Podcasts about African

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  • 14,064PODCASTS
  • 39,168EPISODES
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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about African

Show all podcasts related to african

Latest podcast episodes about African

Business with Purpose
How this Beauty Brand is Going Beyond Fair Trade | EP 281: Olowo-n'djo Tchala, CEO of Alaffia

Business with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 51:24


My guest this week is Olowo-n'djo Tchala. Born in the village of Kaboli, Togo, West Africa near the border of Benin, Olowo-n'djo grew up sharing an 8'x10' room with seven siblings and his mother. Although they did not always have enough, his mother, Ina, instilled in him the importance of kindness and generosity by always sharing what they could. Unable to afford school fees, Olowo-n'djo dropped out of school in the sixth grade to help support his family. After meeting his wife he founded Alaffia in 2003. In 2004, armed with his understanding of the value of indigenous West African resources and sustainable business ideologies, he launched Alaffia's first collective. Alaffia continues to redefine the natural products industry through its values of beauty, equality and empowerment. Alaffia handcrafts award-winning clean, green beauty and grooming products and is a social enterprise on a mission to invest in a more equitable future. 4:25 – My personal testimonial I'm such a huge fan of Alaffia. My son Amos, who is almost 6, had horrible eczema as a child. We tried everything. Somebody recommended Alaffia to me, and I became a believer. It was safe and smelled amazing. It was a lifesaver. 6:09 - Olowo-n'djo 101 He sees Alaffia as everybody's brand, not just his. He feels honored to do something that he believes in. 10:43 – Meeting his wife Olowo-n'djo's wife, Rose, studied chemistry and is from Washington state. He decided to follow her because, “You have to follow the one that touches your heart.” 14:38 – Meaning of Alaffia Alaffia means peace and health. His beauty brand represents a social movement, not just a business. 18:55 – How his business sprouted Olowo-n'djo's mother instilled a sense of responsibility in him. He wanted to be a subway engineer at one point to help find clean water. 21:20 – Fair trade model Alaffia has gone above the idea of the  “fair trade” model. He is setting a standard for other companies. 24:36 – Funding births Olowo-n'djo has funded over 6,500 births. 29:24 – Women's issues I am so grateful to Olowo-n'djo for talking about important topics, like women's' maternal health. Women often have to advocate for themselves, so it's nice to see a man advocating for us. 33:53 – Biggest challenge The biggest challenge he faces depends on the day. The challenges are continuous, and there are incredible difficulties. 37:09 – His products Alaffia makes a lot of bath products, but they also make creams for moisturizing the skin. 41:29 – Get to know you Who would play him in a movie? He would play himself. Who would play his mom in a movie? His aunt FEATURED QUOTES I don't want anyone to feel sorry for us. We have so much to offer the world. I get to do something that I deeply and profoundly believe in, really deep in my heart and my soul. CONNECT: https://www.alaffia.com/ About Olowo-n'djo Tchala: Olowo-n'djo Tchala, founder and CEO of Alaffia, was born and raised in the village of Kaboli, Togo, Africa located in the Central region near the border of Benin. Growing up, he shared an 8' x 10' room with his mother and seven siblings. Olowo-n'djo's mother taught him the importance of kindness and generosity and by the age of five, Olowo-n'djo was working on the family farm to help support his family. After meeting Prairie Rose Hyde, who was serving in the Peace Corps at the time, he came to the United States and worked his way through school, eventually graduating from the University of California, Davis with a degree in organizational theory. Shortly before graduation, Olowo-n'djo and Rose felt they had the responsibility to fight the injustices that existed in West Africa. They founded Alaffia, which handcrafts award-winning clean and fair trade beauty and grooming care. The organization advances gender equality and alleviates poverty through the fair trade of indigenous African resources such as unrefined shea butter, African black soap, coconut oil and neem extract. Thank you to our partner of the show! Are you looking to clean up your household cleaning products this year? MamaSuds would like to help! The best way is to simply start with one product. Every time you run out of a specific cleaning product, replace it with a non-toxic one. Another tip, purchase a product that has multiple uses. The MamaSuds Collection has many multiple use products (castile soap or the toilet bombs are just a few!). Their blog has lots of great tips and a castile soap recipe that you can print and make a lot of your own effective cleaners! Give them a try at www.mamasuds.com and don't forget to use the coupon code MOLLY for 15% off your order!

By Any Means Necessary
Billionaire Gains During Pandemic A Cause For Action, Not Despair

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 113:43


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Maurice Carney, co-founder and Executive Director of Friends of the Congo to discuss the anniversary of the assassination of Congolese leader Patrice Lumumba by Belgian and US forces, the pan-African vision that he had and why that posed a threat to the United States, the theft of Lumuba's remains and how it connects to historic theft from the African continent, and the role of the US government and corporations in the continued exploitation of the Congo.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Brian Mier, co-editor of Brasil Wire and author of Year of Lead: Washington, Wall Street and the New Imperialism in Brazil to discuss the political outlook in Brazil as it faces its presidential election later this year, the struggles that the Jair Bolsonaro faces as he tries to maintain his power, Steve Bannon and his movement's attention to Brazil and its upcoming election and Bannon's interest in the election, and the US interest in securing alliances in Latin America as it pursues a new cold war against Russia and China. In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Chris Garaffa, the editor of TechforthePeople.org to discuss Russia's arrest of key members of the REvil ransomware gang and skewed corporate media coverage of the arrests, models of governance of artificial intelligence coming out of China and what it means for the use of the technology, and more surveillance programs between home surveillance systems and police and the dangerous intrusions of privacy that such programs pose.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by James Early, Former Director of Cultural Heritage Policy at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the Smithsonian Institution and board member of the Institute for Policy Studies to discuss the abstraction of Martin Luther King Jr. and the working class character of his movement, the obscene accumulation of wealth by billionaires during the pandemic as working and poor people suffer its impacts, and the bailout to corporations that contributed to the massive transfer of wealth seen during the pandemic.

By Any Means Necessary
Remembering Patrice Lumumba and Western Exploitation of The Congo

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 17:55


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Maurice Carney, co-founder and Executive Director of Friends of the Congo to discuss the anniversary of the assassination of Congolese leader Patrice Lumumba by Belgian and US forces, the pan-African vision that he had and why that posed a threat to the United States, the theft of Lumuba's remains and how it connects to historic theft from the African continent, and the role of the US government and corporations in the continued exploitation of the Congo.

Noire Histoir
Flora Nwapa [Black History Short 116]

Noire Histoir

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 7:01


If you're interested in learning about the mother of modern African literature and the first female African novelist to publish a book in English, then my Flora Nwapa Black History Short is for you. Show notes and sources are available at http://noirehistoir.com/blog/flora-nwapa.

Noble Blood
The Queen's Goddaughter

Noble Blood

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:15


When Sarah Forbes Bonetta was seven years old, she was enslaved in the African kingdom of Dahomey and presented as a gift to a visiting British naval captain. The captain brought her to London in order to "rescue" her. The young girl would soon become the goddaughter to the most powerful woman in the world: Queen Victoria. Support Noble Blood: — Bonus episodes and scripts on Patreon — Merch! — Order Dana's book, Anatomy: A Love Story — Sign up to join Dana on the Mary Shelley Pilgrimage in April Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

FT News Briefing
China applies brakes to Africa lending

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 8:08


UK inflation is expected to rise to a 30-year high when December's data are released this week, Meta patent applications indicate how the Silicon Valley group intends to cash in on its virtual world with hyper-targeted advertising and sponsored content, Chinese lenders have grown more cautious about lending to African nations as some have reached the limit of their borrowing capacity and the prospect of defaults loom, and the Scottish government has awarded 25 gigawatts of offshore wind project development rights. Subscribe to the FT News Briefing on Apple Podcasts or SpotifyMentioned in this podcast:UK inflation set to hit 30-year high as rate rise expectations mountFacebook patents indicate how it intends to cash in on the MetaverseChina applies brakes to Africa lendingBig boost to UK offshore wind capacity from Scottish auctionThe FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber and Gavin Kallmann. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. Topher Forhecz is the FT's executive producer. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley.Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Africa Daily
Can Africa become vaccine self-sufficient?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 14:12


This time last year we were asking whether Africa would get enough Covid-19 vaccines. As 2021 progressed, it became clear that it wouldn't. African leaders complained that rich countries weren't meeting their commitments to Covax, the scheme aimed at ensuring equitable access to the vaccines. South African president Cyril Ramaphosa coined the term vaccine apartheid, in reference to the gulf between vaccination rates on the continent and other parts of the world. And some people began to ask how the continent could avoid being in this position again in the future. So, can Africa become self-sufficient when it comes to vaccine production? #AfricaDaily

Scouted Says
97: AFCON with Ed Aarons

Scouted Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 39:52


AFCON 2021 is here...in January 2022. We've had two rounds of Group Stage matches already, heaps of late drama, new names, familiar faces and plenty of surprise results - and we're only getting started. Give the tournament the respect it deserves, listen to the Scouted Football Podcast with 'Made in Africa' co-host, author and African football expert: the Guardian's Ed Aarons. Topics include - but are not limited to:  - Mali and Guinea's young squads - Saïdou Sow and Anis Ben Slimane player focus - 17-year-old duo Abdul Fatawu Issahaku and Karim Konaté - Gambia and Serie A - Tournament predictions 

READY SLOW
WHITE MLK

READY SLOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 130:03


Episode 70 finds both guys snowed-in and dreaming of a white Martin Luther King Day. Shean is setting guidelines for hiring employees and Shane is fighting an uphill real estate battle against liars, con artists, and thieves.The guys discuss historical cubism, death mocking, and the white woman with a humanities degree that curated the African section of the ATL airport.They also get into whether or not Shane is the one who's truly unhinged for calling out his old employer on instagram. Plus, Shane welcomes Shean into the Church of Kanye after listening to the new song, “Eazy.” The corpse of Vladimir Lenin makes a special appearance.

The Animal Intuitive Show
Water Element Acupressure /Animal Communication | 87

The Animal Intuitive Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 123:57


Water Element in Traditional Chinese Medicine lesson! AND acupressure points to support your pet during challenging winter weather, as well as for conditions throughout the year. Listen to my live animal communications with a viewer's African grey parrot and 3 pit bulls. More acupressure points for winter season ➡️https://bit.ly/33HoEzO Watch this episode on video - https://bit.ly/3KmOk5J

This Is Karen Hunter
S E1050: In Class with Carr, Ep. 97: What Would MLK Think Today?

This Is Karen Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 124:35


Jan 15, 2022 • Today is Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s actual birthday. Dr. Greg Carr takes us through the words of King and what he thought about the country, this world and African people. Also, there is a tie-in to Patrice Lumumba and what is happening in Barbados with Mia Motley. The Women of the Movement on ABC is also discussed. #WomenoftheMovement #EmmettTill #MLK

Aunti Oni Story Village *!*
Martin Luther King Jr.

Aunti Oni Story Village *!*

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 12:15


Do you know about Martin Luther King Jr.? If you do or you don't, you can listen to this original story poem written by Charlotte Blake Alston, an internationally acclaimed storyteller, narrator, singer, and librettist, from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Miss Charlotte wrote this lovely poem for elementary/primary school children to learn about the life of Martin Luther King Jr. and why he's so important in American history.Miss Charlotte has a big pocketbook of stories as she is a popular African and an American griot. She also plays the kora, an African string instrument, and is the official storyteller for the Philadelphia Orchestra in Pennsylvania, USA!You can watch and listen to Miss Charlotte tell stories on YouTube and learn more about her on her website: Charlotte Blake Alston.(c) 1995 Martin Luther King Jr. Storypoem by Charlotte Blake AlstonMusic: (c) Feel This Way by Wanna BeatMix & Mastered: DJ King CanalIf you love Martin Luther King Jr., story poem, spread the word about this podcast with your teachers, family & friends thanks!Visit with Aunti Oni & friends in Story Village Live! a monthly cultural storytelling adventure live on Zoom.To support this podcast with a one-time or monthly donation and help sustain future episodes feel free to...Click YES! Thank ya kindly *!* See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History of Africa
Season 3 Episode 13 - The Battle of Anomabu

History of Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 24:47


In pursuit of rebellious nobles who gravely insulted his family and people, the asantehene Osei Bonsu invades the rival Fante Confederacy. After winning and unprecedented victory over the Fante, his army faces a soon to be recurring foe for the first time: the British Empire. Support the show (https://patreon.com/historyofafrica)

Period, Sis Podcast
Vaginal Detox: Natural Herbs & Crystals

Period, Sis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 26:28


This week, Mandii B is joined by an official box partner, spiritual teacher, and the CEO of Goodness Detox Olanikee Osibowale. The ladies talk about the rose quartz infused PH wash you can find in the new OBO box release, African spirituality, studying skin bleaching in Tanzania, the metaphysical properties contained in herbs, and much more. Remember we are having a HUGE liquidation sale on ALL OF OUR OBO PRODUCTS for just $10.00! That's right just $10.00 for ALL OBO PRODUCTS check us out at www.officialboxowner.com Connect with Us:
 @fullcourtpumps
 @OfficialBoxOwner Connect with our guest: https://goddessdetox.org/ https://selfishbabe.com/ @goddessdetox

Your Positive Imprint
Protecting and Preserving Wildlife in East Africa. Mike Silvestrini of Big Life Foundation

Your Positive Imprint

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 20:16


Is mitigation between humans and wildlife enough to preserve habitats, elephants, rhinos, lions, cheetahs, giraffes, and other African wildlife on the Massai land culture? Conservationist Mike Silvestrini of Big Life Foundation shares critical conservation efforts for 1.6 million acres of Africa's remaining natural habitat and wildlife migration corridor in Amboseli-Tsavo-Kilimanjaro ecosystem. (Photos: Art Tower, Theuns, LeeShyPooh, Gærtringen.)

Thank God I'm Atheist
We Resolve! #528

Thank God I'm Atheist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 59:19


Christian ASMR offers whispery bible readings, The Taliban continues their long struggle against mannequins, a prayer log of the January 6th attack on the US Capitol, African beauty queens don hijab, Pope Francis criticizes Catholicism, researchers chart Catholic priest pedophile network, and a discussion about New Year's resolutions and why Kate and Frank like them.

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix
Episode 170: HAITIAN ALL-STARZ RADIO - WBAI 99.5 FM - EPISODE #165 - HARD HITTIN HARRY

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 120:26


Tune in! @djhardhittinharry & @DJayCeenyc presents another brand new episode of @haitian_all_starz Radio Podcast on @wbai995 & WBAI.ORG 2am - 4am late Monday/early Tuesday. Also streaming on @itunes @googleplaymusic @amazonpodcasts @iheartradio @mixcloud @soundcloud

30 to Life - Redefining the Black Experience
Ep 82: The Rise of Homeschooling and the Impact On Black Children with Dr. Khadijah Z. Ali-Coleman

30 to Life - Redefining the Black Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 62:46


In this episode, the guys chat with Dr. Khadijah Z. Ali-Coleman about her upcoming book Homeschooling Black Children in the US: Theory, Practice and Popular Culture. She breaks down her experience as a former homeschooling mother, the impact homeschool has on black children in America, and so much more. Tune in. More about our guest: Dr. Khadijah Z. Ali-Colemann. is a former homeschooling mother, cultural curator, community organizer, nationally recognized speaker, and writer. Her work centers the social and political life experiences, history, and culture of the people of the African diaspora. She is author of the children's bookMariah's Maraca's and has poetry and short stories in numerous books, including the 2020 anthology The Fire Inside: Poems and Stories from Zora's Den. Her academic work has been published in The Journal of Higher Education Politics & Economics, and the book Afrofuturism in Black Panther: Gender, Identity and the Remaking of Blackness. Her journalistic bylines have appeared in more than a dozen publications, including Ebony, Romper, The Grade, The Washington Informer and The Afro. She has been quoted in the media as a homeschooling expert, interviewed by Slate, Wired, The Washington Post, NBC and more. She is co-editor of the book Homeschooling Black Children in the US: Theory, Practice and Popular Culture. Learn more by visiting her website at KhadijahAli-Coleman.com Follow on Facebook Follow on Instagram Follow on Twitter Subscribe to YouTube Channel by clicking here LISTEN TO OUR PODCAST Contemporary Perspectives on Black Homeschooling --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/30tolifepod/support

The Apple Seed
EXTRA: The Mule and the Jealous Farmer by Len Cabral

The Apple Seed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 5:39


Join us and Len Cabral for an African folk tale!

Turn Leftist Podcast
067: Interview with comrade Diop of the Black Community Control of Police Organization

Turn Leftist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 27:50


https://apscuhuru.org https://apspuhuru.org https://blackisbackcoalition.org Colonialism is the Cause, Black Power is the Solution "On the morning of January 5, 2022, a fire tore through a row house converted into apartments in the Fairmount neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Twelve people died, nine of them children, and two others were injured. Eight additional people escaped unharmed." Then "A major fire in a residential apartment building in the Bronx in New York City on Sunday (jan9) left 19 people dead, including 9 children, in what Mayor Eric Adams described as one of the worst fires the city has experienced in modern times. The blaze sent 32 people to hospitals with life-threatening conditions, Daniel Nigro, commissioner of the New York City Fire Department, said earlier Sunday. A total of 63 people were injured." As incidents of colonial violence, together these two fires forced the question of fire and public safety policy in the Black community onto the forefront of national discussion within the Black liberation movement. The Philadelphia "row house" was actually a building to house public housing residents, all of whom were African. The Bronx fire was essentially the same situation, housing designated by the ruling class for African workers. As is the case in all sectors of the capitalist economy, the conditions that led to the deaths in these fires were created entirely by the colonial capitalist ruling class, which has no interest in spending resources on effective fire safety equipment that would prevent fires from becoming dangerous to life and limb. In addition the insurance industry ensures that there will be no material loss to ruling class in fires. In fact, insurance companies offer compensation for the costs incurred in the replacement, repair or reconstruction of a property that was damaged due to fire. The contents are usually covered for at least 50% to 70% of the policy value. As an instrument to perpetuate colonial capitalist production the institution of firefighting in north America shares the same origins as that of the police. "The United States did not have government-run fire departments until around the time of the American Civil War. Prior to this time, private fire brigades competed with one another to be the first to respond to a fire because insurance companies paid brigades to save buildings." This situation was more graphically depicted in a scene in the movie entitled" Gangs of New York", told from the perspective of an Irish working class colonizer. "The municipal police fought the metropolitan police, the metropolitan police fought the street gangs, there were 37 amateur fire brigades. And they all fought each other." It is clear how the origins of the US fire-fighting apparatus can be found in the police and the state, as an institution to protect private property as well as wield fire as a weapon of the colonialist-capitalist system. All "official" firefighters in the first US were white. And their fundamental task was to protect the private property as employees of the US ruling class; bosses and landlords. for the rest of the text of the press release: ttps://controlc.com/2efcbb8f

The Mallory Bros Podcast
Episode 83 | ”That Aint

The Mallory Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 123:25


On this episode of the Mallory Bros. Podcast, they bros start with a message about consistency in the New Year. They then send an RIP message out to a few very important celebrities that unfortunately lost their lives over the past week and a half. They talk Gunna's album as it compares to Weeknd's rollout which leads to an interesting discussion about the term “P” and it's meaning. They have a discussion about the Taco Bell Wing Craze that leads to a fast food argument. They speak to their excitement about HBO's “Euphoria” making its return. They then speak to their experience as African descendants of Slavery and their experience with those in the culture who have the benefit of a “Home Country”. This conversation is inspired by the conversation the guys have about Maya Angelou's new Quarter and a different take on the Harriett Tubman 20 dollar bill. A very edgy, insightful, and honest discussion.  Lastly, the fella's recap the NFL's final regular season games and make bold picks for the Playoffs. 

The China in Africa Podcast
Investigating Chinese Corruption in the DRC Linked to the "Deal of the Century"

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 67:14


China's role in the landmark Congo-Hold Up corruption scandal was relatively small compared to those of other actors that were found to have funneled millions of dollars to former Congolese president Joseph Kabila and his associates. Nonetheless, investigators found that Chinese entities were responsible for at least $55 million in illicit payments connected to the $6 billion Sicomines resource-for-infrastructure deal back in 2007.The Washington, D.C.-based NGO The Sentry was among the lead organizations in the Congo Hold-Up investigation that was based on an unprecedented leak of 3.5 million documents from BGFIBank in Gabon. Two of The Sentry's lead investigators involved with the project, John Dell'Osso and Douglas Gillison join Eric & Cobus to discuss how Chinese companies were implicated in the scandal and the specific role of one man in particular.SHOW NOTES:Read The Sentry's full report: State Capture and Bribery in Congo's Deal of the Century -- https://bit.ly/31W74YsPhoto of Sun Ruiwen, president of China Molybdenum, meeting together with DR Congo President Félix Tshisekedi on December 23, 2021: https://bit.ly/3GvQ9egJOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @ChinaAfrProject | @stadenesque | @douglasgillison | @j_dellossoJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

James Acaster's Perfect Sounds
Isy Suttie & International Prog Folk

James Acaster's Perfect Sounds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 29:01


With music inspired by improvisational Jazz, Persian and African folk and vocals in a myriad of languages, it's hard to tie Léonore Boulanger to a specific genre. Will Isy Suttie, with her background in jazz and prog rock bands, be won over?

UN News
UN Catch-Up Dateline Geneva: Tech solutions to relieve typhoon-hit Philippines

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 15:41


In this week's show, the latest on the emergency relief effort in the Philippines after the terrible destruction caused by Super Typhoon Rai; deep concern about the blockade of medicines to Ethiopia's Tigray from the World Health Organization (WHO), a “landmark” judgment against a Syrian interrogator who's been found guilty of crimes against humanity, and Omicron on the African continent, where infections look to be plateauing, but not everywhere.

Afrobility: Africa Tech & Business
#45: Gokada - How the mobility tech platform is providing delivery & transportation services across Nigeria

Afrobility: Africa Tech & Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 119:33


Overview: Today, we're going to talk about Gokada - the Nigerian mobility tech platform. We'll explore the Gokada story across 5 areas: African ridesharing context Gokada's launch, early history, growth over time & fundraising Product & monetization strategy Competitive positioning & potential exit options Overall outlook This episode was recorded on Jan 9, 2022. Companies discussed: Gokada, GoJek, Max.ng, Pathao, Bolt, Uber & Jumia Business concepts discussed: Mobility, logistics, delivery, bike-sharing, Super Apps, Transportation & Logistics Conversation highlights: (01:00) - Gokada context (06:50 - Bike-sharing platforms in other markets - GoJek (08:30) - Nigeria transportation context (37:00) - Gokada founding & early history (51:00) - Fundraising & growth (58:00) - Product & monetization strategy (1:17:00) - Competition & exit options (1:25:13) - Olumide's overall thoughts & outlook (1:33:45) - Bankole's overall thoughts & outlook (1:43:44) - Recommendations & small wins Olumide: Recommendation: How Airlines quietly became banks: Wonderful video that matches a bunch of my interests. Reward programs + corporate finance. Sweet! Recommendation: 9 things I learned about Productivity this year (David Cain). Amazing article about productivity and procrastination Win: Got Logitech Brio & started using Windows Hello Other content: Lagos BRT case study Interested in investing in Africa Tech with Olumide: Read about Adamantium fund & contact me at olumide@afrobility.com Founders looking for funding: If you're a B2B founder working on Education, Health, Finance or food, please contact me for funding at olumide@afrobility.com Bankole: Recommendations: Moxie Marlinspike My first impressions of web3, Why Is There Confetti In So Many Taser Guns & Come My Way (Wande Coal) Win: Saw Kamaru Usman in Lagos! Other content: Gokada finds new growth in logistics, Gokada is not okada, History of Gokada, road quality report (WEF) & The Flip Podcast - S2E3: Finding Fit - Opportunities in the Global South Listeners, Operators & Investors: Email info@afrobility.com, we'd love to partner or get your feedback. All episodes on Afrobility.com

Spotlight on France
Podcast: Political swearing, Molière and women, King Behanzin's surrender

Spotlight on France

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 24:11


Which Macron vowed to "piss off" the unvaccinated and why? The 17th century female playwrights around Molière, as France marks his 400th anniversary with pomp and circumstance. The African kingdom that made France tremble in the 19th century, until its king surrendered. President Emmanuel Macron shocked France when he used a curse word to describe his Covid strategy to put pressure on the unvaccinated, calling them irresponsible and non-citizens. Research suggests that such a confrontational approach is more likely to push people away from vaccination, so the message could be counter-productive. Unless, that is, he was addressing a different audience. Political scientist Philippe Moreau Chevrolet (@moreauchevrolet) says Macron's strategy may pay off electorally in the short term, but it comes at a price. (Listen @0') 17th century playwright Molière is a school curriculum staple in France and his plays are performed all around the world. As France marks the 400th anniversary of his birth, people are battling to appropriate his legacy – either nostalgic for a bygone glorious era or trying to establish his contemporary 'Republican' credentials. Moliere's satirical works poked fun at authority, and he denounced violence against women. But actor, director and researcher Aurore Evain (@auroreevain) cautions against calling him a feminist. She speaks about the influence of female actors around Molière and her discovery of 17th century women playwrights who influenced both him and his work. (Listen @16'50'') When France returned the Benin Bronzes in November 2021, it was returning treasure from the Dahomey kingdom, which fell on 15 January 1894 when King Behanzin surrendered to the French army after two wars. Today he is remembered as the monarch who made French tremble, but his kingdom, and the treasures in it, were also a product of the slave trade. (Listen @11'25'') This episode was mixed by Cecile Pompeani and Erwan Rome. Spotlight on France is a podcast from Radio France International. Find us on rfienglish.com, iTunes (link here), Spotify (link here), Google podcasts (link here), or your favourite podcast app (pod.link/1241973975).

Rover's Morning Glory
Dieter's Conspiracy Corner, does covid shrink your schlong, & more

Rover's Morning Glory

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 178:29


Pennsylvania dentist denies murdering his wife during African hunting trip. Covid symptom sees horrified man's penis shrink by 1.5 inches. Judge orders man convicted of sexual assault to join the military or go to jail. Guy accidentally calls a woman the C word before their first date. Dieter's Conspiracy Corner - Bob Saget was killed by the vaccine.

We Talk Back
Ep. 52 "Coming To America"

We Talk Back

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 68:34


Lately, when it comes to dating, it seems that many black woman have been wanting to date back to their roots, or in other words dating Africans that came over to America. But do you know what to expect when dating one? Well the ladies Tambam and AJ had special guest Daylor who is Nigerian, and he gave his advice on how to date one, their slang and even gave his preference when it comes to dating, that may or may not get him cancelled in his culture. Have you ever, or want to date an African? Lets discuss. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Dance Boss Podcast
How Shifting to A Dance Specialist Model Made Me More Money

Dance Boss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 25:15


How did shifting to a dance specialist model in my online dance business make me more money? I'll give you three ways: More exposure Increased client transformation Raised my prices!  In episode # 171 of the Dance Boss Podcast, I dive into this further. After you listen, hit me up on Instagram @erinpride and tell me which do you want most: More exposure Increased client transformation Raised prices!  Click here for show notes  https://bit.ly/DBPShowNotes  Join Apolla Performance LIVE this and EVERY FRIDAY at 2 pm EST for Beyond the StEPS, where they tackle the big questions facing the dance community.  www.apollaperformance.com IG/FB @Apollaperfomance https://www.instagram.com/apollaperformance/   DancePreneur Academy is Currently Closed! I am focused on helping dance specialists create 5K consistent months with my signature virtual group training program. BUT fear not friend, I'll be back… in the meantime, join the waitlist. https://bit.ly/dpawaitlist

Quilt Buzz
Episode 047: Zak of @zakfoster.quilts

Quilt Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 41:51


Show Notes:1:55 - Laura Ingalls Wilder 1:56 - Little House on the Prairie 1:58 - Four-Patch quilt block 3:44 and 3:47 - Uganda3:51 - African wax prints 5:20 - Anne Truitt8:32- Memory quilts 14:48 - Burial quilts17:52 - Nashville, Tennessee 19:27 - John C Campbell Folk School 19:29 - Brasstown, North Carolina 19:33 - Blue Ridge Mountains19:38 - North Carolina 19:57 - Murphy, North Carolina 20:37 and 21:27 - North Carolina 20:39 and 21:29 - New York 21:56 - New York City 22:43 and 23:00 - Heidi Parkes (listen to episode 37 to learn more about her and her work)23:11- Brooklyn, New York 23:47 - IG (Instagram) live 24:29 - The Quilty Nook25:31 and 25:46 - Patreon 26:23 - The Quilty Nook28:14 - Laura Hartrich (@laurahartrich)29:12 - Vanuatu 29:27, 29:34 and 29:47 - The Quilty Nook31:28 - WDBX 91.1FM31:47 - Wagon Wheel traditional block 31:50 - Farm and Folk (@farmandfolk)33:07and 33:10 - Brooklyn33:34 - Instagram Live 33:48 - Repurposing thread from jeans IG Live with Zak Foster and 36:36 and 36:59 - Heidi Parkes (listen to episode 37 to learn more about her and her work)37:13 - Zak's tiny quilt 38:46 - Deann Tyler (@dhort59)38:53 - Improv quilts 39:09 - TiJay Mohammed of Art of Tijay (@artoftijay)39:13 - Ghanna39:27 - Bisa Butler39:52 - Zak Foster's zine podcast, Seamside 40:17 - Zak's Seamside zines 40:21 - QR code Follow Zak:Instagram - @zakfoster.quiltshttps://www.zakfoster.com/Follow us:Amanda: @broadclothstudio https://broadclothstudio.com/Wendy: @the.weekendquilter https://the-weekendquilter.com/Anna: @waxandwanestudiohttps://www.waxandwanestudio.com/Quilt Buzz: @quilt.buzzhttps://quiltbuzzpodcast.com/Intro/Outro Music:Golden Hour by Vlad Gluschenko

Gun Talk
SOTG on Importance of Training, Dry Fire | Gun Talk Nation

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 33:51


Student of the Gun's Paul Markel joins Gun Talk's Ryan Gresham to talk about the importance of training, why most gun owners need to take a firearms training course this year, the magic number of hours to become proficient at something, how much dry fire practice pro shooters really do, favorite new products, the guns of the African bush wars, and lots more. Gun Talk Nation is brought to you by Savage Arms and Smith & Wesson. Gun Talk Nation 01.12.2022

The Radio Vagabond
220 CARIBBEAN: Cruising in a Pandemic to Saint Lucia, Aruba & Curaçao

The Radio Vagabond

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 39:27


BONJOU FROM THE CARIBBEAN This week I'm going to take you to three different islands in the Caribbean. We will visit an independent UN nation Saint Lucia, then head over to two autonomous islands that are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. CRUISING THROUGH THE PANDEMIC In August 2021, I explored Saint Lucia through a 12-day cruise with Celebrity Cruiselines. I was still traveling through the pandemic and knew that this would impact the cruise. There are stark differences between how we traveled back then and now.  For example, we all had to be fully vaccinated and present a negative COVID test. Instead of having a buffet lunch option during lunch, we had someone serving us lunch. However, we didn't have to wear a mask on the ship. There were also some excursion restrictions for some destinations that we visited, and I noticed that the itinerary had changed quite a bit. The original plan was that we would travel to six UN nations, and since I am one of those travelers that travel intending to visit every country in the world, this was one of the main attractions for me. I knew that this trip would see me mark my "visit 100 countries" goal.  However, that didn't happen, and I was a bit disappointed. Nevertheless, I made peace that things will not always go according to plan during a global pandemic. If you listen to the podcast, you will notice that I have touched on this in previous episodes. And sometimes, plans change during travel, and we have to accept, find solutions and move on. When you're on a cruise like this, the cruise line offers a few different tours or excursions on the port days. And because my trip happened in August 2021, we had to book a trip with the cruise line for some of the stops. That was the only way they would let us off the ship.  This is obviously to curb the spread of the virus and make sure that we only traveled with other fully vaccinated and tested people. And that was the case with Saint Lucia. DAY TRIPPING IN SAINT LUCIA I made my way through the checkpoints on the pier in Saint Lucia, and I managed to book a tram trip around the port city, the capital of Castries. The little yellow trolly train is run by a local company here in Saint Lucia, called Hibiscus Train. But then nature intervened. A rain cloud quickly came in and covered the melting hot sun almost instantly and we were almost left soaking wet on the pier (when we were sweating from the heat only moments before). Island life, hey. I grabbed a poncho and took shelter in a nearby building and waited for the downpour to subside. This kind of flash rain is a regular occurrence on these islands, as a quick cooling intermission to break up the heat. We travelled on a tram, well train, well, we weren't on tracks, so it was just a type of car dressed as a locomotive. It had a little roof thank goodness, so we had shelter from the rain. After a tour around the city with a few stops, like the cathedral The Minor Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, we ended up at the exotic Vigie Beach, just on the other side of their tiny airport. Saint Lucia was so beautiful and the people are so friendly. Here are some interesting things that I learned. 7 FUN FACTS ABOUT SAINT LUCIA It is a small capital built on reclaimed land. Castries is the capital and largest city of Saint Lucia, the island country in the Caribbean. It's a small city in a small country, and the urban area has a population of only around 20,000 inhabitants. It is built on reclaimed land and has undergone several restorations after fire destruction. It is one of the smallest countries in the world. Saint Lucia is tiny, with 616 km 2 (238 sq miles). It is number 178 on the list of 193 (UN Nations) countries. It is smaller than Micronesia and Singapore and only slightly bigger than Andorra. (lidt større end Bornholm). The population of the country is only 184,000. It is the first country to be named after a woman. It's the first country to be named after a woman – Saint Lucy of Syracuse. It's one of just two countries in the world to be named after a woman. The other one is Ireland. Saint Lucia gained its independence in 1979 It gained its independence from Britain in 1979 after ownership of the island was swapped seven times between France & Britain in the 1800s. After 1979 it became a member of the Commonwealth. You can still feel a bit of Britain here. For example, they love playing cricket, driving on the left-hand side of the road, and English is still the official language even though 85% of the population also speak Saint Lucian Creole. It's hard to take a picture without their famous UNESCO landmark. Saint Lucia is home to the Pitons mountain range, a UNESCO World Heritage site. As the island is small, it's hard to take a picture anywhere in Saint Lucia without the two mountain peaks visible. There are 21 different types of rum in just one region. Like many destinations in the Caribbean, rum is big business in Saint Lucia. And the Roseau region just south of the capital is home to 21 different types of rum. Over 70% of the island is covered in rainforest Saint Lucia has it all, from stunning beaches to mountain peaks, and then most of the country is covered in rainforests.  MEETING A FELLOW TRAVELLER ABOARD THE CELEBRITY CRUISE Most cruise lines in the world often have a team of people planning these excursions. On the Celebrity Cruise, I met Austria-born Jennifer Weiner, the Destinations Manager for the cruise. During our time at sea, Jennifer presented and shared relevant information with us on the big theatre on the ship. When she told us that she's been to almost 100 countries, partly because of her job, this sparked my mind, given my journey, and I thought I would ask her more about her story. She mentioned that she caught the travel bug at a very young age: “When I was little, I was envious of kids who were sent far off to boarding school. I saw it as an adventure, so I begged my mother to send me off, but she wanted me close. I think this was an early indication of my desire to explore. But then at age 17, I studied in Rome for a few months, which kickstarted my wanderlust.” She even went to study business after that, but her heart was always in travel. “After attending business school in Austria, I studied at a travel institute and became a travel agent. I started travelling a bit but soon realised the benefits of the job didn't allow me to travel as much as I wanted. A friend told me about cruise ships and then I started cruising as a travel agent. During one cruise, I thought to myself that the teams working on the ships looked like they had a lot of fun, so I applied, and the rest is history.” So, through hard work and serendipitous moments, she found herself working as a Senior Destinations Manager in Celebrity Cruiselines. It's fascinating to hear her story. She also mentioned that taking a cruise is one of the best ways to get to know a destination. You also get to meet with many people and learn about different places in a relaxed setting. Going on a Caribbean cruise like this and visiting many exotic destinations is exciting for us guests. Imagine having that as your job, as Jennifer has. “It's a lot of work, especially now that I am a manager. I don't get to get out as much as I used to but I try to give my team as much opportunity to get out as possible. About 40% of my time is dedicated to travel to my favourite continents, like Africa.” OUT OF AFRICA It's funny that Jennifer mentions Africa. This episode was recorded five months ago, and I'm editing it in my Airbnb apartment in Nairobi, Kenya this week. And in just 2 days I'm going to make it to my 100th country when I travel to Uganda on Friday morning. I was telling Jennifer about my future (now current) plans to visit Kenya and Uganda for my 100th country visited milestone, and she recounts some funny stories of her time in Kenya and Uganda. “Kenya is one of my most favourite places to visit. There's just something about it that holds a special place in my heart. Maybe because it was my first African country, but I just fell in love with it immediately. I love sleeping in a tent hearing the wildlife so close. In Uganda, I had a few close calls with gorillas in Uganda but overall, I love it.” She tells me more great stories about her visit to Uganda, particularly about the time she stroked a wild cheetah. Jennifer been cruising for 9 years now – and has visited 98 countries so far, and it was interesting to hear her stories. ARUBA, OH I WANT TO TAKE YA After exploring Saint Lucia by tram trolly, we got back on the ship and spent the night cruising to another island in the Caribbean. In the morning, we arrived at the Netherlands Antilles in the south westernmost part of the Caribbean Sea. More specifically, to the first of the ABC Islands – and this is the island you probably most know from the beginning of this song. Yes, Aruba, also known as ‘One Happy Island'. The other two ABC islands are Bonaire and Curaçao. Unfortunately, Bonaire wasn't a stop on this cruise itinerary – so only from A to C. Mario Arends, Cruise Manager at Aruba Tourism Authority, was kind enough to take us around his home island. “Aruba is part of the Dutch Caribbean Islands, which originally included the 6 islands (Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao, Saba, Sint Eustatius, and Sint Maarten) knows as the Dutch Antilles. In 1986, Aruba separated from the Antilles and became an autonomous nation within the Kingdom of the Netherlands. In 2010, Curaçao and Sint Maarten did the same.” Mario tells me about the democratic government of Aruba and how it remains autonomous within the Kingdom of the Netherlands. And how the pandemic has hit the tourism industry in Aruba which accounts for about 80% of the island's GDP.  Aruba is a relatively small island, and there is so much more to do except visit the beautiful beach. You can do nature hikes, visit the nature park and do some cultural activities. Here are some TripAdvisor picks. SWINGING CURAÇAO The next day, we arrived at the 2nd of the three islands, Curaçao. It still uses the Dutch Guilder (the currency used in the Netherlands before the conversion to the Euro). I found my way to the oldest still operating pontoon bridge in the world, built in 1888. It spans 167 m (548 feet) from Punda to Otrabanda across the harbor of Willemstad on the island of Curaçao. Notable because this permanent bridge is hinged and opens regularly to enable the passage of oceangoing vessels. It swings open several times a day when boats need to go through. It is surrounded by beautifully coloured houses on each side that reminds me of a town in Copenhagen. It's called Queen Emma Bridge, but the locals call it the Swinging Old Lady. We walked across the old lady to the other side to a pink building called the Blue Experience which I was told sold the famous liquor. Unfortunately, it was closed due to the pandemic so instead, I walked around the area and found a group of guys on the pier laughing and telling jokes in a language I didn't understand. They were speaking Papiamento and one of the guys even taught me how to say thank you - macha dankie. MEET A TRAVELLING WELSHMAN IN NEXT EPISODE I do have a little bit more from the cruise in the next episode when I have an interesting conversation with another avid world traveller who's been to 96 countries. He's also a part of the Celebrity Cruise team and he's almost always on stage holding a microphone. Here's how I introduce him in the next episode: He's a public speaker, stand-up comedian, quiz master, magician, mind reader, DJ, genius dancer and arguably one of the most entertaining things to come out of Wales since Tom Jones. His name is Eddie Jenkins but on the cruise ship we all know him as "Cruise Director Eddie". You really don't wanna miss that conversation. Coming in a few days in your podcast feed. My name is Palle Bo, and I gotta keep moving. See you.     A TOUCHING LETTER FROM A LISTENER I always love getting reviews, comments and emails from listeners and followers. And this week, I would like to share this particular one. I got a very touching letter from Kenneth.  Hi Palle Bo. It's a great podcast you're producing, and I just got this from Spotify. He then attached a picture from Spotify that said: “My favorite podcast of the year is The Radio Vagabond” and that he's streamed a whopping 5.482 minutes. That's more than 91 hours! But this is not what blew my mind. It's what comes next in his email.  You have been a big part of my personal journey. Unfortunately, it's a journey I'm still on. In May I was hit by stress-related anxiety. The serious kind. To get through this hard time I started listening to your podcast. I've had it in my ears on my long daily walks and it has helped me control my thoughts and in this process, I'm still in – because listening to your exciting podcast, I've been able to focus on something else. In other words, your journey has been a big part of my inner journey and will continue to be that in 2022. It's been a tough battle for me and I hope I'm back to 100% soon. I want you to know that you are one of the people that has helped me to where I am today with your podcast. And for that, I thank you so much. Merry Christmas and happy new year. Keep up the good work. Kenneth    I can't even begin to express your email's impact on me, Kenneth. When I started this podcast in 2016, my goal was to give you tips, tricks, and ideas for your next trip. It was to let you follow my journey and maybe inspire you with my somewhat different life choice. Also, I was hoping to entertain you along the way. But if someone had told me that this podcast would be playing even just a tiny part in the recovery of stress-related anxiety, I would have said, "yeah, right." And your email came at a point where I was thinking, "I'm spending 3-4 full days just editing one 30-minute episode. What's the point? Is it worth the many hours of work I put into this"? But after reading your email, I got the motivation back, and for that, I thank you. Also, thank you for sharing, Kenneth. Get better soon. Keep me posted.   This episode is supported in part by Hotels25.com and produced by RadioGuru.co.uk.

The Table Is Ours
Boris Kodjoe: Blackness Is Global

The Table Is Ours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 46:46


This week Kirby and Amira find there's more than meets the eye with accomplished actor and director Boris Kodjoe. He comes open and ready to share his experiences growing up with his siblings as the only Black kids in his German hometown and the racism he still recalls to this day. Boris shares how his family and pride in his Ghanian background kept him going despite the hardships. He expresses his passion for changing the narrative of Black and African culture and his unique understanding of Blackness around the globe. Boris works with his wife and Soul Food series co-star Nicole Ari Parker in his new Lifetime film and directorial debut, Safe Room, premiering Saturday, January 15th. Make sure you grab your passport because this conversation is crossing borders, and you don't want to miss the trip. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Kiki'ing With CoCo
Season 2 Ep 24 Be Brave & Just Do It feat. Desney Carlene

Kiki'ing With CoCo

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 67:48


This Week's Word on the Street, the new Netflix Series Selling Tampa is being called out for not being shown in the same light as Selling Sunset. I get it, but... Next, The Fresh & Fit Podcast hosts claim everyone has a preference, but black women are not their preference, says 2 men of some African descent

The Take
At long last, AFCON kicks off

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 21:02


On January 9, Africa began its biggest biennial football tournament: The Africa Cup of Nations. Postponed a year because of the pandemic, the tournament will pit 24 of the continent's top teams against each other over the course of one month in Cameroon. But despite the celebratory fervor in Cameroon, there's some concern about how the tournament has been portrayed. In this episode:  Usher Komugisha (@UsherKomugisha), African football journalist Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

The Ornstein & Chapman Podcast
Ian Wright, The Comoros & Why AFCON Matters

The Ornstein & Chapman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 45:04


Hosts Dan Bardell and Flo Lloyd-Hughes are joined by The Athletic's Carl Anka and Jay Harris to discuss why AFCON matters, as the 33rd edition of the tournament kicked off in Cameroon... The panel discuss this rite of passage for a diaspora of young football fans, how European attitudes towards the festival of football continue to evolve, de-bunk some of the typical misconceptions about African football and tell the sensational story of Comoros, aka, 'The Island of the Moon'.

The Real News Podcast
A dangerous myth: The US has never been a 'nation of immigrants'

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 96:45


In her latest book, Not a Nation of Immigrants: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion, world-renowned scholar and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz writes, “The United States has never been ‘a nation of immigrants.' It has always been a settler state with a core of descendents from the original colonial settlers, that is, primarily Anglo-Saxons, Scots Irish, and German. The vortex of settler colonialism sucked immigrants through a kind of seasoning process of Americanization, not as rigid and organized as the ‘seasoning' of Africans, which rendered them into human commodities, but effective nonetheless.”The mythology of the United States as “a nation of immigrants” has a complex political history. And studying the history of how and why this mythology emerged can actually tell us a lot more about America than the myth itself. In this extensive and wide-ranging conversation, TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez and Dunbar-Ortiz trace the history of this particular national mythology and the political functions it serves in the larger project of US settler colonialism, economic domination, and military imperialism.Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma in a tenant farming family. She has been active in the international Indigenous movement for more than 4 decades and is known for her lifelong commitment to national and international social justice issues. She is the winner of the 2017 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize, and she has authored and edited many books, including An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, which won the 2015 American Book Award, and Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment.Read the transcript of this interview: https://therealnews.com/a-dangerous-myth-the-us-has-never-been-a-nation-of-immigrantsPre-Production/Studio/Post Production: Cameron GranadinoHelp us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

Church News
Ethiopia Addis Ababa Mission leaders speak about faithfully and flexibly serving the Lord amid trials and the pandemic

Church News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 54:36


Ethiopia's national capital and largest city, Addis Ababa, hosts a new mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, recently opened in summer 2020. The first leaders of this mission, President Robert Dudfield and Sister Darice Dudfield, join this episode of the Church News podcast to talk about missionary work in Ethiopia and all that has impacted it — including the pandemic and the recent civil unrest that has caused President and Sister Dudfield, along with their missionaries, to temporarily relocate to the neighboring country of Kenya. They are examples of serving the Lord faithfully and flexibly, as well as the blessings that come from serving in the Church and testifying of Jesus Christ. The Church News Podcast is a weekly podcast that invites listeners to make a journey of connection with members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints across the globe. Host Sarah Jane Weaver, reporter and editor for The Church News for a quarter-century, shares a unique view of the stories, events, and most important people who form this international faith. With each episode, listeners are asked to embark on a journey to learn from one another and ponder, “What do I know now?” because of the experience. Produced by KellieAnn Halvorsen. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Expert Dojo
E233 VPD Money-The Future of Banking Now

Expert Dojo "The Art of Startup War"

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 45:48


VPD is a financial service app brought to you by part of the team that delivered VoguePay (a leading payment solutions provider that was founded in 2012 and is now operating across 5 continents).   Our Vision To be the financial service of choice for anyone thinking borderless, as well as being the number one choice for digital banking experience.   Our Mission VPD Money is a financial technology firm whose purpose is to be the leader in developing and providing financial services that empower individuals, drive intra-trade by African and international SMEs as well as serve the diaspora community. For more information, visit vpd.money If you have the next big idea, apply to the Expert Dojo Accelerator: www.expertdojo.com

The China in Africa Podcast
Taking Stock of Wang Yi's Tour of East Africa & Indian Ocean States

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 60:43


Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi is back in Beijing after wrapping up the customary first overseas trip of the year that always begins in Africa. Wang spent almost a week visiting five nations in East Africa and throughout the Indian Ocean where debt, infrastructure and great power rivalry with the U.S. were among the key issues on the agenda.University of Nairobi political science lecturer Oscar Otele closely followed Wang's tour and joins Eric & Cobus to discuss the key highlights, particularly during the Foreign Minister's stop in Kenya.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @ChinaAfrProject | @stadenesqueJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The New Yorker Radio Hour
Nnedi Okorafor on Sci-Fi Through an African Lens

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 23:32


Nnedi Okorafor, a recipient of the prestigious Hugo Award, is a prolific writer of science-fiction and fantasy novels for adults and young adults. She spoke with Vinson Cunningham about how her Nigerian American heritage influenced her interest in fantastical worlds. “It's part of the culture—this mysticism,” she says. “I wanted to write about those mystical things that people talked about but didn't talk about because they were mysterious and interesting, and sometimes forbidden.” Her novel “Akata Woman,” which comes out this month, is the third in a series that also acknowledges complicated relationships among peoples of the African diaspora. Plus, Julian Lucas is a passionate gamer, with a particular interest in video games as a form of landscape art. He walks David Remnick through the forthcoming game Norco, a highly anticipated thriller set in coastal Louisiana.

PLOW & HOSE Gardening in Central Texas
01-09-22 Winterizing Fail, African Violets & Seed Starting Soil

PLOW & HOSE Gardening in Central Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 40:35


2022's first freeze for Taylor & our part of Central Texas--Julie's attempts at winterizing kind of okay, kind of a fail. But the indoor plants are happy including the African violets. Plus more info on starting seeds! We need to get seeds ordered and trays started so we can transplant ASAP.

Not Your Mama's Autism (NYMA)
An African Mom's Journey: A Conversation with Tonye Faloughi-Ekezie

Not Your Mama's Autism (NYMA)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 58:36


                  Season 4 of the Not Your Mama's Autism Podcast begins with a great conversation had with Tonye Faloughi Ekezie, mom, wife, disability rights advocate, TV personality, author, writer, producer and podcast host of the newly launched Special Mums Africa Podcast. In this episode, she breaks down her personal story, how she found out she had a daughter with down syndrome and heart conditions, how she and her husband coped with the early days of her journey and how she has used her personal experiences to launch various fruitful business ventures that are great for the community. Check it out and let us know what you think! If you like what you hear, please leave a 5 star review on Apple Podcasts. 

Denise Walsh - Dream Cast
Ep 252: From African Poverty To Profiting in USA

Denise Walsh - Dream Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 51:48


https://www.consistentprofittree.com/Support the show (http://paypal.me/bwalsh)

Global News Podcast
Twice postponed showcase of African football underway in Cameroon

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 30:32


The 2021 African football Cup of Nations kicks off with host victory; A fire at an apartment building in New York has killed at least nineteen people....and in Saudi Arabia...women get a bespoke showcase for their ships of the desert.

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix
Episode 169: HAITIAN ALL-STARZ RADIO - WBAI 99.5 FM - EPISODE #164 - HARD HITTIN HARRY

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 118:31


Tune in! @djhardhittinharry & @DJayCeenyc presents another brand new episode of @haitian_all_starz Radio Podcast on @wbai995 & WBAI.ORG 2am - 4am late Monday/early Tuesday. Also streaming on @itunes @googleplaymusic @amazonpodcasts @iheartradio @mixcloud @soundcloud

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.07.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 60:40


  Richard Gale & Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, January 7, 2022 During the past two years, the rise in wokeness and its cancel culture has shocked the sensibilities and moral fabric of the nation. It has fuelled divisions between races, class and economic status, levels of education and political allegiances. However, the anger that wokeness has carried into civil discourse is a symptom of a much deeper causal factor buried in the national psyche; that is, America's pervasive “reality deficit disorder (RDD).” This is a condition that has proliferated across the American landscape since the Age of Enlightenment and the 19th century's advent of scientific materialism as a secular religion.  The proponents of modern behaviorism and the neurosciences are likewise saturated with RDD. The Woke self-congratulating experts and false prophets are its public face.  These are plastic liberal intellectuals who have found reinforced their sense of self-righteousness by spreading the post-modern gospel of Robin DiAngelo's 2018 bestseller White Fragility. Despite the widespread adulation DiAngelo has received from liberal educators, the mega-corporate elite, and the left media, she has managed to jockey herself away from the deep scrutiny her writings and lectures deserve.  An exception is Jonathan Church, author of Reinventing Racism, who brilliantly exposes DiAngelo's flaws and deconstructs her façade of her impartial objectivity.  Church takes a more philosophical offensive to shed light on DiAngelo's implicit biases and contradictions that in turn distort the very ideas she attempts to proselytize. While we agree wholeheartedly with Church's polemic, we would take a more cognitive approach and state that DiAngelo's racial theories of irredeemable Whiteness as an inherent social construct have no basis in reality whatsoever. White Fragility reads like a tantrum by an author with a third-rate intellect who is deeply confused about her own gender and racial identity. “All white people,” DiAngelo wants us to believe, “are invested in and collude with racism.” If you were born White then racism is built into your socialized development and behavior regardless whether your family background is exemplary of racial justice or not. There can be no escape from this curse, DiAngelo suggests, no redemption or purification by fire regardless of how much penitence, public service or charity you perform for the greater good. We wonder whether she would include the indigenous blond hair, blue-eyed Finno-Ugric peoples inhabiting the northern forests and tundra of Scandinavia and Russia's Kola Peninsula as being socially structured and therefore colluding in the world's racism. The author reminds us of someone who has read every published book about chocolate and thus feels qualified to write one of her own despite never having tasted chocolate. Philosophy and postmodern sociology in general, notably the modern philosophies of science and mind, often suffer from this mental affliction. They write books about other philosophers' books who in turn wrote books about their predecessors' scribbling. Right-wing critics of wokeness and certain factions within postmodern Critical Race Theory likewise indulge in a similar cognitive hallucination built upon feeble-minded pre-Galilean superstitions. Their perceptions about themselves and the world, their righteous anger and biases, are similar to dreamscapes, phantoms they have conjured and which can have dire long-term consequences to the welfare of innocent victims prejudiced and canceled by their vitriol and condemnation. There have always been conflicting ideologies, cherished beliefs and inflamed emotions towards racial discrepancies, social order and justice or how the nation should be governed. But today these cognitive afflictions, masquerading as passions and righteous causes have disintegrated into tribalism. This is now fomenting new class and racial distinctions and struggles as well as media turf wars. No one can accurately predict where this collective reality deficit disorder will lead ultimately but it certainly won't contribute to a positive advancement of human well-being. It repeats the old adage of garbage in, garbage out. “The greatest need of our time,” the Trappist monk Thomas Merton wrote in his Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander, “is to clean out the enormous mass of mental and emotional rubbish that clutters our minds and makes all political and social life a mass illness. Without this housecleaning we cannot begin to see. Unless we see we cannot think.”  Merton believed that this “purification must begin with the mass media.”  We would suggest it also begins with our educational institutions. Teachers who embrace White Fragility's social folly and logical fallacies need to introspectively gaze and observe the destructive ataxia nesting in their own minds.  If anyone wonders why the nation is so angry, screaming and protesting, one reason is because the failed neoliberal experiment, the culture of political nepotism, a captured and biased media, and a thoroughly corrupt judiciary have created this horror show. And DiAngelo seemingly wants to gather tinder to keep racial conflagrations burning. "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous," Martin Luther King lamented, "than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." It is our deep ignorance about not first knowing ourselves and appreciating our intrinsic interconnections with each other and the environment that perpetuates the suffering around us. These deeper existential relationships can potentially outsmart and surpass the benefits Critical Race Theory has to offer. Underlying any social structure is to be found cognitive causal relationships. This includes our attachments to whatever accomplishments and failures we experience in our lives through racial identity, which may lead to a reality deficit with all of its superiority complexes, apathy and depression. First, there is sufficient empirical science to reach a consensus that we are a culture that has become habituated to mistaking its unfounded perceptions about itself and the world as reality-based. This applies to our cognitive conceptions of Whiteness, Blackness, Yellowness, etc. Church makes this clear; DiAngelo's use of the term Whiteness is “nebulous” and “vague.”  He points out that her logic falls into a Kafka Trap, referring to Kafka's novel The Trial when an unassuming man is dragged into court and accused for an unspecified crime; subsequently his unwavering denial is itself interpreted as absolute proof that the accusation is true. “Yes, all white people are complicit with racism,” writes DiAngelo, “People will insist that they are not racist… This is the kind of evidence that many white people used to exempt themselves from that system. It is not possible to be exempt from it.” Consequently, for DiAngelo, Whites can only speak about their “whiteness” in terms of how it reinforces an implicit racism within the social system. But from a neuro-scientific perspective, all colored racisms are skewed perceptions of reality. For example, when we gaze into a deep azure sky we immediately assume there is physical blue over our heads. However, there are no blue-colored photons reaching our retinas. Rather, our brains receive the emitted photons and through a complex channeling of information from the eye to the visual cortex. The brain then Photoshops the color azure and projects it through our glance into the empty space of the sky. The same is true whether we gaze at a verdant forest canopy, a fiery sunset, the fluorescent, shimmering hues of a fanning peacock's feathers or observing an African, Asian or European person crossing the street. There is nothing mysterious behind this; it is visual brain science 101. No neuroscientist questions this visual phenomenon.  We reify the sensory stimuli the brain receives from the objective world and then grasp and cling to these as being factually real. Theoretically race may be understood as only a conventional or relative appearance arising to our mental perceptions. No absolute objective claims can be made about it; therefore, there cannot be any absolute analyses or one-size-fits-all solutions for confronting racism either. In striking contrast to White Fragility's cognitive deficiencies, we may consider an argument posed by the great Jewish German existentialist Martin Buber. Buber speaks of an I-You relationship when we engage with another person as another subject instead of as an object. There's a subject there, and that subject is every bit as real as the subject over here. For example, as much as I might care about my own well-being, then so does another person. To transcend White Fragility's divisions and its many shortcomings, which relate to others as I-Its -- as mere objects -- we simply need to be aware of Buber's advice, and become fully engaged with that reality. Buber highlights this as a profoundly existential problem in modern society. It is debilitating.  It is dehumanizing, although for DiAngelo and the cancel culture preserving racial I-It relationships is not only valid but essential. When we regard others simply in terms of whether the color of their skin is appealing or unappealing, pleasant or unpleasant, superior or inferior, and so forth we are bifurcating impressions that have no substance in reality. We are simply treating other sentient beings as if they have no more sentience, no more subjectivity, no more presence from their own side than a robot or computer. But that seems fine for DiAngelo and her tragic dehumanizing dogma. If DiAngelo were unintelligent or had severe brain damage, we might understand and would certainly sympathize. But she -- and we would argue many of those who would carry White Fragility's banner into school classrooms -- are likely very educated people. That is the calamity and the clear evidence for the deep-seated spiritual impoverishment when a person is viewed as nothing more than the race of their physical bodies. If anti-racial wokeness is true, then the more deeply we probe and investigate it, the truer it should appear. This was one of William James' fundamental principles when he made efforts to turn the psychology of his day into a valid science. If James' methodology had not been obliterated by the rise of behaviorism in 1910, psychology would be completely different today. We might actually be treating and curing people of mental disorders without prescribing life-long medications. On the other hand, if DiAngelo's hypothesis is false, the more deeply one investigates, which includes introspection, the more false it will appear. That is where robust inquiry comes in: to determine what is simply true regardless of whatever your personal unsubstantiated and biased beliefs about it might be. What you believe has absolutely no impact upon whether something is true or not. This is also basic Buddhist epistemology that has been repeatedly replicated by contemplatives for several millennia. Neuroscience, including its gross failures and tendencies towards metaphysical realism, has more to tell us about the inherent dangers in White Fragility's doctrine. First, modern brain science has not produced an iota of evidence to confirm that the mind and consciousness are solely a product or output originating in neuron and synaptic activity. None. Contrary to the evidence, most neuroscientists and evolutionary biologists nevertheless embrace this opinion as a settled matter. But it is ridiculous to believe that evolution somehow dragged along our ancient single-celled ancestors until some point was reached when a conscious mind -- a “nothing” that is not observable, not measurable, not quantifiable, without atoms or photons, mass, electric charge or spin – mysteriously arose out of something, such as genes and biomolecular phenomena. Therefore cognitive scientists pretend to know something about the mind and consciousness when in fact they haven't a clue. Although DiAngelo is not stating that socialized racism among Whites is genetically determined, the trajectory of her argument has the potential to lead towards that conclusion. She does consider systemic White racism as being unconscious. Therefore she has moved her social theory into psychology. Since modern psychology today is becoming increasingly informed by the neurosciences, which in turn is being informed by evolutionary biology, it is only a small leap away to find her theory complementing genetic determinism as a means to explain Whiteness' conditioned racism. If her socialized determinism, and that of the neuroscience and evolutionary biology fields, are correct, then it would break the fundamental physical laws of energy conservation and causal efficacy. In effect, DiAngelo is saying White people have no choice. It's socialized chemistry or its socialized chemistry; either way its socialized chemistry.  In effect, DiAngelo is admitting that her own perceptions about reality are fundamentally flawed. Why is that? Dr. Donald Hoffman has been a professor of neuroscience at the University of California at Irvine for over three decades. He has an impeccable background having studied artificial intelligence at MIT. But unlike the vast majority of his colleagues, Hoffman broke ranks and passed beyond neuroscience's 19th century mechanistic base and dared to study modern quantum physics and relativity theory. Theoretical physics is almost anathema in human biological research and medicine, which is why these soft sciences have made so little progress to improve human health and well-being. Hoffman has performed hundreds of thousands of simulations comparing different species and their chances for survival based upon their ability to perceive and comprehend reality more accurately or not. His discoveries are startling and utterly revolutionary. Hoffman discovered, across the board, species that best perceive reality go extinct more rapidly than competing species that only perceive what is necessary for them to remain fit and survive. During an interview following a TED Talk, Hoffman stated, “according to evolution by natural selection,” – and here he is limiting himself solely to evolutionary biological theory and not the various competing theories about the nature of consciousness – “an organism that sees reality as it is will never be more fit than an organism of equal complexity that sees none of reality but is just tuned to fitness. Never.” In other words, evolution has nothing to do with perceiving reality more clearly, but only to be more fit in order to adapt, survive and procreate. And now physicists are even telling us that the primal cause behind all physical objects may be consciousness itself, which has no association whatsoever with natural selection. For example, Professor Edward Witten, regarded as “the world's smartest” physicist at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton, has been compared to Newton and Einstein. Witten doesn't believe science will ever understand consciousness. “I think consciousness will remain a mystery,” Witten stated during a lecture, ”I have a much easier time imagining how we understand the Big Bang than I have imagining how we can understand consciousness.” Or we can listen to Stanford University theoretical physicist Andre Linde: “The current scientific model of the material world obeying laws of physics has been so successful that we forget our starting point as conscious observers, and conclude that matter is the only reality and that perceptions are only helpful for describing it. But in fact, we are substituting the reality of our experience of the universe with a conceptually contrived belief…” One may feel our critique is too abstract with little or no practical application; however to at least conceptually understand race in terms of our sensory perceptions can have enormous benefits to cut through and lessen the false semblances that arise from reality deficit disorder that winds up producing books such as White Fragility. Moreover, contrary to DiAngelo's arguments, British journalist Melanie Phillips offers a clearer understanding for why we should not rely upon the pundits of anti-racial wokeness to save us from ourselves. Despite disagreeing with Phillips on many of her other socio-political positions, she correctly identifies the fundamental flaws being voiced by arrested development wokeness across our campuses and within the corporate wing of the Democrat party. First, it is unable to establish a hierarchy of values and morals. For example, if one refuses to say that any lifestyle or culture is better than another, then it cannot be said that liberalism is better than conservatism or any other ideology.  Consequently, faux liberalism cannot legitimately defend the very principles upon which it defines itself: racial and gender equality, freedom of speech and religion, justice and tolerance, and class struggle.  It contradicts its own principles and follows DiAngelo's footsteps to remove the dignity of the individual, which in the past was at the heart of authentic liberalism and once served as its moral backbone. What we are witnessing therefore in Woke liberalism – and in DiAngelo's reinvention of racism -- is “the strong dominating the weak,” and this is an ill-liberal ideology that is already showing signs of having catastrophic consequences in classrooms and the workplace. Finally, if DiAngelo's theory is correct, then all Whites, without exception, in American history, were unconsciously transmuted into racists starting at the time of their birth. What is her proof? Is there any scientific evidence to support this outrageous claim? Did she consider the lack of sensitivity towards other peoples and races who were victims of racial identity and violence, such as the Jews who experienced genocide at hands of their Nazi overlords? And what would she say against those Whites who have fought against racism throughout the American experience, such as the Abolitionists in the US and UK who put their bodies at great risk?  In principle she is labeling them too as racist despite their fighting, protesting and even dying as committed anti-racists. Many Whites have embraced other races and cultures with open arms; however, DiAngelo wants us to believe this legacy was a sham, because in some strange voodoo way they were unconsciously racist. Is this not the height of hubris and arrogance?

Latino USA
Tango Resiste

Latino USA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 33:05


While tango is usually pictured as a dance between a white man in an elegant black suit and a white woman in high heels, and a tight red dress, the reality of tango goes much deeper. Born in the brothels and dance halls of Buenos Aires' lower caste, this music and dance is actually rooted in Argentina's African and queer subcultures. Before it became the defining music of Argentina, tango was actually condemned by elites and the Catholic church, which saw it as obscene and transgressive. The dance's reign was also threatened by the worldwide phenomenon of rock n' roll and then all but buried by Argentina's Dirty War. When tango began its revival in the 1980s and 90s, a new era of tango artists began challenging rigid norms established in the early half of the 20th century. Breaking from traditional gender roles and shining a light on the Black history of tango, these artists aimed to invoke tango's past to make way for a more inclusive future. In this episode, we travel to Argentina and meet three women who will help us to understand the controversial roots of tango and how they are helping to give new life to a dance very much rooted in tradition.

The Stoop
Salam, Is this thing on?

The Stoop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 35:34


Welcome to the Stoop Comedy Club! It's our last episode of the season and we are laughin' it up with three African comedians - Nigerian-American Beverly Adaeze, Kenyan-American Dubai Denis, and Sudanese-American Ahmed Abdelrahman. Each has their unique style, and each has to deal with a complicating question that has to do with their Blackness in America. Plus, Leila tries to break into the comedy scene!

Pod Save the World
Trump endorses a dictator

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 82:25


Tommy and Ben talk about Trump's endorsement of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and what it says about the future of democracy, the latest on Biden's efforts to prevent Russia from invading Ukraine, China and Lithuania, a major election in Chile, and a look ahead at some of the world's most important elections in 2022. Then Ben talks with author Howard French about his new book “Born in Blackness: Africa, Africans, and the Making of the Modern World.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices