Podcasts about Hiring

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 8,486PODCASTS
  • 17,990EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Hiring

Show all podcasts related to hiring

Latest podcast episodes about Hiring

Tiger Talk With The 1400 Klub
The Hiring of Brett Bartolone, Offensive Coordinator

Tiger Talk With The 1400 Klub

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 45:55


With the recent hiring of Offensive Coordinator, Brett Bartolone, we give our thoughts on the addition, discuss how it aligns with current roster personnel & recent recruiting, break down what to expect from a new-look JSU offense, and we dive into the background of our new play caller. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast to be notified of each new episode. Apple users, rate & review the show. Everyone go follow Tiger Talk With the 1400 Klub on Facebook, and @TigerTalk1400 on Instagram and Twitter. http://www.facebook.com/tigertalk1400 https://www.instagram.com/tigertalk1400/ http://www.twitter.com/tigertalk1400 Donate to Jackson State University athletics at http://www.gojsutigers.com/give. The Jackson State Sports Network is available to fans and supporters for the 2021-22 season. bit.ly/2UnK1lz. Men's and women's basketball season tickets are now on sale! Visit https://t.co/NqoGf04QgG or contact the ticket office at 601.354.6021 for more information. Season tickets for the 2022 Jackson State baseball season will go on sale Tuesday, January 11 at 9 a.m. and can be ordered by calling 601-737-2420, 601-354-6021, email at jsuticketoffice@jsums.edu or visiting the ticket offices at the Lee E. Williams Athletics & Assembly Center and Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium. Purchase your Jackson State Under Armour gear at bit.ly/2L3buAw. Join the JSU National Alumni Association today by texting “IBELIEVE” to 71777. Donate to the COVID-19 Athletic Relief Fund at www.gojsutigers.com/give. Donate to the Building Champions Fund at https://bit.ly/38cZyt8 Advantages for recruiting prospective student-athletes Critical medical & training facilities Opportunities to host championship events Plus many more! Locker Room Naming Rights Initiative https://gojsutigers.com/news/2021/1/14/football-jsu-announces-locker-room-naming-rights-initiative.aspx --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tigertalk1400klub/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tigertalk1400klub/support

Sports Business Secrets
Episode 370: Hiring & Recruiting

Sports Business Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 18:09


People often get hired the same way that people get recognized, from their past success. And although there is merit to that, I think we should dig deeper. I believe too many companies & sports organizations overweigh their decisions based off past stats.

Profit Is A Choice
Financial Management and Oversight in Your Design Firm

Profit Is A Choice

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 60:54


180: Financial Management and Oversight in Your Design Firm with Peter Lang Joining me on the podcast today is Peter Lang, owner of the designer CPA, Peter and I both have a heart for supporting this industry with good financial practices and understanding. And today we're going to talk about what we see as kind of the lifecycle, if you will, of bookkeeping and bookkeeping needs and the overwhelming hole and desire in the industry to have better bookkeeping practices. So I hope you enjoy the podcast and are able to see where you fit in the bookkeeping trajectory. Topics Mentioned: Bookkeeping  Accounting  Hiring  Internal processes  Key Thoughts:   When all the work comes, whether it's the accounting, the bookkeeping, or the financials, you're going to start seeing fracture points in a business; when the weight comes in, you're going to see the weak links. Michele (3:19)    The longer you wait to start, the longer it's going to take to fix and then it's just like a snowball and you just don't want to get there. So, starting off on the right foot and making sure that you find the right person for your business. Peter Lang (24:36)    Don't forget that you can charge admin fees. So, if you increase your rates to include some administrative costs, or to really have a true understanding of what it takes to run your business, you can build into your fees to have the support for somebody to do the billing and the reconciliation. Michele (25:50)    Our job and our role is to support what is best for that client to give them information, to help them understand so that our clients can make the best decision for where they want to go in the business and what they want to do. Michele (46:23)    Just because you have a great situation today doesn't mean it's going to be a great situation in three months from now or next year. Peter Lang (52:16)      Contact Michele: Email: Team@ScarletThreadConsulting.com Facebook: Scarlet Thread Consulting Instagram: @ScarletThreadATL Website: ScarletThreadConsulting.com LinkedIn: Michele Williams Contact Peter: Website: TheDesignerCPA.com Facebook:TheDesignerCPA Instagram: @thedesignercpa Twitter: TheDesignerCPA Email: peter@thedesignercpa.com References and Resources: AIM Masterclass - Watch now

Serious Sellers Podcast: Learn How To Sell On Amazon
#315 - All You Need To Know About Hiring Virtual Assistants

Serious Sellers Podcast: Learn How To Sell On Amazon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 43:52


Saqib Azhar, owner of the world's largest Amazon Facebook group, is back to talk about hiring virtual assistants and a new launch method that his group uses.

Stinkin Truth podcast
The process of hiring a head coach | NFL Playoffs

Stinkin Truth podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 29:45


What is the process of hiring an NFL head coach? The real NFL playoffs start now!

Bernstein & McKnight Show
NFL hiring processes have been more like the Nepotism Football League (Hour 2)

Bernstein & McKnight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 40:46


In the second hour, Dan Bernstein and Leila Rahimi were joined by Kalyn Kahler of Defector to discuss how nepotism is clogging the pipeline for diverse coaching hires in the NFL. After that, Bernstein and Rahimi discussed a player on the Bulls' roster who could be trade bait. Later, they conducted the Midday Midway, taking a look at the wackiest headlines from around the world.

Mad Radio
P&P - Michael Irvin: Hiring McCown as Head Coach would be Crazy

Mad Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 8:25


Seth and Sean talk with Audacy NFL Insider and Hall of Famer Michael Irvin about the Texans interviewing Josh McCown and get his thoughts on the Cowboys blowing the ball spike and working with Stephen A Smith.

Big Blue Kickoff Live | New York Giants
Big Blue Kickoff Live 1/21 | Giants hire Joe Schoen as GM

Big Blue Kickoff Live | New York Giants

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 63:28


John Schmeelk, Paul Dottino and Lance Medow react to the Giants hiring Joe Schoen and take calls. SUBSCRIBE NOW: Apple Spotify Google Stitcher iHeart Radio :46 - Joe Schoen Hiring 11:52 - Calls 19:43 - Hiring a head coach 35:45 - Play calling 49:04 - GM Draft philosophy

Shock Your Potential
The Leveraged Business - Fabienne Fredrickson

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 41:11


“Your business cannot grow until you shift you inside, because leveraging your business starts in your mindset.” Fabienne Fredrickson As you lead your business to exponential growth, you have to grow as well and shift your mindset to align with the reality of where you want your company to be. Otherwise, you become the bottleneck for your business to thrive. This is according to our guest today Fabienne Frederickson, who says that it all starts by getting structured for your nature. Fabienne Fredrickson is a powerful mentor for solo business owners who seek to make the greatest impact they can in their work, all while creating certainty in their business. Fabienne believes that when women who are really going to tie into their heart core, make their own money and lots of it, they experience a profound feeling of safety. She's the founder of the leveragebusiness.com and boldheart.com and she's been a mentor to women business owners for over 20 years. Her predictable process, taught in the leverage business program practically guarantees that a business owner will multiply their results with more downtime once fully implemented. She is recognized by so many sources in the media, including some big names like Inc Magazine, Fast Company, Forbes, Entrepreneur, American Express Forum and the New York Times. She is the author of multiple books including, The Leveraged Business and Embrace Your Magnificence. In today's episode, Fabienne talks about how she took her business to the next level of performance. She also discusses her most recent book that guides entrepreneurs to make greater impact with their business. Listen in! Contacts www.leveragebusiness.com   www.boldheart.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/fabiennefredrickson Twitter: https://twitter.com/fabienne In my late 20s, I realized that working for someone else was not going to make my life feel meaningful. [3:31] I left corporate and opened up my own holistic nutrition practice out of my teeny tiny apartment in Manhattan. [3:51] At some point I needed to figure out how to get clients and I created the client attraction system which I became known for. [4:31] I learned that what gets you to six figures a month consistently in your business will never get you to a million, and to get there, you actually need to work less. [5:58] Once I understood the concept of leverage in business, I began to leverage every aspect of my business, which eventually got me to seven figures. [6:20] Once you apply the eight leverage activators, which are all featured in the book, ‘The Leveraged Business,' it will take you to multiple figures every year. [7:12] Getting your business to earning multiple figures has nothing to do with the money, but rather about who you become, and how many lives you've impacted. [8:59] I've been teaching the program for more than 10 years, and I put it all into a book. [10:22] It starts with leveraging a team because you need people to help you simply because you cannot do it all on your own. [10:30] There are four things that you're looking for when hiring including the skill set, experience, wiring, and culture fit. [11:26] Next is to leverage your systems whereby anything that's done more than once in your business needs a system and a procedure around it. [11:48] The other is to leverage your time which is about having the visionary getting into their unique zone of genius and that is where you exponentially grow your business. [12:37] The fourth activator is called leverage your business model where you need to change your mindset around how to deliver your work in the world. [13:38] Every time you pull yourself out of the day to day of your business a little bit more, there is a part of you that's required to create the system to give guidance to the team. [16:11] Once you've got your leverage your team, systems, time and business model, the nest step is to leverage your marketing. [17:15] Leveraging your marketing is about becoming omnipresent. [17:35] This then leads us to leverage your accountability where we have everyone know that they are responsible for growing the business. [18:01] The seventh activator is differentiation where you look to never have to compete with anyone. [20:05] Activator number eight is leverage your lifestyle which is about starting to live your ideal life now rather than later. [21:49] Most entrepreneurs believe that the person who founded the business should be running the business, and that could not be further from the truth. [23:11] Hiring a person that you can trust, who is wired opposite from how you're wired is how you can let go of the white knuckling around your business. [23:22] Commercial break. [25:03] Your business cannot grow until you shift you inside, because leveraging your business starts in your mindset. [29:04] When leveraging your team, there is a mindset shifts that need to happen for you to hire a rock star team. [30:16] A lot of people try to do it on their own and wondering why it's not working, and the reason is because true transformation happens when we are witnessed. [32:21] Most of the time you know you are supposed to do better, but you're not doing it, and that is because isolation breeds self-doubt. [33:09] When you are surrounded by mentors, you start to believe in yourself and there is no way you cannot succeed. [34:15] If you understand how you are wired, and instead of beating yourself up, you get structured for your nature, there is nothing you can't do. [37:23] Understand that there has never been anybody like you, and your song needs to be heard far and wide. [39:24] ………………………………………………… Thank you to our January Sponsor: www.businessmiracles.com or Heather Dominick Are you a highly sensitive individual? You can learn to be in charge of yourself physically, spiritually and financially in a way that honors your highly sensitive self. Heather Dominic is the founder of Business miracles.com. and she's been training highly sensitive entrepreneurs and leaders since 2010. Whether you've been in business for years, or just starting out, learn how to be comfortable in your highly sensitive skin, to create your work and life to match who you truly are, so you can work less while making more impact and income. You are welcome to take the HSE quiz by clicking the link: https://energyrich.isrefer.com/go/quiz/SYP/ Learn more: https://energyrich.isrefer.com/go/HSCC/SYP/

The Ken Coleman Show
Want to Beat The Hiring Algorithm? (Do This!)

The Ken Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 45:33


The Ken Coleman Show is here to help answer your questions about career, passion and talent so you can maximize your potential and get closer to landing your dream job. Do you have a question for Ken? Call us live from 12-2 p.m. ET at 844-747-2577 or email ask@kencoleman.com.   Free Guides & Resources The Proximity Principle Facebook Community Subscribe to The Newsletter Articles by Ken

Hire Power Radio
The Hiring Yin & Yang: Job Postings vs Recruiting with Kelly Robinson

Hire Power Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 25:59


Sourcing talented people is a HUGE challenge right now. Over 38 million people quit their jobs in 2021. And a lot of them are not coming back. Then we have the divide over pandemic policies that has driven people away from corporate America. Making it more difficult to retain good people. But sourcing is not the biggest challenge in today's hiring landscape. Engagement is. It is important that we utilize every viable avenue (ie: boards, postings & direct recruiting) with the objective of just starting intentional conversations. By intentional, I mean, not selling. But understanding the desires of the person first… Because It's not about you. Intentional conversations lead to engagement. Engagement leads to the hire! About the Guest: Kelly Robinson, CEO of RedDotMedia Kelly founded Broadbean.com Inc 2001, which was acquired by CareerBuilder in 2014. Now he leads RedDot Media, a recruitment advertising agency with a particular skill in programmatic advertising campaigns.  Kelly has spent the last 25 years in recruitment and recruitment technology, during which time he has grown, integrated, bought, and sold businesses in both the UK and US.  Kelly is the goto industry expert in all things job posting Today we discuss: The current job posting landscape How to best utilize the tools available to maximize your hiring outcome Challenge today? Everyone is having a staffing crisis Not about the job posting.  It is about making a connection 14k recruiter jobs got added Friday! 100% more jobs available,  3 % of the workforce has just … quit in just one month! Meaningful work! Rick's Nuggets Structure is winning over $$ What no one is talking about vaccination policy of the company How do we solve the problem? Posting Depends on the position Indeed Ziprecruiter Linkedin-sourcing/outreachSales people, marketing, recruiters Dice, Angel list Write a great ad Nothing's Free - It's all paid Algorithm distributes jobs equally  PPC has gone away. Can't define what you pay per click Need to spend at least $250 Should translate to 10 applications  Rick's Nuggets Active Reach Out! 1 hour a week  Discovery call-  where the magic happens Buy in/opt out  Referrals - HUGE VALUE Key Takeaways that the Audience can plug into their business today!  -Value: Yesterdays ideas dont work today Cant do things cheeper Guest Links: LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/kellyjrobinson/ Company: https://reddotmedia.co/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/reddotmedia/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/reddotmedia.co Twitter: https://twitter.com/kellyjrobinson Host Links:  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rick-girard-07722/ Company: https://www.stridesearch.com/ Podcast: https://www.hirepowerradio.com Authored:  "Healing Career Wounds"  https://amzn.to/3tGbtre HireOS inquiry: rick@stridesearch.com   Show Sponsor: Criteria Corp: https://www.criteriacorp.com/  

Hoge and Jahns from WGN Radio 720
Reviewing Bill Polian's guide to hiring a coach, interview updates & Browns candidates with Zac Jackson

Hoge and Jahns from WGN Radio 720

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 68:27


What does the chapter on hiring the right coach in Bill Polian's book "The Game Plan" tell us about what the Bears might do? What is the latest on who the front-runners are for GM and head coach? The Adams review Adam Jahn's book report on Polian and bring in Zac Jackson of The Athletic for some insight on the candidates from the Cleveland Browns organization. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dale & Keefe
Gresh & Keefe - Ian Rapoport believes Brian Flores will have a head coaching job at the end of this hiring cycle

Dale & Keefe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 8:05


Gresh and Keefe are joined by Ian Rapoport to discuss the head coaching jobs in the NFL and the Divisional round of the playoffs.

Big Blue Kickoff Live | New York Giants
Big Blue Kickoff Live 1/20 | Interview Process Continues

Big Blue Kickoff Live | New York Giants

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 65:42


John Schmeelk, Paul Dottino and Jeff Feagles provide updates on GM interviews and take calls. SUBSCRIBE NOW: Apple Spotify Google Stitcher iHeart Radio 1:05 - Ryan Poles 10:41 - Hiring for longevity 14:59 - Calls 30:00 - Bolstering O Line 47:52 - Timeline for hiring head coach

Ron and Don Radio
Episode #355: Ron and Don talk about the importance of Kitchen dancing and hiring coaches

Ron and Don Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 30:43


=== Sign up for the Ron & Don Newsletter to get more information at www.ronanddonradio.com ==== To schedule a Ron & Don Sit Down to talk about your Real Estate journey, go to www.ronanddonsitdown.com ==== Thanks to everyone that has become an Individual Sponsor of the Ron & Don Show. If you'd like to learn more about how that works: Just click the link and enter your amount at https://glow.fm/ronanddonradio/ RonandDonRadio.com Episodes are free and drop on Monday's , Wednesday's & Thursday's. From Seattle's own radio personalities, Ron Upshaw and Don O'Neill. Connect with us on Facebook Ron's Facebook Page Don's Facebook Page ====== --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ronanddonradio/support

Customer Service Secrets by Kustomer
From Impressed to Obsessed | Jon Picoult

Customer Service Secrets by Kustomer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 24:25


Our guest today, Jon Picoult, the founder of Watermark Consulting, helps companies impress their customers. He's a leading expert in customer-employee experience and has been featured in dozens of media outlets including the Wallstreet Journal, the New York Times, NBC News forums, fortune 100 CEOs, and he's been working with small entrepreneurs. He's been helping people across the business manage this concept of customer and employee experience and is joining us today to talk about this idea of loyalty-enhancing strategies. You can save money and future hassle with customers by getting rid of issues before the customers even face them. Every time you say no to your customer, it saps their loyalty to your company.Is customer satisfaction key? 4:51Jon's definition of customer service 6:21Quantify the customer experience and understand where they're coming from 13:17The most universal problem/challenge in customer experience 15:21How companies can make it easy to do business with them 19:19“If you are doing things better in the experience upstream, for example making products that are easier to assemble, or providing sales materials that are easier for people to understand and more accurately set expectations. If you're doing things like that, what you actually end up doing is obviating the need for downstream customer contact. You're basically pre-empting dumb, avoidable reasons why customers reach out to you.” 9:49

Screaming in the Cloud
Learning to Give in the Cloud with Andrew Brown

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 38:40


About AndrewI create free cloud certification courses and somehow still make money.Links: ExamPro Training, Inc.: https://www.exampro.co/ PolyWork: https://www.polywork.com/andrewbrown LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrew-wc-brown Twitter: https://twitter.com/andrewbrown TranscriptAndrew: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief cloud economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today is… well, he's challenging to describe. He's the co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro Training, Inc. but everyone knows him better as Andrew Brown because he does so many different things in the AWS ecosystem that it's sometimes challenging—at least for me—to wind up keeping track of them all. Andrew, thanks for joining.Andrew: Hey, thanks for having me on the show, Corey.Corey: How do I even begin describing you? You're an AWS Community Hero and have been for almost two years, I believe; you've done a whole bunch of work as far as training videos; you're, I think, responsible for #100daysofcloud; you recently started showing up on my TikTok feed because I'm pretending that I am 20 years younger than I am and hanging out on TikTok with the kids, and now I feel extremely old. And obviously, you're popping up an awful lot of places.Andrew: Oh, yeah. A few other places like PolyWork, which is an alternative to LinkedIn, so that's a space that I'm starting to build up on there as well. Active in Discord, Slack channels. I'm just kind of everywhere. There's some kind of internet obsession here. My wife gets really mad and says, “Hey, maybe tone down the social media.” But I really enjoy it. So.Corey: You're one of those folks where I have this challenge of I wind up having a bunch of different AWS community Slacks and cloud community, Slacks and Discords and the past, and we DM on Twitter sometimes. And I'm constantly trying to figure out where was that conversational thread that I had with you? And tracking it down is an increasingly large search problem. I really wish that—forget the unified messaging platform. I want a unified search platform for all the different messaging channels that I'm using to talk to people.Andrew: Yeah, it's very hard to keep up with all the channels for myself there. But somehow I do seem to manage it, but just with a bit less sleep than most others.Corey: Oh, yeah. It's like trying to figure out, like, “All right, he said something really useful. What was that? Was that a Twitter DM? Was it on that Slack channel? Was it that Discord? No, it was on that brick that he threw through my window with a note tied to it. There we go.”That's always the baseline stuff of figuring out where things are. So, as I mentioned in the beginning, you are the co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro, which is interesting because unlike most of the community stuff that you do and are known for, you don't generally talk about that an awful lot. What's the deal there?Andrew: Yeah, I think a lot of people give me a hard time because they say, Andrew, you should really be promoting yourself more and trying to make more sales, but that's not why I'm out here doing what I'm doing. Of course, I do have a for-profit business called ExamPro, where we create cloud certification study courses for things like AWS, Azure, GCP, Terraform, Kubernetes, but you know, that money just goes to fuel what I really want to do, is just to do community activities to help people change their lives. And I just decided to do that via cloud because that's my domain expertise. At least that's what I say because I've learned up on in the last four or five years. I'm hoping that there's some kind of impact I can make doing that.Corey: I take a somewhat similar approach. I mean, at The Duckbill Group, we fixed the horrifying AWS bill, but I've always found that's not generally a problem that people tend to advertise having. On Twitter, like, “Oh, man, my AWS bill is killing me this month. I've got to do something about it,” and you check where they work, and it's like a Fortune 50. It's, yeah, that moves markets and no one talks about that.So, my approach was always, be out there, be present in the community, talk about this stuff, and the people who genuinely have billing problems will eventually find their way to me. That was always my approach because turning everything I do into a sales pitch doesn't work. It just erodes confidence, it reminds people of the used mattress salesman, and I just don't want to be that person in that community. My approach has always been if I can help someone with a 15-minute call or whatnot, yeah, let's jump on a phone call. I'm not interested in nickel-and-diming folks.Andrew: Yeah. I think that if you're out there doing a lot of hard work, and a lot of it, it becomes undeniable the value you're putting out there, and then people just will want to give you money, right? And for me, I just feel really bad about taking anybody's money, and so even when there's some kind of benefit—like my courses, I could charge for access for them, but I always feel I have to give something in terms of taking somebody's money, but I would never ask anyone to give me their money. So, it's bizarre. [laugh] so.Corey: I had a whole bunch of people a year or so after I started asking, like, “I really find your content helpful. Can I buy you a cup of coffee or something?” And it's, I don't know how to charge people a dollar figure that doesn't have a comma in it because it's easy for me to ask a company for money; that is the currency of effort, work, et cetera, that companies are accustomed to. People view money very differently, and if I ask you personally for money versus your company for money, it's a very different flow. So, my solution to it was to build the annual charity t-shirt drive, where it's, great, spend 35 bucks or whatever on a snarky t-shirt once a year for ten days and all proceeds go to benefit a nonprofit that is, sort of, assuaged that.But one of my business philosophies has always been, “Work for free before you work for cheap.” And dealing with individuals and whatnot, I do not charge them for things. It's, “Oh, can you—I need some advice in my career. Can I pay you to give me some advice?” “No, but you can jump on a Zoom call with me.” Please, the reason I exist at all is because people who didn't have any reason to did me favors, once upon a time, and I feel obligated to pay that forward.Andrew: And I appreciate, you know, there are people out there that you know, do need to charge for their time. Like—Corey: Oh. Oh, yes.Andrew: —I won't judge anybody that wants to. But you know, for me, it's just I can't do it because of the way I was raised. Like, my grandfather was very involved in the community. Like, he was recognized by the city for all of his volunteer work, and doing volunteer work was, like, mandatory for me as a kid. Like, every weekend, and so for me, it's just like, I can't imagine trying to take people's money.Which is not a great thing, but it turns out that the community is very supportive, and they will come beat you down with a stick, to give you money to make sure you keep doing what you're doing. But you know, I could be making lots of money, but it's just not my priority, so I've avoided any kind of funding so like, you know, I don't become a money-driven company, and I will see how long that lasts, but hopefully, a lot longer.Corey: I wish you well. And again, you're right; no shade to anyone who winds up charging for their time to individuals. I get it. I just always had challenges with it, so I decided not to do it. The only time I find myself begrudging people who do that are someone who picked something up six months ago and decided, oh, I'm going to build some video course on how to do this thing. The end. And charge a bunch of money for it and put myself out as an expert in that space.And you look at what the content they're putting out is, and one, it's inaccurate, which just drives me up a wall, and two, there's a lack of awareness that teaching is its own skill. In some areas, I know how to teach certain things, and in other areas, I'm a complete disaster at it. Public speaking is a great example. A lot of what I do on the public speaking stage is something that comes to me somewhat naturally. So, can you teach me to be a good public speaker? Not really, it's like, well, you gave that talk and it was bad. Could you try giving it only make it good? Like, that is not a helpful coaching statement, so I stay out of that mess.Andrew: Yeah, I mean, it's really challenging to know, if you feel like you're authority enough to put something out there. And there's been a few courses where I didn't feel like I was the most knowledgeable, but I produced those courses, and they had done extremely well. But as I was going through the course, I was just like, “Yeah, I don't know how any this stuff works, but this is my best guess translating from here.” And so you know, at least for my content, people have seen me as, like, the lens of AWS on top of other platforms, right? So, I might not know—I'm not an expert in Azure, but I've made a lot of Azure content, and I just translate that over and I talk about the frustrations around, like, using scale sets compared to AWS auto-scaling groups, and that seems to really help people get through the motions of it.I know if I pass, at least they'll pass, but by no means do I ever feel like an expert. Like, right now I'm doing, like, Kubernetes. Like, I have no idea how I'm doing it, but I have, like, help with three other people. And so I'll just be honest about it and say, “Hey, yeah, I'm learning this as well, but at least I know I passed, so you know, you can pass, too.” Whatever that's worth.Corey: Oh, yeah. Back when I was starting out, I felt like a bit of a fraud because I didn't know everything about the AWS billing system and how it worked and all the different things people can do with it, and things they can ask. And now, five years later, when the industry basically acknowledges I'm an expert, I feel like a fraud because I couldn't possibly understand everything about the AWS billing system and how it works. It's one of those things where the more you learn, the more you realize that there is yet to learn. I'm better equipped these days to find the answers to the things I need to know, but I'm still learning things every day. If I ever get to a point of complete and total understanding of a given topic, I'm wrong. You can always go deeper.Andrew: Yeah, I mean, by no means am I even an expert in AWS, though people seem to think that I am just because I have a lot of confidence in there and I produce a lot of content. But that's a lot different from making a course than implementing stuff. And I do implement stuff, but you know, it's just at the scale that I'm doing that. So, just food for thought for people there.Corey: Oh, yeah. Whatever, I implement something. It's great. In my previous engineering life, I would work on large-scale systems, so I know how a thing that works in your test environment is going to blow up in a production scale environment. And I bring those lessons, written on my bones the painful way, through outages, to the way that I build things now.But the stuff that I'm building is mostly to keep my head in the game, as opposed to solving an explicit business need. Could I theoretically build a podcast transcription system on top of Transcribe or something like that for these episodes? Yeah. But I've been paying a person to do this for many years to do it themselves; they know the terms of art, they know how this stuff works, and they're building a glossary as they go, and understanding the nuances of what I say and how I say it. And that is the better business outcome; that's the answer. And if it's production facing, I probably shouldn't be tinkering with it too much, just based upon where the—I don't want to be the bottleneck for the business functioning.Andrew: I've been spending so much time doing the same thing over and over again, but for different cloud providers, and the more I do, the less I want to go deep on these things because I just feel like I'm dumping all this information I'm going to forget, and that I have those broad strokes, and when I need to go deep dive, I have that confidence. So, I'd really prefer people were to build up confidence in saying, “Yes, I think I can do this.” As opposed to being like, “Oh, I have proof that I know every single feature in AWS Systems Manager.” Just because, like, our platform, ExamPro, like, I built it with my co-founder, and it's a quite a system. And so I'm going well, that's all I need to know.And I talk to other CTOs, and there's only so much you need to know. And so I don't know if there's, like, a shift between—or difference between, like, application development where, let's say you're doing React and using Vercel and stuff like that, where you have to have super deep knowledge for that technical stack, whereas cloud is so broad or diverse that maybe just having confidence and hypothesizing the work that you can do and seeing what the outcome is a bit different, right? Not having to prove one hundred percent that you know it inside and out on day one, but have the confidence.Corey: And there's a lot of validity to that and a lot of value to it. It's the magic word I always found in interviewing, on both sides of the interview table, has always been someone who's unsure about something start with, “I'm not sure, but if I had to guess,” and then say whatever it is you were going to say. Because if you get it right, wow, you're really good at figuring this out, and your understanding is pretty decent. If you're wrong, well, you've shown them how you think but you've also called them out because you're allowed to be wrong; you're not allowed to be authoritatively wrong. Because once that happens, I can't trust anything you say.Andrew: Yeah. In terms of, like, how do cloud certifications help you for your career path? I mean, I find that they're really well structured, and they give you a goal to work towards. So, like, passing that exam is your motivation to make sure that you complete it. Do employers care? It depends. I would say mostly no. I mean, for me, like, when I'm hiring, I actually do care about certifications because we make certification courses but—Corey: In your case, you're a very specific expression of this that is not typical.Andrew: Yeah. And there are some, like, cases where, like, if you work for a larger cloud consultancy, you're expected to have a professional certification so that customers feel secure in your ability to execute. But it's not like they were trying to hire you with that requirement, right? And so I hope that people realize that and that they look at showing that practical skills, by building up cloud projects. And so that's usually a strong pairing I'll have, which is like, “Great. Get the certifications to help you just have a structured journey, and then do a Cloud project to prove that you can do what you say you can do.”Corey: One area where I've seen certifications act as an interesting proxy for knowledge is when you have a company that has 5000 folks who work in IT in varying ways, and, “All right. We're doing a big old cloud migration.” The certification program, in many respects, seems to act as a bit of a proxy for gauging where people are on upskilling, how much they have to learn, where they are in that journey. And at that scale, it begins to make some sense to me. Where do you stand on that?Andrew: Yeah. I mean, it's hard because it really depends on how those paths are built. So, when you look at the AWS certification roadmap, they have the Certified Cloud Practitioner, they have three associates, two professionals, and a bunch of specialties. And I think that you might think, “Well, oh, solutions architect must be very popular.” But I think that's because AWS decided to make the most popular, the most generic one called that, and so you might think that's what's most popular.But what they probably should have done is renamed that Solution Architect to be a Cloud Engineer because very few people become Solutions Architect. Like that's more… if there's Junior Solutions Architect, I don't know where they are, but Solutions Architect is more of, like, a senior role where you have strong communications, pre-sales, obviously, the role is going to vary based on what companies decide a Solution Architect is—Corey: Oh, absolutely take a solutions architect, give him a crash course in finance, and we call them a cloud economist.Andrew: Sure. You just add modifiers there, and they're something else. And so I really think that they should have named that one as the cloud engineer, and they should have extracted it out as its own tier. So, you'd have the Fundamental, the Certified Cloud Practitioner, then the Cloud Engineer, and then you could say, “Look, now you could do developer or the sysops.” And so you're creating this path where you have a better trajectory to see where people really want to go.But the problem is, a lot of people come in and they just do the solutions architect, and then they don't even touch the other two because they say, well, I got an associate, so I'll move on the next one. So, I think there's some structuring there that comes into play. You look at Azure, they've really, really caught up to AWS, and may I might even say surpass them in terms of the quality and the way they market them and how they construct their certifications. There's things I don't like about them, but they have, like, all these fundamental certifications. Like, you have Azure Fundamentals, Data Fundamentals, AI Fundamentals, there's a Security Fundamentals.And to me, that's a lot more valuable than going over to an associate. And so I did all those, and you know, I still think, like, should I go translate those over for AWS because you have to wait for a specialty before you pick up security. And they say, like, it's intertwined with all the certifications, but, really isn't. Like—and I feel like that would be a lot better for AWS. But that's just my personal opinion. So.Corey: My experience with AWS certifications has been somewhat minimal. I got the Cloud Practitioner a few years ago, under the working theory of I wanted to get into the certified lounge at some of the events because sometimes I needed to charge things and grab a cup of coffee. I viewed it as a lounge pass with a really strange entrance questionnaire. And in my case, yeah, I passed it relatively easily; if not, I would have some questions about how much I actually know about these things. As I recall, I got one question wrong because I was honest, instead of going by the book answer for, “How long does it take to restore an RDS database from a snapshot?”I've had some edge cases there that give the wrong answer, except that's what happened. And then I wound up having that expire and lapse. And okay, now I'll do it—it was in beta at the time, but I got the sysops associate cert to go with it. And that had a whole bunch of trivia thrown into it, like, “Which of these is the proper syntax for this thing?” And that's the kind of question that's always bothered me because when I'm trying to figure things like that out, I have entire internet at my fingertips. Understanding the exact syntax, or command-line option, or flag that needs to do a thing is a five-second Google search away in most cases. But measuring for people's ability to memorize and retain that has always struck me as a relatively poor proxy for knowledge.Andrew: It's hard across the board. Like Azure, AWS, GCP, they all have different approaches—like, Terraform, all of them, they're all different. And you know, when you go to interview process, you have to kind of extract where the value is. And I would think that the majority of the industry, you know, don't have best practices when hiring, there's, like, a superficial—AWS is like, “Oh, if you do well, in STAR program format, you must speak a communicator.” Like, well, I'm dyslexic, so that stuff is not easy for me, and I will never do well in that.So like, a lot of companies hinge on those kinds of components. And I mean, I'm sure it doesn't matter; if you have a certain scale, you're going to have attrition. There's no perfect system. But when you look at these certifications, and you say, “Well, how much do they match up with the job?” Well, they don't, right? It's just Jeopardy.But you know, I still think there's value for yourself in terms of being able to internalize it. I still think that does prove that you have done something. But taking the AWS certification is not the same as taking Andrew Brown's course. So, like, my certified cloud practitioner was built after I did GCP, Oracle Cloud, Azure Fundamentals, a bunch of other Azure fundamental certifications, cloud-native stuff, and then I brought it over because was missing, right? So like, if you went through my course, and that I had a qualifier, then I could attest to say, like, you are of this skill level, right?But it really depends on what that testament is and whether somebody even cares about what my opinion of, like, your skillset is. But I can't imagine like, when you have a security incident, there's going to be a pop-up that shows you multiple-choice answer to remediate the security incident. Now, we might get there at some point, right, with all the cloud automation, but we're not there yet.Corey: It's been sort of thing we've been chasing and never quite get there. I wish. I hope I live to see it truly I do. My belief is also that the value of a certification changes depending upon what career stage someone is at. Regardless of what level you are at, a hiring manager or a company is looking for more or less a piece of paper that attests that they're to solve the problem that they are hiring to solve.And entry-level, that is often a degree or a certification or something like that in the space that shows you have at least the baseline fundamentals slash know how to learn things. After a few years, I feel like that starts to shift into okay, you've worked in various places solving similar problems on your resume that the type that we have—because the most valuable thing you can hear when you ask someone, “How would we solve this problem?” Is, “Well, the last time I solved it, here's what we learned.” Great. That's experience. There's no compression algorithm for experience? Yes, there is: Hiring people with experience.Then, at some level, you wind up at the very far side of people who are late-career in many cases where the piece of paper that shows that they know what they're doing is have you tried googling their name and looking at the Wikipedia article that spits out, how they built fundamental parts of a system like that. I think that certifications are one of those things that bias for early-career folks. And of course, partners when there are other business reasons to get it. But as people grow in seniority, I feel like the need for those begins to fall off. Do you agree? Disagree? You're much closer to this industry in that aspect of it than I am.Andrew: The more senior you are, and if you have big names under your resume there, no one's going to care if you have certification, right? When I was looking to switch careers—I used to have a consultancy, and I was just tired of building another failed startup for somebody that was willing to pay me. And I'm like—I was not very nice about it. I was like, “Your startup's not going to work out. You really shouldn't be building this.” And they still give me the money and it would fail, and I'd move on to the next one. It was very frustrating.So, closed up shop on that. And I said, “Okay, I got to reenter the market.” I don't have a computer science degree, I don't have big names on my resume, and Toronto is a very competitive market. And so I was feeling friction because people were not valuing my projects. I had, like, full-stack projects, I would show them.And they said, “No, no. Just do these, like, CompSci algorithms and stuff like that.” And so I went, “Okay, well, I really don't want to be doing that. I don't want to spend all my time learning algorithms just so I can get a job to prove that I already have the knowledge I have.” And so I saw a big opportunity in cloud, and I thought certifications would be the proof to say, “I can do these things.”And when I actually ended up going for the interviews, I didn't even have certifications and I was getting those opportunities because the certifications helped me prove it, but nobody cared about the certifications, even then, and that was, like, 2017. But not to say, like, they didn't help me, but it wasn't the fact that people went, “Oh, you have a certification. We'll get you this job.”Corey: Yeah. When I'm talking to consulting clients, I've never once been asked, “Well, do you have the certifications?” Or, “Are you an AWS partner?” In my case, no, neither of those things. The reason that we know what we're doing is because we've done this before. It's the expertise approach.I question whether that would still be true if we were saying, “Oh, yeah, and we're going to drop a dozen engineers on who are going to build things out of your environment.” “Well, are they certified?” is a logical question to ask when you're bringing in an external service provider? Or is this just a bunch of people you found somewhere on Upwork or whatnot, and you're throwing them at it with no quality control? Like, what is the baseline level experience? That's a fair question. People are putting big levels of trust when they bring people in.Andrew: I mean, I could see that as a factor of some clients caring, just because like, when I used to work in startups, I knew customers where it's like their second startup, and they're flush with a lot of money, and they're deciding who they want to partner with, and they're literally looking at what level of SSL certificate they purchased, right? Like now, obviously, they're all free and they're very easy to get to get; there was one point where you had different tiers—as if you would know—and they would look and they would say—Corey: Extended validation certs attend your browser bar green. Remember those?Andrew: Right. Yeah, yeah, yeah. It was just like that, and they're like, “We should partner with them because they were able to afford that and we know, like…” whatever, whatever, right? So, you know, there is that kind of thought process for people at an executive level. I'm not saying it's widespread, but I've seen it.When you talk to people that are in cloud consultancy, like solutions architects, they always tell me they're driven to go get those professional certifications [unintelligible 00:22:19] their customers matter. I don't know if the customers care or not, but they seem to think so. So, I don't know if it's just more driven by those people because it's an expectation because everyone else has it, or it's like a package of things, like, you know, like the green bar in the certifications, SOC 2 compliance, things like that, that kind of wrap it up and say, “Okay, as a package, this looks really good.” So, more of an expectation, but not necessarily matters, it's just superficial; I'm not sure.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: You've been building out certifications for multiple cloud providers, so I'm curious to get your take on something that Forrest Brazeal, who's now head of content over at Google Cloud, has been talking about lately, the idea that as an engineer is advised to learn more than one cloud provider; even if you have one as a primary, learning how another one works makes you a better engineer. Now, setting aside entirely the idea that well, yeah, if I worked at Google, I probably be saying something fairly similar.Andrew: Yeah.Corey: Do you think there's validity to the idea that most people should be broad across multiple providers, or do you think specialization on one is the right path?Andrew: Sure. Just to contextualize for our listeners, Google Cloud is highly, highly promoting multi-cloud workloads, and one of their flagship products is—well, they say it's a flagship product—is Anthos. And they put a lot of money—I don't know that was subsidized, but they put a lot of money in it because they really want to push multi-cloud, right? And so when we say Forrest works in Google Cloud, it should be no surprise that he's promoting it.But I don't work for Google, and I can tell you, like, learning multi-cloud is, like, way more valuable than just staying in one vertical. It just opened my eyes. When I went from AWS to Azure, it was just like, “Oh, I'm missing out on so much in the industry.” And it really just made me such a more well-rounded person. And I went over to Google Cloud, and it was just like… because you're learning the same thing in different variations, and then you're also poly-filling for things that you will never touch.Or like, I shouldn't say you never touch, but you would never touch if you just stayed in that vertical when you're learning. So, in the industry, Azure Active Directory is, like, widespread, but if you just stayed in your little AWS box, you're not going to notice it on that learning path, right? And so a lot of times, I tell people, “Go get your CLF-C01 and then go get your AZ-900 or AZ-104.” Again, I don't care if people go and sit the exams. I want them to go learn the content because it is a large eye-opener.A lot of people are against multi-cloud from a learning perspective because say, it's too much to learn all at the same time. But a lot of people I don't think have actually gone across the cloud, right? So, they're sitting from their chair, only staying in one vertical saying, “Well, you can't learn them all at the same time.” And I'm going, “I see a way that you could teach them all at the same time.” And I might be the first person that will do it.Corey: And the principles do convey as well. It's, “Oh, well I know how SNS works on AWS, so I would never be able to understand how Google Pub/Sub works.” Those are functionally identical; I don't know that is actually true. It's just different to interface points and different guarantees, but fine. You at least understand the part that it plays.I've built things out on Google Cloud somewhat recently, and for me, every time I do, it's a refreshing eye-opener to oh, this is what developer experience in the cloud could be. And for a lot of customers, it is. But staying too far within the bounds of one ecosystem does lend itself to a loss of perspective, if you're not careful. I agree with that.Andrew: Yeah. Well, I mean, just the paint more of a picture of differences, like, Google Cloud has a lot about digital transformation. They just updated their—I'm not happy that they changed it, but I'm fine that they did that, but they updated their Google Digital Cloud Leader Exam Guide this month, and it like is one hundred percent all about digital transformation. So, they love talking about digital transformation, and those kind of concepts there. They are really good at defining migration strategies, like, at a high level.Over to Azure, they have their own cloud adoption framework, and it's so detailed, in terms of, like, execution, where you go over to AWS and they have, like, the worst cloud adoption framework. It's just the laziest thing I've ever seen produced in my life compared to out of all the providers in that space. I didn't know about zero-trust model until I start using Azure because Azure has Active Directory, and you can do risk-based policy procedures over there. So, you know, like, if you don't go over to these places, you're not going to get covered other places, so you're just going to be missing information till you get the job and, you know, that job has that information requiring you to know it.Corey: I would say that for someone early career—and I don't know where this falls on the list of career advice ranging from, “That is genius,” to, “Okay, Boomer,” but I would argue that figuring out what companies in your geographic area, or the companies that you have connections with what they're using for a cloud provider, I would bias for learning one enough to get hired there and from there, letting what you learn next be dictated by the environment you find yourself in. Because especially larger companies, there's always something that lives in a different provider. My default worst practice is multi-cloud. And I don't say that because multi-cloud doesn't exist, and I'm not saying it because it's a bad idea, but this idea of one workload—to me—that runs across multiple providers is generally a challenge. What I see a lot more, done intelligently, is, “Okay, we're going to use this provider for some things, this other provider for other things, and this third provider for yet more things.” And every company does that.If not, there's something very strange going on. Even Amazon uses—if not Office 365, at least exchange to run their email systems instead of Amazon WorkMail because—Andrew: Yeah.Corey: Let's be serious. That tells me a lot. But I don't generally find myself in a scenario where I want to build this application that is anything more than Hello World, where I want it to run seamlessly and flawlessly across two different cloud providers. That's an awful lot of work that I struggle to identify significant value for most workloads.Andrew: I don't want to think about securing, like, multiple workloads, and that's I think a lot of friction for a lot of companies are ingress-egress costs, which I'm sure you might have some knowledge on there about the ingress-egress costs across providers.Corey: Oh, a little bit, yeah.Andrew: A little bit, probably.Corey: Oh, throwing data between clouds is always expensive.Andrew: Sure. So, I mean, like, I call multi-cloud using multiple providers, but not in tandem. Cross-cloud is when you want to use something like Anthos or Azure Arc or something like that where you extend your data plane or control pla—whatever the plane is, whatever plane across all the providers. But you know, in practice, I don't think many people are doing cross-cloud; they're doing multi-cloud, like, “I use AWS to run my primary workloads, and then I use Microsoft Office Suite, and so we happen to use Azure Active Directory, or, you know, run particular VM machines, like Windows machines for our accounting.” You know?So, it's a mixed bag, but I do think that using more than one thing is becoming more popular just because you want to use the best in breed no matter where you are. So like, I love BigQuery. BigQuery is amazing. So, like, I ingest a lot of our data from, you know, third-party services right into that. I could be doing that in Redshift, which is expensive; I could be doing that in Azure Synapse, which is also expensive. I mean, there's a serverless thing. I don't really get serverless. So, I think that, you know, people are doing multi-cloud.Corey: Yeah. I would agree. I tend to do things like that myself, and whenever I see it generally makes sense. This is my general guidance. When I talk to individuals who say, “Well, we're running multi-cloud like this.” And my response is, “Great. You're probably right.”Because I'm talking in the general sense, someone building something out on day one where they don't know, like, “Everyone's saying multi-cloud. Should I do that?” No, I don't believe you should. Now, if your company has done that intentionally, rather than by accident, there's almost certainly a reason and context that I do not have. “Well, we have to run our SaaS application in multiple cloud providers because that's where our customers are.” “Yeah, you should probably do that.” But your marketing, your billing systems, your back-end reconciliation stuff generally does not live across all of those providers. It lives in one. That's the sort of thing I'm talking about. I think we're in violent agreement here.Andrew: Oh, sure, yeah. I mean, Kubernetes obviously is becoming very popular because people believe that they'll have a lot more mobility, Whereas when you use all the different managed—and I'm still learning Kubernetes myself from the next certification I have coming out, like, study course—but, you know, like, those managed services have all different kind of kinks that are completely different. And so, you know, it's not going to be a smooth process. And you're still leveraging, like, for key things like your database, you're not going to be running that in Kubernetes Cluster. You're going to be using a managed service.And so, those have their own kind of expectations in terms of configuration. So, I don't know, it's tricky to say what to do, but I think that, you know, if you have a need for it, and you don't have a security concern—like, usually it's security or cost, right, for multi-cloud.Corey: For me, at least, the lock-in has always been twofold that people don't talk about. More—less lock-in than buy-in. One is the security model where IAM is super fraught and challenging and tricky, and trying to map a security model to multiple providers is super hard. Then on top of that, you also have the buy-in story of a bunch of engineers who are very good at one cloud provider, and that skill set is not in less demand now than it was a year ago. So okay, you're going to start over and learn a new cloud provider is often something that a lot of engineers won't want to countenance.If your team is dead set against it, there's going to be some friction there and there's going to be a challenge. I mean, for me at least, to say that someone knows a cloud provider is not the naive approach of, “Oh yeah, they know how it works across the board.” They know how it breaks. For me, one of the most valuable reasons to run something on AWS is I know what a failure mode looks like, I know how it degrades, I know how to find out what's going on when I see that degradation. That to me is a very hard barrier to overcome. Alternately, it's entirely possible that I'm just old.Andrew: Oh, I think we're starting to see some wins all over the place in terms of being able to learn one thing and bring it other places, like OpenTelemetry, which I believe is a cloud-native Kubernetes… CNCF. I can't remember what it stands for. It's like Linux Foundation, but for cloud-native. And so OpenTelemetry is just a standardized way of handling your logs, metrics, and traces, right? And so maybe CloudWatch will be the 1.0 of observability in AWS, and then maybe OpenTelemetry will become more of the standard, right, and so maybe we might see more managed services like Prometheus and Grafa—well, obviously, AWS has a managed Prometheus, but other things like that. So, maybe some of those things will melt away. But yeah, it's hard to say what approach to take.Corey: Yeah, I'm wondering, on some level, whether what the things we're talking about today, how well that's going to map forward. Because the industry is constantly changing. The guidance I would give about should you be in cloud five years ago would have been a nuanced, “Mmm, depends. Maybe for yes, maybe for no. Here's the story.” It's a lot less hedge-y and a lot less edge case-y these days when I answer that question. So, I wonder in five years from now when we look back at this podcast episode, how well this discussion about what the future looks like, and certifications, and multi-cloud, how well that's going to reflect?Andrew: Well, when we look at, like, Kubernetes or Web3, we're just seeing kind of like the standardized boilerplate way of doing a bunch of things, right, all over the place. This distributed way of, like, having this generic API across the board. And how well that will take, I have no idea, but we do see a large split between, like, serverless and cloud-natives. So, it's like, what direction? Or we'll just have both? Probably just have both, right?Corey: [Like that 00:33:08]. I hope so. It's been a wild industry ride, and I'm really curious to see what changes as we wind up continuing to grow. But we'll see. That's the nice thing about this is, worst case, if oh, turns out that we were wrong on this whole cloud thing, and everyone starts exodusing back to data centers, well, okay. That's the nice thing about being a small company. It doesn't take either of us that long to address the reality we see in the industry.Andrew: Well, that or these cloud service providers are just going to get better at offering those services within carrier hotels, or data centers, or on your on-premise under your desk, right? So… I don't know, we'll see. It's hard to say what the future will be, but I do believe that cloud is sticking around in one form or another. And it basically is, like, an essential skill or table stakes for anybody that's in the industry. I mean, of course, not everywhere, but like, mostly, I would say. So.Corey: Andrew, I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about your opinions, how you view these things, et cetera. Where can they find you?Andrew: You know, I think the best place to find me right now is Twitter. So, if you go to twitter.com/andrewbrown—all lowercase, no spaces, no underscores, no hyphens—you'll find me there. I'm so surprised I was able to get that handle. It's like the only place where I have my handle.Corey: And we will of course put links to that in the [show notes 00:34:25]. Thanks so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Andrew: Well, thanks for having me on the show.Corey: Andrew Brown, co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro Training and so much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment telling me that I do not understand certifications at all because you're an accountant, and certifications matter more in that industry.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Bernstein & McKnight Show
Bears' Hiring Latest and Your Calls with Hub Arkush (Hour 3)

Bernstein & McKnight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 36:36


In the final hour of the show, Dan and Leila spoke with Senior Score Football Expert Hub Arkush about the latest news surrounding the Bears' hiring processes. Hub also took your calls on the Bears and the NFL playoffs. 

Bernstein & McKnight Show
NFL Hiring Cycle with Mike Florio and a Bucs Coordinator Summary (Hour 2)

Bernstein & McKnight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 41:05


In the second hour of the show, Dan and Leila started by having a conversation about the flaws in the NFL's interviewing processes with Pro Football Talk's Mike Florio. They also discussed who the Bears are looking at and the first experience with a Super Wild Card Weekend. Then they spoke to Bucs beat reporter for the Athletic, Greg Auman about Byron Leftwich and Todd Bowles, who the Bears are interviewing in the coming days.

Real Soulutions Podcast
Preparing For Labor /Birth In 3rd Trimester

Real Soulutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 24:54


Today we are talking about what I'm planning on doing in the third trimester to prepare for birth and delivery as someone planning to have a natural birth at home.   In this episode of Real SOULutions: 02:30 - Good nutrition, hydration, and continued movement 04:00 - Advice from my chiropractor 04:40 - Red raspberry leaf tea 08:00 - Exercise and stretches everyday 11:50 - Going through the pain-free birth course and books 14:00 - Hiring a Doula 15:00 - Nutrition and hydration 16:30 - Things I plan to do starting at 35 weeks 19:20 - Making padcicles 20:20 - Focusing on selfcare 23:00 - My plans close to the due date

The $100 MBA Show
MBA1965 Q&A Wednesday: How do I fire my brother?

The $100 MBA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 15:53


Well this is awkward. However, it's not that uncommon. Hiring family members who just don't work out is a thing that happens. In fact, it even happened to Omar!  It's Q&A Wednesday, and it also happened to one of our listeners. Six months into a new position, and one business founder's brother just isn't up […] The post MBA1965 Q&A Wednesday: How do I fire my brother? appeared first on The $100 MBA.

Out of the Hourglass
The Entrepreneurial Spirit Series ~ An Interview with Lori Delin

Out of the Hourglass

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 24:24


Today's episode features the third installment of our Entrepreneurial Spirit Series! NCG's Sr. Business Coach & Director of Operations, Kathryn Freeman, is joined by Lori Delin, President & Co-Owner of Tru-Colors Contracting, 24 Hour Floor and My Stack Box Storage all located in beautiful Pompano Beach, FL. Lori shares how her entrepreneurial spirit started from a young age and grew into a passion for solving problems and growing businesses. Over the years she has never shied away from taking risks or being afraid to fail. Lori's strategic decisions have paved the way for the growth of successful business organizations and allowed her to help others rethink their potential. If there is a challenge in her way, Lori looks for the opportunity.

UnF*ck Your Brain to Create Feminist Confidence
UnF*ck Your Brain is hiring!

UnF*ck Your Brain to Create Feminist Confidence

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:37


Are you a strategic thinker who enjoys both data and storytelling? A graphic designer with a passion for thought work? Or an experienced project leader who loves keeping lots of moving parts and people organized and focused? If so, you could be the next UnF*ck Your Brain team member.   Listen to this episode to learn more about the Marketing Director, Graphic Designer, and Chief Operating Officer positions, or head straight to unfuckyourbrain.com/hiring for details on how to apply!

Girls Who Do Stuff
How to host a list build and still run your business

Girls Who Do Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:33


Learn more at SystemToThrive.comAlyson Lex 0:00To the Okay, so that way you can hit record. I have been avoiding hosting a summit since I did my first summit My only summit in 2013. So I don't know, brighter for a reason you do the math on that. It's a lot of years between my first summit and my second summit, which is coming up in just a couple of months. Now, why did I wait so long? Between summits, there's a lot of reasons. One, I couldn't see the roadmap to how it would actually make me money. To, it felt like a lot of work for pay off, I couldn't visualize. Three, my first summit bombed so badly, that I was not at all eager to try it again. And for wasn't sure where I was gonna find the time to do it in my business, I was so super busy, if you will, with serving all of my clients, getting new leads, having sales calls, doing all of the stuff that's required to grow a businessthat I couldn't see how I would be able to do it. All right, how can I do it all, when I'm by myself working for myself, trying to build this business. It's such a huge undertaking, and I just don't know that it's gonna pay off for the amount of work that I'm going to put into it. If that at all. Sounds familiar to you, this is the episode that you want to listen to. And the reason is, Jenny has been hounding me to do a summit for about six years. And I know how long she's been hounding me to do a summit because that's how long we've been friends. Really, it started almost immediately. It took six years, but I'm finally coming around to it, guys. And I want to tell you why. And we want to kind of talk you through what the plan is for me to actually get this done. With still being really busy in my business, and now doing the mom thing. And, you know, The Good Wife thing and the lockdown thing that we're still dealing with and all of that stuff. But I'm now looking forward to it because I see the roadmap to success. So I'm rambling and Jenny's being very, awfully quiet. And this is my way of trying to bring her into the conversation because she has run how many of these now for your clients about 280. So she's done a couple just knows how much time they take. And I think she's probably designed some processes to help it take a little bit less time. Right?Jennie Wright 3:04Yeah. So let's talk about it. There's, you know, there's, your story is no different than the a lot of the clients that I deal with. And it is no different in terms of how they feel the past experiences the poopy summit they had in the beginning, things like that, there is no difference in that story whatsoever. The only difference is your lens on it. Right? And your approach to it. And also all of the, and I'm not going to sugarcoat this, all of the excuses that we put in our way to make sure we don't do the things that we need to do. I am no different than anybody else. I make a boatload of excuses to do things the way I want versus the way they need to be done. First person to admit, right.Alyson Lex 3:51And I think that that's really important. Not only do we make excuses to not do things at all, but I really like what you just said we make excuses to do things the way we want to do them, not the way they should be done. Correct. Correct. Well, I don't want to go live to promote, or I don't want to Xyz to do this. I don't want and so what happens is then we decide how we do want to do it, which is very rarely in a way that's going to actually get traction. Correct. And then we get upset when it doesn't work.Jennie Wright 4:26100% that so I've actually literally worked with people who are saying, Yeah, I'll do it somewhat with you. But I don't want to do this. I don't want to do this. And it's this laundry list of things they don't want to do, for whatever reason. It's their own preconceived notions on it. And then, you know, this is before I was really in my project management sort of space. I would let them I would let them run the ship. Alright, I would let them steer the boat. And then when the summit didn't go the way they wanted the only person they looked at, it wasn't themselves. It was me. This didn't work. It's your fault. So I don't want to go down that road too too much. But what I want to pull from this conversation on that is, there's a, there's a way it works. And there's an acceptance piece, just like anything else, you want to lose weight, you have to accept the fact that things are going to change, you want to have a better relationship with your partner, you have to accept the fact that you've made some boo boos, and how are you going to fix them? Right, and you have to see the roadmap, like you were saying earlier, on how to get there. So any coach worth their metal, worth their salt, whatever word you want to use, we'll show you the roadmap. There are lots of programs out there that'll teach you summits, and a lot of them will keep you behind that gaming term of fog of war, to tell you to stay on the step that you're in and not know, the whole roadmap, and you and I are very similar, where we need to have, like, we need to know all the picture, everything that's going on. So let's, let's move into that space, and talk about what that's going to be like. The biggest hurdle for you was time, how to fit it into your business, how did it fit in into your life? How did it fit, you know, and I'll tell you that the secret is, it's my favorite phrase, there's a suck it up opportunity in there. Because if you want to achieve the goal, build your list, increase your income and actually get clients with more ease than maybe the way that people have been doing it, where they're working so hard to get those leads, you have to accept a bit of uncomfortability. And that's what a summit is going to do. Now, let's talk about the benefit real quick. If you do a summit, and you fit it into your life, and by the end of this episode, we're going to show you how then you're going to uplevel all of those skills, your video skills, your audio skills, your Facebook Live skills, your copywriting skills, your tech skills, just by even if you're not a tech person, and you're not doing the tech, you'll improve just by the fact that somebody is doing it for you. And you're going to see what works, right? So you're going to learn all these things, you're going to uplevel, your sales skills, your joint venture skills, your interview skills, all these different things. So at the end of the summit, you're going to be a better entrepreneur. That's one of the biggest selling features.Alyson Lex 7:07It's not just that though, right? Like, I really feel like, and this is why it's important for me to do one this year. It kind of forces you on the stage, if you will. So it's really easy to hide, oh, I've built my business on nothing but referrals and word of mouth. And I've said that for 13 years, which by the way, that's awesome. The fact that I get referrals is a great thing. And I'm not downplaying those. But what that was was an excuse to keep hiding. And to not put myself out there. And so a list build like this kind of pushes you out into the limelight a little bit, it forces you to be a little bit more visible. And because of that your business can take on a different trajectory. Correct?Jennie Wright 8:00Absolutely. So let's let's talk about the time factor, because I think that's a really big thing that plays into people's lives. I want you to share how you overcame the time issue.Alyson Lex 8:18So I'm going to be very transparent and say that I have not fully done that yet.Jennie Wright 8:27And what's the acceptance process that you'reAlyson Lex 8:28well, there is the acceptance process. And so what has happened is I'm very overwhelmed by even the concept. And as of the time of this recording, I still have about four to five months to plan. And I know that 90 days is a good barometer for planning. And I told Jennie I said, I need more time. I need to stretch out my planning period longer. Because even like 90 days already,Jennie Wright 8:55I don't like 90 days, 90 days is too fast. There's a lot of people who are like do your summit 90 days, I don't like it. It is way too pressured. I prefer 120 days, right. So three months to four months. I like a four month planning period. If I can get five months, I'll take five months.Alyson Lex 9:13Yeah, I mean, honestly, I started thinking about it late last year. So there's some mental planning that went on in the first month. So that would pause to about six months between conception to implementation and launch. I I haven't fully figured out how I'm going to do it. But I just know that I have to. Yeah, go ahead for all the reasons that I talked about, but mostly this stop hiding thing. And so really, it's about committing to something and removing the fact that I'm going to let excuses get in my way.Jennie Wright 9:56And there's a reason why that's also going to help you is because You are going to have the roadmap. So let's for transparency sake, I'm working with Allison to help her build her summit that's happening. And I have a lot of tools in my arsenal that I bring out that help people, I have Trello boards, and Asana boards, and Google drives full of information and all this kind of stuff. And with my regular clients, I do weekly calls, and I do coaching calls, and all that kind of thing with them. With Allison, there has been a necessity for a mindset shift. And this is not uncommon. And you might be experiencing this listeners, if you're listening to this, you might be experiencing this. And if it sounds familiar, then this might speak to you. There is the acceptance of the fact that for the four months of planning a summit, it's not going to take over your entire life. It's not going to ruin your ability to serve your clients, it's not going to stop your ability to make income. It's only going to be in the beginning, a little bit of extra work. And I will tell you this, if it matters, you will make time. Okay, I'm doing a 30 day yoga challenge. Do you think I want to get up 30 minutes earlier in the morning?Alyson Lex 11:11No,Jennie Wright 11:12but I'm doing it. Because I'm trying to create a new habit. I'm making the time, I can talk myself out of it all day long. Trust me, I have talked myself out of doing a 30 day yoga challenge for about two years. Two years.Alyson Lex 11:27Sounds like me.Jennie Wright 11:28Yep. And I finally said a couple days ago that I'm going to do it. And I happen to have an accountability partner, it's my sister in law. I call her my life coach carebear. Because she's very positive person. And I'm doing it. But there's a mindset shift of like, screw this eff that whatever you want to say I'm doing it and you make it happen. The same applies to anything in your business, you want to build out your own website, you're gonna have to learn some new tools and and apply those. If you're going to do a summit. It's the same thing. Now let's talk about how you actually go from the acceptance to the doing. Right. So here's the expectations that I want to set up for you. And I'm setting this up for Alyson this is technically almost, we can call this a coaching call, we can have some fun with that. But I want to set up expectations. When you're doing a summit, it is not going to be the entire day. Now, if you're like me, when I'm learning something new, I tend to get engrossed. So I like to set a bit of a timer and I will say I will spend one hour if you can find 30 minutes in your day or 45 minutes in your day, four days a week, you can get a summit done. Okay, it is all about structure and timing. So the time that you would be on clubhouse, which at the time we're recording this as this huge brand new social media platform, the time that you're spending going down the rabbit hole on club hosts, or the time you're on tik tok watching silly videos, or the time that you're, you know, scrolling Reddit for 30 minutes, that's 30 minutes you could be spending on your summit. That is invaluable time. Right. So there's, there's a shift there. Now, as you're starting to build out your summit, the main thing you're going to be doing in the beginning, and this is something that somebody who is I would call my mentor for four years now has mentioned is that the summit actually starts taking place the work to it builds up the six months out, right, this is where you're starting to think about the speakers that you want to have on there. This is where you're starting to go on the Facebook pages and look at people go, ooh, I would really like to have so and so on my event. And then you start liking their business page and taking a look and see if you guys have the same values and things like that. That's where that kind of stuff happens. And by the way, that is passive. You can do that, instead of scrolling Reddit. You can do that I've literally done that while I'm folding laundry, right? I can scroll and be like, Oh, I like that, oh, I wanna check that person out. I want to listen to their podcast and see if they're, you know, we have that alignment. These are things you can fit into your life. So the lesson here is, if you want it, you'll make it happen. And it's not going to overtake your life.Alyson Lex 14:18It reminds me when I did my my summit in 2013 I think I did in eight weeks. And it did take over my life. Because I had to find experts, secure experts, interview experts published and I did it all 100% by myself in 2013 without a lot of the technology that's available today or the knowledge that I have today.Jennie Wright 14:42Correct. SoAlyson Lex 14:45if I'm thinking about my experience, then it was overtaking my life and in a way that was not enjoyable.Jennie Wright 14:56No and there's something there even just before you finish your point If you're doing it in eight weeks, and you had a bad result, which we know you did, what part of the reason is you didn't have enough time to contact and get in touch with rolling good experts, you took what you could get?Alyson Lex 15:12Yeah, I mean, I got some decent people. But a lot of it was the concept wasn't very well flushed out. And it was it was the wrong market and all that, but not gonna run down that rabbit hole, but it did take over my whole life. And I've carried that through over the last eight years, as this is what planning a summit is like, and it's not. And so I think, really that expectation, there's reasonable expectation to 45 minutes a day, four to five days a week, for five to six months, starting passive and then getting into more of the active creation of it. I think that that is not that bad.Jennie Wright 15:56It's not, it's really not. And the funny thing is, is that after you start getting used to doing the 30 minutes to 45 minutes, four or five times a day, and you start getting that preliminary research out of the way, then you're getting into the more of the active part, which is booking your interviews and conducting your interviews and things like that. And there will be days where it's like I'm doing two interviews today. So there's two hours that are happening, but it's not every day. Right. So the expectation is, there's going to be some days as you get closer to the summit, where you're going to be conducting your interviews and doing other things. Now, there's two camps on this whole, get a summit done side, there's the completely do it yourself, I'm going to do everything on my lonesome. Do all my tech do all my everything, right? So if you're tech savvy, if you're good at video, you can make better your own video and all those kinds of things, you want to do it all on your own. that's those are those people. The other side is the people who understand or they they know their limitations, or they know their abilities, and they're willing to hire team. Hiring a team doesn't mean that you have 10 people working for you and you're spending $10,000, it could mean as little as having a VA for four hours a week, who handles the administrative side, it could be that you are really good in Canva. So you'll do your own graphics, great, save your money there. Or it could be that you're very, very busy. And you're at the level in your business that you know that you need to do this like CEO style, where you delegate. Right, Alison loves to play in Canva. I'm telling you,Alyson Lex 17:32I know you love it so much. But you're not doing it. But I'm not allowed No, not for this. I can do it for little things here and there. If it's a one off, if it's like, I need this right now, I don't have time to send it to her to my designer. Whatever, it's going to take me five minutes, I'm just throwing something together. But when it comes to these graphics for an event, or list build, I could run down that rabbit hole and stay there all day. Yep, that's not a good use of my time. I think hiring help. And you can hire someone just to do your graphics. Like Jenny said, you can hire someone just to build the pages, you can hire someone just to write the copy, you can hire someone just to do the social. Or you can hire someone to help you project manage the whole thing. And that's one of the things that I really rely on Jenny for is to tell me what I need to do. Because there's a lot of those little pieces that I just don't know. I haven't done it 280 times like Jenny. Yeah, I've done it once. And it wasn't done well. And so Jenny's able to say, Allison, I need I need XYZ, I need you to do XYZ now. Coal. Great, you don't you give me my marching orders, and I can get it done. It's when I look at the whole big, huge picture of these lists and these checklists, and these calendars and these project management and these Trello boards. I'm like, Holy guaca No, I can't do all that. But that's not all at once.Jennie Wright 19:17No, it's not.Alyson Lex 19:19And so for the last 30 days or so I've been like I've been building my little list of potential experts. I've been thinking about the, the direction I want to go, I've been building that roadmap in my head to how I'm going to profit from it, which I think is really important. And I've been writing notes down and and now that I'm getting into five months out at the I think the time of this recording and publication I'm about four and a half to five months out. Like Okay, now it's going to be time to start doing some of those more active stuff and getting maybe starting to secure some of these speakers. How do I need to do that I need to put up a landing page. Okay. I'm relying on Jennie to kind of help me to understand what needs to happen step by step. So that I don't get overwhelmed. And that is somebody in my business in my world, that is invaluable. Because when I get overwhelmed, I shut down.Jennie Wright 20:18Yeah, a lot of people do. A lot of people do. Part of my job, funny enough is not just the project management, it's the cheerleader, come on, you know, pick yourself up, get into the chair,Alyson Lex 20:31it's the host management,Jennie Wright 20:33management, and there's a lot of host management, and that's okay. And it's totally okay. And we actually, you know, there's a lot of products out there that you can go and check out and if you want to go do so, there's products that tout themselves as a complete summit package, right, it's like, um, you know, buy this thing for X amount of dollars. And I'll give you templates and this and this, and this, and this and this, right. And some of them are good, like, they're not bad, Allison, and I recently checked one out. And we were very shocked at what it's missing. And it's a very popular product. And we were like, Wow, there is no project management tools. And I've actually got clients at this particular moment, who have purchased that product, and then found me and said, holy crap, this was what was missing. So there's a lot of a lot of products out there on how to do a summit, go check out and see what you need. And you might not need the project management, maybe you're a really good project manager. But a lot of people tend to need what Allison is talking about, which is the step by step process and the carving out of time. The next thing I kind of want to mention and Alison on what your take is systems and processes.Alyson Lex 21:44Oh, I'm so not a systems and processes girl. Jenny knows this about me. And I do know that that's a downfall of mine. Because what happens is it ends up taking me five or 10 times longer to do something, because I don't have a system or process or anything to get it done. So when it comes to hosting a summit, and I've, you know, again, hashtag transparency, I've seen Jenny do this for her clients, like I've, we're friends, we've talked about the stuff. So I have an idea of the kinds of systems and processes that she puts in place. And I also happen to have a really weird love for spreadsheets. I mean, it's getting weird. At this. Yeah,Jennie Wright 22:28there's spreadsheet, there's a spreadsheet to talk about the spreadsheets.Alyson Lex 22:31Like I love, I actually had one of those ones I really did. And it was my link, like my my link life spreadsheet, and it was a spreadsheet with links to all my spreadsheet.Jennie Wright 22:43Housing our problem,Alyson Lex 22:44I do have a problem. I really like spreadsheets. But so I know that I get to do that a little bit with the planning of summit, I get to have some spreadsheets. Yeah. So I do get to tap into some of the systems and processes. And there's automation. Right. So one quick little automation that we use here on this podcast, when we have guests is we have a guest request form. And it automatically populates into a spreadsheet, yay. It automatically populates into a spreadsheet. Well, I can use that same technology, that same automation to capture info, submission info from my future, my future speakers. That's a system. That's a process that saves me time. I don't have to come through email. They fill out the form. I've got an A link on a spreadsheet. Yep, I sent me a spreadsheet to who ever needs it. Right when I've written some ad copy for some of Jenny's clients. And I say, where's your speaker spreadsheet. And they send me a sheet that I know they've had to build manually. That really hurts my heart for them. And so that's one little example of a system or process that you might already be using somewhere else in your business. You can translate over to planning your summit. When it comes to communicating with outsourced we use slack. I use slack to communicate with just about everybody except for my ghostwriter. I use email for that. But that's a system. Right now I have one place I can communicate to everybody. Now I just need to build a process around that. Well, my process tends to be firing off things as I think of them. So maybe I need to work on that. ButJennie Wright 24:45yeah, and I think the point that you're I think the good point out of this is there's systems and processes that you can put in place that help create the time. Right? I don't like being I don't like being on email. I hate I hate sending emails. Back and forth. When I'm doing a summit with a client, I actually despise getting a boatload of emails like, oh, here's the link to such and such. And here's the link, like, that drives me nuts, because to me, it's, it's duplication of work where you could have everything centralized in my world, centralized into one spot. to really put a fine point on this, I'm usually managing anywhere between four to six summits at any given time. you're managing one, right you the person, you're the client, or managing one, I'm managing five or six. So the centralization and the, you know, making things really system like system driven, is going to help. So I will teach my clients how to do that you actually, because we've worked together, you know, all these things. And you've grown those processes, and you had a lot of them before I even met you. But I will teach people the systems and processes that can save them time, right. And then there's the great thing about templates, Allison, and I both adore templates. Templates are timesavers. So I just worked with a client who's running a really big summit. It's gonna be a six figure summit. It's huge. And one of the things they didn't have is, they were just doing this summit into English for the first time. They're an overseas client. And they are not proficient in English. In terms of writing, we had templates, right. So we had communication templates, with the experts, communication templates with this and that, first of all, you can either make those templates, and if you're going to do more than one summit, and trust me, if I have my way you will write, you can template, this kind of stuff. So that you know, you don't have to write it 10 times you can write it once and reuse. So templates are going to be your friend for sure and saving you time and also a ton of mental anguish when it comes to writing and figuring all this kind of stuff out.Alyson Lex 26:54Now, I do want to give a caveat, because there are a lot of templates out there for sale, people give them away. This is just my copywriters soul coming through, please personalize your templates, please don't just drop them in like a Madlib and go personalize them, make it so that they're totally you use them as a format or a formula. Because otherwise, it's not going to feel like your summit. That's all and right. Now, it's good. Yeah,Jennie Wright 27:29I appreciate the fact that you're talking about that. Because that keeps everybody on their toes in terms of not just copying and pasting, which we don't want them to do. Alright. So we want to make sure that you work your summit into your work into how you work. So summits are not cookie cutter. And it doesn't mean that you're going to change how you actually approach your work. So if your work style is how you're you know, take a look at the way that you're currently working. If you are a get up early, before everybody else is up in the house, and get stuff done. And then you take a break mid morning and you do chores, or whatever you want to do, right? That's awesome. It's also me. And you take a break midday because I do and then you get back at it later, then you can work a summit into that, what I don't want you to do is go, Wow, this woman is going to change everything. And I have to change everything about how I work, you're going to hate it. If you hate the process, you're really not going to enjoy the event. If you don't enjoy the event, you're not going to have a good result potentially, if you don't have a good result, potentially you didn't enjoy it, you're never going to do it again. Or you're going to wait six years and get badgered by somebody like me until you're willing to do it again. And you don't want that either. SoAlyson Lex 28:45because it gets really annoying after a while, you also have to know where your non negotiables are. And that's one of Jenny's favorite words to is non negotiable. And that's basically saying like, this is just something that has to happen. And it's not open for discussion. It is what it is, for me that certain things like Friday nights are my kids virtual karate class. There's no moving not. Now, can I talk to my husband and have him do it? Yeah, but I can't record at that time, because it's right in the next room and they are not quiet. Right. So that's a non negotiable. I can do work at that time. But I can't record at that time. I can't be on a call at that time. Not movable. What else is a non negotiable. Jenny's morning Yoga is a non negotiable. That's part of that challenge that she's doing? So if a client says I would like to have a first thing in the morning call, no, I have yoga, it's a non negotiable. I think it's really important to know where those are in your life and in your business. Right I'm part of a coaching program, there's a call every Tuesday at two o'clock, non negotiable. For me, it's an investment I made in my business. So start there and then plan around it. And that way, you're not gonna feel like you're giving up your whole world. Because I think that's the feeling that that I had. It took me this whole episode to kind of land into it, I felt like I was giving up something, to not get something else. That's why the summit felt like such a failure, because it wasn't successful. And I had sacrificed so much. Because I worked so hard. And it was actually to the detriment of my business. Because I was so focused on this summit, that I wasn't focused on serving clients, I wasn't focused on finding new clients. So not only did I not make money from the summit, but I didn't make money after because I hadn't hustled the way that I needed to hustle to get clients. Right. So I felt like I gave up all of this stuff. For something that didn't work. So if I could have avoided feeling like I was giving something up, I could have entered the summit with a different attitude. I could have exited the summit with a different attitude, even if it didn't meet my expectations. I wouldn't have had such a bad feeling about it.Jennie Wright 31:34too. Yes. Yes, very much.Alyson Lex 31:41So money for you got a tongue tied?Jennie Wright 31:42No, it's Yeah. So that's, I've got to edit that out. You do a fat the ladder clap. When it comes to what Alyson was talking about the sacrifice of time and sacrifice, of not investing in still getting other clients and not getting any money out of it. One of the things that the point that she's making that is incredible here is that if it's planned, you have non negotiables, you give yourself enough time you make it fit into your life the way it is right now, then you're not going to hate the process. And you're still going to be able to do the things that you're normally doing. Will you have to, quote unquote, sacrifice something else a little bit? Yeah, you do have to make some adjustments. But it's just an adjustment. It's looking at your schedule and finding the space. And we all can make that space. Trust me, if it's important enough, you'll do it. And it is important. If you do a summit, you will create a list injection. If you do a summit, you will create an income injection. If you do a summit, you will increase your ability to do video, audio, joint venture partnerships, all these different things, copywriting, all of it. And if you do a summit, you're going to uplevel all these different skills in combination. And it's going to make it easier for you to grow your business in the future. There are no downsides. In that way. The only downside, the only barrier is actually you. And the people that you choose to be on your event, which is why you have to be incredibly picky with your experts, which is a totally different episode.Alyson Lex 33:25Totally different episode, totallyJennie Wright 33:27different episode, we could go down the rabbit hole there. But in terms of time, and sacrifice, and all those things, it's worth it. And if this episode hasn't been able to get that across, then I'm I'd be shocked. Hopefully it has. And if you're thinking about a summit, if you're interested in doing a summit try and get more information if you want to check out what I'm doing in terms of summits come and find me. I talk about them all the time. It's Jennie wright.com. You can also find me on Facebook and Instagram and all those things. I'm still learning clubhouse, we won't go there.Alyson Lex 34:01I also want to say if this episode hasn't convinced you that it's time to do a summit. Here's what I want you to do. I want you to download this episode as an mp3 however you can. And I want you just set it as your morning alarm every morning when you get up. Because that's what my last six years has been like. It hasn't been that bad. No, it really hasn't been that bad. But this is the stuff that Jenny has been trying to get through my head for a long time. You might feel resistant. And that's okay. I get it six years, guys. I resisted this for six years. You will get there. But I'm excited now. I'm excited, man. I'm terrified. Like let's just put that out there. I'm scared. I'm nervous and overwhelmed. I'm kind of freaking out a little bit. I'm wondering what the heck I've gotten myself into. But I'm also really excited because I know this time is going to be different because I have that plan for success. And I have someone on my side to help me get there. That is really important. So get yourself a really good support team, find yourself an amazing cheerleader, someone to help keep you from getting overwhelmed someone to guide you in the right direction. If you need a reference for someone, I happen to know someone who can do all that, but build your support system in a way that will guide you forward. That's just as important as getting your own head stuff, right?Jennie Wright 35:30Yep, I agree. And if you need me to be your feed me to be that person in your ear in the morning to try and get you moving forward. Download the episode, like Allison said, and then listen to it. Because my voice is that aggravating it will make you eventually do one of two things, stop listening or do the summit. All right. Having said that, I hope that you guys found this to be a helpful episode that you got something out of this that'll help you make a decision whether or not you think a summit will fit. Keep in mind that it is not as terrifying as you think from somebody who's done it as many times as I have. How Alyson feels is completely understandable. But it also is tempered with the fact that it's just the unknown. And as she moves along the process, the terror will subside, the fear will subside, and she will get more and more excited and encouraged and all those things. So that's all going to happen for her. And it will happen for you as well. So thank you for listening to this episode. If you have any questions about this or comments, please do leave us a review. We'd love to hear from you. And if you're not already, please do subscribe to the podcast. So you're catching all of the episodes of the System to THRIVE. We would love to have you do that so that you don't miss anything at all. Thank you so much for being on with us and listening in and we will be back very soon answering another big question.

Cancer Buzz
The Business Case for Hiring Oncology Social Workers

Cancer Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 7:09


Oncology social workers are integral members of the multidisciplinary cancer care team, but their services are largely unreimbursed by payers, so cancer programs and practices must fund these positions from their bottom line. This, in turn, makes it challenging to hire additional oncology social work staff.Hear about two new resources coming from ACCC to help demonstrate the value that oncology social workers play. In "Making the Business Case for Hiring an Oncology Social Worker," evidence-based data will show how oncology social workers help improve the quality of care and the patient experience, provide much needed support to other members of the multidisciplinary cancer team, and reduce costs of care. A new benchmarking survey will help uncover data to determine where psycho-oncology care stands for patients with cancer across the country and serve as a jumping-off point for future research.Guest:Krista Nelson, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C, FAOSWACCC 2021-2022 PresidentProgram Manager of Quality & Research, Cancer Support Services & CompassionProvidence Cancer InstitutePortland, ORRelated Resources:Making the Business Case for New StaffComprehensive Cancer Care Survey & Matrix[PODCAST] Ep 11: Sustaining Whole-Patient Cancer CareReal-World Lessons from COVID-19: Driving Oncology Care ForwardOncology Social Work Working Group[VIDEO PODCAST] Ep 01: Real-World Lessons from COVID-19[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 59: Collaboration and Innovation in the Time of COVID-19[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 64: A Summer of Disconnect for Cancer ProfessionalsA Social Worker Leads ACCC, and Her Timing is Perfect 

Growth Mindset Podcast
200 - From sheep-farming as a kid to named Best Business Woman 2017 - Rachel Carrell, CEO of Koru Kids

Growth Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 40:20


Rachel Carrell Rachel Carrell is the CEO of KoruKids, building the world's best childcare service. She was the former CEO of DrThom, a healthcare company which she grew to 1.3 million paying users in 3 countries. She has a DPhil in Development from the University of Oxford, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and was elected as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2014. She was named 'Best Business Woman in Technology' at the 2017 Best Business Women awards, and also won the 'Inspirational Mother' award at the 2017 Inspiration awards. Takeaways Building trust as a foundation with your people will bring more positive consequences. Having an emotional check-in within your team will help you understand each other and boost productivity at work. Who: The A Method for Hiring (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Who-Geoff-Smart/dp/0345504194) by Geoff Smart and Randy Street - (book recommended when hiring) 01:20 - Who is Rachel? 02:00 - Childhood Competitions and Entrepreneurial Experience 04:16 - Common Things About Founders 05:14 - Other Business Experience 06:24 - Management Consulting Experience 07:28 - People Management Tip 12:51 - Hiring People 16:43 - Interview Sample Questions 20:38 - Feedback Received by Rachel 23:35 - How did Rachel start Koru Kids 28:22 - The Koru Kids Team 33:55 - Rachel's Childhood Memories 36:01 - Kindest Thing Done for Rachel 38:34 - Rachel's advice CONNECT WITH RACHEL Koru Kids (https://www.korukids.co.uk/) LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachcarrell) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/rach.of.koru.kids) Twitter (https://twitter.com/rachcarrell) ABOUT THE HOST My name is Sam Harris. I am a British entrepreneur, investor and explorer. From hitchhiking across Kazakstan to programming AI doctors I am always pushing myself in the spirit of curiosity and Growth. My background is in Biology and Psychology with a passion for improving the world and human behaviour. I have built and sold companies from an early age and love coming up with unique ways to make life more enjoyable and meaningful. Connect with Sam: LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/sharris48/) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/samjamharris/) Twitter (https://twitter.com/samjamharris) Wiser than Yesterday (https://www.wiserpod.com) ReasonFM (https://reason.fm/podcast/growth-mindset-podcast) Support the Show - Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/growthmindset) Subscribe! If you enjoyed the podcast please subscribe and rate it. And of course, share with your friends! Special Guest: Rachel Carrell.

Pints & Polishing...an Auto Detailing Podcast
Hiring Team Members. Let's Cut Through The Noise and Discuss What We Should Do To Win

Pints & Polishing...an Auto Detailing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:55


Marshall and Nick discuss hiring team members for your auto detailing business. It's a constant topic and there seems to be constant overload of information on this topic in auto detailing. The guys talk about buttoning up your processes and procedures before you even think about hiring. Nick shares a story about his team and a conversation in the real world. Cut through the B.S. by listening to this episode and we hope that you enjoy this podcast. As always thank you for being a part of the community.

Accelerate! with Andy Paul
1019: 5 Steps for Effective Sales Hiring, with Kristie Jones

Accelerate! with Andy Paul

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 51:57


Kristie Jones is the Principal of the Sales Acceleration Group. On this episode we're talking about hiring and Kristie's 5 steps for effective sales hiring. We dig into the questions that companies should answer to build a good hiring profile. And we explore why we rarely see a hiring company ask their buyers: What qualities and skills do you need from our sellers to help you do your jobs? More on Andy: Connect on LinkedIn Pre-Order Andy's book "Sell Without Selling Out" on Amazon Learn more at AndyPaul.com Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Unlock exponential growth with an AI-powered RevOps platform | Revenue.io Scratchpad | The fastest way to update Salesforce, take sales notes, and stay on top of to-dos | Scratchpad.com Blueboard | World's leading experiential rewards & recognition platform | Blueboard.com Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast RevOps Podcast

Sprint to Profit
Ep. 94 The Secret Scaling Hack - Hiring A+ Talent to Multiply your Growth

Sprint to Profit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 48:28


Welcome to the Sprint to Profit Podcast for Amazon Sellers. Today we’re going to talk about one of the key areas that you will need to focus on to take your business from a one-person show where you do everything and scale only at your own pace into a full business where you have a team helping you to grow your business in ways that you didn’t know were possible. To get time freedom in your life, you will need to hire strategically in your business, and that means, you need to hire the best talent you can at key points in the business’s life cycle. We previously talked about the FREEDOM EQUATION (MONEY + TIME + ENERGY = FREEDOM). Neither time or energy are finite resources. You need to do something, which lets you recharge both of those things. One of the best ways to get more time and energy for this equation is to hire the right people to free up that time and energy for you. To get some FREE training on what it takes to have a successful business to fuel your lifestyle, head to www.goteamreal.com to download our FREE training today. Also head to www.goteamreal.com/income to download your free INCOME calculator. Talking Points: 00:23 - Hello and Welcome 05:30 - Breakdown of what we’re talking about today 07:25 - Set up processes that attract great talent every time 09:30 - Know what role you are hiring for and how to communicate that 13:00 - Being a creative leader for your business 15:15 - Be clear with your expectations and the visions of your company 16:45 - Hire employees who have potential and initiative 31:47 - Look in the right places for the best talent 35:21 - Have an onboarding and training process that sets employees up for success 38:30 - What you can do if you can’t afford a “big hire” yet 47:05 - Summary 47:50 - Conclusion Resources/Links: “Who Not How: The Formula to Achieve Bigger Goals Through Accelerating Teamwork” by Dan Sullivan: https://www.amazon.com/Who-Not-How-Accelerating-Teamwork-ebook/dp/B0867ZJ151 “Clockwork: Design Your Business to Run Itself” by Mike Michalowicz: https://www.amazon.com/Clockwork-Design-Your-Business-Itself-ebook/dp/B078GDX7BP Money/Time Investment Tool: https://www.goteamreal.com/smartgoal Our Website: https://www.goteamreal.com/ Real Amazon Seller Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/AmazonSellerRoundTable/ Quotes: “Hire someone who has the ability to do MORE than the job you’re hiring for.” - Kirsty “You also want to make sure you are looking in the right places to find the right people.” - Kirsty “You have to be very clear about what role you are hiring for, and the applicants should understand what they are applying for.” -

WebTalkRadio.net
065. Jennifer Leake – Hiring Straight Talk 

WebTalkRadio.net

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


Connie’s motivational quotes for today is by – Eleanor Roosevelt “Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them yourself.” Check Out These Highlights:   As I reflect on my 39 years in sales I can easily say which of the people I reported to were quality leaders and which had […] The post 065. Jennifer Leake – Hiring Straight Talk  appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

WebTalkRadio.net
Warning: Proceed with Caution when hiring an Intimacy Coach

WebTalkRadio.net

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


Are you interested in hiring an intimacy coach?  Before you do, watch this video to find out the warning signs for unqualified coaches. The goal is not to scare people away from hiring someone but rather to help them have a better understanding of what they are getting into before they take the plunge. Because […] The post Warning: Proceed with Caution when hiring an Intimacy Coach appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Monday - Hiring A Head Coach Isn't Easy

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 1:00


Big O discusses hiring a head coach

Hacking Your Leadership
Ep 273: Is there really a labor shortage?

Hacking Your Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 20:39


Many retail stores, restaurants, and other service industry employers can't seem to find enough employees. Yet jobs outside those industries appear to have dozens or even hundreds of applicants for every open position. Why?Send us a message on Community! (213) 444-5381https://link.chtbl.com/workcheck?sid=podcast.hackingyourleadership#HackingYourLeadership #StarkEngagementConsulting #LifeOfLozo #BeABetterLeaderYouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/HackingYourLeadershipPodcast/featuredPatreon Account: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=22174142#Leadership #HackingYourLeadership #StarkEngagementConsulting #LifeOfLozolozo@lifeoflozo.comchris@starkengagement.com

Dietitian Boss with Libby Rothschild MS, RD, CPT

In this episode, Dietitian Boss Method creator and CEO Libby Rothschild and Dietitian Boss's Director of Operations Sara talk about the things you need to do after you make your first hire and few important things to consider as you onboard your new team member. What you'll learn from this episode: The process of hiring How to do a Test Project? What happens on the first 90 days? Connect with Libby: Instagram: @libbyrothschild | @dietitianboss  YouTube: Dietitian Boss Are you ready to start your journey? Book a call to learn more about the Dietitian Boss Group Coaching program

Honest eCommerce
156 | The Zero-Sum vs the Abundance Mindset | with Austin Brawner

Honest eCommerce

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 53:38


Austin Brawner is the CEO of Brand Growth Experts, where he provides coaching and training ecommerce entrepreneurs. He's also the host of the Ecommerce Influence Podcast. On this episode, we talk about the 6 steps of the Effortless Growth Operating System, the hiring process between agencies and brands, how negativity can positively and negatively affect your business, and so much more! To learn more, visit: http://honestecommerce.co Resources: Unlock massive growth in your business without burning out brandgrowthexperts.com Convert more visitors into paying customers ecommerceinfluence.com Connect with Austin austinbrawner.com linkedin.com/in/austinbrawner Profit First: Transform Your Business from a Cash-Eating Monster to a Money-Making Machine mikemichalowicz.com/profit-first Traction: Get a Grip on Your Business eosworldwide.com/traction-book Vivid Vision: A Remarkable Tool For Aligning Your Business Around a Shared Vision of the Future cameronherold.com/vivid-vision Who: The A Method for Hiring whothebook.com Double Your Profits: In Six Months or Less (Packaging May Vary) amazon.com/Double-Your-Profits-Months-Less/dp/088730740X Simple Numbers, Straight Talk, Big Profits simplenumbers.me/the-books The Brain Audit psychotactics.com/products/the-brain-audit-32-marketing-strategy-and-structure Scale your business with electriceye.io Download Mesa at the Shopify App Store apps.shopify.com/mesa Level up your customer support gorgias.grsm.io/honest Respond to any of Rewind's welcome emails and mention HONEST ECOMMERCE to get 1 month free rewind.io/honest Get started with a free account at klaviyo.com/honest Subscribe to Honest Ecommerce on Youtube 

Dental Digest
103. Angela Holland - How to Outsmart Dental Insurance

Dental Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 55:27


In this episode Ms. Angela Holland, the CEO of Preferred Dental Services will share her protips for having a profitable practice that takes dental insurance. She'll also explain how you can stay out of trouble and avoid insurance fraud.  Website: https://www.preferreddentalservice.com/ Instagram: @preferreddentalservices Podcast IG: @dental_digest_podcast Dr. Seibert: @dr.melissa_seibert One of the greatest ways dentists lose money or get into trouble is not knowing how to deal with Dental insurance companies. Sometimes dentists hire a front office manager to do the billing and manage insurance, but oftentimes they're undertrained in this area or they can't devote the time to constantly being up to date on all the changes in dental insurance. So, effectively you're losing a lot of money. Well, the CEO of Preferred Dental Services is here with us today to share her expertise. Preferred Dental Services is a company where you can entirely outsource insurance to a Billing Specialist so you and your office never have to sweat it again. Hiring a Billing Specialist is like hiring an OUTSTANDING Assitant to your Practice Manager. However, they are paid based on how much money they make you, and NEVER request PTO or uses sick leave. Your Preferred Billing Specialist also doesn't require medical insurance and  removes the threat of embezzlement, and NEVER has to go home early. Angela is phenomenal to work with and once you listen to this episode you'll realize very quickly she knows what she's doing. If you want to make your practice more profitable, I recommend you go to preferred dental services.com.

Loan Officer Freedom
Branch Managers Hiring Real Producers

Loan Officer Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 45:04


As a branch manager, how do you attract new talent? In this episode of Loan Officer Freedom, the #1 podcast nationwide for loan officers, I am joined by Travis Newton, a branch manager out of Oregon.  This episode focuses on what criteria we both have used to seek out options vs. opportunities when bringing a new hire on. Travis gives us his viewpoint for the way he reads the potential in the loan officers he hires.  Because he doesn't have very much time to train from square one, he makes sure the LOs he brings on are established talent and can produce high volume for the company.   Tune in to hear how my buddy Travis has hired not 1, not 2, but 3 - $100M+ producers in the last 10 months.   Interested in learning more from my team here at Mortgage Marketing Animals? I'm offering a free coaching call to loan officers. Schedule Here.

M&A Science
142. Hiring The Head Of Corp Dev That Fits Your M&A Strategy

M&A Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:49


Charles Breed, VP Corporate Development at Corel Corporation (NASDAQ: CREL)  142. Hiring The Head Of Corp Dev That Fits Your M&A Strategy In this episode of the M&A Science Podcast, Charles Breed, VP of Corporate Development at Corel Corporation, talks about how to hire a corporate development team that fits into your M&A strategy. When you're building a corporate development function, the first thing you need to do is hire a head of corporate development, but hiring is not as simple as it sounds. The head of corporate development needs to fit into the overall strategy. Things you will learn in this episode: -What to look for in when hiring a head of corporate development -The role of the head of corporate development -Skills required for a corporate development leader To join our network of M&A practitioners and sign up for our newsletter go to mascience.com.

Tomorrow's Leader
#233 - When Hiring That Overqualified Person is OK

Tomorrow's Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 12:08


Business leaders and hiring managers are pretty much familiar with the dilemma of hiring someone overqualified for a position. More often than not, this doesn't end well for either or both parties. But in today's episode, John Laurito shares the instances when this type of hire can work. So if you're currently in this dilemma or wondering how to go about it, if you'll do, then make sure to tune in.  Show notes:[0:50] On hiring someone overqualified for a position[2:21] The impact on the organization's culture and resources[4:10] As the manager/leader, here is what you need to do[7:35] What this person needs to be clear on[11:41] Outro  Get a copy of Tomorrow's Leader on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/huseae9hText LEADER to 617-393-5383 to receive The Top 10 Things That The Best Leaders Are Doing Right NowFor questions, suggestions, or speaker inquiries, contact me at john@lauritogroup.com

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Friday - Hiring Mike McDaniel 01 14 2022

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 2:15


Big O talks Mike McDaniel

The Will To Change: Uncovering True Stories of Diversity & Inclusion
E196: The Why's and How's of Second Chance Hiring with Sue Mason and Catherine Goetz

The Will To Change: Uncovering True Stories of Diversity & Inclusion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 31:41


This episode, originally recorded as a DEI Community Call, features a conversation between Sue Mason, Co-Founder and Executive Director of What's Next Washington, and Catherine Goetz, Global Head of Diversity Recruiting at LivePerson. Sue and Catherine discuss the challenges and opportunities of making a commitment to operationalize second chance hiring in a heavily regulated field. Discover why AI and talent leaders need to be focused on accessing the talent pool of people with conviction histories, and how organizations can accompany operationalized second chance priorities as part of their DEI recruiting strategy.  

The 10 Minute Entrepreneur
Ep 358: Create a Scorecard for Hiring

The 10 Minute Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 8:11


Can you find hires that hit my thirty-point threshold? Learn how to quantitatively score your hires to find the best people to build your company with. #hiring #entrepreneurship #talent #itfactor

Marketing Trends
Jumping on Opportunities Through Rapid Expansion with Christine de Wendel, Co-Founder and CEO US Sunday

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 46:32


There is an old saying that in every tragedy there is an opportunity. Sometimes it's our darkest moments that we find a way to make the world a better place, and that's exactly what Christine de Wendel, Co-Founder and CEO US Sunday sought out to do during the pandemic. Today marketers are all trying to create a frictionless experience. Or simply, a better buying experience for the consumer. But what is less seamless than waiting on the person to bring you the bill? Sunday sought to rectify this, and they did. “We said, if we want to get to market really quickly and take advantage of this incredible wave, and this opportunity that has come out of the COVID pandemic, we need to make [payment] really easy. And so our solution is we put a QR code on the table. We map it to the point of sale system. It allows you as a consumer to scan the QR code on the table, see the menu, order like many restaurants already had, but then pull up your bill and pay. And so we're transforming something that used to take 15 minutes and we're turning it into a ten second experience” Sunday's technology is simple, but has innovated the restaurant industry in ways that has staying power.. Not only is it creating a smoother process for consumers, but it also has the possibility to give businesses a better sense of who they are working with while also creating more personalized experiences.. On Marketing Trends, Christine takes us through the process of jumping on an opportunity, how to scale quickly while finding good candidates regardless of market, and, the importance of a strong central branding and so much more on this episode of Marketing Trends.Main TakeawaysQR Codes should be an important part of your business.They help make payments smoother for your consumers.It's important for a start up to over invest in brand identity.Hiring local experts when expanding globally is important to understand the culture and mindset of customers.It's important to have a strong central brand, but allow for flexibility in local markets.When you're an entrepreneur, you're going to have extreme emotional highs and lows as you see your idea come to life.Key Quotes“We said, if we want to get to market really quickly and take advantage of this incredible wave and this opportunity that has come out of the pandemic, we need to make it really easy. And so our solution is we put a QR code on the table. We map it to the point of sale system. It allows you as a consumer to scan the QR code on the table, see the menu, order like many restaurants already had, but then pull up your bill and pay. And so we're transforming something that used to take 15 minutes and we're turning it into ten-secondnd experience”“As an early stage startup, you over-invest in brand.”“We've had great traction and great partnerships with most of the point of sales because they realize that it's a very fragmented market and that working with us means that we're really building something that's going to address 70, 80, 90, 100 percent of the market, as opposed to just their customer base.”“Entrepreneurs will tell you this every day, it is full of challenges and the ups and downs of building a company like this are incredible. Seeing your product live is so rewarding and the stress and the anxiety of making sure that you're building a really robust product that won't disappoint is also extremely nice. I love the enthusiasm we're getting, and am extremely appreciative of my teams because I never thought it would be such a roller coaster in terms of emotions. It's really a call out to other entrepreneurs that this is exciting, but this can be so hard. BioChristine de Wendel is the co-founder and CEO of Sunday, a QR-based payment platform that improves the ease of the guest checkout experience. Prior to Sunday, Christine became an expert in European E-commerce. Between 2020 and 2017, Christine was Chief Operating Officer of ManoMano, one of France's fastest growing tech companies and Europe's leading online platform for home improvement.  Prior to joining ManoMano, Christine spent seven years at Zalando, Europe's largest online fashion retailer, where she built up the Paris office and managed Zalando's French business.  Christine began her career as a consultant with Bain & Company in Paris and New York.  She is currently working on a new venture.Christine holds a BSc in International Affairs from Georgetown University, an MSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics and an MBA from INSEAD.  Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Christine has American, French and Austrian citizenship. She currently lives in Atlanta with her husband and three children after spending 15 years in Paris.---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.

Business Meets Spirituality
BONUS - Tips for Hiring Talent: Screening Interviews & Sharing Your Culture

Business Meets Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 18:29


Attracting the right talent to your organization also means communicating that your company is not the right fit for everyone. You want someone to join your team who is excited about the vision and culture of your organization. In this short bonus episode, Adam shares how to begin screening new hires from the moment you write the job ad. He also shares tips and best practices for screening interviews, and how to spot talent right off the bat.

Big Blue Kickoff Live | New York Giants
Big Blue Kickoff Live 1/13 | Reacting To John Mara Press Conference

Big Blue Kickoff Live | New York Giants

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 59:40


Lance Medow and Paul Dottino react to John Mara's press conference and take calls. SUBSCRIBE NOW: Apple Spotify Google Stitcher iHeart Radio :53 - John Mara Presser 10:37 - Hiring process 24:08 - Calls 37:34 - GM candidates 54:00 - What Giants are looking for

The Dental Marketer
380: Derek Perez | SmileCraft Dental Studio

The Dental Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022


Join my email list here: https://thedentalmarketer.lpages.co/newsletter/Join this podcast's Facebook Group: The Dental Marketer SocietyGuest: Derek PerezPractice Name: SmileCraft Dental StudioCheck out Derek's Media:‍Dr. Kasey's Instagram PageDr. Kasey's Facebook PagePractice Facebook PageDerek's Facebook Page‍Host: Michael Arias‍Website: The Dental Marketer‍‍Join the podcast's Facebook Group: The Dental Marketer Society My Key Takeaways:Do not cheap out on a dental specific attorney!Hiring for experience at the start can be a big help.Establish a flow and hire associates to fit that.Market the doctor instead of the office!Be sure to adjust marketing budget based on patient influx.‍‍Please don't forget to share with us on Instagram when you are listening to the podcast AND if you are really wanting to show us love, then please leave a 5 star review on iTunes!‍‍DON'T FORGET TO:Join The Newsletter here and be a part of The Dental Marketer FamilyClick here to see how you can attract new patients immediately and consistently!Click Here to join the Ground Marketing Facebook Group‍

The Cy Amundson Show
Minnesota Vikings: Now Hiring

The Cy Amundson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 61:41


This week, Cy is joined by the whole gang to discuss our favorite GM and HC candidates and begin piecing together how this team might look next season and beyond.  ------------- The Cy Amundson Show (@cyamundsonshow) is one of the best sports comedy podcasts around with Cy Amundson (@cyamundson), Blake Wexler (@BlakeWexler), Joe Gill (@cyshowJPG), Tom Schreier (@tschreier3), and Ethan Heidorn (@ethanheidorn) -------------- As always, a special shout-out to our sponsors Bradshaw and Bryant PLLC - Bradshaw and Bryant specialize in Personal Injury Lawsuits and are available for a free consultation ANY time that you are involved in a situation that leads to Personal Injury, Wrongful Death, or other Criminal Defense Matters. Call them for free at 800-770-7008 -------------- Don't forget to rate and review us on iTunes - (The Cy Amundson Show) - each rating gets us higher up on the iTunes charts and brings news fans to the podcast! -------------- P.S. - Buy and review Cy's new album Monday Night on iTunes!

Dental A Team w/ Kiera Dent and Dr. Mark Costes
Episode 471: Stand Out From Other Practices When Hiring

Dental A Team w/ Kiera Dent and Dr. Mark Costes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 25:11


Kiera and Tiffanie are both on the pod — this time to talk about a topic many, many practices (and businesses worldwide) are struggling with: hiring. The following points are discussed: Write solid ads Have a solid culture Use incentives that work (Kiera and Tiff give many ideas on these) This episode covers perspectives from both a doctor and a team member, so everyone is covered. Episode resources: Reach out to Tiffanie and Kiera Listen to episode 464, Break That Negative Morale! Listen to episode 440, 3 Tips to Hiring Your Unicorn Subscribe to The Dental A-Team podcast Become Dental A-Team Platinum! Review the podcast on iTunes

Ghostrunners
140 - Hiring a 60 Second Butler

Ghostrunners

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 102:12


What a week it's been here in KC! Plenty of videos, laundry, and vomit all going places. We hope y'all have a great week! Buy tickets to F12 and check out Ghostrunners merch: https://bit.ly/399MXFu  Become a Patron and get exclusive content from Jake & Brad: https://bit.ly/2XJ1h3y  Watch this episode on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3cQSPnw  Follow us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/33WAq4P  Leave us a voice memo and ask a question: https://anchor.fm/jake-triplett/message  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices