Podcasts about babies

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Very young offspring of a human

  • 42,860PODCASTS
  • 87,053EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 4, 2022LATEST
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    Best podcasts about babies

    Show all podcasts related to babies

    Latest podcast episodes about babies

    Mike Nick's Podcast
    Episode 26: Lil Baby GOAT

    Mike Nick's Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 113:34


    Lil Baby, a new generational GOAT. Yes or Nah ? Listen, and you can decide. Presented by: DJ Mike Nick's ... Your Forever DJ. 

    Toxic
    Ep. 47: It's Never Been About Babies - How to Avoid Forced Birth After Friday's Supreme Court Decision

    Toxic

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 77:32


    Last week, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade because it will never personally affect them so who cares and declared states could make their own decisions about whether or not uterus-owners should be allowed bodily autonomy. States across the country immediately said, “Bodily autonomy what? Anyone with a vagina does not deserve such a luxury!” Abortion was outlawed or made extremely difficult to access in more than half the states where lawmakers obviously love babies so much they want to force individuals to have more of them but then also not pay these living incubators livable wages or provide affordable housing or guarantee family leave or take steps to make sure pregnant individuals survive childbirth or keep said babies from getting shot when they start school. In Ohio, a 10-year-old sexual assault victim found to be pregnant was denied an abortion because we live in the Upside Down now. In today's episode, Amanda and Jenna talk to Dr. Paula Cody, Medical Director of Adolescent Medicine at the University of Wisconsin. She works with adolescents and young adults with a special interest in eating disorders, sexuality and reproductive health, menstrual disorders and high-risk behaviors. (Follow her @TeenDocCody on Twitter.) Dr. Cody talked safe abortion and what that looks like now—is Plan C safe and when and how do you get it? Is traveling across state lines an option? Is she afraid of being prosecuted for—god forbid—providing reproductive care to young people? Thank you to podvoices.help for organizing podcasters in this mass-PSA you'll hear at the beginning. To learn more about Plan C, visit plancpills.org. To help support everyone's right to safe abortion access, visit abortionfunds.org.   To wear your protest message everywhere you go (hint, it's the name of this podcast), visit toxicthepodcast.com and click “Store.” A hundred percent of proceeds will go to organizations helping women access safe healthcare.

    Barnyard Language
    Bogs, Babies, and Badgers w/ Amber Bristow of Cranberry Chats

    Barnyard Language

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 82:35


    This week we talked to Amber Bristow of https://www.facebook.com/cranberrychats/ (Cranberry Chats) about raising the 6th generation of cranberry growers on her family farm in Wisconsin. Amber also cohosts the https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/forward-farming/id1522897325 (Forward Farming Podcast) with dairy farmer Becca Hilby. Turns out growing cranberries is nothing like what any of us think, and it's actually super interesting. You can find us on https://www.instagram.com/barnyardlanguage/ (Instagram) and https://www.facebook.com/BarnyardLanguage/ (Facebook) or leave us a Cussing and Discussing on https://www.speakpipe.com/BarnyardLanguage (SpeakPipe).

    The Girl Defined Show
    The Truth about Roe v. Wade, Abortion, and What This Means for Women with Kristan Hawkins

    The Girl Defined Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 46:13


    Ep. 084 - The overturning of Roe v. Wade has sent shock waves throughout all of America. Shock in a good way and shock in a bad way. Many Christians are rejoicing and praising God for the lives that will be saved as a result of this decision. Many other women are grieving what they view as a loss to their basic human rights. Should we be celebrating? Should we be mourning? And what in the world does the overturning of Roe v. Wade actually mean for women? We brought an expert to help us truly understand how this monumental decision actually impacts women. Personal Retreat Journal Girl Defined: God's Radical Design for Beauty, Femininity and Identity Sex, Purity and the Longings of a Girl's Heart: Discover the Beauty and Freedom of God-Defined Sexuality Not Part of the Plan: Trusting God with the Twists and Turns of Your Story Love Defined: Embracing God's Vision for Lasting Love and Satisfying Relationships Shine Bright Devotional 8-Week Girl Defined Mentorship Course Biblical Counseling Link LIVE ACTION Students for Life Action Connect with Kristan Hawkins Support the show

    Stories From Women Who Walk
    60 Seconds for Motivate Your Monday: Pack Up the Babies & Grab the Old Ladies - Everyone's Going to ENCOUNTER 360° TAMPA BAY

    Stories From Women Who Walk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 2:00


    Hello to you Dennis & Ali Pitocco listening in Lutz, Florida!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is Stories From Women Who Walk with 60 Seconds for Motivate Your Monday and your host, Diane Wyzga.This news is better than fireworks! The very first ever ENCOUNTER 360° TAMPA BAY shines and sparkles on March 22nd and 23rd, 2023.What is ENCOUNTER 360°? A Close Encounter of the Very Best Human Kind to re-discover humanity together. Dennis and Ali Pitocco have re-imagined a program unlike any before it. Come for rich conversation, real connection, authentic engagement, human interaction, and powerful relationship! In short, a window of time to experience belonging and then carrying that sense of community back home where you can continue to create for good.      Click HERE to get all the details and buy your ticket; only 50 seats available and they're going FAST!You're invited: “Come for the stories - stay for the magic!” Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, and join us next time! Remember to stop by the website, check out the Services, arrange a Discovery Call, and Opt In to stay current with Diane and Quarter Moon Story Arts and on Linked In. Stories From Women Who Walk Production TeamPodcaster: Diane F Wyzga & Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 to Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts

    The Selby Is Godcast: A Cleveland Indians podcast

    Zack and T.J. talk about the return of Oscar Mercado and how the team is handling a few roster spots in the absence of Oscar Gonzalez. Then, the guys discuss the importance of the upcoming stretch of winnable games before the All-Star Break and T.J. asks Zack about a pair of potential trade candidates. For additional episodes of the show, find us at Patreon.com/SelbyIsGodcast

    ASMR Sleep Recordings
    Ocean Waves White Noise for Stress Relief & Sleep | 2 Hours

    ASMR Sleep Recordings

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 120:01


    Welcome to a new episode of ASMR Sleep Recordings. In this episode, you will hear ocean waves. Improve your health and happiness.The sound you hear in this episode creates a calm atmosphere and at the same time blocks out disturbing noises. This will help you de-stress, unwind, and rest. Enjoy two hours of relaxing sounds to help you relax, focus, study and fall asleep.About ASMR Sleep Recordings:The purpose of ASMR Sleep Recording is to help you sleep and concentrate better. This particular episode lasts two hours and has no ads in the middle, so you won't be woken up or disturbed while focusing or relaxing. When you listen to ASMR Sleep Recordings, you can lock your phone, so you won't get any bothersome stimuli from notifications and other sounds from your phone. You can switch between apps while studying or working without pausing the ambient sound.About our sounds:Water creates a natural white noise. Infused with the relaxing quality of nature and the sound-masking properties of white noise, listening to running water is an ideal way to turn off all the stressful things life brings, and to de-stress. Some of our most popular sounds include a river, flowing creek, babbling brook, gentle waves on a lake, and a bamboo fountain. Rain also creates a natural white noise. Infused with the relaxing quality of nature and the sound-masking properties of white noise, listening to rain is an ideal way to switch off all the stressful things life brings and to de-stress. Some of our most popular sounds are rain on an umbrella, hailstorms, hard rain, soft rain, gentle rain, wind and rain, rain on a car.White noise helps babies and children to get a better and deeper night's sleep. This is because external sounds are masked by the noise. With white noise in the background, your child will not hear annoying cars driving by or dogs barking in bed. This allows your little one to sleep better. And it also saves you as a parent a lot of hours!Pink noise is more common in nature than you might expect. It can be compared to continuous rainfall or wind. In addition to white noise, pink noise is also increasing in popularity, especially in business environments. Because it can increase productivity, concentration and creativity.Brown noise can be compared to waves of the sea, a river current, strong winds or the sound of thunder during a storm. Like pink noise, brown noise is very similar to white noise. However, the frequencies have been lowered even further and a lot more concentrated. This gives it a rougher/coarse tone than pink noise. It sounds a bit deeper and a bit bass-like. The benefits of brown noise are the same as the other types of noise. It provides relaxation, increased focus and improved deep sleep.DISCLAIMER: Be aware that loud noises can damage your hearing. If you can't carry on a conversation without raising your voice while playing one of our spheres, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Do not place the speakers directly next to a baby's ears. If you have trouble hearing or ringing in your ears, stop listening to the white noise immediately and see an audiologist or your doctor. The sounds provided by ASMR Sleep Recordings are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. Consult your doctor if you regularly have severe sleeping problems, experience fitful/restless sleep or feel tired during the day.ASMR Sleep Recordings is the white noise and nature sounds podcast to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. ASMR Sleep Recordings has uploaded more than 400+ episodes in the 4 years that the podcast has been online. You can listen to all episodes of the podcast on your favorite podcast platform. People use white noise for sleep, focus, sound masking or relaxation. This podcast has the sound for you, whether you're using white noise to study, to soothe a baby with cramps, to fall asleep, or to just enjoy a quiet moment. You don't need to buy a white noise machine if you can listen to these sounds for free.

    ASMR Sleep & Relax Meditation
    Rain Sounds for Stress Relief and Sleep

    ASMR Sleep & Relax Meditation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 61:01


    Follow our ad-free Rain Playlist here: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1MMT1HDdPHNtxUWhcgjSEl?si=16f05b6327c74056--- Listen to our ad-free podcast "ASMR Sessions": Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/673bLsHJCXPV8bG2aXnqz1Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/asmr-sessions/id1570426570Google podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy81NGNmYzZkOC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw==--- Welcome to a new episode of ASMR Rain Recordings. In this episode, you will hear rain sounds. What type of sound do you want to hear on our podcast next time? Leave a comment in the review ☔

    That Checks Out
    Johan Bovine and The "Wanted" Baby

    That Checks Out

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 52:53


    The guys discuss how they avoided being the spokesmen for a popular unnamed fashion brand, why long-term memory is imperative for shipwreck exploration, and when a crossbow may be helpful in searching for a toddler.thatchecksout.netsnapchat: TCODamonTedtwitter.com/OutWdtinstagram.com/thatchecksoutwdtfacebook.com/thatchecksoutwithdamonandtedRecorded at Audiohive PodcastingHosted on Transistor.fm

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 055 - Purple Heart Album - Ann Blyth - Tex Beneke - Everybody Loves My Baby

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 15:00


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Her Style Secrets
    Baby Boy | Patreon Clips

    Her Style Secrets

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 3:29


    This week we discuss the consequences of our actions, the fun of dating younger guys, blame shifting, the biggest turn offs from a sneaky link, male insecurities making them play therapist and simply. being. over. it. Listen to the full episode on Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/styleandcitydiaries CHAT WITH US: Instagram @styleandcitydiaries Twitter @stylecitydiary

    Mommy Labor Nurse
    Preparing Your Relationship for Baby with Dr. Tracy Dalgleish

    Mommy Labor Nurse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 27:21


    This week on the Mommy Labor Nurse podcast I was joined by psychologist and couples therapist, Dr. Tracy Dalgleish to talk all about preparing your relationship for baby before they're here! Inside of the episode, you'll learn actionable tips and systems you can put into place now, hear about common pitfalls and obstacles that couples often have so that you can prepare for them, and so much more!

    Big Fat Positive: A Pregnancy and Parenting Journey
    Ep. 209: First Night Away from the Kids

    Big Fat Positive: A Pregnancy and Parenting Journey

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 50:39


    Laura spends a night away from her kids for the first time ever, and Shanna has big feelings about her six-year-old finishing kindergarten. Also, in the special segment, "Never Have I Ever: Parenting Edition," Shanna and Laura reveal embarrassing and unexpected situations they've never been in before having kids, including a desperate desire at a local family festival and a desperate hunt for an offending odor. Finally they share their BFPs and BFNs for the week. Shanna's kids are 3 and 6 years old, and Laura's kids are 3 years old and 16 months old.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    School Life Podcast
    The Robber and the Baby - Sienna, Sophia and Grayson - Leaders Day

    School Life Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 2:24


    On a beautiful day, a robber steals a car from the street, but little does he is not alone. Join the Robber and the Baby on their crazy journey together as the most unlikely of friends. This podcast was created at Arch D Leaders Day, using 3 mystery sounds pieced together to make this incredible story! Check out more podcasts from Leaders Day here: archdradio.com/leaders-day-2022/

    Matt and Doree's Eggcellent Adventure: An IVF Journey

    We share the news from Doree's beta last week. Then we hear an update from a listener who had PPROM and the placenta accreta signal goes out. Plus, listeners have advice about the 3-year sleep regression.Call or text us at 413-461-BABY or email us at mattanddoree@gmail.com or doreeandmatt@gmail.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά
    The worst is not over for NSW, mother and her six-week-old baby been rescued - Τα χειρότερα δεν έχουν τελειώσει για τη ΝΝΟ, διασώθηκε μητέρα και το έξι εβδομάδων μωρό της

    SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 5:39


    Despite three days of flooding, the worst is not over for New South Wales, state officials say, with heavy rainfall causing thousands of people to flee their homes. - Παρά τις τρεις ημέρες πλημμυρών τα χειρότερα δεν έχουν τελειώσει για τη Νέα Νότια Ουαλία όπως αναφέρουν αξιωματούχοι της πολιτείας,με τις ισχυρές βροχοπτώσεις να έχουν οδηγήσει χιλιάδες ανθρώπους να εγκαταλείψουν τις εστίες τους.

    Relaxing White Noise
    Sleep Sounds Baby White Noise + Womb Sounds 8 Hours

    Relaxing White Noise

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 480:47


    To soothe a crying baby, try this sleep sounds mix featuring baby white noise plus womb sounds. White noise for babies is an effective way to soothe a crying infant and lull your newborn to sleep. White noise resembles sounds the baby heard in the womb, which has a calming effect. It also masks other distracting noises so that your baby can fall asleep and remain sleeping. The addition of womb sounds contributes to the comforting ambience for the baby. This sleep noise lasts for 8 hours, so that baby can sleep all night long. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Here are some great products to help you sleep! Relaxing White Noise receives a small commission (at no additional cost to you) on purchases made through affiliate links. Thanks for supporting the podcast! Click: Sleepyhead USA Mattress Topper $50 off with code 'RWN' Baloo Living Weighted Blankets (Use code 'relaxingwhitenoise10' for 10% off) At Relaxing White Noise, our goal is to help you sleep well. This episode is eight hours long with no advertisements in the middle, so you can use it as a sleeping sound throughout the night. Listening to our white noise sounds via the podcast gives you the freedom to lock your phone at night, keeping your bedroom dark as you fall asleep. It also allows you to switch between apps while studying or working with no interruption in the ambient sound. Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. Relaxing White Noise Privacy Policy © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2021. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited.

    Boston Confidential Beantown's True Crime Podcast
    Laura Jane Rosenthal-The Burnt Ziti Case-Laura Jane was a new mother, domestic abuse would prevent her from raising her baby

    Boston Confidential Beantown's True Crime Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 31:29


    This is one of Metro-Boston's most infamous murders. Richard Rosenthal was a successful financial analyst at John Hancock Insurance in Boston. He met Laura Jane at work and they later married. The couple appeared to be living the American dream. But inside the home was another story, friends at work would later report, seeing Laura Jane with black eyes on at least two separate occasions. In retrospect she was the classic victim of on-going domestic abuse. In 1994 the duo had a baby boy who died quickly after being born, he had problems with his heart and lungs. Richard Rosenthal blamed his wife and seemingly could not move on, despite the arrival of a healthy baby girl. Richard, holding on to the death of his son, soon killed his wife, he eviscerated the woman he claimed to love. He removed some organs and placed them on a stake in the backyard, which organs were selected? Yes, Laura Jane's heart and lungs. Please be advised this episode contains extreme violence. Tune in for more details.FindLaw-Commonwealth V Rosenthal https://bit.ly/3NEsA5VCelebrate Boston-https://bit.ly/3yCdt8DThe Harvard Crimson- https://bit.ly/3bFmiWd

    Knowing God With Heart and Mind
    Perfect Love: Baby Steps

    Knowing God With Heart and Mind

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 29:27


    Poets have written thousands of verses about perfect love, while knowing it doesn't exist. Or does it? What if, perfect love does not come from others, but from within ourselves? What if it is planted there by God? Join us Sunday morning to consider these questions, worship, sing, pray, and enjoy friendship.

    Lights, Thunder, Action!
    91. Soldier Boy Baby & Kamala's Train to the Past Ft. Ethan Simmie

    Lights, Thunder, Action!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 133:17


    Ethan Simmie of 15 Minutes of Marvel joins a special Sunday Morning Episode of LTA to break down The Boys Ep 7 and Ms. Marvel Episode 4!Follow Ethan Simmie on Twitter: @EthanSimmieFollow 15 Minutes of Marvel on Twitter: @15minutemarvel Be sure to click the "Get Reminder" button below to get notified when we go LIVE here!!"Cash Machine" by Anno Domini Beats----Be sure to subscribe to our Podcast Channel for new audio episodes----Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lights-thunder-action/id1506501050?uo=4Goodpods: https://goodpods.app.link/tPDQF0TLyobSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5BZZtuC0mhgrc26QBvn0SDYoutube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC_C2z2k60d6lOj8DFMWDGEA===Keep up with us on Social Media===Linktr.ee/LightsThunderActionJRB:Twitter: www.twitter.com/jrb_directThomas:Linktr.ee/TCRochesterACT

    Books That Matter
    3. My Boyfriend Dumped Me When I Came Out

    Books That Matter

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 44:52


    We're back with the third episode of The Chapters, where we discuss coming out, being your true self, moving through trauma and dealing with chronic illness. This episode contains so many book recommendations - we know you're going to love it!  #TheChaptersPodcast is a chatty and entertaining listen for lovers of books and agony aunt advice! Hosted by the girls behind Books That Matter, this podcast is all about recommending books to get us through every chapter of life. Listeners write in, the girls deliver advice and the perfect books to get them through! New episodes are available every week, and you can find the girls at @booksthatmatteruk, and can write in with your dilemmas and questions to support@booksthatmatter.co.ukThis podcast is brought to you by Books That Matter, the book subscription box by women, for women. Find our subscription boxes at www.booksthatmatter.co.ukBook Recommendations:Dilemma 1:Milk Fed by Melissa BroderWhat a Time to Be Alone by Chidera Eggerue Women Don't Owe You Pretty by Florence GivenElinor Oliphant is Completely FinePoetry of Rupi Kaur Woman Eating by Claire Kohda - disrupted eating married together with vampire story Untamed by Glennon DoyleTiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life by Cheryl Strayed Dilemma 2:Olive by Emma GannonPoor Little Sick Girls by Ione GambleDilemma 3:To the Lighthouse and Orlando by Virginia Woolf This Book is Gay by Juno DawsonAudre Lorde- We Can Do Better Than This by Amelia Abraham- The Sun Isn't Out Long Enough by Tatevik Sargsyan- A Marvellous Light by Freya Marske- Detransition, Baby by Torrey Peters- Last Night at the Telegraph Club by Malina Lo- The Transgender Issue by Shon Faye- All The Things She Said by Daisy JonesQueer Sex by Juno RocheInsatiable by Daisy BuchananYou Exist Too Much by Zaina ArafatWatching Women and Girls by Danielle Pender 

    Sean Hendrix - Deep At The Beach
    Soulful House Mystery Mountain 2022 #177 (For Orange Babies)

    Sean Hendrix - Deep At The Beach

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 61:25


    Soulful House Mystery Mountain 2022 #177 (For Orange Babies)

    Podcast In Death
    Babies are Nightmare Inducing!! We Review “Born in Death” by J.D. Robb

    Podcast In Death

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 132:35


    Hey, Everyone! This week we are reviewing "Born in Death!" The one where Mavis finally has that freaking baby!! This book is about babies but it's also about "Trust." The first victim, Natalie, trusted the wrong person with the information that she had found discrepancies in financial data, and thereby causing her own death. Mavis trusts Eve to find Tandy, Whitney has to tell Eve that "some people" don't trust Roarke with the financial info that they need to look through to find the killer. Tandy trusts the wrong adoption agency. Also, pregnancy is ghetto! Anyway...this book opens with Eve and Roarke being emotionally damaged by childbirth classes. After class, they have dinner with Mavis, Leonardo and Mavis' new friend, Tandy who is also pregnant. Eve is assigned a double murder that involves an accounting firm, and is also dealing with trying to organize a baby shower. Eve and Roarke have a slight argument regarding his involvement in the case, and Peabody is appalled at Eve's lack of Baby Shower Organizing Skills. Then Mavis' friend Tandy disappears, and now Eve is working two cases...but IS she?? Lots of really funny moments in this book that are just gold! Summerset is, for some reason, really a dick in this episode. However, he really comes through in the end when they needed him and even lent his wifes wedding ring to Mavis and Leonardo so they can get married in the delivery room before the baby comes.

    SnowSchool
    AWITB - Chapter 5: "Roe Verzuz Wade"

    SnowSchool

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 94:11


    This week Spike and Maurice speak on Baby daddy drama thats circulating, upgrading black awards and The law that was recently passed. It is another week in the books podcast! Email Us: Awitb2022@gmail.com IG: Iamspikelou & The_Conceptual_Mauricehunt WE DO NOT OWN THE RIGHTS TO THE MUSIC USED IN THIS PODCAST Music By: James Brown and Tupac Shakur --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/awitb/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/awitb/support

    MUJER DE EXITO, Unbounded!!
    Interview with Best Baby Beginnings CEO Irene Martinez

    MUJER DE EXITO, Unbounded!!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 37:32


    Listen as I interview the CEO of Best Baby Beginnings- Irene Martinez- www.BestBabyBeginnings.com For your F*R*E*E* gift go here and let her know that you heard her interview on Mujer De Exito, Unbounded Podcast Show!! https://bestbabybeginnings.com/masterclass-miracles/     >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Get your CELAVIVE mask here!!  https://martiangel.usana.com/s/FXLZw *********************************************************************** **   Check out some of my favorite journals and books here! https://amzn.to/3siywJ4 Digital downloads here: https://www.shop.martiangel.com **TAKE THE FREE QUIZ “ WHAT IS YOUR ENTREPRENEURIAL ARCHETYPE”  **  https://bit.ly/Mbizquiz **CHECK OUT ALL THE SOCIAL MEDIA AND BUSINESS TOOLS I RECOMMEND** http://bit.ly/MARTIANGELTOOLS​ **GET ALL OF MY EQUIPMENT HERE**: http://bit.ly/MARTIANGELTOOLS​ Disclaimer Marti Angel is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to www.amazon.com.      

    Slumber Party with Amanda Jewson
    Camping & Sleeping?! BBS Consultant Bria gives the tips!

    Slumber Party with Amanda Jewson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 32:01


    Whether it's your first time camping with your kids, or you're just looking to improve your annual trip, the experts from Baby's Best Sleep are ready to share their honest truth about the ins-and-outs of camping and sleep. On this episode of the Slumber Party Podcast, Baby's Best Sleep Founder Amanda Jewson and co-host Liza Ramnarine team up with BBS Certified Sleep Consultant Bria MacCallum to fill us in on their sleep successes (and not so successful moments) when taking to the camp ground. As a parent, we all know that trying to get our little ones to fall asleep while away from home is no easy feat. The experts agree that incorporating a few key elements can help make that transition easier for all involved.

    Hollywoodkc27LIVE's podcast
    hwlradio.com mcdonalds baby mother responds but would mothers do the same if it was them ???

    Hollywoodkc27LIVE's podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 8:01


    hwlradio.com download radio station app: http://tun.in/sfxUj download the alexa app : https://www.amazon.com/dp/product/B07S8ZJN1Q donate -paypal.me/hwlradiocom website : hwlradio.com

    Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
    Baby Neck Floats Unsafe For Water Therapy

    Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 1:20


      Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/YkGSMV1kRsU   The FDA now issues a special communication warning parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers not to use neck floats with babies participating in water therapy.  The use of neck buoyancy devices can lead to serious injury or death by drowning, particularly for children with developmental delays,  spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, Down syndrome, or cerebral palsy.  These neck float devices have not be evaluated or approved by the FDA, provide no demonstrated benefits, and may lead to an increased risk of neck strain snd injury for children with musculoskeletal problems.  The FDA is calling on all providers, healthcare teams, and parents to immediately stop using these devices.  Everyone should report any injuries or untoward incidents associated with the use of these devices to the FDA via the reporting portal.  I've provided the link with this report's narrative.   https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/safety-communications/do-not-use-baby-neck-floats-due-risk-death-or-injury-fda-safety-communication?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/medwatch/index.cfm   #neckfloats #fda #recall #drowning #neckinjuries #developmentaldelays #spinalcord #downsyndrome #cerebralpalsy    

    One Bad Mother
    Episode 461: Not Been Feeling Like a Self? How 'Bout Now. with Kimberly Inez McGuire

    One Bad Mother

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 59:20


    We are super fucking angry, sad, and enraged. Guess why. We talk to Kimberly Inez McGuire of URGE, Unite for Reproductive and Gender Equity, about power, control, and papayas. Plus, Biz is pissed.Go to URGE.org to learn more. To learn about self-managed abortion, mifepristone, and misoprostol, please check out URGE.org/smazine. Check out URGE's linktree @urgeorg and follow URGE on Twitter @URGE_org.Kimberly Inez McGuire recommends you donate to KansansForFreedom.com to help continue the fight to protect safe, legal abortion in Kansas.Kimberly also recommends the Euki app for a safe, unmonitored, private sexual health app.Biz also recommends donating to the National Network of Abortion Funds, an organization that helps fund those in need of reproductive health on a national and local level.Check out Theresa's book! It Feels Good To Be Yourself is available now wherever books are sold. Our book You're Doing A Great Job!: 100 Ways You're Winning at Parenting! is available wherever books are sold.Thank you to all our listeners who support the show as monthly members of MaximumFun.org. This week, we're sponsored by Coterie. Go to Coterie.com and use code BADMOTHER for 20% off your first order, plus free shipping.Be sure to tell us at the top of your message whether you're leaving a genius moment, a fail, or a rant! Thanks!!Share a personal or commercial message on the show! Details at MaximumFun.org/Jumbotron.Subscribe to One Bad Mother in Apple PodcastsJoin our mailing listJoin the amazing community that is our private One Bad Mother Facebook groupFollow One Bad Mother on TwitterFollow Biz on TwitterLike us on Facebook!Get a OBM tee, tank, baby onesie, magnet or bumper sticker from the MaxFunStoreYou can suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming show by sending an email to onebadmother@maximumfun.org.Show MusicSummon the Rawk, Kevin MacLeod (www.incompetech.com)Ones and Zeros, Awesome, Beehive SessionsMom Song, Adira Amram, Hot Jams For TeensTelephone, Awesome, Beehive SessionsMama Blues, Cornbread Ted and the ButterbeansMental Health Resources:Therapy for Black Girls – Therapyforblackgirls.comDr. Jessica Clemmens – https://www.askdrjess.comBLH Foundation – borislhensonfoundation.orgThe Postpartum Support International Warmline - 1-800-944-4773 (1-800-944-4PPD)The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Helpline - 1-800-662-4357 (1-800-662-HELP)Suicide Prevention Hotline: Call or chat. They are here to help anyone in crisis. https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org and number 1-800-273-8255 and there is a chat option on the website.Crisis Text Line: Text from anywhere in the USA (also Canada and the UK) to text with a trained counselor. A real human being.USA text 741741Canada text 686868UK text 85258Website: https://www.crisistextline.orgNational Sexual Assault: Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.https://www.rainn.orgNational Domestic Violence Hotline: https://www.thehotline.org/help/Our advocates are available 24/7 at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) in more than 200 languages. All calls are free and confidential.They suggest that if you are a victim and cannot seek help, ask a friend or family member to call for you.Teletherapy Search: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapists/online-counseling

    80z Babies
    Episode 155: Make it a Classic - Ghetto Fabolous

    80z Babies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 85:38


    Fan Sourced:  As requested, the 80z Babies tackle the debut album from Brooklyn emcee Fabolous entitled Ghetto Fabolous, released September 11, 2001.   Timestamps: (0:42) Why this Fabolous album to Make a Classic? (1:35) Remembering the William Holla family (3:09) Does Fabolous have a classic album in his catalog? Is he a better mixtape artist? (4:45) Where was Yinka? (5:10) DJ Clue introduces Fabolous Sport. Origins of the name 'Fabolous' (7:37) Remembering 106th & Park's Freestyle Fridays (10:53) Where was Outlaw? His thoughts on DJ Clue (11:58) DJ Clue vs Funkmaster Flex (13:53) Superwoman remix with Lil' Mo (15:00) Ghetto Fabolous vs Blueprint (17:15) Who started the trend of the throwback jerseys and fitted hats? (21:52) Critical Reception (22:18) Did we anticipate Fabolous albums? (24:09) Overarching Highlights (24:40) Did Fabolous force his rhymes? Were the MA$E comparisons fair? What was Fabolous' image? (28:28) Overarching Lowlights (29:49) Does an album need to have themes to be great? Does Fabolous have any substance? (32:25) Track for track analysis (34:47) Remembering the Harlem Shake (Holla back, young'n) (37:10) Outlaws recalls how he first learned to Shake (42:45) Who is Fabolous? Does anybody actually know anything about him? (47:00) Is Timbaland given his proper flowers? Timbaland vs Pharrell (50:33) Fabolous vs Ludacris? Can you take either seriously? Did Fabolous ever see himself as having a rap career? Would Fabolous have been more successful today? (53:15) East coast artists on West coast beats vs West coast artists on East coast beats (58:54) Is Fabolous believable as a 'bad guy'? (1:03:11) Yinka attempts to Make it a Classic (1:14:55) Closing thoughts   Socials: 80z Babies: @the80zbabies Yinka Diz: @YinkaDiz Outlaw: @outlawbebe

    DT Radio Shows
    No Shade episode #013 with Jason Busteed

    DT Radio Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 63:28


    No Shade Episode 13 Session description : Keeping it deep this week with music from - Ross from Friends / Dam Swindle / a track of my own and many more Genres : House / DeepHouse / classichouse Track list 1 - Bootman - Ross from friends 2- Raw Cuts 3- Motorcity drum ensemble 3- Cut u loose - Dam Swindle 4- Twenty20 (Spiritlevel Dub) by Spiritchaser & AM2PM 5- With Friends- Jason Busteed 6- live at filmore - Around 7 7-Love the Feeling by Jansons 8- Hey mr dj - Joss Moog 9- Just Another Groove (Boris Dlugosch Remix) by The Mighty Dub Katz 10- Some Lovin' by Liberty City 11- Oh, Baby by Black Loops & Innocent Soul 12- Cool Whip - Scott Diaz 13- Follow The Step (Kink Beat Mix) by Rachel Row 14- It's You (San Soda's Panorama Bar Acca Version) by FCL

    The Joy Filled Mama - Christian Motherhood, Self Care, and Faith Based Encouragement for Moms
    Welcoming a New Baby Into the Family: How to Avoid Sibling Resentment and Help Your Kids Thrive in Their New Role

    The Joy Filled Mama - Christian Motherhood, Self Care, and Faith Based Encouragement for Moms

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 18:41


    One of the hardest things to navigate as a parent is cultivating sibling relationships, especially with littles and welcoming a new baby into the family. Whether you're currently in a season of adjusting to a new baby in the family or you know this is something you'll experience down the road, my goal is to lend some advice and encouragement for you. We'll discuss preparing your older kiddos for a baby, God's design for the family unit, and how to help your kids thrive as siblings. Thanks for joining me on the podcast today and if you haven't already, make sure you hit the follow button so you never miss an episode! ---------------------  Join the Joy Filled Community Group!  Rate and review the Joy Filled Podcast Connect with Jenna on Instagram  Follow the Joy Filled Podcast on Instagram Never miss an episode

    WOMENdontDOthat (WDDT)
    Taking the road less traveled with former Premier Christy Clark Ep. 98

    WOMENdontDOthat (WDDT)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 57:32


    Host Stephanie and former Premier Christy Clark discuss Christy's career, politics, parenting, and leadership. Find out why Christy tried to dress the same everyday, her thoughts on the sexualization of women and girls, her take on politics today, what she thinks holds women back, what Canada needs more of, and what keeps her hopeful today. I loved this raw and honest conversation. If you want to be inspired by an authentic leader, this is a must listen!More about Christy Clark: Christy Clark was the Premier of British Columbia, Canada's third largest province, for over six years. Throughout her tenure, Ms. Clark demonstrated the strongest performance of any Canadian Premier for economic growth, fiscal management and job creation.As an advisor at Bennett Jones, Ms. Clark offers clients insights tied to her experience in infrastructure, Canada-Asia trade, natural resources, social licence and indigenous Ms. Clark retired from political life in 2017 as the longest serving female Premier in Canadian history and the only woman in Canada ever to be re-elected. Now she works at Bennett Jones, a law firm and spends her time on boards. Find Christy online:TwitterLinkedInInstagramFacebookPodcast recommendation: C.D. Howe Institute PodcastBook recommendation: The Road to Character by David Brooks and HBR's 10 Must Reads on Women and Leadership How to find WOMENdontDOthat:PatreonInstagramTwitterBlogPodcastNewsletterWebsiteInterested in sponsorship? Contact us at hello@womendontdothat.com Produced by: Stephanie Mitton

    Investing in Regenerative Agriculture
    175 Jaclyn Schnau, the success and health of our society starts in the pregnant belly

    Investing in Regenerative Agriculture

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 66:01


    Jaclyn Schnau, co-founder of Pumpkin Organics, joins us to talk about the shocking reality of baby food. An episode diving deep into baby nutrition during the first 1000 days and the reasons why the current baby food industry really needs a shake-up.---------------------------------------------------Join our Gumroad community, discover the tiers and benefits on www.gumroad.com/investinginregenag. Support our work:Share itGive a 5-star ratingBuy us a coffee… or a meal! www.Ko-fi.com/regenerativeagriculture----------------------------------------------------Why are we feeding children and mothers so badly? The first foods for babies shouldn't be fruit but should be vegetables, bitter things, maybe a bit acidic. They might not love it immediately, but they need to be exposed to it to learn how to eat it later, to be healthy and become the non-picky eaters we all need.More about this episode on https://investinginregenerativeagriculture.com/jaclyn-schnau.Find our video course on https://investinginregenerativeagriculture.com/course.----------------------------------------------------For feedback, ideas, suggestions please contact us through Twitter @KoenvanSeijen, or get in touch through the website www.investinginregenerativeagriculture.com. Join our newsletter on www.eepurl.com/cxU33P. The above references an opinion and is for information and educational purposes only. It is not intended to be investment advice. Seek a duly licensed professional for investment advice.Support the show Support the show

    I Swear I Never
    'My unborn baby was harmed by a disease I'd never heard of'

    I Swear I Never

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 26:38


    Bek Murray didn't think much of catching a mild cold during pregnancy until her 20-week scan suggested that something had gone very wrong.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    TWFS
    AEW Forbidden Door Fallout; Kayla Braxton is a Rape Baby; John Cena Returns | Raw's 4th Hour 06/27/2022

    TWFS

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 146:21


    Kevin Scampoli and TylaSpida hug Tony Khan on https://havegrit.club TWFS Video Podcast: · Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/twfs-video/id1600675226 · Podbean: https://superfunwrestlingtime.podbean.com · Podcast Addict: https://podcastaddict.com/podcast/3749545 PPV Companions and lost TWFS YouTube videos: https://subscribestar.com/twfs  

    Couples Therapy
    John Flynn

    Couples Therapy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 71:00


    John is another old pal from UCB and one of the best darn storytellers around! Maybe you've heard his podcast Two Old Queens or read his BRAND NEW book Baked, about his years as the original High Maintenance guy for the New York comedy scene? Well, well, well, either way, on this episode, we talk to John about his Craig's List hookup days, how he met his husband and of course NEW YAWK VS. EL-AY, BABY! PLUS, obvi, we answer YOUR advice questions! If you'd like to ask your own advice questions, call 323-524-7839 and leave a VM or just DM us on IG or Twitter! Also! Get tickets for Naomi's Largo show on Thursday here! And discounted Couples Therapy Quarantine Crew t-shirts here (if you don't get one, we're gonna have A LOT of nightshirts over at the ol' Beckperigin household!)! Also, you can support the show on Patreon (two extra exclusive episodes a month!) or with a t-shirt (or a Jewboo shirt) and check out clips on YouTube! (Every once in a while we'll do a Twitch show, if you want to also follow us there). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Pat Miller Program
    With the SCOTUS ruling will the Safe Haven Baby Boxes see more activity?

    Pat Miller Program

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 10:48


    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
    Episode 150: “All You Need is Love” by the Beatles

    A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


    This week's episode looks at “All You Need is Love”, the Our World TV special, and the career of the Beatles from April 1966 through August 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Rain" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ NB for the first few hours this was up, there was a slight editing glitch. If you downloaded the old version and don't want to redownload the whole thing, just look in the transcript for "Other than fixing John's two flubbed" for the text of the two missing paragraphs. Errata I say "Come Together" was a B-side, but the single was actually a double A-side. Also, I say the Lennon interview by Maureen Cleave appeared in Detroit magazine. That's what my source (Steve Turner's book) says, but someone on Twitter says that rather than Detroit magazine it was the Detroit Free Press. Also at one point I say "the videos for 'Paperback Writer' and 'Penny Lane'". I meant to say "Rain" rather than "Penny Lane" there. Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of songs by the Beatles. I have read literally dozens of books on the Beatles, and used bits of information from many of them. All my Beatles episodes refer to: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn, All The Songs: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Release by Jean-Michel Guesdon, And The Band Begins To Play: The Definitive Guide To The Songs of The Beatles by Steve Lambley, The Beatles By Ear by Kevin Moore, Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald, and The Beatles Anthology. For this episode, I also referred to Last Interview by David Sheff, a longform interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono from shortly before Lennon's death; Many Years From Now by Barry Miles, an authorised biography of Paul McCartney; and Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles by Geoff Emerick and Howard Massey. Particularly useful this time was Steve Turner's book Beatles '66. I also used Turner's The Beatles: The Stories Behind the Songs 1967-1970. Johnny Rogan's Starmakers and Svengalis had some information on Epstein I hadn't seen anywhere else. Some information about the "Bigger than Jesus" scandal comes from Ward, B. (2012). “The ‘C' is for Christ”: Arthur Unger, Datebook Magazine and the Beatles. Popular Music and Society, 35(4), 541-560. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2011.608978 Information on Robert Stigwood comes from Mr Showbiz by Stephen Dando-Collins. And the quote at the end from Simon Napier-Bell is from You Don't Have to Say You Love Me, which is more entertaining than it is accurate, but is very entertaining. Sadly the only way to get the single mix of "All You Need is Love" is on this ludicrously-expensive out-of-print box set, but the stereo mix is easily available on Magical Mystery Tour. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I start the episode -- this episode deals, in part, with the deaths of three gay men -- one by murder, one by suicide, and one by an accidental overdose, all linked at least in part to societal homophobia. I will try to deal with this as tactfully as I can, but anyone who's upset by those things might want to read the transcript instead of listening to the episode. This is also a very, very, *very* long episode -- this is likely to be the longest episode I *ever* do of this podcast, so settle in. We're going to be here a while. I obviously don't know how long it's going to be while I'm still recording, but based on the word count of my script, probably in the region of three hours. You have been warned. In 1967 the actor Patrick McGoohan was tired. He had been working on the hit series Danger Man for many years -- Danger Man had originally run from 1960 through 1962, then had taken a break, and had come back, retooled, with longer episodes in 1964. That longer series was a big hit, both in the UK and in the US, where it was retitled Secret Agent and had a new theme tune written by PF Sloan and Steve Barri and recorded by Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But McGoohan was tired of playing John Drake, the agent, and announced he was going to quit the series. Instead, with the help of George Markstein, Danger Man's script editor, he created a totally new series, in which McGoohan would star, and which McGoohan would also write and direct key episodes of. This new series, The Prisoner, featured a spy who is only ever given the name Number Six, and who many fans -- though not McGoohan himself -- took to be the same character as John Drake. Number Six resigns from his job as a secret agent, and is kidnapped and taken to a place known only as The Village -- the series was filmed in Portmeirion, an unusual-looking town in Gwynnedd, in North Wales -- which is full of other ex-agents. There he is interrogated to try to find out why he has quit his job. It's never made clear whether the interrogators are his old employers or their enemies, and there's a certain suggestion that maybe there is no real distinction between the two sides, that they're both running the Village together. He spends the entire series trying to escape, but refuses to explain himself -- and there's some debate among viewers as to whether it's implied or not that part of the reason he doesn't explain himself is that he knows his interrogators wouldn't understand why he quit: [Excerpt: The Prisoner intro, from episode Once Upon a Time, ] Certainly that explanation would fit in with McGoohan's own personality. According to McGoohan, the final episode of The Prisoner was, at the time, the most watched TV show ever broadcast in the UK, as people tuned in to find out the identity of Number One, the person behind the Village, and to see if Number Six would break free. I don't think that's actually the case, but it's what McGoohan always claimed, and it was certainly a very popular series. I won't spoil the ending for those of you who haven't watched it -- it's a remarkable series -- but ultimately the series seems to decide that such questions don't matter and that even asking them is missing the point. It's a work that's open to multiple interpretations, and is left deliberately ambiguous, but one of the messages many people have taken away from it is that not only are we trapped by a society that oppresses us, we're also trapped by our own identities. You can run from the trap that society has placed you in, from other people's interpretations of your life, your work, and your motives, but you ultimately can't run from yourself, and any time you try to break out of a prison, you'll find yourself trapped in another prison of your own making. The most horrifying implication of the episode is that possibly even death itself won't be a release, and you will spend all eternity trying to escape from an identity you're trapped in. Viewers became so outraged, according to McGoohan, that he had to go into hiding for an extended period, and while his later claims that he never worked in Britain again are an exaggeration, it is true that for the remainder of his life he concentrated on doing work in the US instead, where he hadn't created such anger. That final episode of The Prisoner was also the only one to use a piece of contemporary pop music, in two crucial scenes: [Excerpt: The Prisoner, "Fall Out", "All You Need is Love"] Back in October 2020, we started what I thought would be a year-long look at the period from late 1962 through early 1967, but which has turned out for reasons beyond my control to take more like twenty months, with a song which was one of the last of the big pre-Beatles pop hits, though we looked at it after their first single, "Telstar" by the Tornadoes: [Excerpt: The Tornadoes, "Telstar"] There were many reasons for choosing that as one of the bookends for this fifty-episode chunk of the podcast -- you'll see many connections between that episode and this one if you listen to them back-to-back -- but among them was that it's a song inspired by the launch of the first ever communications satellite, and a sign of how the world was going to become smaller as the sixties went on. Of course, to start with communications satellites didn't do much in that regard -- they were expensive to use, and had limited bandwidth, and were only available during limited time windows, but symbolically they meant that for the first time ever, people could see and hear events thousands of miles away as they were happening. It's not a coincidence that Britain and France signed the agreement to develop Concorde, the first supersonic airliner, a month after the first Beatles single and four months after the Telstar satellite was launched. The world was becoming ever more interconnected -- people were travelling faster and further, getting news from other countries quicker, and there was more cultural conversation – and misunderstanding – between countries thousands of miles apart. The Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, the man who also coined the phrase “the medium is the message”, thought that this ever-faster connection would fundamentally change basic modes of thought in the Western world. McLuhan thought that technology made possible whole new modes of thought, and that just as the printing press had, in his view, caused Western liberalism and individualism, so these new electronic media would cause the rise of a new collective mode of thought. In 1962, the year of Concorde, Telstar, and “Love Me Do”, McLuhan wrote a book called The Gutenberg Galaxy, in which he said: “Instead of tending towards a vast Alexandrian library the world has become a computer, an electronic brain, exactly as an infantile piece of science fiction. And as our senses have gone outside us, Big Brother goes inside. So, unless aware of this dynamic, we shall at once move into a phase of panic terrors, exactly befitting a small world of tribal drums, total interdependence, and superimposed co-existence.… Terror is the normal state of any oral society, for in it everything affects everything all the time.…” He coined the term “the Global Village” to describe this new collectivism. The story we've seen over the last fifty episodes is one of a sort of cultural ping-pong between the USA and the UK, with innovations in American music inspiring British musicians, who in turn inspired American ones, whether that being the Beatles covering the Isley Brothers or the Rolling Stones doing a Bobby Womack song, or Paul Simon and Bob Dylan coming over to the UK and learning folk songs and guitar techniques from Martin Carthy. And increasingly we're going to see those influences spread to other countries, and influences coming *from* other countries. We've already seen one Jamaican artist, and the influence of Indian music has become very apparent. While the focus of this series is going to remain principally in the British Isles and North America, rock music was and is a worldwide phenomenon, and that's going to become increasingly a part of the story. And so in this episode we're going to look at a live performance -- well, mostly live -- that was seen by hundreds of millions of people all over the world as it happened, thanks to the magic of satellites: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "All You Need is Love"] When we left the Beatles, they had just finished recording "Tomorrow Never Knows", the most experimental track they had recorded up to that date, and if not the most experimental thing they *ever* recorded certainly in the top handful. But "Tomorrow Never Knows" was only the first track they recorded in the sessions for what would become arguably their greatest album, and certainly the one that currently has the most respect from critics. It's interesting to note that that album could have been very, very, different. When we think of Revolver now, we think of the innovative production of George Martin, and of Geoff Emerick and Ken Townshend's inventive ideas for pushing the sound of the equipment in Abbey Road studios, but until very late in the day the album was going to be recorded in the Stax studios in Memphis, with Steve Cropper producing -- whether George Martin would have been involved or not is something we don't even know. In 1965, the Rolling Stones had, as we've seen, started making records in the US, recording in LA and at the Chess studios in Chicago, and the Yardbirds had also been doing the same thing. Mick Jagger had become a convert to the idea of using American studios and working with American musicians, and he had constantly been telling Paul McCartney that the Beatles should do the same. Indeed, they'd put some feelers out in 1965 about the possibility of the group making an album with Holland, Dozier, and Holland in Detroit. Quite how this would have worked is hard to figure out -- Holland, Dozier, and Holland's skills were as songwriters, and in their work with a particular set of musicians -- so it's unsurprising that came to nothing. But recording at Stax was a different matter.  While Steve Cropper was a great songwriter in his own right, he was also adept at getting great sounds on covers of other people's material -- like on Otis Blue, the album he produced for Otis Redding in late 1965, which doesn't include a single Cropper original: [Excerpt: Otis Redding, "Satisfaction"] And the Beatles were very influenced by the records Stax were putting out, often namechecking Wilson Pickett in particular, and during the Rubber Soul sessions they had recorded a "Green Onions" soundalike track, imaginatively titled "12-Bar Original": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "12-Bar Original"] The idea of the group recording at Stax got far enough that they were actually booked in for two weeks starting the ninth of April, and there was even an offer from Elvis to let them stay at Graceland while they recorded, but then a couple of weeks earlier, the news leaked to the press, and Brian Epstein cancelled the booking. According to Cropper, Epstein talked about recording at the Atlantic studios in New York with him instead, but nothing went any further. It's hard to imagine what a Stax-based Beatles album would have been like, but even though it might have been a great album, it certainly wouldn't have been the Revolver we've come to know. Revolver is an unusual album in many ways, and one of the ways it's most distinct from the earlier Beatles albums is the dominance of keyboards. Both Lennon and McCartney had often written at the piano as well as the guitar -- McCartney more so than Lennon, but both had done so regularly -- but up to this point it had been normal for them to arrange the songs for guitars rather than keyboards, no matter how they'd started out. There had been the odd track where one of them, usually Lennon, would play a simple keyboard part, songs like "I'm Down" or "We Can Work it Out", but even those had been guitar records first and foremost. But on Revolver, that changed dramatically. There seems to have been a complex web of cause and effect here. Paul was becoming increasingly interested in moving his basslines away from simple walking basslines and root notes and the other staples of rock and roll basslines up to this point. As the sixties progressed, rock basslines were becoming ever more complex, and Tyler Mahan Coe has made a good case that this is largely down to innovations in production pioneered by Owen Bradley, and McCartney was certainly aware of Bradley's work -- he was a fan of Brenda Lee, who Bradley produced, for example. But the two influences that McCartney has mentioned most often in this regard are the busy, jazz-influenced, basslines that James Jamerson was playing at Motown: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "It's the Same Old Song"] And the basslines that Brian Wilson was writing for various Wrecking Crew bassists to play for the Beach Boys: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)"] Just to be clear, McCartney didn't hear that particular track until partway through the recording of Revolver, when Bruce Johnston visited the UK and brought with him an advance copy of Pet Sounds, but Pet Sounds influenced the later part of Revolver's recording, and Wilson had already started his experiments in that direction with the group's 1965 work. It's much easier to write a song with this kind of bassline, one that's integral to the composition, on the piano than it is to write it on a guitar, as you can work out the bassline with your left hand while working out the chords and melody with your right, so the habit that McCartney had already developed of writing on the piano made this easier. But also, starting with the recording of "Paperback Writer", McCartney switched his style of working in the studio. Where up to this point it had been normal for him to play bass as part of the recording of the basic track, playing with the other Beatles, he now started to take advantage of multitracking to overdub his bass later, so he could spend extra time getting the bassline exactly right. McCartney lived closer to Abbey Road than the other three Beatles, and so could more easily get there early or stay late and tweak his parts. But if McCartney wasn't playing bass while the guitars and drums were being recorded, that meant he could play something else, and so increasingly he would play piano during the recording of the basic track. And that in turn would mean that there wouldn't always *be* a need for guitars on the track, because the harmonic support they would provide would be provided by the piano instead. This, as much as anything else, is the reason that Revolver sounds so radically different to any other Beatles album. Up to this point, with *very* rare exceptions like "Yesterday", every Beatles record, more or less, featured all four of the Beatles playing instruments. Now John and George weren't playing on "Good Day Sunshine" or "For No One", John wasn't playing on "Here, There, and Everywhere", "Eleanor Rigby" features no guitars or drums at all, and George's "Love You To" only features himself, plus a little tambourine from Ringo (Paul recorded a part for that one, but it doesn't seem to appear on the finished track). Of the three songwriting Beatles, the only one who at this point was consistently requiring the instrumental contributions of all the other band members was John, and even he did without Paul on "She Said, She Said", which by all accounts features either John or George on bass, after Paul had a rare bout of unprofessionalism and left the studio. Revolver is still an album made by a group -- and most of those tracks that don't feature John or George instrumentally still feature them vocally -- it's still a collaborative work in all the best ways. But it's no longer an album made by four people playing together in the same room at the same time. After starting work on "Tomorrow Never Knows", the next track they started work on was Paul's "Got to Get You Into My Life", but as it would turn out they would work on that song throughout most of the sessions for the album -- in a sign of how the group would increasingly work from this point on, Paul's song was subject to multiple re-recordings and tweakings in the studio, as he tinkered to try to make it perfect. The first recording to be completed for the album, though, was almost as much of a departure in its own way as "Tomorrow Never Knows" had been. George's song "Love You To" shows just how inspired he was by the music of Ravi Shankar, and how devoted he was to Indian music. While a few months earlier he had just about managed to pick out a simple melody on the sitar for "Norwegian Wood", by this point he was comfortable enough with Indian classical music that I've seen many, many sources claim that an outside session player is playing sitar on the track, though Anil Bhagwat, the tabla player on the track, always insisted that it was entirely Harrison's playing: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] There is a *lot* of debate as to whether it's George playing on the track, and I feel a little uncomfortable making a definitive statement in either direction. On the one hand I find it hard to believe that Harrison got that good that quickly on an unfamiliar instrument, when we know he wasn't a naturally facile musician. All the stories we have about his work in the studio suggest that he had to work very hard on his guitar solos, and that he would frequently fluff them. As a technical guitarist, Harrison was only mediocre -- his value lay in his inventiveness, not in technical ability -- and he had been playing guitar for over a decade, but sitar only a few months. There's also some session documentation suggesting that an unknown sitar player was hired. On the other hand there's the testimony of Anil Bhagwat that Harrison played the part himself, and he has been very firm on the subject, saying "If you go on the Internet there are a lot of questions asked about "Love You To". They say 'It's not George playing the sitar'. I can tell you here and now -- 100 percent it was George on sitar throughout. There were no other musicians involved. It was just me and him." And several people who are more knowledgeable than myself about the instrument have suggested that the sitar part on the track is played the way that a rock guitarist would play rather than the way someone with more knowledge of Indian classical music would play -- there's a blues feeling to some of the bends that apparently no genuine Indian classical musician would naturally do. I would suggest that the best explanation is that there's a professional sitar player trying to replicate a part that Harrison had previously demonstrated, while Harrison was in turn trying his best to replicate the sound of Ravi Shankar's work. Certainly the instrumental section sounds far more fluent, and far more stylistically correct, than one would expect: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Where previous attempts at what got called "raga-rock" had taken a couple of surface features of Indian music -- some form of a drone, perhaps a modal scale -- and had generally used a guitar made to sound a little bit like a sitar, or had a sitar playing normal rock riffs, Harrison's song seems to be a genuine attempt to hybridise Indian ragas and rock music, combining the instrumentation, modes, and rhythmic complexity of someone like Ravi Shankar with lyrics that are seemingly inspired by Bob Dylan and a fairly conventional pop song structure (and a tiny bit of fuzz guitar). It's a record that could only be made by someone who properly understood both the Indian music he's emulating and the conventions of the Western pop song, and understood how those conventions could work together. Indeed, one thing I've rarely seen pointed out is how cleverly the album is sequenced, so that "Love You To" is followed by possibly the most conventional song on Revolver, "Here, There, and Everywhere", which was recorded towards the end of the sessions. Both songs share a distinctive feature not shared by the rest of the album, so the two songs can sound more of a pair than they otherwise would, retrospectively making "Love You To" seem more conventional than it is and "Here, There, and Everywhere" more unconventional -- both have as an introduction a separate piece of music that states some of the melodic themes of the rest of the song but isn't repeated later. In the case of "Love You To" it's the free-tempo bit at the beginning, characteristic of a lot of Indian music: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] While in the case of "Here, There, and Everywhere" it's the part that mimics an older style of songwriting, a separate intro of the type that would have been called a verse when written by the Gershwins or Cole Porter, but of course in the intervening decades "verse" had come to mean something else, so we now no longer have a specific term for this kind of intro -- but as you can hear, it's doing very much the same thing as that "Love You To" intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] In the same day as the group completed "Love You To", overdubbing George's vocal and Ringo's tambourine, they also started work on a song that would show off a lot of the new techniques they had been working on in very different ways. Paul's "Paperback Writer" could indeed be seen as part of a loose trilogy with "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows", one song by each of the group's three songwriters exploring the idea of a song that's almost all on one chord. Both "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Love You To" are based on a drone with occasional hints towards moving to one other chord. In the case of "Paperback Writer", the entire song stays on a single chord until the title -- it's on a G7 throughout until the first use of the word "writer", when it quickly goes to a C for two bars. I'm afraid I'm going to have to sing to show you how little the chords actually change, because the riff disguises this lack of movement somewhat, but the melody is also far more horizontal than most of McCartney's, so this shouldn't sound too painful, I hope: [demonstrates] This is essentially the exact same thing that both "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" do, and all three have very similarly structured rising and falling modal melodies. There's also a bit of "Paperback Writer" that seems to tie directly into "Love You To", but also points to a possible very non-Indian inspiration for part of "Love You To". The Beach Boys' single "Sloop John B" was released in the UK a couple of days after the sessions for "Paperback Writer" and "Love You To", but it had been released in the US a month before, and the Beatles all got copies of every record in the American top thirty shipped to them. McCartney and Harrison have specifically pointed to it as an influence on "Paperback Writer". "Sloop John B" has a section where all the instruments drop out and we're left with just the group's vocal harmonies: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B"] And that seems to have been the inspiration behind the similar moment at a similar point in "Paperback Writer", which is used in place of a middle eight and also used for the song's intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Which is very close to what Harrison does at the end of each verse of "Love You To", where the instruments drop out for him to sing a long melismatic syllable before coming back in: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Essentially, other than "Got to Get You Into My Life", which is an outlier and should not be counted, the first three songs attempted during the Revolver sessions are variations on a common theme, and it's a sign that no matter how different the results might  sound, the Beatles really were very much a group at this point, and were sharing ideas among themselves and developing those ideas in similar ways. "Paperback Writer" disguises what it's doing somewhat by having such a strong riff. Lennon referred to "Paperback Writer" as "son of 'Day Tripper'", and in terms of the Beatles' singles it's actually their third iteration of this riff idea, which they originally got from Bobby Parker's "Watch Your Step": [Excerpt: Bobby Parker, "Watch Your Step"] Which became the inspiration for "I Feel Fine": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] Which they varied for "Day Tripper": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Day Tripper"] And which then in turn got varied for "Paperback Writer": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] As well as compositional ideas, there are sonic ideas shared between "Paperback Writer", "Tomorrow Never Knows", and "Love You To", and which would be shared by the rest of the tracks the Beatles recorded in the first half of 1966. Since Geoff Emerick had become the group's principal engineer, they'd started paying more attention to how to get a fuller sound, and so Emerick had miced the tabla on "Love You To" much more closely than anyone would normally mic an instrument from classical music, creating a deep, thudding sound, and similarly he had changed the way they recorded the drums on "Tomorrow Never Knows", again giving a much fuller sound. But the group also wanted the kind of big bass sounds they'd loved on records coming out of America -- sounds that no British studio was getting, largely because it was believed that if you cut too loud a bass sound into a record it would make the needle jump out of the groove. The new engineering team of Geoff Emerick and Ken Scott, though, thought that it was likely you could keep the needle in the groove if you had a smoother frequency response. You could do that if you used a microphone with a larger diaphragm to record the bass, but how could you do that? Inspiration finally struck -- loudspeakers are actually the same thing as microphones wired the other way round, so if you wired up a loudspeaker as if it were a microphone you could get a *really big* speaker, place it in front of the bass amp, and get a much stronger bass sound. The experiment wasn't a total success -- the sound they got had to be processed quite extensively to get rid of room noise, and then compressed in order to further prevent the needle-jumping issue, and so it's a muddier, less defined, tone than they would have liked, but one thing that can't be denied is that "Paperback Writer"'s bass sound is much, much, louder than on any previous Beatles record: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Almost every track the group recorded during the Revolver sessions involved all sorts of studio innovations, though rarely anything as truly revolutionary as the artificial double-tracking they'd used on "Tomorrow Never Knows", and which also appeared on "Paperback Writer" -- indeed, as "Paperback Writer" was released several months before Revolver, it became the first record released to use the technique. I could easily devote a good ten minutes to every track on Revolver, and to "Paperback Writer"s B-side, "Rain", but this is already shaping up to be an extraordinarily long episode and there's a lot of material to get through, so I'll break my usual pattern of devoting a Patreon bonus episode to something relatively obscure, and this week's bonus will be on "Rain" itself. "Paperback Writer", though, deserved the attention here even though it was not one of the group's more successful singles -- it did go to number one, but it didn't hit number one in the UK charts straight away, being kept off the top by "Strangers in the Night" by Frank Sinatra for the first week: [Excerpt: Frank Sinatra, "Strangers in the Night"] Coincidentally, "Strangers in the Night" was co-written by Bert Kaempfert, the German musician who had produced the group's very first recording sessions with Tony Sheridan back in 1961. On the group's German tour in 1966 they met up with Kaempfert again, and John greeted him by singing the first couple of lines of the Sinatra record. The single was the lowest-selling Beatles single in the UK since "Love Me Do". In the US it only made number one for two non-consecutive weeks, with "Strangers in the Night" knocking it off for a week in between. Now, by literally any other band's standards, that's still a massive hit, and it was the Beatles' tenth UK number one in a row (or ninth, depending on which chart you use for "Please Please Me"), but it's a sign that the group were moving out of the first phase of total unequivocal dominance of the charts. It was a turning point in a lot of other ways as well. Up to this point, while the group had been experimenting with different lyrical subjects on album tracks, every single had lyrics about romantic relationships -- with the possible exception of "Help!", which was about Lennon's emotional state but written in such a way that it could be heard as a plea to a lover. But in the case of "Paperback Writer", McCartney was inspired by his Aunt Mill asking him "Why do you write songs about love all the time? Can you ever write about a horse or the summit conference or something interesting?" His response was to think "All right, Aunt Mill, I'll show you", and to come up with a lyric that was very much in the style of the social satires that bands like the Kinks were releasing at the time. People often miss the humour in the lyric for "Paperback Writer", but there's a huge amount of comedy in lyrics about someone writing to a publisher saying they'd written a book based on someone else's book, and one can only imagine the feeling of weary recognition in slush-pile readers throughout the world as they heard the enthusiastic "It's a thousand pages, give or take a few, I'll be writing more in a week or two. I can make it longer..." From this point on, the group wouldn't release a single that was unambiguously about a romantic relationship until "The Ballad of John and Yoko",  the last single released while the band were still together. "Paperback Writer" also saw the Beatles for the first time making a promotional film -- what we would now call a rock video -- rather than make personal appearances on TV shows. The film was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who the group would work with again in 1969, and shows Paul with a chipped front tooth -- he'd been in an accident while riding mopeds with his friend Tara Browne a few months earlier, and hadn't yet got round to having the tooth capped. When he did, the change in his teeth was one of the many bits of evidence used by conspiracy theorists to prove that the real Paul McCartney was dead and replaced by a lookalike. It also marks a change in who the most prominent Beatle on the group's A-sides was. Up to this point, Paul had had one solo lead on an A-side -- "Can't Buy Me Love" -- and everything else had been either a song with multiple vocalists like "Day Tripper" or "Love Me Do", or a song with a clear John lead like "Ticket to Ride" or "I Feel Fine". In the rest of their career, counting "Paperback Writer", the group would release nine new singles that hadn't already been included on an album. Of those nine singles, one was a double A-side with one John song and one Paul song, two had John songs on the A-side, and the other six were Paul. Where up to this point John had been "lead Beatle", for the rest of the sixties, Paul would be the group's driving force. Oddly, Paul got rather defensive about the record when asked about it in interviews after it failed to go straight to the top, saying "It's not our best single by any means, but we're very satisfied with it". But especially in its original mono mix it actually packs a powerful punch: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] When the "Paperback Writer" single was released, an unusual image was used in the advertising -- a photo of the Beatles dressed in butchers' smocks, covered in blood, with chunks of meat and the dismembered body parts of baby dolls lying around on them. The image was meant as part of a triptych parodying religious art -- the photo on the left was to be an image showing the four Beatles connected to a woman by an umbilical cord made of sausages, the middle panel was meant to be this image, but with halos added over the Beatles' heads, and the panel on the right was George hammering a nail into John's head, symbolising both crucifixion and that the group were real, physical, people, not just images to be worshipped -- these weren't imaginary nails, and they weren't imaginary people. The photographer Robert Whittaker later said: “I did a photograph of the Beatles covered in raw meat, dolls and false teeth. Putting meat, dolls and false teeth with The Beatles is essentially part of the same thing, the breakdown of what is regarded as normal. The actual conception for what I still call “Somnambulant Adventure” was Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments. He comes across people worshipping a golden calf. All over the world I'd watched people worshiping like idols, like gods, four Beatles. To me they were just stock standard normal people. But this emotion that fans poured on them made me wonder where Christianity was heading.” The image wasn't that controversial in the UK, when it was used to advertise "Paperback Writer", but in the US it was initially used for the cover of an album, Yesterday... And Today, which was made up of a few tracks that had been left off the US versions of the Rubber Soul and Help! albums, plus both sides of the "We Can Work It Out"/"Day Tripper" single, and three rough mixes of songs that had been recorded for Revolver -- "Doctor Robert", "And Your Bird Can Sing", and "I'm Only Sleeping", which was the song that sounded most different from the mixes that were finally released: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I'm Only Sleeping (Yesterday... and Today mix)"] Those three songs were all Lennon songs, which had the unfortunate effect that when the US version of Revolver was brought out later in the year, only two of the songs on the album were by Lennon, with six by McCartney and three by Harrison. Some have suggested that this was the motivation for the use of the butcher image on the cover of Yesterday... And Today -- saying it was the Beatles' protest against Capitol "butchering" their albums -- but in truth it was just that Capitol's art director chose the cover because he liked the image. Alan Livingston, the president of Capitol was not so sure, and called Brian Epstein to ask if the group would be OK with them using a different image. Epstein checked with John Lennon, but Lennon liked the image and so Epstein told Livingston the group insisted on them using that cover. Even though for the album cover the bloodstains on the butchers' smocks were airbrushed out, after Capitol had pressed up a million copies of the mono version of the album and two hundred thousand copies of the stereo version, and they'd sent out sixty thousand promo copies, they discovered that no record shops would stock the album with that cover. It cost Capitol more than two hundred thousand dollars to recall the album and replace the cover with a new one -- though while many of the covers were destroyed, others had the new cover, with a more acceptable photo of the group, pasted over them, and people have later carefully steamed off the sticker to reveal the original. This would not be the last time in 1966 that something that was intended as a statement on religion and the way people viewed the Beatles would cause the group trouble in America. In the middle of the recording sessions for Revolver, the group also made what turned out to be their last ever UK live performance in front of a paying audience. The group had played the NME Poll-Winners' Party every year since 1963, and they were always shows that featured all the biggest acts in the country at the time -- the 1966 show featured, as well as the Beatles and a bunch of smaller acts, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Yardbirds, Roy Orbison, Cliff Richard and the Shadows, the Seekers, the Small Faces, the Walker Brothers, and Dusty Springfield. Unfortunately, while these events were always filmed for TV broadcast, the Beatles' performance on the first of May wasn't filmed. There are various stories about what happened, but the crux appears to be a disagreement between Andrew Oldham and Brian Epstein, sparked by John Lennon. When the Beatles got to the show, they were upset to discover that they had to wait around before going on stage -- normally, the awards would all be presented at the end, after all the performances, but the Rolling Stones had asked that the Beatles not follow them directly, so after the Stones finished their set, there would be a break for the awards to be given out, and then the Beatles would play their set, in front of an audience that had been bored by twenty-five minutes of awards ceremony, rather than one that had been excited by all the bands that came before them. John Lennon was annoyed, and insisted that the Beatles were going to go on straight after the Rolling Stones -- he seems to have taken this as some sort of power play by the Stones and to have got his hackles up about it. He told Epstein to deal with the people from the NME. But the NME people said that they had a contract with Andrew Oldham, and they weren't going to break it. Oldham refused to change the terms of the contract. Lennon said that he wasn't going to go on stage if they didn't directly follow the Stones. Maurice Kinn, the publisher of the NME, told Epstein that he wasn't going to break the contract with Oldham, and that if the Beatles didn't appear on stage, he would get Jimmy Savile, who was compering the show, to go out on stage and tell the ten thousand fans in the audience that the Beatles were backstage refusing to appear. He would then sue NEMS for breach of contract *and* NEMS would be liable for any damage caused by the rioting that was sure to happen. Lennon screamed a lot of abuse at Kinn, and told him the group would never play one of their events again, but the group did go on stage -- but because they hadn't yet signed the agreement to allow their performance to be filmed, they refused to allow it to be recorded. Apparently Andrew Oldham took all this as a sign that Epstein was starting to lose control of the group. Also during May 1966 there were visits from musicians from other countries, continuing the cultural exchange that was increasingly influencing the Beatles' art. Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys came over to promote the group's new LP, Pet Sounds, which had been largely the work of Brian Wilson, who had retired from touring to concentrate on working in the studio. Johnston played the record for John and Paul, who listened to it twice, all the way through, in silence, in Johnston's hotel room: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "God Only Knows"] According to Johnston, after they'd listened through the album twice, they went over to a piano and started whispering to each other, picking out chords. Certainly the influence of Pet Sounds is very noticeable on songs like "Here, There, and Everywhere", written and recorded a few weeks after this meeting: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] That track, and the last track recorded for the album, "She Said She Said" were unusual in one very important respect -- they were recorded while the Beatles were no longer under contract to EMI Records. Their contract expired on the fifth of June, 1966, and they finished Revolver without it having been renewed -- it would be several months before their new contract was signed, and it's rather lucky for music lovers that Brian Epstein was the kind of manager who considered personal relationships and basic honour and decency more important than the legal niceties, unlike any other managers of the era, otherwise we would not have Revolver in the form we know it today. After the meeting with Johnston, but before the recording of those last couple of Revolver tracks, the Beatles also met up again with Bob Dylan, who was on a UK tour with a new, loud, band he was working with called The Hawks. While the Beatles and Dylan all admired each other, there was by this point a lot of wariness on both sides, especially between Lennon and Dylan, both of them very similar personality types and neither wanting to let their guard down around the other or appear unhip. There's a famous half-hour-long film sequence of Lennon and Dylan sharing a taxi, which is a fascinating, excruciating, example of two insecure but arrogant men both trying desperately to impress the other but also equally desperate not to let the other know that they want to impress them: [Excerpt: Dylan and Lennon taxi ride] The day that was filmed, Lennon and Harrison also went to see Dylan play at the Royal Albert Hall. This tour had been controversial, because Dylan's band were loud and raucous, and Dylan's fans in the UK still thought of him as a folk musician. At one gig, earlier on the tour, an audience member had famously yelled out "Judas!" -- (just on the tiny chance that any of my listeners don't know that, Judas was the disciple who betrayed Jesus to the authorities, leading to his crucifixion) -- and that show was for many years bootlegged as the "Royal Albert Hall" show, though in fact it was recorded at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. One of the *actual* Royal Albert Hall shows was released a few years ago -- the one the night before Lennon and Harrison saw Dylan: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Like a Rolling Stone", Royal Albert Hall 1966] The show Lennon and Harrison saw would be Dylan's last for many years. Shortly after returning to the US, Dylan was in a motorbike accident, the details of which are still mysterious, and which some fans claim was faked altogether. The accident caused him to cancel all the concert dates he had booked, and devote himself to working in the studio for several years just like Brian Wilson. And from even further afield than America, Ravi Shankar came over to Britain, to work with his friend the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, on a duet album, West Meets East, that was an example in the classical world of the same kind of international cross-fertilisation that was happening in the pop world: [Excerpt: Yehudi Menuhin and Ravi Shankar, "Prabhati (based on Raga Gunkali)"] While he was in the UK, Shankar also performed at the Royal Festival Hall, and George Harrison went to the show. He'd seen Shankar live the year before, but this time he met up with him afterwards, and later said "He was the first person that impressed me in a way that was beyond just being a famous celebrity. Ravi was my link to the Vedic world. Ravi plugged me into the whole of reality. Elvis impressed me when I was a kid, and impressed me when I met him, but you couldn't later on go round to him and say 'Elvis, what's happening with the universe?'" After completing recording and mixing the as-yet-unnamed album, which had been by far the longest recording process of their career, and which still nearly sixty years later regularly tops polls of the best album of all time, the Beatles took a well-earned break. For a whole two days, at which point they flew off to Germany to do a three-day tour, on their way to Japan, where they were booked to play five shows at the Budokan. Unfortunately for the group, while they had no idea of this when they were booked to do the shows, many in Japan saw the Budokan as sacred ground, and they were the first ever Western group to play there. This led to numerous death threats and loud protests from far-right activists offended at the Beatles defiling their religious and nationalistic sensibilities. As a result, the police were on high alert -- so high that there were three thousand police in the audience for the shows, in a venue which only held ten thousand audience members. That's according to Mark Lewisohn's Complete Beatles Chronicle, though I have to say that the rather blurry footage of the audience in the video of those shows doesn't seem to show anything like those numbers. But frankly I'll take Lewisohn's word over that footage, as he's not someone to put out incorrect information. The threats to the group also meant that they had to be kept in their hotel rooms at all times except when actually performing, though they did make attempts to get out. At the press conference for the Tokyo shows, the group were also asked publicly for the first time their views on the war in Vietnam, and John replied "Well, we think about it every day, and we don't agree with it and we think that it's wrong. That's how much interest we take. That's all we can do about it... and say that we don't like it". I say they were asked publicly for the first time, because George had been asked about it for a series of interviews Maureen Cleave had done with the group a couple of months earlier, as we'll see in a bit, but nobody was paying attention to those interviews. Brian Epstein was upset that the question had gone to John. He had hoped that the inevitable Vietnam question would go to Paul, who he thought might be a bit more tactful. The last thing he needed was John Lennon saying something that would upset the Americans before their tour there a few weeks later. Luckily, people in America seemed to have better things to do than pay attention to John Lennon's opinions. The support acts for the Japanese shows included  several of the biggest names in Japanese rock music -- or "group sounds" as the genre was called there, Japanese people having realised that trying to say the phrase "rock and roll" would open them up to ridicule given that it had both "r" and "l" sounds in the phrase. The man who had coined the term "group sounds", Jackey Yoshikawa, was there with his group the Blue Comets, as was Isao Bito, who did a rather good cover version of Cliff Richard's "Dynamite": [Excerpt: Isao Bito, "Dynamite"] Bito, the Blue Comets, and the other two support acts, Yuya Uchida and the Blue Jeans, all got together to perform a specially written song, "Welcome Beatles": [Excerpt: "Welcome Beatles" ] But while the Japanese audience were enthusiastic, they were much less vocal about their enthusiasm than the audiences the Beatles were used to playing for. The group were used, of course, to playing in front of hordes of screaming teenagers who could not hear a single note, but because of the fear that a far-right terrorist would assassinate one of the group members, the police had imposed very, very, strict rules on the audience. Nobody in the audience was allowed to get out of their seat for any reason, and the police would clamp down very firmly on anyone who was too demonstrative. Because of that, the group could actually hear themselves, and they sounded sloppy as hell, especially on the newer material. Not that there was much of that. The only song they did from the Revolver sessions was "Paperback Writer", the new single, and while they did do a couple of tracks from Rubber Soul, those were under-rehearsed. As John said at the start of this tour, "I can't play any of Rubber Soul, it's so unrehearsed. The only time I played any of the numbers on it was when I recorded it. I forget about songs. They're only valid for a certain time." That's certainly borne out by the sound of their performances of Rubber Soul material at the Budokan: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "If I Needed Someone (live at the Budokan)"] It was while they were in Japan as well that they finally came up with the title for their new album. They'd been thinking of all sorts of ideas, like Abracadabra and Magic Circle, and tossing names around with increasing desperation for several days -- at one point they seem to have just started riffing on other groups' albums, and seem to have apparently seriously thought about naming the record in parodic tribute to their favourite artists -- suggestions included The Beatles On Safari, after the Beach Boys' Surfin' Safari (and possibly with a nod to their recent Pet Sounds album cover with animals, too), The Freewheelin' Beatles, after Dylan's second album, and my favourite, Ringo's suggestion After Geography, for the Rolling Stones' Aftermath. But eventually Paul came up with Revolver -- like Rubber Soul, a pun, in this case because the record itself revolves when on a turntable. Then it was off to the Philippines, and if the group thought Japan had been stressful, they had no idea what was coming. The trouble started in the Philippines from the moment they stepped off the plane, when they were bundled into a car without Neil Aspinall or Brian Epstein, and without their luggage, which was sent to customs. This was a problem in itself -- the group had got used to essentially being treated like diplomats, and to having their baggage let through customs without being searched, and so they'd started freely carrying various illicit substances with them. This would obviously be a problem -- but as it turned out, this was just to get a "customs charge" paid by Brian Epstein. But during their initial press conference the group were worried, given the hostility they'd faced from officialdom, that they were going to be arrested during the conference itself. They were asked what they would tell the Rolling Stones, who were going to be visiting the Philippines shortly after, and Lennon just said "We'll warn them". They also asked "is there a war on in the Philippines? Why is everybody armed?" At this time, the Philippines had a new leader, Ferdinand Marcos -- who is not to be confused with his son, Ferdinand Marcos Jr, also known as Bongbong Marcos, who just became President-Elect there last month. Marcos Sr was a dictatorial kleptocrat, one of the worst leaders of the latter half of the twentieth century, but that wasn't evident yet. He'd been elected only a few months earlier, and had presented himself as a Kennedy-like figure -- a young man who was also a war hero. He'd recently switched parties from the Liberal party to the right-wing Nacionalista Party, but wasn't yet being thought of as the monstrous dictator he later became. The person organising the Philippines shows had been ordered to get the Beatles to visit Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos at 11AM on the day of the show, but for some reason had instead put on their itinerary just the *suggestion* that the group should meet the Marcoses, and had put the time down as 3PM, and the Beatles chose to ignore that suggestion -- they'd refused to do that kind of government-official meet-and-greet ever since an incident in 1964 at the British Embassy in Washington where someone had cut off a bit of Ringo's hair. A military escort turned up at the group's hotel in the morning, to take them for their meeting. The group were all still in their rooms, and Brian Epstein was still eating breakfast and refused to disturb them, saying "Go back and tell the generals we're not coming." The group gave their performances as scheduled, but meanwhile there was outrage at the way the Beatles had refused to meet the Marcos family, who had brought hundreds of children -- friends of their own children, and relatives of top officials -- to a party to meet the group. Brian Epstein went on TV and tried to smooth things over, but the broadcast was interrupted by static and his message didn't get through to anyone. The next day, the group's security was taken away, as were the cars to take them to the airport. When they got to the airport, the escalators were turned off and the group were beaten up at the arrangement of the airport manager, who said in 1984 "I beat up the Beatles. I really thumped them. First I socked Epstein and he went down... then I socked Lennon and Ringo in the face. I was kicking them. They were pleading like frightened chickens. That's what happens when you insult the First Lady." Even on the plane there were further problems -- Brian Epstein and the group's road manager Mal Evans were both made to get off the plane to sort out supposed financial discrepancies, which led to them worrying that they were going to be arrested or worse -- Evans told the group to tell his wife he loved her as he left the plane. But eventually, they were able to leave, and after a brief layover in India -- which Ringo later said was the first time he felt he'd been somewhere truly foreign, as opposed to places like Germany or the USA which felt basically like home -- they got back to England: [Excerpt: "Ordinary passenger!"] When asked what they were going to do next, George replied “We're going to have a couple of weeks to recuperate before we go and get beaten up by the Americans,” The story of the "we're bigger than Jesus" controversy is one of the most widely misreported events in the lives of the Beatles, which is saying a great deal. One book that I've encountered, and one book only, Steve Turner's Beatles '66, tells the story of what actually happened, and even that book seems to miss some emphases. I've pieced what follows together from Turner's book and from an academic journal article I found which has some more detail. As far as I can tell, every single other book on the Beatles released up to this point bases their account of the story on an inaccurate press statement put out by Brian Epstein, not on the truth. Here's the story as it's generally told. John Lennon gave an interview to his friend, Maureen Cleave of the Evening Standard, during which he made some comments about how it was depressing that Christianity was losing relevance in the eyes of the public, and that the Beatles are more popular than Jesus, speaking casually because he was talking to a friend. That story was run in the Evening Standard more-or-less unnoticed, but then an American teen magazine picked up on the line about the Beatles being bigger than Jesus, reprinted chunks of the interview out of context and without the Beatles' knowledge or permission, as a way to stir up controversy, and there was an outcry, with people burning Beatles records and death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. That's... not exactly what happened. The first thing that you need to understand to know what happened is that Datebook wasn't a typical teen magazine. It *looked* just like a typical teen magazine, certainly, and much of its content was the kind of thing that you would get in Tiger Beat or any of the other magazines aimed at teenage girls -- the September 1966 issue was full of articles like "Life with the Walker Brothers... by their Road Manager", and interviews with the Dave Clark Five -- but it also had a long history of publishing material that was intended to make its readers think about social issues of the time, particularly Civil Rights. Arthur Unger, the magazine's editor and publisher, was a gay man in an interracial relationship, and while the subject of homosexuality was too taboo in the late fifties and sixties for him to have his magazine cover that, he did regularly include articles decrying segregation and calling for the girls reading the magazine to do their part on a personal level to stamp out racism. Datebook had regularly contained articles like one from 1963 talking about how segregation wasn't just a problem in the South, saying "If we are so ‘integrated' why must men in my own city of Philadelphia, the city of Brotherly Love, picket city hall because they are discriminated against when it comes to getting a job? And how come I am still unable to take my dark- complexioned friends to the same roller skating rink or swimming pool that I attend?” One of the writers for the magazine later said “We were much more than an entertainment magazine . . . . We tried to get kids involved in social issues . . . . It was a well-received magazine, recommended by libraries and schools, but during the Civil Rights period we did get pulled off a lot of stands in the South because of our views on integration” Art Unger, the editor and publisher, wasn't the only one pushing this liberal, integrationist, agenda. The managing editor at the time, Danny Fields, was another gay man who wanted to push the magazine even further than Unger, and who would later go on to manage the Stooges and the Ramones, being credited by some as being the single most important figure in punk rock's development, and being immortalised by the Ramones in their song "Danny Says": [Excerpt: The Ramones, "Danny Says"] So this was not a normal teen magazine, and that's certainly shown by the cover of the September 1966 issue, which as well as talking about the interviews with John Lennon and Paul McCartney inside, also advertised articles on Timothy Leary advising people to turn on, tune in, and drop out; an editorial about how interracial dating must be the next step after desegregation of schools, and a piece on "the ten adults you dig/hate the most" -- apparently the adult most teens dug in 1966 was Jackie Kennedy, the most hated was Barry Goldwater, and President Johnson, Billy Graham, and Martin Luther King appeared in the top ten on both lists. Now, in the early part of the year Maureen Cleave had done a whole series of articles on the Beatles -- double-page spreads on each band member, plus Brian Epstein, visiting them in their own homes (apart from Paul, who she met at a restaurant) and discussing their daily lives, their thoughts, and portraying them as rounded individuals. These articles are actually fascinating, because of something that everyone who met the Beatles in this period pointed out. When interviewed separately, all of them came across as thoughtful individuals, with their own opinions about all sorts of subjects, and their own tastes and senses of humour. But when two or more of them were together -- especially when John and Paul were interviewed together, but even in social situations, they would immediately revert to flip in-jokes and riffing on each other's statements, never revealing anything about themselves as individuals, but just going into Beatle mode -- simultaneously preserving the band's image, closing off outsiders, *and* making sure they didn't do or say anything that would get them mocked by the others. Cleave, as someone who actually took them all seriously, managed to get some very revealing information about all of them. In the article on Ringo, which is the most superficial -- one gets the impression that Cleave found him rather difficult to talk to when compared to the other, more verbally facile, band members -- she talked about how he had a lot of Wild West and military memorabilia, how he was a devoted family man and also devoted to his friends -- he had moved to the suburbs to be close to John and George, who already lived there. The most revealing quote about Ringo's personality was him saying "Of course that's the great thing about being married -- you have a house to sit in and company all the time. And you can still go to clubs, a bonus for being married. I love being a family man." While she looked at the other Beatles' tastes in literature in detail, she'd noted that the only books Ringo owned that weren't just for show were a few science fiction paperbacks, but that as he said "I'm not thick, it's just that I'm not educated. People can use words and I won't know what they mean. I say 'me' instead of 'my'." Ringo also didn't have a drum kit at home, saying he only played when he was on stage or in the studio, and that you couldn't practice on your own, you needed to play with other people. In the article on George, she talked about how he was learning the sitar,  and how he was thinking that it might be a good idea to go to India to study the sitar with Ravi Shankar for six months. She also talks about how during the interview, he played the guitar pretty much constantly, playing everything from songs from "Hello Dolly" to pieces by Bach to "the Trumpet Voluntary", by which she presumably means Clarke's "Prince of Denmark's March": [Excerpt: Jeremiah Clarke, "Prince of Denmark's March"] George was also the most outspoken on the subjects of politics, religion, and society, linking the ongoing war in Vietnam with the UK's reverence for the Second World War, saying "I think about it every day and it's wrong. Anything to do with war is wrong. They're all wrapped up in their Nelsons and their Churchills and their Montys -- always talking about war heroes. Look at All Our Yesterdays [a show on ITV that showed twenty-five-year-old newsreels] -- how we killed a few more Huns here and there. Makes me sick. They're the sort who are leaning on their walking sticks and telling us a few years in the army would do us good." He also had very strong words to say about religion, saying "I think religion falls flat on its face. All this 'love thy neighbour' but none of them are doing it. How can anybody get into the position of being Pope and accept all the glory and the money and the Mercedes-Benz and that? I could never be Pope until I'd sold my rich gates and my posh hat. I couldn't sit there with all that money on me and believe I was religious. Why can't we bring all this out in the open? Why is there all this stuff about blasphemy? If Christianity's as good as they say it is, it should stand up to a bit of discussion." Harrison also comes across as a very private person, saying "People keep saying, ‘We made you what you are,' well, I made Mr. Hovis what he is and I don't go round crawling over his gates and smashing up the wall round his house." (Hovis is a British company that makes bread and wholegrain flour). But more than anything else he comes across as an instinctive anti-authoritarian, being angry at bullying teachers, Popes, and Prime Ministers. McCartney's profile has him as the most self-consciously arty -- he talks about the plays of Alfred Jarry and the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luciano Berio: [Excerpt: Luciano Berio, "Momenti (for magnetic tape)"] Though he was very worried that he might be sounding a little too pretentious, saying “I don't want to sound like Jonathan Miller going on" --