says linguist Peter Bakker.  Twin languages play fast and loose with word order, putting subjects, verbs, and objects wherever, but always putting the most important item first, which makes sense.  Negation, making something negative, is used as the first or last word of the statement, regardless of how the parental language handles negation.  It's almost like a Spanish question mark, letting you know where the sentence is going.  Verbs aren't conjugated--go is go, regardless of it's attached to I, he/she, us, or them.  There are also no pronouns, like he, she, or they, only the proper nouns.  There is also no way to locate things in time and space; everything just is.  If you're a fan of Tom Scott's language series on YouTube, he's started making them again.  If not, start with “Fantastic Features We Don't Have In The English Language.”  I'll put a link to it in the show notes.  If I forget, or you want to tell me what you thought, Soc Med.  Breakroom  Most children stop using private languages on their own or with minimal intervention, which is good, according to psychologists, because the longer they practice cryptophasia, the worse they do in tests later.  If you remember nothing else I say ever, remember that correlation does not equal causation.  Cryptophasia could be a symptom of an underlying handicap and that's the cause of the low test scores.     This simple-structured language is fine for two or a few people, but once there are more people to talk to or more things to talk about, you're going to need some more features, “unambiguous ways to distinguish between subject and object,” Bakker says.  “In the twin situation these can be dispensed with, but not in languages in which it is necessary to refer to events outside the direct situation.”  So do twin languages really offer insight into mankind's first language?  Could a primitive society have functioned as a cohesive unit with a language that can only refer to what can be seen at that moment?  That's what linguists are studying, but UC-Santa Barbara's Bernard Comrie adds the asterisk that this research into the infancy of spoken language is still a baby itself.  “First we were told that creole languages [that is, a distinct language that develops from the meeting a two or more languages] would provide us with insight into ‘first language,' then when that didn't pan out interest shifted to deaf sign language (also with mixed results)—I guess twin language will be the next thing.”     It's not an easy scientific row to hoe.  Twin languages come and go quickly as the children develop hearing their parents' language much more than their twin language.  They might keep speaking their twin language if they were very isolated, like two people in a Nell situation or that Russian family who lived alone for 40 years, but we'll file that idea under “grossly unethically and probably illegal.”  Not that it hasn't been tried.  Herodotus tells us of what is considered the first every psychological experiment, when Pharaoh Psammetichus I in the sixth century BCE wanted to know if the capacity for speech was innate to humans and beyond that, what language would that be.  He ordered two infants to be raised by a shepherd hermit who was forbidden to speak in their presence.  After two years the children began to speak; the word that they used most often was the Phrygian word for bread.  Thus, Psammetichus concluded that the capacity for speech is innate, and that the natural language of human beings is Phrygian.  Similar experiments were conducted by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 12th century CE who ordered children to be raised by caretakers forbidden to speak to them and 15th century James I of Scotland who ordered children raised exclusively by a deaf-mute woman, which was repeated by 16th century Mughal Indian Emperor Akbar, among others.  I shouldn't have to tell you that they were all based on dubious methodology and soaking in confirmation bias.  A less-terrible test was done in the 20th century by British ethologist, or animal behavior scientist, William H. Thorpe, who raised birds in isolation to determine which songs are innate.   One of the best-known cases a negative impact from cryptophasia is the Kennedy sisters of San Diego, Grace and Virginia, of Poto and Cabengo, as they called each other.  They created a media whirlwind in 1970s when it was reported that they only spoke their twin language, to the complete exclusion of English, at the rather advanced age of 6.  “Twin Girls Invent Own Language,” “Gibberish-Talking Twins,” “Like a Martian” the headlines read.  Here is a clip of the girls speaking and sadly this is the best audio quality I could find.  Grace and Virginia had suffered apparent seizures as infants, leading their parents to conclude that the girls had been left mentally handicapped.  Their parents opted to keep them inside and away from other children, leaving them mostly in the care of a laconic grandmother who often left them to their own devices.  They seemed like the next big thing in language-creation studies, but on closer examination, it was discovered that, like most cryptophasics, the girls were just very badly, and very quickly, mispronouncing English and German, the languages spoken at home.  Adding to their disappointment, when scientists tried to use the girls' words to converse with them, the girls couldn't stop laughing.  Grace and Virginia were also cleared of their parents mis-labeling them as intellectually handicapped.  Both were found to have relatively normal IQs, for as much good as IQ tests are, which is very little, but that's another show.  The girls eventually underwent speech therapy and learned regular English, though their language skills were a bit stunted, even into adulthood.  identical twins come from a fertilized egg that splits.  If the zygote splits most of the way, but not all, it results in conjoined twins.  Or if the zygotes collide and fuse, science isn't really sure.  Thus conjoined twins are always identical, meaning the same gender.  Why am I pointing that out?  I met two moms of twins at the She PodcastsLive conference who regularly have people ask them if their identical twins are the same gender.  This is why we need sex ed in school.  You'll also notice I'm not using the term Siamese twins.  That term comes from Chang & Eng Bunker, who were born in Siam, modern day Thailand, in 1811, connected by a band of tissue at the chest.  It's not offensive per e, but just doesn't apply to anyone not born in Siam, so people have stopped using it.   Conjoined twins occur once every 2-500,000 live births, according to the University of Minnesota. About 70% of conjoined twins are female, though I couldn't find a reason or theory why.  40 to 60% of these births are delivered stillborn, with 35% surviving only one day.  The overall survival rate is less than 1 in 4.  Often, one twin will have birth defects that are not conducive to life and can endanger the stronger twin.   Conjoined twins are physically connected to one another at some point on their bodies, and are referred to by that place of joining.  Brace yourself while I wallow in my medical Latin.  The most common conjoinments are thoracopagus (heart, liver, intestine), omphalopagus (liver, biliary tree, intestine), pygopagus (spine, rectum, genitourinary tract), ischiopagus (pelvis, liver, intestine, genitourinary tract), and craniopagus (brain, meninges).  75% are joined at the chest or upper abdomen, 23% are joined at the hips, legs or genitalia, 2% are joined at the head.     If the twins have separate organs, chances for separation surgery are markedly better than if they share the organs.  As a rule, conjoined twins that share a heart cannot be separated. Worldwide, only about 250 separation surgeries have been successful, meaning at least one twin survived over the long term, according to the American Pediatric Surgical Association. The surgical separation success rate has improved over the years, and about 75 percent of surgical separations result in at least one twin surviving.  The process begins long before the procedure, with tests and scans, as well as tissue expanders, balloons inserted under the skin and slowly filled with saline or air to stretch the skin, so there will be enough skin to cover the area where the other twin's body used to be. It requires a whole hospital full of specialties to separate conjoined twins, from general surgeons, plastic and reconstructive surgeons, neurosurgeons, neonatologists, cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, and maternal-fetal medicine specialists, among others.  In fact, the longest surgery of all time was a conjoined twin separation.  Separation surgeries often last an entire day; this one required 103 hours.  If they started at 8am Monday, the team finished the surgery at 3pm Thursday.  In 2001, a team of 20 doctors at Singapore General Hospital worked in shifts to separate Ganga and Jamuna Shrestha, 11-month-old twins conjoined at the head.  Not only did the girls share a cranial cavity, their brains were partially fused.  Each tiny brain had hundreds of bitty blood vessels, each of which had to be traced and identified as belonging to one or the other of the girls.  Their brains were not only connected, they were wrapped around each other like a helix.  Plus, each twin's skull needed to be reshaped and added to, using a blend of bone material and Gore-Tex fibers.  Both babies survived the surgery.  Sadly, Ganga died of meningitis at age 7, but Jamuna has gone on to live a healthy life and attend school.   We interrupt this podcast script for an exciting article.  Meaning I was almost done writing it, then I found something I had to go back and include.  There was another pair of conjoined twins named Ganga and Jamuna, this pair born in 1970 in West Bengal.  The pairing of the names makes sense when you learn that the Ganga and Jamuna are sacred rivers.  The sisters are ischio-omphalopagus tripus, meaning joined at the abdomen and pelvis.  They have two hearts and four arms, but share a set of kidneys, a liver and a single reproductive tract.  Between then they have three legs, the third being a nine-toed fusion of two legs, which was non-functional and they kept that one under their clothing.  They can stand, but they cannot walk and crawl on their hands and feet, earning them the show name "The Spider Girls".  Managed by their uncle while on the road with the Dreamland Circus, they exhibit themselves by lying on a charpoy bed, talking to the spectators who come to look at them.  They earned a good living, making about $6/hr, compared to the average wage in India of $.40.   Ganga and Jamuna have two ration cards for subsidized grain, though they eat from the same plate.  They cast two votes, but were refused a joint bank account.  They also share a husband, Gadadhar, a carnival worker who is twenty years their senior.  When asked which he loves more, Gadadhar replies, "I love both equally."  In 1993, the twins had a daughter via Caesarean section, but the baby only lived a few hours.  Though the sister would like to have children, doctors fear that pregnancy would endanger their lives.  Doctors have offered them separation surgery, but they're not interested.  They feel it would be against God's will, be too great of a risk, and put them out of a job.  "We are happy as we are. The family will starve if we are separated."   Not all parasitic twins are as obvious as a torso with arms and legs.  The condition is called fetus in fetu, a parasitic twin developing or having been absorbed by the autosite twin.  It's extremely rare, occurring only once in every 500,000 births and twice as likely to happen in a male.  The question of how a parasitic twin might develop is one that currently has no answer.  To say the fetuses in question are only partially developed is still overstating thing.  They are usually little more than a ball of tissues with perhaps one or two recognizable body parts.  One school of thought holds that fetus in fetu is a complete misnomer.  Adherents contend that the alien tissue is not in fact a fetus at all, but a form of tumor, a teratoma, specifically.  A teratoma, also known as a dermoid cyst, is a sort of highly advanced tumor that can develop human skin, sweat glands, hair, and even teeth.  Some believe that, left long enough, a teratoma could become advanced enough to develop primitive organs.   There have only been about 90 verified cases in the medical record.  One reason fetus in fetu is rare is that the condition is antithetical to full-term development.  Usually, both twins die in utero from the strain of sharing a placenta.  Take 7 year old Alamjan Nematilaev of Kazakstan, who reported to his family abdominal pain and a feeling that something was moving inside him.  His doctors thought he had a large cyst that needed to be removed.  Once they got in there, though, doctors discovered one of the most developed cases of fetus in fetu ever seen.  Alamjan's fetus had a head, four limbs, hands, fingernails, hair and a human if badly misshapen face.    Fetus in fetu, when it is discovered, is usually found in children, but one man lived 36 years, carrying his fetal twin in his abdomen.  Sanju Bhagat lived his whole life with a bulging stomach, constantly ridiculed by people in his village for looking nine months pregnant.  Little did they know, eh?  Fetus in fetu is usually discovered after the parasitic twin grows so large that it causes discomfort to the host.  In Bhagat's case, he began having trouble breathing because the mass was pushing against his diaphragm.  In June of 1999, Bhagat was rushed to Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India for emergency surgery.  According to Dr. Ajay Mehta, "Basically, the tumor was so big that it was pressing on his diaphragm and that's why he was very breathless.  Because of the sheer size of the tumor, it makes it difficult [to operate]. We anticipated a lot of problems."   While operating on Bhagat, Mehta saw something he had never encountered.  The squeamish may wish to jump30 and think about kittens, though if you've made it this far, you're cut from strong cloth.  As the doctor cut deeper into Bhagat's stomach, gallons of fluid spilled out.  "To my surprise and horror, I could shake hands with somebody inside," he said. "It was a bit shocking for me."   One unnamed doctor interviewed in the ABC News story described what she saw that day in the operating room:  “[The surgeon] just put his hand inside and he said there are a lot of bones inside,” she said. “First, one limb came out, then another limb came out. Then some part of genitalia, then some part of hair, some limbs, jaws, limbs, hair.”  There was no placenta inside Bhagat -- the enveloped parasitic twin had connected directly to Bhagat's blood supply. Right after the surgery, Bhagat's pain and inability to breathe disappeared and he recovered immediately.  Upon recovery from the surgery, in which his twin was removed, Bhagat immediately felt better. But he says that villagers still tease him about it. The story I was referring to was made into a plot point on AHS:FS, the tale of Edward Mordrake, the man with two faces.  In 1895, The Boston Post published an article titled “The Wonders of Modern Science” that presented astonished readers with reports from the Royal Scientific Society documenting the existence of “marvels and monsters” hitherto believed imaginary.   Edward Mordrake was a handsome, intelligent English nobleman with a talent for music and a peerage to inherit.  But there was a catch.  With all his blessings came a terrible curse.  Opposite his handsome was, was a grotesque face on the back of his head.  Edward Mordrake was constantly plagued by his “devil twin,” which kept him up all night whispering “such things as they only speak of in hell.”  He begged his doctors to remove the face, but they didn't dare try.  He asked them to simply bash the evil face in, anything to silence it.  It was never heard by anyone else, but it whispered to Edward all night, a dark passenger that could never be satisfied.  At age 23, after living in seclusion for years, Edward Mordrake committed suicide, leaving behind a note ordering the evil face be destroyed after his death, “lest it continues its dreadful whispering in my grave.”   This macabre story ...is just that, a story, a regular old work of fiction.  “But, but, I've seen a photograph of him.”  Sadly, no.  You've seen a photo of a wax model of the legendary head, Madame Toussad style.  Don't feel bad that you were convinced.  The description of the cursed nobleman was so widely accepted that his condition appeared in an 1896 medical encyclopedia, co-authored by two respected physicians.  Since they recounted the original newspaper story in full without any additional details, gave an added air of authority to Mordrake's tale.   “No, there's a picture of his mummified head on a stand.”  I hate to puncture your dreams, but that's papier mache.  It looks great, but the artist who made it has gone on record stating it was created entirely for entertainment purposes.  If you were to look at that newspaper account of Mordrake, it would fall apart immediately.  “One of the weirdest as well as most melancholy stories of human deformity is that of Edward Mordake, said to have been heir to one of the noblest peerages in England. He never claimed the title, however, and committed suicide in his twenty-third year. He lived in complete seclusion, refusing the visits even of the members of his own family. He was a young man of fine attainments, a profound scholar, and a musician of rare ability. His figure was remarkable for its grace, and his face – that is to say, his natural face – was that of Antinous. But upon the back of his head was another face, that of a beautiful girl, ‘lovely as a dream, hideous as a devil.'”  What did we say at the top?  Conjoined twins are identical, meaning among other things, the same gender.   And that… though we'll finish up out story of the twin Jims.  Their lives were so unbelievably similar, if you saw it in a movie, you'd throw your popcorn at the screen.  Both Jims had married women named Linda, divorced them and married women named Betty.   They each had sons that they named James Alan, though one was Alan and the other Allan.  Both smoked, drove a Chevrolet, held security-based jobs, and even vacationed at the exact same Florida beach, though one assumes not at the same time.  After being reunited at age 37, they took part in a study at University of Minnesota, which showed that their medical histories, personality tests, and even brain-wave tests were almost identical.  Remember, you can always find… Thanks…  

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Dashed Dreams: The Tokyo Olympics, Sex Testing and Biology

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 65:53


Leading up to the recent Tokyo Olympics. athletes Annet Negesa of Uganda and Maximila Imali of Kenya both had their Olympic dreams crushed because of rules set by the track and field global governing body, World Athletics. They are just two—of many—elite women athletes who have been told their natural testosterone levels, if not lowered through medication or surgery, disqualify them from competition at the highest levels of sport. Join us for an in-depth conversation about intersex biology and the history of sex testing in women's athletics ahead of the Tokyo Olympics. About the Speaker In February 2021, Eliza Anyangwe became the editor of As Equals, CNN's ongoing gender inequality project. She began her career working for nongovernmental organizations Action Against Hunger and then the Pesticide Action Network, where she was Organic Cotton Officer, but has spent more than a decade in media, working for The Guardian, The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, and most recently The Correspondent, where she was managing editor. The Guardian Opinion series she commissioned and wrote for, a "Week in Africa," was longlisted for a One World Media award. In 2016, Eliza founded The Nzinga Effect, a media project focused on telling the stories of African and Afro-descendant women, and delivered that work through partnerships with organizations such as The Serpentine Galleries and The British Council. In 2018 she was awarded a development reporting grant by the European Journalism Centre to tell stories about the African women breaking taboos and carving out space to talk about sex and sexuality.  Eliza has written for The Independent, Financial Times, Al Jazeera and Open Democracy; has appeared on broadcast programs, including "Newsnight," "BBC World Service," PRI's "The World," and the podcast "Our Body Politic"; and has spoken at events, among them SXSW, D&AD Festival, The Google News Initiative Summit, the International Journalism Festival, Africa Utopia, The Web We Want Festival and the Next Einstein Forum. Eliza is a contributing author to Africa's Media Image in the 21st Century, published by Routledge. SPEAKERS Eliza Anyangwe Journalist; Editor, As Equals, CNN Gender Inequality Project; Twitter @elizatalks; Instagram @Elizatookthis Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors; Twitter @msmichellemeow—Co-Host John Zipperer Producer and Host, Week to Week Political Roundtable; Vice President of Media & Editorial, The Commonwealth Club—Co-Host In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 4th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The 20 Podcast With DJ Spider
GuiltyBeatz: working with Tems, impact of WizKid's "Essence"

The 20 Podcast With DJ Spider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 94:22


DJ Spider connects with Ghanian producer/DJ GuiltyBeatz on "The 20 Podcast." The Accra native, who's best known for working on Beyonce's "Lion King" soundtrack, discusses producing Tems' "If Orange Was a Place" EP, what WizKid's global hit "Essence" means for African music, plus more. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S25E29 - Using Metrics to Support Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, with Dr. Shannon Prince

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:16


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Dr. Shannon Prince about using metrics to support diversity, equity, and inclusion. See the video here: https://youtu.be/IAgPZKFEqKc. Dr. Shannon Prince (linkedin.com/in/shannon-prince-04573a211) is an attorney and legal commentator. She earned her doctorate in African and African American Studies and her master's degree in English from Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, her law degree from Yale Law School, and her bachelor's degree from Dartmouth College. She drafted best practice language on policing policies for the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, represented plaintiffs in CCJEF v. Rell, a high-profile landmark education adequacy lawsuit, and is currently representing the Cherokee Nation in their lawsuit against pharmaceutical distributors and pharmacies for their role in the opioid crisis that the tribe is suffering. She is a member of her firm's Firm Diversity Council and is a Legal Council on Legal Diversity Pathfinder. Her writing has been published in The Hill, Transition Magazine, Science, and Jezebel among other venues, and she has a book on antiracism forthcoming from Routledge called Tactics for Racial Justice. Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/ Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/ Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/ Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/ Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/ Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/

Girl In Skies Podcast
A Mixolis Summer - Episode 90

Girl In Skies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 80:35


In this episode of #GirlInSkies we're joined by DJ Mixolis, Amapiano + Afrohouse DJ & founder of Room 28 (an events collective delivering curated musical experiences). We discuss the summer of #Amapiano, how southern music culture has gained traction in the UK, Mixolis' journey in the music scene & more! --------------------------------- Follow Mixolis: https://www.instagram.com/mixolis/?hl=en Follow Room 28: https://www.instagram.com/room28ldn/?hl=en --------------------------------- This episode is sponsored by Enchanted Kitchen By Sharmaine. Food cooked from the heart available for collection or delivery (within 30 miles of Chelmsford, Essex). Enchanted Kitchen By Sharmaine serves private gatherings, home parties and more. Some of the signature dishes include Sadza/Pap/Istshwala, Oxtail, Beef Stew, Trotters, Grilled Fish & more! Enchanted Kitchen by Sharmaine on IG: https://www.instagram.com/enchantedkitchenbysharmaine/?hl=en Enchanted Kitchen by Sharmaine on FB: https://www.facebook.com/Enchanted-Kitchen-by-Sharmaine-104384584240655/ ---------------- #GirlInSkies is your podcast by Nat & Xolie discussing life, hot topics, being Africans away from home and more. Keep the conversation going on @girlinskies on twitter & Instagram and be sure to add #GirlInSkies. Hosts: Nat Twitter: https://twitter.com/malaikadiva Xolie Twitter: https://twitter.com/XolieNc email us on mygirlinskies@gmail.com Become a patron and get additional content plus one exclusive podcast episode/month: https://www.patreon.com/girlinskies Like the episode? Buy us coffee to keep the show going: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/girlinskies

Insurtech Insider by 11:FS
102. Nano is the new macro

Insurtech Insider by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:45


Nigel Walsh and Gwera Kiwana are joined by a great panel of guests to take a deep dive into African Insurtech. Cross African Insurtech is booming, and deserves to have some time in the limelight. In this episode, we want to take a look at what the African insurtech landscape looks like right now, who it's helping, what reaching a potential customer is like, how it can lock in long term growth prospects, and what the future holds! Joining us today are: * Roy Perlot, CFO/COO, Lami * Francis Ngari, Head of Digital, Resolution Insurance Kenya All that and much more on this week's episode of Insurtech Insider! Subscribe so you never miss an episode, leave a review on iTunes and every other podcast app. Spread the insurtech love by sharing or tweeting this podcast. This episode of Insurtech Insider was produced by Irina Andronic and edited by George Sztuka. Special Guests: Francis Ngari and Roy Perlot.

How Did We Not Know That
What is Vodou?

How Did We Not Know That

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:38


Despite the erroneous displays and spellings of "voodoo" in the western world and media, Vodou is actually an ancient religion passed down for centuries throughout West Africa. In this episode, learn about the history of one of the only traditional African religions to survive in the modern western hemisphere!

South Bend's Own Words
Ralph Miles

South Bend's Own Words

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:30


In 1952, three-year-old Ralph Miles moved with his family to South Bend after an uncle told Ralph's father that the Bendix company was hiring.  Ralph's special needs school gave him work well beyond his grade level. He left that school to attend Harrison and then Washington. The work was on grade level, and way too easy for him. Bored, and without appropriate emotional and learning spaces, he acted out. By the time he got to Washington High School, he turned to violence, particularly to combat racist white students.  Eventually, Ralph was expelled for bringing a gun into school.  He did not have a positive opinion of local Black leaders or Black organizations. He saw cronyism, colorism, and compliance with white people in power at the expense of people in his west side community.  In 2003, Civil Rights Heritage Center historian David Healey sat down to talk with Ralph Miles. They discussed Ralph's early years in his special needs school, his perspective as a disaffected high school student, and his critiques of South Bend's Black elite.  In the interview, both David and Ralph use words like “normal” and “regular” to describe Ralph's first school—the one for students with special needs. We do not condone the use of those words, as they set a rigid and unacceptable definition of “normal”, and pits those that differ as somehow irregular or abnormal.  This episode was produced by Jweetu Pangani for the Ernestine M. Raclin School of the Arts at Indiana University South bend, and by George Garner for the IU South Bend Civil Rights Heritage Center. Click here for a full transcript of this episode.  Want to learn more about South Bend's history? View the photographs and documents that helped create it. Visit Michiana Memory at http://michianamemory.sjcpl.org/.  Title music, “History Explains Itself,” from Josh Spacek. Visit his page on the Free Music Archive, http://www.freemusicarchive.org/. 

A Runner’s Life
#108 - London Marathon - This is our London (Film) - Behind the scenes

A Runner’s Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:54


This is a behind the scenes chat about the film - This is our London which is available to watch via Youtube via this link: https://youtu.be/jBbV-lP3KNQ When I watched London marathons before I was a marathoner, whilst the leading runners were African. However as a Black British kid growing up in London, I couldn't relate to both British and African running culture. Sport was never a priority in my household, and I wasn't exposed to running clubs, or cross country as a youth. I couldn't relate to the runners from the elites, or to the masses, based on the people that I saw in the area I lived and existed within. However the London marathon was a celebration of the city I lived in. Often it is easy to live in a place but to not know it. The marathon seemed to provide a way to open up and show a space that was often closed off. For example Canary Wharf I remember going there as kid and it was fairly underdeveloped, and it's a world apart from the place we see today. Watching the London marathon on the BBC brought out the best of Londoners and the best of London. I was drawn to explore the unseen parts of my city that I called home. The marathon seemed to unite a group of people that in other days just passed each other like ships in the night. The London marathon means a lot to me because it was my first experience of it I ran 4:55. I earned a GFA 2.56 and last Sunday I ran 3:00:06. So it has taken me on a massive journey revealing what I'm capable of, which I've learnt through running. This translates into other areas of our life's and I hope that it inspires other people to take part. The film aims to bridge the gap between the existing running community and encouraging new people into marathon running. It tells the stories of runners based internationally, as they share their honest, at times funny and truly unfiltered thoughts about what running the 2021 London marathon means to them. Their stories create a powerful narrative showing what truly connects the runners behind the thousands of anonymous runners. Their collective voices show what London, and what it's marathon means to them, and ultimately what it represents to us. I hope that after watching the film that it inspires people to apply to run the 2022 London marathon. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This is our London, shares the stories of runners based internationally, as they share their honest, at times funny and truly unfiltered thoughts about what running the 2021 London marathon means to them. Their stories create a powerful narrative showing what truly connects the runners behind the thousands of anonymous runners. Their collective voices show what London, and what it's marathon means to them, and ultimately what it represents to us. A Runner's Life Podcast Presents In association with a Matt Foulds Film Production “This is our London” a film by Marcus Brown & Matt Foulds Featuring Ayodeji Akande, Hugh Brasher, Marcus Brown, Charlie Dark, Trina Dawkins, Michael Dolan, Tanya Franks, James Gray King, Philip King, Nethilee Le Croix, Stephen Lewis, Tu Chi Luong, Scott Mitchell, David Starley, & Sally from London Footage by Marcus Brown, Matt Foulds, David Starley & London Marathon Additional Photography by Simon Roberts Photography, Jane Stockdale Photography, Run Dem Crew, Black Trail Runners & Adobe Stock Images Graphics by Sportymaps Music by Epidemic Sound #ThisIsOurLondon --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/marcus-brown9/support

5 Minutes in Church History with Stephen Nichols
Church History Makers with Ken Mbugua

5 Minutes in Church History with Stephen Nichols

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:00


By God's grace, biblical preaching and theological book publishing are on the rise in the African continent. On this episode of 5 Minutes in Church History, Rev. Ken Mbugua joins Dr. Stephen Nichols to share why he is hopeful about the future of the church in Africa. Read the transcript: https://www.5minutesinchurchhistory.com/church-history-makers-with-ken-mbugua/ A donor-supported outreach of Ligonier Ministries. Donate: https://www.5minutesinchurchhistory.com/donate/

Sheppard Mullin's Nota Bene
Africa Q4 Check In: The Emergence of Africa's Competition Regimes and Public Interest Merger Conditions in South Africa with Primerio's Andreas Stargard

Sheppard Mullin's Nota Bene

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 50:40


We catch up with our African expert Andreas Stargard of Primerio  on our fourth quarter geopolitical check in.  We learn the latest on the antitrust law in South Africa and how the public interest standard contributes to the marketplace, including updates on Kenya, COMESA and Competition Authority of Kenya, and recent anti-corruption efforts and the broader economic developments in the marketplace. A co-founding senior member of Primerio, a business advisory firm helping companies do business within Africa from a global perspective, Andreas Stargard is legal, strategic, and business advisor to companies and individuals across the globe. He focuses on antitrust and competition advice, white-collar counseling, contract dispute and negotiation, and resolution of global business disputes, including cartel work, corruption allegations and internal investigations, intellectual property, and distribution matters.  Andreas also advises clients on corporate compliance programs that conform to local as well as global government standards, and has handled key strategic merger-notification questions, including evaluation of filing requirements, avoidance strategies, cross-jurisdictional cooperation, and the like. What We Discussed in This Episode: What's happened in Q3 and what's on the horizon for Q4 for African businesses? What impact will the Burger King case decision have on the African antitrust markets and public interest regimes? How has the public interest standard been viewed in other countries? What's the latest with Kenya and COMESA and what does it mean for broader economic development in the continent? What are recent anti-corruption efforts throughout the African markets and how do foreign investors affect that? What other unpredictable impacts has COVID-19 had on the global economy? Contact Information: Africa Antitrust & Competition News and Analysis blog  Primerio website Andreas's bio 

The China in Africa Podcast
China's Role in Zambia's Unfolding Debt Crisis

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:27


Zambia owes at least 18 Chinese creditors $6.6 billion, nearly twice as much as previously stated, according to a new report published by the China-Africa Research Initiative (CARI) at Johns Hopkins University. And that figure may be even higher as it doesn't account for penalties accrued by various Zambian borrowers who've fallen behind in their payments.While these latest findings confirm Zambia indeed has a very serious Chinese debt problem, the CARI report, however, details why the situation there is actually very different from that of other African countries that are also struggling to repay Chinese loans.The report's two authors, CARI Director Deborah Brautigam and Senior Research Assistant Yinxuan Wang join Eric & Cobus from Washington to discuss their findings and explain why Zambia is an outlier when it comes to Chinese debt in Africa.SHOW NOTES:China-Africa Research Initiative: How Zambia and China Co-Created a Debt "Tragedy of the Commons" by Deborah BrautigamChina-Africa Research Initiative: Zambia's Chinese Debt in the Pandemic Era by Deborah Brautigam and Yinxuan WangJOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque JOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectYour support of this podcast helps to keep the show on the air. Thank you!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The African History Network Show
Dr. David Imhotep: Africans In America before Columbus, Native Americans, New Bk

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 97:00


Dr. David Imhotep discusses The Africans In America before Columbus and Native Americans and Why Indigenous Peoples' Day includes African Americans as well.  He will talk about his NEW BOOK, ‘The First Americans Were Africans Expanded & Revised'. – TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 10-12-21 Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow   NEXT Class Starts Sun. 10-17-21, 12:00pm EST (LIVE Online Course) ‘Ancient Kemet (Egypt), The Moors & The Maafa: Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade What They Didn't Teach You In School' with Michael Imhotep host of The African History Network Show.  10 Week Online Course.  REGISTER NOW!. ON SALE $80; ALL SESSIONS WILL BE RECORDED SO YOU CAN WATCH AT ANY TIME!  WATCH CONTENT ON DEMAND! REGISTER HERE: https://theahn.learnworlds.com/course/ancient-kemet-moors-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-oct-2021

KING LIT The Light Bringer
ASIA & ASSUWA LAND IS A NUBIAN AFRICAN ORIGIN & KEMETIC STOLEN SCIENCE.

KING LIT The Light Bringer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 61:41


Africa Daily
Is Africa's space age ready for blast off?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:31


South Africa launched the continent's first satellite in 1999. Since then, African countries have launched more than 40 more into orbit. And over the next five years, there are plans to triple that number. So, why is there such a scramble to put satellites in space? And how will they benefit people back on Earth? Host: Karnie Sharp (@KarnieSharp) Guest: Pontsho Maruping #AfricaDaily

On the Whistle
Iconic Moments In African Football

On the Whistle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:46


In this show we talk about the greatest moments in African football. We look back with a great sense of pride and wonder on Cameroon's Indomitable Lions humbling Diego Maradona's Argentina in 1990, Kenya's looooong awaited return to the AFCON, Zambia's famous triumph in 2012 and what about THAT goal scored by King George for AC Milan against Verona, Panel: Zayn Nabbi (@sportsguyzayn), Francis Nkwain (African football expert) and Alasdair Howorth (@ahoworth97) ☝

The Opperman Report
Unknown Empire: The True Story of Mysterious Ethiopia and the Future Ark of Civilization

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 52:07


Unknown Empire: The True Story of Mysterious Ethiopia and the Future Ark of Civilization Keepers of the Ark of the Covenant * The Garden of Eden * The First Christian Empire * 1000 Years Jewish Before Christ *Ethiopia makes remarkable claims! The future of civilization is shifting. Some say to an Asian world, others a Muslim world, or perhaps to a New World Order (if China and Islam do not win the day). However, a new book offers the little-considered thesis that Ethiopia, unknown as a majority Christian nation and the first Christian empire, could be the next epicenter of civilization.Unknown Empire begins with a barefoot Ethiopian army defeating thousands of European soldiers in 1896. As the only African nation to never be conquered, they defeated Mussolini during WWII. With the West dying but Africa booming, Ethiopia faces population control leaders such as Bill Gates and the U.N. in an epic confrontation for the future of civilization. In all these confrontations, the Ark of the Covenant plays a central role for Ethiopians who believe that they have held the world's most famous object since before the time of Christ. The author explores the Ark claim throughout and weaves in the claims of Eden and empire. Utilizing his trademark style—history with a plot—Dean W. Arnold provides a unique and edifying experience, a “nonfiction novel” where every exciting action and quote is true.

Chat with Betty
S2/E18: The Rapper Who Gave Up Bling For His Jewish Identity, Nissim Black

Chat with Betty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 32:44


.#43 Season 2 - Episode 18: On Today's Episode we are joined by Nissim Black The former drug dealer tells of his journey from a tough Seattle neighborhood to an ultra-orthodox family life in Jerusalem Nissim Black has been a gangsta rapper, a gang member, and a faith seeker. But it is his current incarnation that is here to stay: an African American Hasidic Jew who brings sharp beats and hooked-filled rhymes to the masses. The first single of 2020, “Mothaland Bounce” is a confluence of everything he's ever done, and everywhere he's ever been. The vibe is old school, but the song is thoroughly fresh, pairing big beats with an African hook and a catchy chorus for a video that has already garnered 4.5 million views on YouTube The new tunes feature Black's melodic singing mixed with silky smooth beats and his nimble verbal sparring; Black's music has always leaned heavily on melody, but he had to wait for hip hop to catch up. After a long discovery process, both musically and personally, Black has finally found his true identity. “All of those journeys—being in a gang, being on the football team was a part of me trying to say, ‘I belong to something greater than myself, I know where, but I belong somewhere,'” he says. "It's almost like trying to find that home." Chat with Betty The Podcast: It's fun, raw, inspiring, and self growth focused - join in on the chats today! Follow on social for all the behind the scenes - IG: @bettygulko Twitter: @bettygulko TikTok: @betty.gulko CH: @bettygulko Web: www.bettygulko.com FOLLOW /SUBSCRIBE / RATE / REVIEW / SHARE xx Betty, your GLOW UP bestie Contact: chatwithbettypodcast@gmail.com Betty now offers: 1:1 Mindset and Confidence Consulting ~ Available Today! *Confidence on Video *Confidence in Dating *Confidence with your Voice *Confidence in elevating your life babeZ* --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/betty-gulko/support

Science Salon
217. Mary Grabar on the 1619 Project, Howard Zinn, Historical Revisionism, and Pseudohistory

Science Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 98:35


Michael Shermer speaks with Mary Grabar about her books Debunking the 1619 Project: Exposing the Plan to Divide America and Debunking Howard Zinn: Exposing the Fake History That Turned a Generation Against America. According to the New York Times's “1619 Project,” America was not founded in 1776, with a declaration of freedom and independence, but in 1619 with the introduction of African slavery into the New World. Ever since then, the “1619 Project” argues, American history has been one long sordid tale of systemic racism. Celebrated historians have debunked this, more than two hundred years of American literature disproves it, parents know it to be false, and yet it is being promoted across America as an integral part of grade school curricula and unquestionable orthodoxy on college campuses. The “1619 Project” is not just bad history, it is a danger to our national life, replacing the idea, goal, and reality of American unity with race-based obsessions that we have seen play out in violence, riots, and the destruction of American monuments — not to mention the wholesale rewriting of America's historical and cultural past. In Debunking the 1619 Project: Exposing the Plan to Divide AmericaMary Grabar shows just how full of flat-out lies, distortions, and noxious propaganda the “1619 Project” really is.

KEXP Song of the Day
Susana Baca - Sorongo

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 3:46


Susana Baca - "Sorongo" from the 2021 album Palabras Urgentes on Real World Records. Singer, musicologist, writer, three-time Latin Grammy winner, and a former Minister of Culture in her native Peru, Susana Baca has been a treasure to the Peruvian people for five decades now. A champion of the revival of Afro-Peruvian music, Baca's latest album “Palabras Urgentes,” is an enthralling 10 song set that pays homage to the heritage and tradition of those that once fought for a better world and features production by Snarky Puppy's Michael League.  The record's lead single and our Song of the Day, “Sorongo,” is Baca's take on a song by salsa composer Tite Curet Alonso. Alonso was a prolific writer, originally from Puerto Rico, who penned more than 2,000 songs in a thirty year career and “Sorongo” was first released by his friend Rafael Cortijo Y Su Bonche in the late 1960s. More recently the song was recorded by Calle 13 (who also collaborated with Susana Baca on the Latin Grammy-winning song “Latinoamerica.”) “Within ‘Sorongo', one can find intuition, strength, feeling and enunciation,” says Baca of the song. “I spent many nights trying to find the right way of singing ‘Sorongo'… in the end it is only with the presence of the musicians that accompanied me that it found vitality. I am sure that Sorongo' is faith found at the crossroad between feelings and rhythm.” Michael League added: “Sorongo is a very interesting track because of its history with Calle 13 and because it's a powerhouse track on a record that doesn't really have powerhouse tracks. This is like a freight train and stands apart from the rest of the record in that way but Susana was really, really adamant about feeling Africa in Sorongo, so we made a lot of really interesting decisions during the recording process about textures and sounds and structure to make you feel the connection between the sugar fields in Peru and the African roots of the people who were enslaved and working them.” Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The African History Network Show
What is Indigenous People's Day? Columbus Day; Africans In Americas

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 97:00


What is Indigenous People's Day? Why do people still Celebrate Columbus Day? What about The Africans that were in the Americas before Columbus and Native Americans?; Dave Chappelle gets major support from Netflix. - TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 10-11-21   Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow   NEXT Class Starts Sun. 10-17-21, 12:00pm EST (LIVE Online Course) ‘Ancient Kemet (Egypt), The Moors & The Maafa: Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade What They Didn't Teach You In School' with Michael Imhotep host of The African History Network Show.  10 Week Online Course.  REGISTER NOW!. ON SALE $80; ALL SESSIONS WILL BE RECORDED SO YOU CAN WATCH AT ANY TIME!  WATCH CONTENT ON DEMAND! REGISTER HERE: https://theahn.learnworlds.com/course/ancient-kemet-moors-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-oct-2021

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese
Building The Movement To Shut Down AFRICOM And End US Imperialism In Africa

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:01


The US Out of Africa Network, which is coordinated by the Black Alliance for Peace, launched a month of action on October 1, the 13th anniversary of the launch of AFRICOM (the US' Africa command) to educate the public about what AFRICOM is doing and to build the movement against US imperialism on the African continent. Clearing the FOG speaks with Tunde Osazua, who organizes the network, about the harm the US is doing on the continent such as the increase in violence and terrorist acts against the people as well as supporting coups and an economic war. What the US is doing in Africa is largely in violation of international law and it is creating a growing sentiment in opposition to the United States. AFRICOM is just one of eleven commands around the world that are run by the United States. For more information, visit PopularResistance.org.

Africa Daily
Why do young Africans continue to care about Thomas Sankara?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 13:06


Fourteen men are standing trial accused of complicity in the murder of the former president of Burkina Faso, Thomas Sankara. Almost 34 years after his death, Sankara remains an iconic figure to many young people across Africa. His image adorns walls, bars and taxis across west Africa. And words are shared today on social media platforms that he never knew existed. So, why is Thomas Sankara still so important to a generation of young people who were born years after his death? #Africa Daily

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1447 Settler Colonialist Structures Around the World

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 69:16


Air Date 10/9/2021 Today we take a look at structures and specifics of settler colonialism from around the world including the US, Caribbean, Australia, Israel and Mexico Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) CHECK OUT UNF*CKING THE REPUBLIC! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: History of US imperialism in Latin America: From settler colonialism to Pink Tide - Moderate Rebels - Air Date 12-12-20 Ben Norton was invited to give this talk on US imperialism in Latin America, for the Workers' Party of Ireland. He discusses the history from European settler colonialism, through the Monroe Doctrine, the first cold war, and the three revolutions. Ch. 2: Slavery, race and capital in the sixteenth century / Gerald Horne - This Is Hell! - Air Date 7-21-20 Gerald Horne discusses the relationship between racism and expansionist foreign policies Ch. 3: Settler Colonialism Is Behind Climate Denial - Novara Media - Air Date 1-5-20 Australia is on fire. So why do so many of its politicians seem intent on denying the cause? Ch. 4: Pearls for empire / Molly A. Warsh - This Is Hell! - Air Date 9-20-21 Historian Molly A. Warsh on her book "American Baroque: Pearls and the Nature of Empire, 1492-1700" from UNC Press. Ch. 5: Rewriting resistance: how Black rebellion shapes world events - People's Republic - Air Date 8-20-20 This week, we continue our commemoration of Black August with Dr. Gerald Horne, professor of history and author of over 40 books, including The Counter-Revolution of 1776. Ch. 6: Ilan Pappé: Viewing Israel-Palestine Through the Lens of Settler-Colonialism - The East is a Podcast - Air Date 5-13-20 A 2017 lecture by Ilan Pappé titled "The Value of Viewing Israel-Palestine Through the Lens of Settler-Colonialism" hosted by the WRMEA. Ch. 7: Crimes of Apartheid - In The Thick - Air Date 5-14-21 Maria is joined by guest co-host and ITT All-star Jamilah King to discuss the continued violence and attacks against Palestinians by Israeli settlers and forces in Gaza. We hear from Gaza-based journalist Hana Salah about what she is seeing on the ground. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 8: Rick Perlstein: ‘I was drafted into the project of settler colonialism as a child' - The Real News Podcast - Air Date 8-13-21 Marc talks with Rick Perlstein about growing up Jewish in Milwaukee, the process of unlearning Zionist indoctrination, and how the United States' support of an Israeli ethno-state foments continued violence. Ch. 9: Gerald Horne: Slavery, White Supremacy, & The Roots Of Settler Colonialism - Last Born In The Wilderness - Air Date 5-25-18 Did racism and white supremacy arise as a result of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in the 17th century, or did these concepts exist prior to the mass enslavement of Africans and the genocide of the indigenous peoples on what is now called America? Ch. 10: So Far from God, So Close to the United States w/ Alexander Aviña - American Prestige - Air Date 9-9-21 The boys speak with Alexander Aviña, an assistant professor of history at Arizona State University, about the history of Mexico and U.S.-Mexican Relations from the 1810 Mexican War of Independence to the "drug war" of today. VOICEMAILS Ch. 11: No velvet glove - Nick From California Ch. 12: Followup on conspiracy theory hot take - Nick from California FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 13: Final comments on how conspiracy theorists are like timeshare sales people MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com Listen Anywhere! BestOfTheLeft.com/Listen Listen Anywhere! Follow at Twitter.com/BestOfTheLeft Like at Facebook.com/BestOfTheLeft Contact me directly at Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com