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Best podcasts about Native

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Latest podcast episodes about Native

Science Friday
Shinnecock Nation, Marsh Science, Weekend Stargazing. Oct 15, 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:29


On Long Island, A Tribal Nation Faces Growing Pressures The Hamptons on Long Island are known as a mansion-lined escape for wealthy New Yorkers. But the area is also home to the Native residents of the Shinnecock Tribal Nation. An estimated 1,500 Shinnecock members are left in the U.S., and about half live on the Nation's territory on Long Island. As with the rest of the island, Shinnecock Nation is extremely vulnerable to climate change. Receding shorelines threaten to eat up three-quarters of its territory by 2050, adding to the existing threat of development from the Hamptons. This issue of climate change and its impacts around Long Island is the subject of the new podcast, “Higher Ground,” from WSHU Public Radio in Fairfield, Connecticut. One of the stories told in the podcast is that of Tela Troge, Shinnecock tribal sovereignty attorney and kelp farmer, who lives on Shinnecock territory in Long Island.  Tela talks to Ira about seeing climate change and development affect Shinnecock land with her own eyes, and her venture into kelp farming as a tool for nitrogen sequestration.      The World According To Sound: Listening To Lightning There is more than one way to listen to a bolt of lightning. While you can pick up the boom and rumble of thunder with your ears, if you tune in with a radio receiver, you can hear an entirely different sound: an earth whistler. When lightning strikes, it releases electromagnetic radiation in the VLF or Very Low Frequency band, which runs from 3 Hz to 30 kHz. This falls within the human range of hearing, which spans from 20 Hz to 20 kHz. However, we can not hear whistlers with our own ears because the radiation is electromagnetic, not physical vibrations in the air. We can, though, capture the electromagnetic radiation with a radio receiver. Radio operators have been picking up the strange twanging of lightning ever since they started trying to tune into man-made signals. They dubbed the eerie electro-magnetic disturbances in their headphones “earth whistlers.” People first heard earth whistlers back in the 19th century. The electromagnetic radiation from lightning interfered with telephone lines and crept into phone conversations. You'd be talking with someone and hear these bursts of energy, like little phone ghosts.  Today, we know earth whistlers are made by the interaction of lightning with the planet's magnetic field. There are over a million lightning strikes in the atmosphere, which means there is a nearly constant chorus around earth.  The whistlers in this piece were provided courtesy of NASA and The University of Iowa.  The World According to Sound is a live audio show, online listening series, and miniature podcast that focuses on sound, not story. Producers Chris Hoff and Sam Harnett create intentional, communal listening experiences as a way to “reclaim autonomy in a visually dominated world that is increasingly fracturing our attention.”  This recording is part of their next listening series, an immersive listening party where audiences from all over the globe will be invited to experience a world of sound together, beginning in January 2022. You can get a ticket to the series here.      Save The Wetlands, Save The World In Rising, the Science Friday Book Club pick for this fall, author Elizabeth Rush writes frequently of marshes. Rush explores the disappearing wetlands of Louisiana's hurricane-battered coast, the San Francisco Bay Estuary, Staten Island's newly abandoned flood zones, and other marshes around the country. But why, scientifically speaking, are wetlands such a feature of the conversation around coastal resilience to climate change and rising seas.  In a recording with a ‘live' Zoom audience, SciFri producer Christie Taylor speaks with wetland ecologists Marcelo Ardón and Letitia Grenier about the resilience and adaptability of marshland, how climate change and sea level rise threatens them, and why protecting and restoring tidelands is good for everyone.      Widening The Lens On A More Inclusive Science In 2012, the Obama administration projected that the United States would need to add an additional 1 million college graduates in STEM fields per year for the next ten years to keep up with projected growth in the need for science and technology expertise. At the same time, though, native Americans and other Indigenous groups are underrepresented in the sciences, making up only 0.2% of the STEM workforce in 2014, despite being 2% of the total population of the United States. Why are Indigenous people still underrepresented in science?   In this re-broadcast of the 2019 conversation, Ira speaks with astrophysicist Annette Lee and anthropologist Kim TallBear about the historical role of science and observation in Indigenous communities, and how Western scientific culture can leave out other voices. They also discuss the solutions: What does an inclusive scientific enterprise look like, and how could we get there?      This Weekend, Take Time For The Moon This Saturday marks International Observe the Moon Night, a worldwide astronomy education event encouraging people to take time to look at the moon—through a telescope, if possible. Around the world, astronomers will be setting up public telescopes and encouraging passers-by to take a look.  Dean Regas, astronomer at the Cincinnati Observatory, joins Ira to explain how to get in on the lunar-observation action. They also talk about other astronomical events, including the ongoing Orionid meteor shower and an upcoming partial lunar eclipse on November 19.  

Science Friday
Native Biodata, Indigenous Carbon Resistance, COVID Boosters Next Steps. Oct 15, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:18


More Boosters, For More People This week, an FDA advisory committee met to pore over data and debate the role of COVID vaccine boosters. And on Thursday, they voted to recommend Moderna boosters for older Americans, as well as people in certain at-risk groups. This recommendation came just a few weeks after the FDA authorized a Pfizer booster for similar individuals. The recommendations of the panel regarding boosters for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines, as well as the idea of mixing and matching different vaccine and booster types, will now go to FDA officials. The CDC will also weigh in. Amy Nordrum, commissioning editor at MIT Technology Review, joins Ira to talk about the vaccine meeting and other topics from the week in science—including the FDA authorization of an e-cigarette, efforts to map the brain, mysterious radio signals from space, and a mission to explore asteroids near Jupiter.   Indigenous-Led Biology, Designed For Native Communities Monday was Indigenous Peoples' Day here in the United States: a holiday to honor Native Americans and their resilience over many centuries of colonialism. Due to a long history of discrimination, Native Americans face stark health disparities, compared to other American populations. Illnesses like chronic liver disease, diabetes, and respiratory diseases are much more common in Native communities. This is where the Native BioData Consortium (NBDC) comes in. It's a biobank, a large collection of biological samples for research purposes. What sets this facility apart from others is its purpose—the biological samples are from indigenous people, and the research is led by indigenous scientists. This is important, say the founders, because for too long, biological samples from Native people have been used for purposes that don't benefit them. Joining Ira to talk about the importance of having a biobank run by indigenous scientists are three foundational members of the project: Krystal Tsosie, co-founder and ethics and policy director of the NBDC and PhD candidate in genetics at Vanderbilt University, Joseph Yracheta, executive director and laboratory manager of the NCDC, and Matt Anderson, assistant professor of microbiology at Ohio State University and NCDC board member.   Indigenous Activists Helped Save Almost A Billion Tons Of Carbon Per Year This summer, Science Friday and other media outlets covered the protests against an oil pipeline project in northern Minnesota, where Canadian company Enbridge Energy was replacing and expanding their existing Line 3 infrastructure. Native American tribes in Minnesota—whose lands the pipeline would pass through and alongside—organized protests, direct action, and other resistance against the project. The pipeline was completed, and began moving tar sands oil at the beginning of October. But the protests and their non-Native allies drew arrests, news coverage, and social media attention to the debate over continued drilling of fossil fuels. Before Line 3, there were protests at the Dakota Access Pipeline, which was completed against the wishes of the nearby Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and the Keystone XL pipeline, which President Biden ultimately cancelled after objections and lawsuits from two Native American communities in Montana and South Dakota. So far, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has remained un-drilled, despite multiple attempts, with help from vocal opposition by Alaska's Gwich'in people. A new report from two advocacy groups does the math on how much carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions these cancelled or delayed projects would have emitted in the last 10 years. According to their calculations, Indigenous resistance to pipelines and other fossil fuel projects has saved the U.S. and Canada 12% of their annual emissions, or 0.8 billion tons of CO2 per year. Ira talks to the co-authors, Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network, and Kyle Gracey from Oil Change International, about the value of tallying these emissions in the fight to prevent future oil projects. Plus, why Native American protesters and their allies deserve credit for keeping fossil fuels in the ground—and the bigger environmental justice issue of pipeline projects alongside Native land.

Fish Talk
The First Fishers

Fish Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 36:45


This episode will look at the ways in which Native communities are continuing their fishing traditions in contemporary America and revitalizing their connection with local fisheries.

Poetry Unbound
No'u Revilla — Smoke Screen

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 18:01


The life of a sugar worker is the center of this poem: a worker whose body and person bear the imprint of that industry, with its demands and smoke and exhaustion. The worker in question is the poet's father, and No'u Revilla brings us into a consideration of how he takes pride in work that depleted him, how he needed to find ways to recover from work that exhausted him, how in his body he carries the story of Hawaii and its indigenous people.No‘u Revilla (she/her) is an ʻŌiwi (Native Hawaiian) queer poet and educator. Born and raised with the Līlīlehua rain of Waiʻehu on the island of Maui, she currently lives and loves with the Līlīlehua rain of Pālolo in the ahupuaʻa of Waikīkī on Oʻahu. She has performed and facilitated workshops throughout the pae ʻāina of Hawaiʻi as well as in Papua New Guinea, Canada, and the United Nations. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Hawaiʻi-Mānoa and is proud to have taught poetry at Puʻuhuluhulu University in the summer 2019 as she stood with her lāhui to protect Maunakea. A winner of the 2021 National Poetry Series, her debut poetry book will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2022.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Poetry Unbound
BONUS: A Conversation with No'u Revilla

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:51


While preparing for this week's episode of Poetry Unbound, host Pádraig Ó Tuama began an email correspondence with the poet, No‘u Revilla. The exchange was so rich that Pádraig asked No‘u to join him in conversation. Together they talk about poetry, queerness and how Hawaiian language, culture, and history show up in her poetry.No‘u Revilla (she/her) is an ʻŌiwi (Native Hawaiian) queer poet and educator. Born and raised with the Līlīlehua rain of Waiʻehu on the island of Maui, she currently lives and loves with the Līlīlehua rain of Pālolo in the ahupuaʻa of Waikīkī on Oʻahu. She has performed and facilitated workshops throughout the pae ʻāina of Hawaiʻi as well as in Papua New Guinea, Canada, and the United Nations. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Hawaiʻi-Mānoa and is proud to have taught poetry at Puʻuhuluhulu University in the summer 2019 as she stood with her lāhui to protect Maunakea. A winner of the 2021 National Poetry Series, her debut poetry book will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2022.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

BEAUTY NEWS
Beauty News Beauty Coming Soon*!! *never

BEAUTY NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:18


Welcome to Wine Time, in this episode we're chatting about all things 'starting a beauty brand'. #beautynews #WineTime This episode of Wine Time is sponsored by Native, Aurate & Pretty Litter Native create effective natural deodorants. Visit http://nativedeo.com/beautynews to get 20% off your first order. Aurate provide quality jewellery with an affordable price tag. For 20% off your order visit http://auratenewyork.com/beauty Pretty Litter is kitty litter reinvented. To get 20% off your first order visit https://www.prettylitter.com/ and use promo code BEAUTYNEWS at checkout. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jim Harold's Campfire
Terrifying Toy Clowns - Campfire 522

Jim Harold's Campfire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 90:43


Terrifying toy clowns and an amazing headscratcher are just some of the great spooky stories on tonight's Campfire! –NATIVE– Don't stink! Native deodorant is my deodorant of choice…it is aluminum-free and is made with ingredients you actually know like coconut oil and shea butter. Make the switch to Native TODAY by going to NativeDeo.com/campfire or use promo code campfire at checkout, and get 20% OFF your first order. -STAMPS.COM- Stamps.com brings the Post Office, and UPS shipping, right to your computer. Mail and ship anything from the convenience of your home or office. Use Stamps.com for all of your shipping needs! With my promo code, CAMPFIRE, you get a special offer that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage and a digital scale. No long term commitments or contracts. Just go to Stamps.com, click on the Microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in CAMPFIRE. Never go to the Post Office again! EARNEST- It's time to break out of the student debt cycle. Earnest can help you by refinancing your student loan. Earnest is offering our listeners a $100 cash bonus. Refinance your student debt at Earnest.com/campfire Terms & conditions apply

Antonia Gonzales
10-14-21 National Native News

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:58


The Association of Indigenous Anthropologists wants a reconsideration of Native land acknowledgements The CEO of Minnetonka footwear company apologizes for appropriating and profiting from Native culture

Charlottesville Community Engagement
October 14, 2021: Boyles resigns as Charlottesville City Manager; Friendship Court agreement reauthorized by EDA

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 18:27


Today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out is for the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. The leaves have started to fall as autumn set in, and as they do, this is a good time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!On today’s show:Charlottesville City Manager resigns, citing personal and professional attacks from Nikuyah WalkerThe Charlottesville Economic Development Authority reauthorizes a performance agreement with the Piedmont Housing Alliance for the redevelopment of Friendship CourtCharlottesville moving forward with planning for climate adaptation The Charlottesville Economic Development Authority has reauthorized a performance agreement with the Piedmont Housing Alliance for a loan for the redevelopment of Friendship Court. Piedmont Housing Alliance would pay the money back through the incremental tax revenue the city would get from a more intense residential development. Here’s Economic Development Director Chris Engel. (staff report)“Typically, our performance agreements are done to encourage business development, job creation, capital investment that creates office space or an industrial building,” Engel said. “In this case, the public good if you will is the rehabilitation and addition of not public housing, but affordable housing that would be owned and managed on a long term basis by the Piedmont Housing Alliance.” The city is currently considering using this tool to finance improvements to Stribling Avenue. This is also the same mechanism that was proposed by the owner of the skeleton Landmark hotel. In this case, the 11.75 acre property is assessed at $8.185 million this year, which yields $77,714 in property taxes for the city. When the first phase of redevelopment is completed, the value is projected to be over $20 million, which Engel said would bring in an additional $190,000. Piedmont Housing Alliance would get that increase through a transfer from the Economic Development authority. “This is a very complicated, complex deal to get this to all come together,” Engel said.This is separate from the nearly $16 million in capital funds city taxpayers will contribute to all four phases of redevelopment. Under this agreement, Piedmont Housing Alliance would collect the funding up to $6 million.“There’s not a profit making opportunity here for anybody but it’s an opportunity to see additional affordable housing added to the city again and an old site that needs rehabilitation,” Engel said. The EDA approved the reauthorization with little debate. The original agreement was written up by former city attorney John Blair before he became the acting city manager after former city manager Tarron Richardson resigned. Engel said the Piedmont Housing Alliance is ready to begin construction. Their website has not been updated with information about redevelopment since last October when a December start-date for construction was expected. More information as it comes in. Charlottesville’s efforts to create a Climate Adaptation Plan move forward this month with a community forum to get input on potential threats from more extreme weather patterns. The October 25 event will be the first steps for the city to complete a Climate Vulnerability Assessment. “As part of the city’s climate action effort, it has committed to developing a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to prepare and respond to our changing climate,” said Susan Elliott, the city’s climate protection program manager..Participants are being asked to review a webinar recorded on October 7 where representatives from ICLEI described Charlottesville’s projected climate hazards and gave an overview of the process. Another pre-forum webinar will be held on October 15. (register) The Community Forum on October 25 will begin at 5:30 p.m. (register)Charlottesville City Council will have to appoint someone to serve as City Manager as of Monday, November 1. The five-member elected body held an emergency closed session Tuesday afternoon to discuss “Urgent Personnel Matters.” “I move that we accept the resignation of Chip Boyles, effective October 29, 2021 per the letter that he has sent to Council,” said City Councilor Heather Hill as she read a motion coming back from closed session. Council voted 5-0 to accept the resignation, but there was no sense of who would take over as city manager. There are two deputy city managers who were hired by Boyles, both of whom have a collective tenure of seven months. Ashley Marshall has been Deputy City Manager for Racial Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion since May and Sam Sanders has been Deputy City Manager for Operations since August. Before we get back to Boyles, there was also news of another person leaving city government. In an earlier motion, Hill disclosed the departure of the city’s Information Technology department, Sunny Hwang. He’s served in that position since September 2018 according to his LinkedIn profile, which has not yet been updated. There are also vacancies at the tops of the parks department and the public works department. Back to Boyles. Boyles was hired in January to replace John Blair, who served as interim city manager after Dr. Tarron Richardson resigned in September. In his resignation letter, Boyles said he had been hired to help the organization get back on its feet after a “time of turbulence and organizational instability.” “This success was disrupted with my decision to to change the leadership of the City Police Department,” Boyles wrote. “I continue to support my decision taken on this matter, but the vitriol associated with this decision of a few vocal community members and the broken relationship with Mayor Walker have severely limited my ability to be productive towards the goals of City Council.”Boyles said personal and professional attacks from Walker and others were beginning to hurt his mental health. He resigned to protect himself and his family. To recap, Boyles terminated the contract of Chief RaShall Brackney on September 1, 2021, triggering a ferocious outcry from Walker. She spent much of the September 7 meeting using her privileges as Mayor to force a conversation about the topic. For context, go back and listen to the September 8 edition of this newsletter. The soundbites for the read of the newsletter today come from the October 4, 2021 meeting of Council, and the last hour or so of the meeting. The agenda listed a formal discussion of the matter at the conclusion of other business. Boyles defended his decision, which was his alone to make under the city’s charter. Boyles’ explanationBoyles said Brackney had moved the department toward being a more just and fair system, but said surveys conducted by the Police Benevolent Association indicated low morale.“It became to me evident that some type of change needed to be made that while we had been making strides in one area, the implementation into the department itself was in jeopardy,” Boyles said. That soundbite comes from about an 11 minute explanation that Boyles gave. For some more background, I refer you to the August 20 “response from the city” to those PBA surveys. The statement also describes the resignations of two members of the SWAT team and the termination of a third. (read the statement)What followed were questions from the rest of the Council. Councilor Michael Payne said he was concerned about the timing of the incident.“It has to be stated that, one, the PBA is an organization that is one that is not friendly to reform,” Payne said. “Those organizations across the country are not friendly to officers being disciplined and held accountable for mistreatment.” Vice Mayor Sena Magill said she wanted Boyles to write down his vision for the city.“I have seen the team that you are building in City Hall and I believe that you are focused on a team that wants to bring Charlottesville into 21st century practices on a lot of things including a teamwork environment,” Magill said.Councilor Heather Hill.“We’re not condoning any of the behaviors that were rightfully dealt with in the police department and that we are committed to a very way of policing in the city of Charlottesville,” Hill said. In his comments on October 4, Councilor Lloyd Snook referred to a closed session from mid August after the disciplinary actions described in the statement were made. “When Chief Brackney explained to use in closed session on August 16 I believe it was what the evidence was of the SWAT team officers conduct, showed us a few snippets of video,” Snook said. “Every Councilor in the room, every senior management person in the room was satisfied with the chief’s decision.”Snook said the City Manager has the right and power to fire the police chief.“The only issue for us quite frankly is whether we fire the city manager for firing the police chief,” Snook said. On October 4, Snook said the answer was no.But for Mayor Nikuyah Walker, the answer was not no. Walker’s cross-examinationWalker used her time to ask Boyles a series of pointed questions, including this one about internal surveys. “How did you arrive from looking at the survey that the Chief was the issue based on those surveys,” Walker asked.“Most of the survey was built around the command staff and answers were regarding the individual command staff but it was just an overall leadership from both the questions that were included in the survey and then the chance for the officers to comment,” Boyles said. Let’s skip ahead a little to another section.“So these issues arose and you didn’t afford her a conversation to talk with her about the issues that you had come to learn and create a plan with her to rectify those issues,” Walker said.“I did,” Boyles said. “And one of our meetings after a lot of this started becoming evident, I asked her about preparing a plan to try to address some of these items. The response was that a plan wasn’t needed and what did I have in mind to put into a plan.”Boyles said that was not his area of expertise. Let’s skip ahead. Walker quoted from the September 17 op-ed Boyles wrote for the Daily Progress.“So, in the immediacy of the decision in the op-ed piece that you wrote that the CPD was ‘gripped in chaos’,” Walker said.“Yes, it was my understanding that some of the leadership positions were not going to be staying if Chief Brackney were staying,” Boyles said. This line of questioning continued. Walker said her information said only two of six members of the command staff were set to leave. “So, you consider two of six people to be chaos?” Walker said. “No, I think it extends beyond,” Boyles said. “It’s the statements from the survey of people looking for other jobs, wanting to be out of the police department. There is no smoking gun in this.”Walker went through many of the comments and read through them out loud. She also wanted to pin down Boyles on what conversations he had with regional leaders about policing issues. Boyles said those were conversations were private and in confidence.“Okay, Chip, so since all of these people are secretive and you think that’s okay, because what you want us to do on whether or not you want to stay here or not based on some random conversations we had without talking to you about?” Walker asked.”That’s a decision you all will make,” Boyles said. “As I stated earlier, I’m here to fulfil the direction of Council. I took this job knowing. I think I’ve even stated for me there’s a job evaluation every other meeting. I accept that.”The questioning continued. At one point, there was to have been a press conference after the release of the August 20 statement.“And then, Chief Brackney arrived at a meeting, right, Chip? And you had changed course by that time that there’s no longer going to be a press conference,” Walker said.“Yes,” Boyles responded. “We had a disagreement over wanting to show the videos that you all saw in your closed session.” A little later on in the cross-examination, Councilor Hill brought a specific incident related to how former Police Chief Brackney responded to feedback. Go back to the tape to learn more about that but Walker asked Hill to read the email in question. “Okay, do you want to pull that email up?” Walker asked“I’m happy to find it, but I don’t think it’s necessary right now,” Hill said. “I’m just saying you are trying to pick specific examples. I don’t want to go down this path with you.”“I’m not,” Walker said, her voice rising. “I was open to whatever you all presented. I asked and allowed you all you to talk first because I’m just trying…”“We were trying to be respectful,” Hill said. “Excuse me?” Walker asked.“We were trying to be respectful of the process,” Hill said. “This is not the appropriate forum to get into all of this.”“You were not trying to be respectful of any process,” Walker said. “I have been on this Council and I know how you operate.”“I’d like for us to move on,” Hlll said. The conversation went back to that meeting after the August 20 press release. Boyles explained the dynamic that was leading him to make a decision. “That meeting was a good indication similar to what Councilor Hill was just talking about when we began to disagree over the videos and other issues, Chief Brackney just left the meeting which again gave me concern of being able to work with that type of interaction, with that type of relationship,” Boyles said. Boyles acknowledged that Brackney had told him that she had felt targeted by members of the community as well as internally. “My knowledge of that comes from what she’s told me and I certainly believe it to be true,” Boyles said. Walker was clear she was not going to let Boyles forget his decision to terminate Brackney. “I can go on about every city manager that has been here, and you are never going to, I told you this, Chip,” Walker said. “You’re never going to live past this decision.”Soon after, Walker quoted from the book White Rage to make part of her point and chastised her fellow Councilors for trying to control her.“Have I made 100 percent of the right decisions?” Walker asked. “No. Have you all made 100 percent of the right decisions? No. You haven’t. But again, your white gaze gets to determine who wins in a situation like this.”Earlier this year, Walker wrestled with whether to seek a second term before announcing in May she would be a candidate. She withdrew from the race on September 8, citing the racism of her fellow Councilors. Walker raised no campaign funds this year. The conversation on October 4 continued, and the rest of the discussion is available to watch.  Now it’s perhaps a better use of our time to think ahead to Council’s next meeting on October 18, as well as the four regular meetings of the year. Two new Councilors will join in January when Walker and Hill’s terms are up. Who will be the city manager? Who will be mayor? Who will be running the city This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

StateImpact Oklahoma Report
Oklahoma School for the Deaf welcomes new, more inclusive Bison mascot

StateImpact Oklahoma Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:31


Host: Earlier this month Oklahoma School for the Deaf unveiled a fresh logo featuring their new Bison mascot. StateImpact's Robby Korth reports the Bison name flips a new page in the storied history of Oklahoma's school for deaf students. NEWSPAPER CLIPPING PAGE FLIP RK: John Reinenger is thumbing through a book of old newspaper clippings. The pages are from his days as a student at Oklahoma School for the Deaf here in Sulphur, a school that competed under the name Indians in his time. He's speaking here through an interpreter. REINENGER (through interpreter): It brings back a lot of memories. Definitely nostalgic. So yeah. I feel very, very closely connected to OSD. It's like my second home, really. (11) RK: The Midwest City man has a son here. His parents met here. He is a 2000 graduate. But there was one thing his mother Sylvia told him not to do at school. REINENGER: My mother told me never to dress like in costume as an Indian, like any kind of Indian costumes. (06) RK: John and his mother are both citizens of the Muscogee Nation. And people did dress up in costume regularly at football games and pep rallies.  REINENGER: I mean, I didn't honestly really think much about it. And then as life went on and I've gotten older, then I've looked at it and realized, Ooh. [air sucking grimace] Yikes. OK. (08) RK: There's been a community-wide realization here as well. The Indians mascot was officially retired this year and replaced with the Bison. Superintendent Chris Dvorak. DVORAK: It really kind of came to a head where there were some serious conversations within the administration that had links to alumni. And we just got the sense that the time is now, you know, we can we really need to have a serious conversation. The writing is on the wall. (18) RK: So he tasked OSD alum and director of student life Trudy Mitchell with creating a task force and leading the charge toward a new mascot. She spoke to StateImpact through an interpreter. MITCHELL: The change is needed. I'm excited that it's going to be something new, it's going to be a new vision for our school. (08) RK: Mitchell met and spoke with dozens of alumni about the potential for change. It wasn't well received at first, but she says, after several discussions many in the community have come around to the idea.  MITCHELL: Oh we had lots of options. We had painted horse, a T. Rex, a Tasmanian Devil. There was an eagle.  RK: But more than two-thirds ended up voting for Bison. Oklahoma School for the Deaf was hardly alone in its use of an Indigenous-themed mascot in Oklahoma. A StateImpact review of school nicknames found at least 75 public school districts - almost 15 percent - use Indigenous themed mascots. Corey Bunch, Education Services executive director for Cherokee Nation, says that can be hurtful. BUNCH: The chants from opposing teams and the slogans that kind of are associated with the mascots and the imagery they can quickly get carried away. And they just don't represent Native people.  (14) RK: The movement to change offensive names is gaining momentum in western states. Laws in Washington and Colorado passed this year are compelling schools to stop using Indigenous-themed mascots. Such a bill has not even been introduced in Oklahoma - the state with the highest proportion of Native Americans in the lower 48.  BUNCH: Certainly, Cherokee Nation nor other tribal nations are out twisting anybody's arm, telling them that they ought to change their mascots. But when we are asked we are certainly happy to participate. (13) RK: Individual districts are considering changes. Tulsa Union recently announced it would change its nickname. Tulsa Public Schools is looking at changing mascots at some sites as well. Bunch served as an advisory member for the review boards at both districts. And he says he always wants to advocate for Native students. BUNCH: We don't want them to be ashamed for any reason to just be the people that...

Grounded with Dinée Dorame
Episode 35 - Life Updates + My Running Story

Grounded with Dinée Dorame

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:27


Solo episode time! Join Grounded Pod creator/host, Dinée Dorame, for some stories around running, life, body and health, social media, and Navajo culture and traditions.   In This Episode: SHEFIT Sports Bras   Follow Grounded Pod: Instagram: @groundedpod Twitter: @groundedpod Facebook: facebook.com/groundedpodwithdinee   Subscribe, Listen, & Review on: Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Soundcloud | Stitcher   Music by Jacob Shije (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). This podcast was made possible through the Tracksmith Fellowship Program.

No Country
58 - Spirit Weather

No Country

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 64:06


David tells of his recent tornado adventures, followed by a discussion of the term "Two Spirit" as it's commonly used in modern discourse. This leads to a bigger discussion of the rich histories and traditions of Native peoples (timely talk for Indigenous Peoples' day). How do we view these cultures respectfully while still granting them the agency? What are ways to express culture without becoming a neoliberal subject?

Antonia Gonzales
10-13-21 Natiional Native News

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 4:58


Vice President Harris says administration invests in tribes Community members protest White Mesa Uranium Mill

Code Switch
Skeletons In The Closet

Code Switch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:22


In a small suburb of Washington, D.C., a non-descript beige building houses thousands of Native human remains. The remains are currently in the possession of the Smithsonian Institution. But for the past decade, the Seminole Tribe of Florida has been fighting to get some of them back to Florida to be buried. The controversy over who should decide the fate of these remains has raised questions about identity, history, and the nature of archaeology.

Fat Man Beyond
345: Scott Snynder! FatMan Beyond LIVE for 10/12/21

Fat Man Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 158:51


SPONSOR: Stay fresh, stay clean with Native, https://nativedeo.com/fatman, or use promo code fatman at checkout, and get 20% off your first order. Kevin Smith and Marc Bernardin return to the Scum & Villainy Cantina to talk to Scott Snyder, talk about the return of REVELATION, review the DUNE movie, discuss Superman's sexuality, and dissect all the other nerdy news the internet's obsessed with!

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
10-12-21 Young people promote healthy living

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:30


Some civic-minded young Native people are devoting their energy to promoting healthy living for themselves and those around them. Several groups are hoping to deploy Native youth to help improve statistics for Native Americans who are disproportionately affected by many adverse health problems, from diabetes to obesity.

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Biggest need for Afghan refugees | Yolo County schools collaboration to keep COVID cases down | Indigenous orphan returns home more than a century later

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Update on Afghan families that have moved to Sacramento and the biggest need to help the families in their resettlement efforts. ‘Healthy Davis Together' discusses their collaboration with school districts in Yolo County for on-site COVID-19 testing. Finally, a UC Davis Ph.D. Native American Studies scholar returns the remains of her grandmother's aunt from an ‘Indian Boarding School' to her native Alaskan homeland more than 120 years later. Today's Guests Jessie Tientcheu, Chief Executive Officer of Opening Doors, one of five refugee resettlement agencies in Sacramento, joins us to update our listeners on the Afghan families that have moved to Sacramento and the biggest need to help the families in their resettlement efforts. Dr. Sheri Belafsky, Medical Director of Healthy Davis Together, discusses their collaboration with school districts in Yolo County for on-site COVID-19 testing.  Lauren Peters, a UC Davis Ph.D. scholar in Native American Studies with a designated emphasis in Human Rights and enrolled in the Agdaagux Tribe in the Unangax Nation, explains her passion for finding the orphan children stolen by missionaries during the Native boarding school era and reuniting them with their families —  including relocating her grandmother's aunt home from Carlisle Indian Industrial School to her home on St. Paul Island, Alaska. 

Steel Magnolias - Holding on to the good of The South

Native to the southern United States, muscadine grapes love the heat and grow wild all over. They can be eaten whole, used in jams, jellies, smoothies, or fermented into sweet wine.    We visited a muscadine winery just outside of Centerville, Tennessee.. Grinder's Switch Winery which we are excited to tell y'all all about. They ship their wines to most of the United States: https://gswinery.com   A few resources mentioned:  Recipe for "Drunken Chicken with Muscadine Grapes and White Wine” - https://ediblepiedmont.ediblecommunities.com/recipes/drunken-chicken-muscadine-grapes-and-white-wine   To buy muscadine juice (not fermented) check out MightyMuscadine.com ******************************************* If you'd like to join our Patreon Community to support us monthly for perks and exclusive content check out https://www.patreon.com/steelmagnolias   Places to Connect: Sign up for mailing list HERE  https://mailchi.mp/e3cef217a5e7/sweetnews Instagram: @SteelMagnoliasPodcast Private Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/32Kna4T

Green Dreamer: Sustainability and Regeneration From Ideas to Life
328) Nick Estes: Decolonial histories and The Red Deal

Green Dreamer: Sustainability and Regeneration From Ideas to Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:53


In this episode, we welcome Nick Estes, a member of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe and co-founder of The Red Nation. Nick is a historian, journalist, and author of Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance. Together, we unravel the topics of why truth-seeking to better understand history has become so politicized and contentious, the boarding school system that the U.S. used to assimilate Native children, The Red Deal as going beyond what The Green New Deal addresses, and more. (The musical offering in this episode is Mother by Jared Sowan, provided to us by Indigenous Cloud.)   Green Dreamer is a community-supported podcast and multimedia journal exploring our paths to collective healing, ecological regeneration, and true abundance and wellness for all. Find our show notes, transcripts, and newsletter at GreenDreamer.com. *Our episodes are minimally edited. Please view them as open invitations to dive deeper into each resource shared and topic explored.

Consider This from NPR
Native Americans Take Over The Writers' Room and Tell Their Own Stories

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 11:42


After decades of Indigenous stories told by non-Natives, two shows from this past year signal a change. Reservation Dogs from FX on Hulu was created by and stars Native people. It follows four Indigenous teenagers growing up on a reservation in rural Oklahoma, with dreams of adventuring to California. Vincent Schilling, a Native journalist and critic for Rotten Tomatoes, calls Reservation Dogs 'a show about Native American resilience.' Rutherford Falls is a sitcom on NBC's streaming platform, Peacock, which follows a conflict over a historical statue in a small town. When the show was co-created by Sierra Teller Ornelas, she became the first Native American showrunner of television comedy. Teller Ornelas told Audie Cornish this year: "There are five Native writers on staff. We had a Native director for four of the episodes, and this is really a reflection of our shared experience as Native people from nations all over the country." In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2693 - The Myth Of A "Nation Of Immigrants" w/ Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 64:45


Sam and Emma host historian Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz, to discuss her recent book Not A "Nation Of Immigrants": Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, And A History Of Erasure And Exclusion. Sam and Emma host historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, to discuss her recent book, “Not A ‘Nation Of Immigrants": Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, And A History Of Erasure And Exclusion,“ on the settler-colonial roots of the US and the impossibility of obscuring them, no matter how much liberals push the “melting pot” ideology. They start off with the coining of the term “nation of immigrants” by Senator John F. Kennedy in '58, which was quickly adopted by the liberal US elite during their ‘60s fad of multiculturalism, and the status of which Biden has restored on the White House immigration page following Trump's removal of it. To help emphasize the meaninglessness of this term, Dunbar-Ortiz helps define what a “settler state” is, and how the US has always been one; they start with the British origins of settler-colonialism and the replacement of local and indigenous peoples in Northern Ireland, before the empire moved on to New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and, of course, North America. While colonialism had existed since Columbus' first arrival in the western hemisphere, the settler state brought about a new form of it, different even from the enslavement and exploitation of local peoples and resources engaged in by the Spanish, and saw the migration of Brits to new lands, while still claiming wholeheartedly their citizenship status to the British Empire. From a start that could not be more contrary to the concept of a  “melting” of cultures, Roxanne, Emma, and Sam then dive into the nature of the US as a Fiscal Military state, made for and by war, as they laid claim to “property rights” across the world via militia, before they move to reflect on the connections between the myth of Columbus and the Americanization of white immigrant populations, and the cultural perception of whiteness that drives American ideology. She particularly looks into the birth of an explicitly racist warfare ideology during the Spanish Inquisition, ingraining this blood quantum view of whiteness into a certain Christian ideology, and touches on how the legacy of Columbus reaches back to the first founding of the US, with the District of Columbia, and continues to be central in the history of Americanizing foreign white folks. Sam and Emma also discuss the absurdity of pretending to care about Columbus Day, and watch the Bobby Jindal-funded Black-Box Republican-Theater-commercial that aired during this weekend's Red Sox-Rays game.  Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: StitchFix: You know your closet well, but what does it sound like? Yes, your closet. With Stitch Fix Freestyle, a shop that evolves alongside your taste, your closet will scream “so you” without actually screaming. Stitch Fix Freestyle is your trusted style destination where you can discover and instantly buy curated items based on your style, likes and lifestyle. Whether you're looking for a brand you love or to try a new one, at Stitch Fix Freestyle, you can shop hundreds of brands personalized to your size and fit. Get started today by filling out your style quiz at StitchFix.com/MAJORITY. That's StitchFix.com/MAJORITY to try Stitch Fix Freestyle. StitchFix.com/MAJORITY. ZocDoc: With Zocdoc, you can search for local doctors who take your insurance, read verified patient reviews and book an appointment, in-person or video chat. Never wait on hold with a receptionist again. Whether you need a primary care physician, dentist, dermatologist, psychiatrist, eye doctor, or other specialist, Zocdoc has you covered. Go to Zocdoc.com/MAJORITY and download the ZocDoc app to sign-up for FREE and book a top-rated doctor. Native: Sometimes life stinks. But you don't have to, because Native has your back. Native cares about the products you put on your body, and they're all about stopping the stink, the right way. You probably already know about Native's legendary aluminum-free deodorant, but they also have body wash, toothpaste, and their brand new mineral based sunscreen! Stay fresh, stay clean with Native by going to nativeDEO.com/majorityreport or use promo code majorityreport at checkout, and get twenty percent off your first order. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
10-11-21 Slow progress on Indigenous issues awareness

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 56:30


The Black Lives Matter social justice movement called attention to just how unbalanced public awareness and recognition is for Native American issues. Native people and their allies took to the streets, toppling statues and monuments that civic leaders long ago established to promote a decidedly white, colonialist—sometimes racist—viewpoint. Now elected officials are pondering what to do with statues of Christopher Columbus, Father Junipero Serra, and others. Meanwhile the number of places recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day is growing and getting more organized.

Queens of the Mines
The Occupation of Alcatraz - Happy Indigenous Peoples Day!

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:53


The famed Alcatraz prison on Alcatraz Island was in operation from 1934 to 1963. For most, the thought of Alcatraz may bring up a Hollywood film or some of the most notorious criminals in America. But the island carries a different symbolism to the native coastal peoples of California. The California Ohlone Mewuk which translates to coastal people, passed down an oral history that tells us that Alcatraz was used by their Native population long before  anyone else “discovered” the San Francisco Bay. Trips would be made to the island in tule boats for gathering foods, such as bird eggs and sea-life. It was also used as a place of isolation, or for punishment for naughty members of the tribe. The island was also a camping spot and hiding place for many native Americans attempting to escape the California Mission system. In 1895, the island was being used as a US fort and military prison and 19 Hopi men served time on Alcatraz for trying to protect their children from being sent to federal Indian boarding schools, which we discussed last week.    “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. This week's episode is coming out a few days early in honor of Indigenous Peoples Day. Today we will talk about The Occupation of Alcatraz and the Red Power Movement which demanded self-determination for Native Americans to better the lives of all Indian people. To make it known to the world that they have a right to use their land for their own benefit by right of discovery. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out.    In 1953, U.S. Congress established a policy towards American Indians: termination. This policy eliminated most government support for indigenous tribes and ended the protected trust status of all indigenous-owned lands. It wiped out the reservations and natives had the choice to assimilate or die out. So the BIA began a voluntary urban relocation program where American Indians could move from their rural tribes to metropolitan areas, and they would give them assistance with locating housing and employment. Numerous American Indians made the move to cities, lured by the hope of a better life. It was a struggle for them. Many struggled to adjust to life in a city with these low-end jobs, they faced discrimination, they were homesickn and they totally lost their cultural identity. Giving a person a home and a job, yet taking away everything that they are, that is defining a human only in economic terms. So, after they relocated and got job and housing placement, as soon as they received their first paycheck, the assistance was done. Termination.    This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Charles, you will love. Now, back to Alcatraz.   When Rosebud Sioux Belva Cottier heard the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary was closing in 1963 and that the property was going to be given to the City of San Francisco, she thought of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Treaty that allowed Native Americans to appropriate surplus federal land. So, she and her cousin Richard McKenzie retrieved a copy of the treaty and thought, if the property was surplus land of the government, the Sioux could claim it.    Belva organized a demonstration to raise awareness and planned to take court action to obtain the title to the island. On March 8, 1964 her group of Sioux activists, photographers, reporters and her lawyer landed on Alcatraz. About 40 people. The demonstration lasted only four hours. It was "peaceful and in accordance with Sioux treaty rights” but the demonstrators left under the threat of felony charges. The idea of reclaiming “the Rock” became a rallying cry for the indigenous population.   Five years later, on October 10, 1969, there was a fire that destroyed the San Francisco American Indian Center. It was a detrimental loss for the native community because the center provided Native Americans with jobs, health care, aid in legal affairs, and social opportunities.    An activist group formed, known as “Indians of All Tribes” with Pipestone Indian Boarding School graduate Adam Fortunate Eagle and the handsome, Mohawk college student Richard Oakes.  Richard had co-founded the American Indian Studies Dept at SF State and worked as a bartender in the Mission District of San Francisco which brought him in contact with the local Native American communities.    The goal was to take immediate action towards claiming space for the local Indian community and they set their sights on the unused federal land at Alcatraz, which would soon be sold to a billionaire developer.   Adam and Oakes planned a takeover of the island as a symbolic act. They agreed on November 9, 1969. Richard would gather approximately 75 indigenous people and Adam would arrange transportation to the island. The boats did not show up.   Nearby, a sailor was watching the natives waiting, some wearing traditional ceremony dress and Adam Fortunate Eagle convinced him, the owner of a three-masted yacht to pass by the island with him and 4 friends on board. As the boat passed by Alcatraz, Oates and two men jumped overboard, swam to shore, and claimed the island by right of discovery. At this moment, Richard became the leader of the movement. The five men were quickly removed by the Coast Guard.    Later that night, Adam, Richard and others hired a boat, making their way back to the island again, some students stayed overnight before they were again made to leave. Richard Oakes told the San Francisco Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   Eleven days later on November 20, 1969, Richard and Adam met 87 native men, women and children, 50 of whom California State University students at the No Name bar in Sausalito just after closing at 2, met with some free-spirited boat owners and sailed through San Francisco Bay towards Alcatraz, not knowing if they'd be killed, ignoring warnings that the occupation of the island was illegal. Indians of All Tribes made one last attempt to seize Alcatraz and claim the island for all the tribes of North America using unarmed, body and spirit politics. As they disembarked onto the island an Alcatraz security guard yelled out, may day! May day! The Indians have landed! Three days in, it became clear - this wasn't going to be a short demonstration.    Richard Oates soon addressed the media with a manifesto titled “The Great White Father and All His People.” In it, he stated the intention was to use the island for an Indian school, cultural center and museum. Oates claimed Alcatraz belonged to the Native Americans “by right of discovery”. He sarcastically offered to buy the island back for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”, the same price that Natives received for the island of Manhattan.    Now I'll read the manifesto   “We feel that this so-called Alcatraz Island is more than suitable as an Indian Reservation, as determined by the white man's own standards. By this we mean that this place resembles most Indian reservations, in that: It is isolated from modern facilities, and without adequate means of transportation. It has no fresh running water. The sanitation facilities are inadequate. There are no oil or mineral rights. There is no industry and so unemployment is very great. There are no health care facilities. The soil is rocky and non-productive and the land does not support game. There are no educational facilities. The population has always been held as prisoners and kept dependent upon others. Further, it would be fitting and symbolic that ships from all over the world, entering the Golden Gate, would first see Indian land, and thus be reminded of the true history of this nation. This tiny island would be a symbol of the great lands once ruled by free and noble Indians.   “We hold the Rock”   The Nixon administration sent out a negotiator, and as the two sides debated, the natives continued to settle onto their new land. Native American college students and activists flocked to join the protest, and the population of Alcatraz often swelled to more than 600 people. They moved into the old warden's house and guards' quarters and began personalizing the island with graffiti. Buildings were tagged with slogans like Home of the Free, Indian Land, Peace and Freedom, Red Power and Custer Had It Coming.   This episode is brought to you by Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This episode was also brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner, carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Alcatraz   The occupation sought to unify indigenous peoples from more than 500 nations across America, the Western Hemisphere and Pacific. Everyone on the island had a job. The island soon had its own clinic, kitchen, public relations department and even a nursery and grade school for its children. A security force sarcastically dubbed the “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs” patrolled the shoreline to watch for intruders. All decisions were made by unanimous consent of the people. A Sioux named John Trudell hopped behind the mic to broadcast radio updates from Alcatraz under the banner of “Radio Free Alcatraz.” “ We all had things to offer each other,” resident Luwana Quitquit later remembered. “Brotherhood. Sisterhood.”    The federal government initially insisted that the protestors leave the island and they placed an inadequate barricade around the island. The demonstration was a media frenzy and the protestors received an enormous amount of support. There was a call for contributions  and a mainland base was set up at San Francisco's Pier 40, near Fisherman's Wharf. Supplies such as canned goods and clothes were shipped in. Visitors and volunteers were sailing in, and thousands of dollars in cash were pouring in from donors across the country. The Black Panther Party had volunteered to help provide security and celebrities like Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda and Merv Griffin visited the island in support. The band Creedence Clearwater Revival gave the Indians of All Tribes a boat, which was christened the “Clearwater.”    Things started to change in early 1970, there was a leadership crisis.  The organizers and a majority of the college students had to return to school. Many vagrants who were not interested in fighting for the cause moved in, taking advantage of the rent free living and drugs and alcohol, which were originally banned on the island, started to move freely among a select crowd.     Then tragically, Richard and Annie Oakes's daughter Yvonne fell 5 stories to her death from one of the prison's stairwells in the guards quarters. Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz in the wake of the accident, leaving groups of warring activists to fight it out for control of the island.    In May of 1970, the Nixon administration cut the electricity to Alcatraz, hoping to force the demonstrators out. Let's face it, the government was never going to meet the demands of the Indians of All Tribes. Next, they removed the water barge which had been providing fresh water to the occupiers. Three days following the removal of the water barge, a fire was started on the island, destroying the warden's house, the inside of the lighthouse which was important for SF bay navigation and several of Alcatraz's historic buildings. No one knows who started the fire. It could have come from either side. Was it - Burn it down? Or get them out?   Two months later, President Richard Nixon gave a speech saying, “The time has come…for a new era in which the Indian future is determined by Indian acts and Indian decisions.” The U.S. government later returned millions of acres of ancestral Indian land and passed more than 50 legislative proposals supporting tribal self rule. The termination policy was terminated.   In the meantime, the FBI, Coast Guard and the Government Services Administration stayed clear of the island. While it appeared to those on the island that negotiations were actually taking place, in fact, the federal government was playing a waiting game, hoping that support for the occupation would subside and those on the island would elect to end the occupation. At one point, secret negotiations were held where the occupiers were offered a portion of Fort Miley, a 15 minute walk from the Sutro Baths, as an alternative site to Alcatraz Island.    The occupation continued into 1971. Support for the cause had diminished after the press turned against them and began publishing stories of alleged beatings and assaults; one case of assault was prosecuted. In an attempt to raise money to buy food, they allegedly began stripping copper wiring and copper tubing from the buildings and selling it as scrap metal. Three of the occupiers were arrested, tried and found guilty of selling some 600lbs of copper. In January 1971, two oil tankers collided in the entrance to the San Francisco Bay. Though it was acknowledged that the lack of an Alcatraz light or fog horn played no part in the collision, it was enough to push the federal government into action. A few holdouts continued to live on the Rock for another year. “I don't want to say Alcatraz is done with,” former occupier Adam Fortunate Eagle lamented to The San Francisco Chronicle in April 1971, “but no organized Indian groups are active there. It has turned from an Indian movement to a personality thing.”    Citing a need to restore Alcatraz's foghorn and lighthouse, President Nixon gave the go-ahead to develop a removal plan to be acted upon with as little force as possible, when the smallest number of people were on the island. The government told the remaining occupiers they would have news on the deed the following Monday morning. They were told no action would be taken until the negotiations were settled. That was a lie. On June 10, 1971 armed federal marshals, FBI agents, and special forces police descended on the island and removed five women, four children, and six unarmed men. the last of the indigenous residents. The occupation was over.   An island ledger entry reads “We are about to leave for Alcatraz, maybe for the last time, To this beautiful little Island, which means a little something, which no one will ever understand my feelings.”  It is signed by Marie B. Quitiquit of Stockton. Beneath Quitiquit's words someone wrote in capital letters “I SHALL NEVER FORGET, MY PEOPLE, MY LAND ALCATRAZ”.   Oakes, who had once proclaimed that “Alcatraz was not an island, it was an idea”, never left the idea behind and continued his resistance. As a result of his activism, he endured tear gas, billy clubs, and brief stints in jail. He helped the Pit River Tribe in their attempts to regain nearly 3 million acres of land that had been seized by Pacific Gas & Electric and had plans to create a "mobile university" dedicated to creating opportunities for Native Americans.  Soon after he left the occupation, Oates was in Sonoma where Michael Morgan, a YMCA camp manager was being accussesd as a white supremacist, and being tough with Native American children. 30 year old Oakes reportedly confronted Michael Morgan. Morgan said he was in fear for his life, when he drew a handgun and fatally shot Richard Oakes. Oakes was unarmed. Morgan was charged with voluntary manslaughter, but was acquitted by a jury that agreed with Morgan that the killing was an act of self-defense, even though Oakes was unarmed. Oakes supporters contend the shooting was an act of murder, and that Morgan received support from a racially motivated jury and district attorney.  So, over the course of the 19-month occupation, more than 10,000 indigenous people visited the island to offer support. Alcatraz may have been lost, but the occupation gave birth to political movements which continue today as injustices inflicted on indigenous people is an ongoing problem. The Rock has also continued to serve as a focal point of Native American social campaigns  and it left the demonstrators with big ideas. Indian rights organizations, many of them staffed by Alcatraz veterans, later staged occupations and protests at Plymouth Rock, Mount Rushmore, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and dozens of other sites across the country. Federal officials also started listening to calls for Indian self-determination. The occupation of Alcatraz was the first demonstration of its kind for the American Indians. It was a spiritual reawakening for the indigenous peoples and renewed interest in tribal communities. Many natives did not know what it meant to be native, and they learned of and about their heritage in light of the media attention the occupation received. It was the first chance they were able to feel proud of their indigenous background. A beginning for Native pride, the kickstarter for a move back to a traditional identity. A revival of language, traditions. Awakening the native people, the tribes, the media, the government and Americans. The “return of the buffalo”. Dr LaNada War Jack, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, one of UC Berkeley's first native students & demonstration leader tells us, “We wanted to bring to the forefront that every single one of (more than 500) treaties were broken by the fed government.” The boarding schools, genocide, relocation, termination, , everything that historically happened to American Indians — continues to impact them today. They are still here.  Now, that is a real theft of freedom. A theft of freedom from the ones who were here first. So, I do not want to hear a damn word about your loss of rights for having to wear a damn mask. You want to fight for freedom? Stand up for your local indigenous people.    Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2020-11-19/alcatraz-occupation-indigenous-tribes-autry-museum https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago The Alcatraz Indian Occupation by Dr. Troy Johnson, Cal State Long Beach https://www.nps.gov/alca/learn/historyculture/we-hold-the-rock.htm https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=ALCATRAZ_Proclamation  

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST
RU167: LYLA JUNE & TANAYA WINDER – DREAM WARRIORS, INDIGENOUS SCHOLARS, ACTIVISTS, ARTISTS, CREATORS

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 53:17


Rendering Unconscious welcomes Lyla June Johnston and Tanaya Winder to the podcast! Lyla June is an Indigenous public speaker, artist, scholar and community organizer of Diné (Navajo), Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) and European lineages from Taos, New Mexico. Her messages focus on Indigenous rights, supporting youth, traditional land stewardship practices and healing inter-generational and inter-cultural trauma. She blends undergraduate studies in human ecology at Stanford University, graduate work in Native American Pedagogy at the University of New Mexico, and the indigenous worldview she grew up with to inform her perspectives and solutions. Her internationally acclaimed presentations are conveyed through the medium of poetry, music and/or speech. She is currently pursuing a doctoral degree at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks in Indigenous Studies with a focus on Indigenous Food Systems Revitalization. https://www.lylajune.com Follow her at Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lylajune/ Tanaya Winder is a poet, writer, artist and educator who was raised on the Southern Ute reservation in Ignacio, CO. An enrolled member of the Duckwater Shoshone Tribe, her background includes Southern Ute, Pyramid Lake Paiute, Diné, and Black heritages. Tanaya writes and teaches about different expressions of love (self love, intimate love, social love, community love, and universal love). https://tanayawinder.com Follow her at Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tanayawinder/ Tanaya created Dream Warriors Management, a collective of Indigenous Artists who believe in pursuing passions, dreams, and gifts to better loved ones and communities while also uplifting others. Each artist travels to perform concerts, run workshops, teach empowerment and artistic skill sets, showcase his/her performance art & artistry, and speak at various engagements throughout the country. In addition to their artistic endeavors, they hustle hard to work within communities whenever they get the opportunity. Together, they developed the Dream Warriors Scholarship. https://dreamwarriors.co Support Tanaya at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/tanaya You can also check out her TEDx Talk presented at TEDxABQ 2013: Igniting Healing – a powerful talk on the power of poetry and creativity. https://youtu.be/BF1z5XHEMaM This episode also available at YouTube: https://youtu.be/XjNH8f2NefI Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice by Rupa Marya and Raj Patel. https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374602529 Poet Warrior: A Memoir by Joy Harjo. https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393248524 Rendering Unconscious Podcast is hosted by psychoanalyst Dr. Vanessa Sinclair, who interviews psychoanalysts, psychologists, scholars, creative arts therapists, writers, poets, philosophers, artists & other intellectuals about their process, work, world events, the current state of mental health care, politics, culture, the arts & more. www.renderingunconscious.org Support the podcast at Patreon. Your support is greatly appreciated! www.patreon.com/vanessa23carl Rendering Unconscious Podcast can be found at your favorite podcasting platforms, including: Spotify / iTunes / Soundcloud / Podbean: www.renderingunconscious.org/about/ The song at the end of the episode is “North Star (feat. Quincy Davis)” by Lyla June. All Bandcamp sales benefit @7genfund dedicated to Indigenous Peoples' self-determination and the sovereignty of Native nations. https://lylajune.bandcamp.com Lyla June's YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/lylajohnston/videos?app=desktop Many thanks to Carl Abrahamsson, who created the intro and outro music for Rendering Unconscious podcast. www.carlabrahamsson.com Image: Tanaya Winder and Lyla June

The Fascinating Podcast
Reservation Dogs with Rev Sonya Brown - Fascinating Season 7

The Fascinating Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 82:57


What happens when you make a TV show about Native Americans with a Native show runner and an all-Native writers' room? You get the unparalleled new show Reservation Dogs. Rev. Sonya Brown (Dine/Navajo) joins us to dive into this groundbreaking show.

Pub Talk Podcast
Episode 308 - Skydance Brewing Co

Pub Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 45:17


This week we return to Oklahoma City to chat with Jake from Skydance Brewing Co. Listen in as Jake shares the moving story of his dad's influence on getting the brewery started, why being OKC's first Native owned brewery is important, the process of going from homebrewing, to the Brewers Union, and finally to having his own space, and much more! Check out our site Instagram Facebook YouTube

Public Health On Call
382 - Indigenous Peoples' Day: Un-Erasing America's History

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 15:10


Monday, October 11 is Indigenous Peoples' Day in the U.S.—a day previously recognized as Columbus Day that is now reserved for reflection, education, and untangling the false narrative of discovery. Dr. Sophie Neuner of the Center for American Indian Health and co-host of a new podcast, Indigenae, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about how non-Indigenous people can think about this observance and how Indigenous people are leading on health practices and environmental revitalization. Learn more about Indigenae: https://caih.jhu.edu/programs/indigenae-podcast. Find your area on the Native Land map: native-land.ca

Dear Gabby
5 Ways to Experience the Greatest Relationship of Your Life

Dear Gabby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 44:53


The greatest love story you'll ever know is the one where you learn to love yourself. In this episode of Dear Gabby, I'll guide you to rely on your inner voice to let go of who you think you need to be and dwell in who you really are: LOVE! Listen now to learn how to develop a rock-solid relationship with the most important person in your life—YOU! In this episode, you'll learn: Tools to bring peace with you wherever you go How to trust your intuition How to awaken a presence of love within yourself My method to show up for spiritual assignments The #1 way to dwell in who you really are and stop fearing who you should be Why you should take the word “challenge” off the table and replace it with the word “opportunity” We're all a presence of love. Never question it. Never deny it. And you'll live a life beyond your wildest dreams! RESOURCES: The following are helpful resources and books I mention within the episode: MIRACLE MEMBERSHIPS Want even more support? I created the Miracle Membership to help you design a spiritual practice you can stick to—so you can feel connected, supported and inspired every day. Each month I deliver brand new workshops, guided meditations, live group meditations, community connection, and so much more. Plus, it's easy to access on your phone, computer or tablet. Click here to join: https://bit.ly/2XQB3Pr MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES Safety, Recovery and Mental Health Resources: https://bit.ly/3hVeMXE Mental Health Resources and My Story of Recovery from Postpartum Anxiety and Depression: https://bit.ly/3nWOiZE BOOKS & CARDS Super Attractor: https://bit.ly/3kufhcN Spirit Junkie: https://amzn.to/3hjdFA0 The Universe Has Your Back: https://bit.ly/3EzaEX7 Hey Girl Reel: https://bit.ly/3fZR8YZ   PARTNERS Visit vitruvi.com/deargabby and use code DEARGABBY20 to get 20% off your next purchase.   Get your own Infrared Sauna Blanket or Infrared PEMF Mat at HigherDOSE.com today and use my exclusive Promo Code: GABBY75 at check out to save $75. Or just go to Higherdose.com/gabby to get your $75 off today.   To experience an entirely new standard of comfort, visit bollandbranch.com. Get 15% off your first set of sheets with promo code gabby.   You're going to love Native as much as I do. Right now you can save 20% on your first purchase! Go to NativeDeo.com/gabby or use promo code gabby at checkout.   Produced by Dear Media. 

Let's Not Meet: A True Horror Podcast
7x07: Daisy - Let's Not Meet

Let's Not Meet: A True Horror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:33


Stories in this episode: -A Bad Egg Just Gets More Bad - RayNell. -Creepy Neighborhood Stalker Staring At My Children - mom of 3 under 4. -Daisy - Zbornak. -Barefoot Jogger - Benjamin B. -Creepy Man Somehow Knew Where I Live And Came At Night - redeemedbywater. -I Was Almost Kidnapped By The Cartel - Sciencemusk. Extended Patreon Content: -A Shot of Jim Beam Apple With a Side of Date Rape Drug - Anon. -She's Mine - Slightly Creeped out Mom. -Two Stories - Elizabeth Walter. Check out Sarah Steel's podcast Let's Talk About Sects at ltaspod.com or wherever you get your podcasts! All of the stories you've heard this week were narrated and produced with the permission of their respective authors. Let's Not Meet: A True Horror Podcast is not associated with Reddit or any other message boards online. To submit your story to the show, send it to letsnotmeetstories@gmail.com. Get access to extended, ad-free episodes of Let's Not Meet: A True Horror Podcast with bonus stories every week along with a bunch of other great exclusive material and merch at patreon.com/letsnotmeetpodcast. This podcast would not be possible to continue at this rate without the help of the support of the legendary LNM Patrons. Come join the family! Go to theouai.com and use code MEET to get 15% off your entire purchase. Find out how Upstart can lower your monthly payments today when you go to upstart.com/meet. Check out NativeDeo.com/meet, or use promo code MEET at checkout, and get 25% off your first order of Native Deodorant. Native aluminum free deodorant is a great addition to your 2021 routine. Try EveryPlate for just $1.99 per meal by going to EveryPlate.com and entering code meet199. - Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/433173970399259/  - Twitter - https://twitter.com/letsnotmeetcast  - Website - https://letsnotmeetpodcast.com  - Patreon - https://patreon.com/letsnotmeetpodcast  - Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/letsnotmeetcast/  - Twitch - https://twitch.tv/andrewtatelive  

Keeping-Track
Celebrating Patti Dillon At The Boston Marathon

Keeping-Track

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 58:16


Fall Marathons are back! The 125th running of the Boston Marathon is being held on Indiginous People's Day,  October 11th,  in Massachusetts.  We talk to one of the best road runners in American History, Patti Dillon, about her career, being the fastest Native runner in history and how she is staying connected to the Native Community. Patti also talks about the power of the mind in running, her unique journey from smoker to Marathon champion and how healing trauma is the way forward in life. Molly does this interview solo and missed Ro and Alysia big time! Also this interview was done in the Fairmont Copley Lobby so there is some ambient crowd noise as we catch up live-ish among the hubub of pre-Marathon preparations. Check out Wings Of America here, and follow Patti Dillon on instagram  @pattispeaks227

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective
Episode 356 "Climate Changes' Effect on Native Communities."

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 137:24


In this episode of Native Opinion, Cohosts David Greyowl (Echota Cherokee) and Michael Kickingbear (Mashantucket Pequot) review a story on the the effects of climate change (not created by behaviors of Indigenous peoples) which has now created a restriction on how many Salmon Indigenous people of Alaska (and other communities) can "take." In another story, Water shortages due to droughts continue to have devastating effects on Indigenous communities in the west. The Federal government is expected to declare a water shortage in the lower basin of the Colorado River by 2022. This restriction is likely to hit indigenous communities particularly hard, as they have struggled to get their legal share of Colorado River water for years—even when those waters have been abundant. Why should our communities bear even more restrictions over an issue which we did not create?Also, a first look at Congressional candidate, and North Carolina Lumbee Indian tribal citizen, Charles Graham. What are his priorities for Indian country should he be successful in his Candidacy? Join our Chat room as we broadcast the show live every Saturday Morning at 10 am eastern at http://www.nativeopinion.com

COFFEE with CRIME
NATIVE ROOT COFFEE / PETER LUNDIN PT. 1

COFFEE with CRIME

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 39:21


In this episode we bring you four coffees from a company with a story of strong family ties to a coffee farm in Columbia, hard work, and an exciting future, as well as a Danish crime that you might describe as both "vicious" and "delicious" Native Root Coffee - https://www.nativerootcoffee.com/

DevTalles
035 - PWA vs Native App + Hybrid

DevTalles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 46:00


Una comparativa del punto de vista de una PWA vs Native + Hybrid Apps --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fernando-her85/support

Bioneers: Revolution From the Heart of Nature | Bioneers Radio Series
Transforming Indigenous Stereotypes with Crystal Echo Hawk

Bioneers: Revolution From the Heart of Nature | Bioneers Radio Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 30:54


From racist mascots, to stereotypes in national creation myths like Thanksgiving, we have always faced misrepresentation and disrespect of our cultures and identities. Cultural appropriation and commodification of our cultures is commonplace, but Native activists, artists, youth, educators, legislators and our allies are changing that reality. We are winning battles to ban racist mascots and call out negative stereotypes in the media. This series premier episode features Crystal Echo Hawk, an enrolled member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma and President and CEO of IllumiNative and of Echo Hawk Consulting. 

Press Play with Madeleine Brand
We can't ignore race when it comes to gender violence, says Anita Hill

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 49:49


 Anita Hill went from being a relatively unknown law professor to a high-profile and outspoken advocate for victims of workplace harassment and sexual assault — after her 1991 Congressional testimony that President George H.W. Bush's Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her. Now Hill is out with a new book about what was — and wasn't — learned in the last 30 years. It's called “Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence.”  “When it comes to women of color, we know that they have a higher rate of sexual assault and rape, they have higher rates of murder by partners. … One in every two Native women have experienced sexual assault. … More often than not, those assaults are committed by non-Native men,” Hill says. “We can't ignore race when we are addressing the problem of gender violence. What happens is that race layers on top of the misogyny and leaves women of color completely vulnerable.” Press Play also gets reviews of the latest film releases: “No Time to Die,” “Mass,” “South of Heaven,” and “Justin Bieber: Our World.”

Bubbler Talk
Oconomowoc, Nagawicka, Okauchee: unpacking Wisconsin's Native place names

Bubbler Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 4:24


When you look at a map of Wisconsin, it's covered in names that remind us of this country's original inhabitants. Milwaukee, Wauwatosa, Waukesha, Kinnickinnic — all words derived from Native American languages.

Diversity Hire
Episode 56: Getting Acknowledged with Tristan Ahtone

Diversity Hire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 77:25


Hello and welcome! We are back from the hiatus. We talked to journalist and editor Tristan Ahtone about how badly the mainstream media covers Native issues and what can be done to make it better, how the edit a magazine like a painter, the vast and weird world of the Southwest, getting to know a community rather parachuting in for one-off reports, the cruel history of land grant universities and whether and the possibility of reparations, and much more. Kevin and Arjun also deliver a state of the pod (we might be winding down soon and working on new projects!!!), our favorite grocery stores, why media news is so boring right now. Get on the email list at diversityhire.substack.com

Storage Unpacked Podcast
#213 – Kubernetes-Native Data Protection

Storage Unpacked Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 39:00


With KubeCon North America 2021 looming, Chris and Martin spend this week looking at data protection for Kubernetes-native environments. Vendors have started to introduce backup solutions, some working within the container environment itself, some outside as part of existing products. Exactly what should be backed up and how should these products work? Are we right […] The post #213 – Kubernetes-Native Data Protection appeared first on Storage Unpacked Podcast.

The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast
Western Native Trout Challenge, with Daniel Ritz

The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 108:30


My guest this week is Daniel Ritz [1:00:58], who recently completed the Master Caster level of the Western Native Trout Challenge. We talk about how he did it, what flies worked, and had a lot of discussion about what actually counts as a subspecies of trout. If you want to view his entire journey, it can be found at www.tu.org/magazine/author/daniel-ritz/ In the Fly Box this week, which was unusually long (either I talked too much or chose too many questions), we have these questions and tips: Why does my line get twisted when I try to shoot line? How do I know if the fly pattern I developed is really something new? What would you recommend for a wing material on bonefish flies? A question on exactly what hook shank measurements like 1X and 2X long mean, and what are they compared to? Does a 10-foot 5 weight Recon have a softer tip or a heftier butt section as compared to shorter rods? Is a 7-weight rod too light for pike fishing? How do fall leaves in the water affect fishing and what should I do? How do I get a non-weighted streamer deeper in the water column? My old floating fly line has a tip that is sinking. Is there any way of fixing this? Do brookies really drop down lower downstream in the fall after spawning? I fish a small high-altitude stream and only catch small trout. Do you think there could be larger trout there? What is a good step up from a cheapo fly-tying vise? How do you gauge your speed on how fast to move in a small stream? How do I catch the large trout in a small, clear stream with slow current? Is it ever appropriate not to tip a guide? A transcript of this podcast will be available in approximately three weeks at howtoflyfish.orvis.com.

Inglês com Rhavi Carneiro
Like a Native #3 - Gírias e expressões do baseball

Inglês com Rhavi Carneiro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 8:52


Vamos para mais um episódio de Like a Native! No episódio de hoje, o teacher Scott vai te ensinar expressões muito usadas no dia a dia que têm origem no baseball. Assim, você consegue se comunicar como um nativo, well, like a native! Come check it out! Material: https://rhavi.co/podcast-lan-03

Good Beer Hunting
CL-088 Doug Hoverson Lives On Native Soil

Good Beer Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 74:44


Every inch of the land now known as the United States of America actually belongs to someone else. Some call them Native Americans. Others prefer American Indians, First Nations, Indigenous Americans, or use other monikers to describe the multitude of tribal identities that have been used, abused, and exploited throughout the generations by (mostly) white imperialist settlers. But these invaders didn't simply erase history—they repackaged it with a new narrative, one that leverages ancient connections between the earth and its peoples for advertising purposes. History teacher and beer historian Doug Hoverson unpacks this widespread practice and beer's role in it for his latest piece for Good Beer Hunting, titled “Chiefs, Maidens, and Image-Making — A History of American Indians in Beer Advertising,” which was published on September 22, 2021. Here, Hoverson and I discuss how his historical expertise and Midwestern roots led him to explore this phenomenon, as well as how other industries—such as professional sports—have finally begun to address the problematic nature of Native caricatures in advertising and beyond. He describes how Prohibition spawned a new wave of strangely puritanical marketing and how his research ultimately led him to tackle this project. You'll hear what lies we've been told not just through advertising, but through history itself, and how the inescapable snare of white supremacy continues to emphasize tradition over collective improvement. It's a complex conversation around a complex topic. But history buffs, beer drinkers, advertisers, and all Americans can learn something about ourselves, our communities, and our current social situation by looking at the past with fresh eyes. Let's look back together.

1A
The Indian Child Welfare Act Faces Its Biggest Challenge Yet

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:47


The Indian Child Welfare Act was signed into law following decades of U.S. policies aimed at forcibly assimilating Native children — including sending them to boarding schools.Now, it's facing its most significant challenge yet: Brackeen v. Haaland. The case could be taken up by the Supreme Court this term. The second season of the podcast "This Land" follows Brackeen v. Haaland — and the impact of ICWA — as it moves through the courts. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The Smart Marketer Podcast
Ep. 74, Win On YouTube, Google Search And Google Shopping (Part 2), With Brett Curry.

The Smart Marketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 27:03


If you're looking to diversify your content with Google & YouTube - or just have more success on these platforms, this two-part series is the best place to start.  John Grimshaw talks with Brad Curry, the award-winning OMG Commerce CEO, a Smart Marketer Faculty member, and one of YouTube's Top Spenders! You've probably seen Ads for many of his clients, True Earth, Native, True Beard, and many more.  Today Brett shares his insights on Smart Shopping, bid adjustments, and the current behavioral data. Plus, Brett provides a few quick campaign ideas if you're looking to increase your Q4/Holiday impact. “Even right now with all the craziness going on…I still believe this is one of the best times to diversify and get started on YouTube and Google ads”. Brett Curry. YOUR ENGAGEMENT MATTERS!  You can make a difference by following us (and leaving a review) on Apple Podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-smart-marketer-podcast/id1522629407) or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts.  We'd also love it if you repost this episode to your social media, share your favorite episodes with friends, and be sure to tag us in your next post, #WeOutHere. Have questions? Please send us an email at support@smartmarketer.com, and don't forget to… Serve the World Unselfishly and Profit Links: Smart Marketer, https://smartmarketer.com/get-started/ OMG Commerce, (https://www.omgcommerce.com/).

Grounded with Dinée Dorame
Episode 34 - Kyle Sumatzkuku & Duane Humeyestewa, "A Journey from Hopi to Boston"

Grounded with Dinée Dorame

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 75:50


Kyle Sumatzkuku (Hopi) is an endurance runner who qualified for the 2021 Boston Marathon and is currently raising funds for his trip. This year's marathon falls on October 11th (Indigenous Peoples' Day) and Kyle hopes to shed light on the legacy of Hopi running, represent his community, and put his longtime training to the test. Kyle's marathon journey is being fully documented by filmmaker Duane Humeyestewa (Hopi) for an upcoming project. Duane is also a lifelong distance runner who specializes in film, journalism, editing, and production. His perspective, as both a mentor to Kyle and a fellow Indigenous runner, allows him to bring depth and authenticity to Kyle's story. To support Kyle's journey and Duane's film project, please visit the link below. DONATE TO KYLE – A JOURNEY FROM HOPI TO BOSTON:  https://www.gofundme.com/f/4bgege-hopi-runner-kyle-sumatzkuku-chases-a-dream?utm_campaign=p_lico+share-sheet+spider1v&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_source=customer   In This Episode: An update from the B.A.A. on Indigenous Peoples' Day Grounded Pod Episode 11 – Women's Running Across the Generations with Kathrine Switzer, Patti Catalano Dillon, & Weini Kelati Grounded Pod Episode 1 – Jordan Marie Daniel “Jordan Marie Daniel ran and prayed for 26 #MMIW names at 26.2 mile Boston Marathon” by Vincent Schilling, com, April 23, 2019. Grounded Pod Episode 13 – Dustin Martin Support Dustin in his #RunWithWings Boston Marathon Fundraiser Wings of America Grounded Pod Episode 14 – Beth Wright Support Beth in her #RunWithWings Boston Marathon Fundraiser Grounded Pod Episode 25 – Yatika Starr Fields Support Yatika in his #RunWithWings Boston Marathon Fundraiser “Hopi endurance runner Kyle Sumatzkuku qualifies for Boston Marathon,” by Duane Humeyestewa, Navajo-Hopi Observer (Online), September 14, 2021. Lewis Tewanima (Hopi), American Indian Observer – Magazine of Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, Summer 2012 / Vol. 13 No. 2. Reservation Dogs | Watch on FX on Hulu Boston: The Documentary (Narrated by Matt Damon) Philip Glass   Follow Kyle and Duane: Instagram (Kyle Sumatzkuku): @kylesumatzkuku Instagram (Duane Humeyestewa): @hopifilmmaker   Follow Grounded Pod: Instagram: @groundedpod Twitter: @groundedpod Facebook: facebook.com/groundedpodwithdinee   Subscribe, Listen, & Review on: Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Soundcloud | Stitcher   Music by Jacob Shije (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). This podcast was made possible through the Tracksmith Fellowship Program.

PARANORMAL PODCAST
The In Between - Ghostly Voices - Paranormal Podcast 701

PARANORMAL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 85:34


Marc Klein joins us to talk about the afterlife and his new novel, The In Between. Marc is not only a novelist but a legendary Hollywood screenwriter…he wrote Serendipity! We talk about his book and the supernatural. In part two, we talk about Electronic Voice Phenomena with Nicole Tito and Lisa Krick. You can find Marc's book at Amazon: The In Between You can find Nicole & Lisa's website at Ghostly-Voices.com Thanks Marc, Nicole & Lisa! -NATIVE- Native is my choice for deodorant! With natural ingredients and great scents, I've made Native a part of my daily life. For 20% off your first order, visit nativedeo.com/jim or use promo code JIM during checkout! -RAYCON- Raycon earbuds are my wireless earbuds of choice! Great sound at a great price! Raycon's offering 15% off all their products for my listeners and here's what you've gotta do to get it. Go to buyraycon.com/harold Thanks Raycon for your sponsorship of The Paranormal Podcast!

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Big money is behind the fight over the Indian Child Welfare Act

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 38:59


What do corporate lawyers, political operatives, and right-wing groups have to do with the Indian Child Welfare Act? A whole lot. ICWA has been around for almost 40 years. It provides protections for Native American kids who are up for foster care or adoption and it says Native kids should be placed with extended family or stay with native communities whenever possible. It doesn’t seem terribly controversial on the face of it. But the child custody law has drawn the attention of groups who see the chance to undo ICWA as the first step into doing away with a whole chain of legislation around Native sovereignty, with huge implications for land use, water rights and gaming rights. In short, a successful legal challenge to this one law, which has now reached the steps of the Supreme Court, could mean a lot of money for a whole lot of non-Native people. “I always say that federal Indian law is the canary in the coal mine, like what the courts are willing to do to tribes. I think everyone should be concerned about and this case for this term, I think will be will be an important one to watch,” said Rebecca Nagle, independent journalist and host of the podcast “This Land,” which focuses on ICWA in its latest season. On today’s show, we’ll dig into the fight over ICWA, the players involved and who stands to benefit if it’s found unconstitutional on the basis of race. In the news fix, we'll talk about Facebook whistleblower testimony, COVID's two-month cycle and the cost of living in flood zones — speaking of the effects of climate change, Molly's super secret project, the “How We Survive” podcast, launches tomorrow. Plus, the birds of “Make Me Smart.” When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain the history behind historically Black colleges and universities, how pumpkin-spice beer became a thing and why Sherlock Holmes continues to be one of the most popular fictional detectives of all time. Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “This Land Podcast” “The Native adoption case that could dismantle the Indian Child Welfare Act, explained” from Vox “A Court Battle Over a Dallas Toddler Could Decide the Future of Native American Law” from The Atlantic “Facebook whistleblower will urge U.S. Senate to regulate company” from Reuters “The price of living near the shore is already high. It’s about to go through the roof.” from The Washington Post “Covid, in retreat” from The New York Times Molly’s “secret” project: “How We Survive”

Between the Reps with Brooke Ence & Jeanna Cianciarulo

This week on Between the Reps, Brooke and Jeanna are joined by Natalie Paterson from Ingarden to talk about Microgreens. She discusses the importance micronutrients have on the body. Brooke avoids talking about her hair. Jeanna doesn't eat vegetables or drink Kombucha because it reminds her of a loogie. For more Between the Reps on Insta: @betweenthereps. For more Brooke on Insta: @brookeence.  For more Jeanna on Insta: @jeanna_cianciarulo. Send us emails at: betweenthereps@gmail.com. To watch Between the Reps podcast videos on YouTube: http://bit.ly/BTRPodYouTubeVideo. Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or using this link: http://bit.ly/BetweenTheRepsPod. If you wanna support the show, and get all the episodes ad free go to https://betweenthereps.supercast.tech/. If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be helpful! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: http://bit.ly/BetweenTheRepsPod. Thanks to our sponsors:  Check out ingarden.com to learn more and save 20% off with my code REPS20. You can experience Organifi's high quality superfoods without breaking the bank. Go to www.organifi.com/reps and use code REPS for 20% off your order. Stay fresh, stay clean with Native by going to nativedeo.com/reps, or use promo code reps at checkout, and get twenty percent off your first order. Right now, our listeners can get 15% off their Raycon order at buyraycon.com/reps. Check out CrowdHealth! Our listeners get their first month free - AND, after you've been a member, CrowdHealth will include a Fitness Wearable. That's 30 days to try risk free plus the Fitness Wearable. Just go to JoinCrowdHealth.com/fit and enter code REPS at sign up. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tuesdays with Stories!
#421 Whole Boost

Tuesdays with Stories!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 71:03


Hoooo weeee, it's another great Tuesdays as we're pontificating about death, the biggest states, how we know what to eat, and more! Check it out! Check out our NEW MERCH STORE here! New designs and items! https://tuesdayswithstories.bigcartel.com/ Sponsored by: Lucy (lucy.co code: tuesdays), Liquid IV (liquidiv.com code: tuesdays), Breakshot Pool (available on the Apple & Android stores or at https://breakshotpool.com), Native (nativedeo.com/tuesdayswithstores or use code: tuesdayswithstories), & Raycon (buyraycon.com/tuesdays) Subscribe to our Patreon for full video of the show A WEEK EARLY, bonus eps, and more! www.patreon.com/tuesdays

The Rich Roll Podcast
Joanne Molinaro Is The Korean Vegan: Lessons On Life, Identity, & Food

The Rich Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 153:36


A central theme of my podcast is the power of a plant-based diet to enhance the quality of life for both the individual and the whole.Over time, the show has grown to embrace a wider variety of themes—art, entertainment, cuisine, entrepreneurship, spirituality, sports, social justice, creativity, equality, and more—each guest sharing his/her respective expertise and experience.Some conversations traverse more than one field. Only a select few impart powerful, impactful lessons across several.Joanne Molinaro is one such human—a cultural phenomenon who goes by the moniker, The Korean Vegan.Born in Chicago to immigrant parents from what is today North Korea, Joanne is a (soon to be) New York Times bestselling cookbook author, food blogger, marathon runner, social activist and corporate law firm partner (although she just resigned last week) with millions of fans across a variety of social media platforms—including over 2.5 million on TikTok—obsessed with her wisdom-laced and thought-provoking food content, garnering her features on CNN, CBS, The Food Network and many other mainstream media outlets.Joanne's audience isn't just massive, it's insanely engaged—a loyalty rooted in her wholesale re-imagination of the cuisine landscape. Her content is so fresh, so beyond nice photographs or the A-B-C food preparation tutorials to which we've grown accustomed, that it's fair to say Joanne has pioneered an entirely new content genre altogether.Exquisitely captured in irresistible sixty-second short films with a penchant for virality, across her social channels Joanne masterfully entwines food, culture, education and self-improvement with incredibly honest, vulnerable, heartfelt stories about life, relationships, grief, family, divorce, surviving abuse, and the immigrant experience. Her deeply personal yarns tug on the universal—an authentic relatability that leaves most teary-eyed upon each's film's conclusion.One of my most memorable encounters of 2021, our conversation spans her remarkable career balancing corporate law firm partner duties with the full-court demands of her growing voice of public influence. We cover her path to veganism (a journey that ironically began with her husband reading Finding Ultra), her experience as a Korean woman living in the diaspora, the many ways in which food and social justice advocacy intersect, and the importance of humanizing the immigrant story.To read more click here. You can also watch listen to our exchange on YouTube. And as always, the podcast streams wild and free on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.This is a powerful, potentially life-altering conversation on the importance of creativity, self-empowerment, and leveraging social media for good.May this extraordinary woman inspire you to think more deeply about your own story—and the indelible power inherent in sharing it.Peace + Plants,Listen, Watch & SubscribeApple Podcasts | YouTube | Spotify | Stitcher | Google PodcastsThanks to this week's sponsors:LMNT: A science-backed electrolyte drink mix with everything you need and nothing you don't. The formula is super high-caliber, it's plant-based with no sugar, fillers, gluten, or sketchy ingredients. For a limited time receive a FREE LMNT sample pack—just cover 5$ for shipping. Try it out at drinkLMNT.com/RICHROLL.Native: Stay fresh, stay clean with Native: a deodorant that isn't a chemistry experiment. That means no aluminum, parabens, phthalates or talc. Just safe, effective protection against odor and wetness. Visit nativedeo.com/roll or use promo code roll at checkout, and get 20% off your first order.Whoop: The world's most powerful fitness tracker is now waterproof. Designed to be worn 24/7, the advanced WHOOP 4.0 is lightweight and minimal so nothing gets in the way of a snatch, swing, or stride. Get the WHOOP 4.O at WHOOP.com and use the code Richroll at checkout to get 15% off a membership.Daily Harvest: Daily Harvest makes it easy to eat more fruits and vegetables with thoughtfully sourced, chef-crafted foods that are ready in five minutes or less. Go to dailyharvest.com/RICHROLLto get up to $40 off your first box.For a complete list of all RRP sponsors, vanity URLs & discount codes, visit Our Sponsors.Show Notes:Connect with Joanne: Website | Instagram | TikTok | TwitterBook: The Korean Vegan Cookbook: Reflections and Recipes from Omma's KitchenYouTube: The Korean VeganAl Jazeera: How does immigrant food shape identity? | The StreamCBS: The Korean Vegan dishes out life lessons and stories of her diaspora experienceAd Week: NBA's DeAndre Jordan Spreads the Gospel of Going Plant-Based With His Show, Cooking CleanVegNews: NBA Star DeAndre Jordan Is Now A Chef On A New Vegan Cooking ShowCNN: How TikTok is teaching a generation of people about foodLAIKA: Joanne Molinaro, aka The Korean Vegan, Doesn't Mince WordsHealthyish: ‘The Korean Vegan' Makes Cooking TikToks That Get Real, QuickLiveKindly: Addictive Vegan Recipes and No B.S.: Get to Know ‘The Korean Vegan'HOW CAN I SUPPORT THE PODCAST?Tell Your Friends & Share Online!Subscribe & Review: iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | Soundcloud | Google PodcastsDonate: Check out our Patreon accountSupport The Sponsors: One of the best ways to support the podcast is to support our sponsors. For a complete list of all RRP sponsors and their respective vanity url's and discount codes, visit my Resources page and click "Sponsors".Thank The Team: I do not do this alone. Send your love to Jason Camiolo for audio engineering, production, show notes and interstitial music; with additional engineering by Cale Curtis and additional music by Moby; Blake Curtis & Dan Drake for video, & editing; graphics by Jessica Miranda & Daniel Solis; portraits by Davy Greenberg & Grayson Wilder; copywriting by Georgia Whaley; and theme music by Tyler Piatt, Trapper Piatt & Hari Mathis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The JTrain Podcast
Get Over The Friends With Benefits Hump (@ashgavs)

The JTrain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 69:42


Comic Ashley Gavin joins Jared on this week's Monday episode of The JTrain Podcast, to read your emails and answer questions about getting back into dating after a break up, seeing a college hook up again in a new city, when to give up on dating apps in a smaller area, and all new deal reveals. Check it out and Enjoy!Stream Jared's new album 'Always A Momma Bear' here: https://orcd.co/vcn-jaredfreid-mommabearSponsored by: Headspace (headspace.com/jtrain), JuneShine (juneshine.com/jtrain or use code: jtrain), & Native (nativedeo.com/jtrain or use code: jtrain)Subscribe to the JTrain Patreon now at www.patreon.com/jaredfreidinstagram.com/jaredfreid // instagram.com/ashgavs // instagram.com/classicshelbSubscribe to The JTrain Podcast on Apple Podcasts: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/By: Jared Freid