Podcasts about american indian

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,086PODCASTS
  • 2,020EPISODES
  • 53mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 4, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about american indian

Show all podcasts related to american indian

Latest podcast episodes about american indian

The John Batchelor Show
4/4 The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 9:35


Photo:  President Roosevelt at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington, Virginia, where the president attended the Armistice Day commemoration. 4/4    The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell                       Hardcover – May 22, 2018  When the first Unknown Soldier was laid to rest in Arlington, General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, selected eight of America's most decorated, battle-hardened veterans to serve as Body Bearers. For the first time, O'Donnell portrays their heroics on the battlefield one hundred years ago, thereby animating the Tomb by giving voice to all who have served. The Body Bearers appropriately spanned America's service branches and specialties. Their ranks include a cowboy who relived the charge of the light brigade, an American Indian who heroically breached mountains of German barbed wire, a salty New Englander who dueled a U-boat for hours in a fierce gunfight, a tough New Yorker who sacrificed his body to save his ship, and an indomitable gunner who, though blinded by gas, nonetheless overcame five machine-gun nests. Their stories slip easily into the larger narrative of America's involvement in the conflict, transporting readers into the midst of dramatic battles during 1917–1918 that ultimately decided the Great War https://www.amazon.com/Unknowns-Americas-Soldier-Decorated-Brought/dp/0802128335

The John Batchelor Show
3/4 The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 11:05


Photo:  Tomb Unknown Soldier in Athens, Greece 3/4    The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell                       Hardcover – May 22, 2018  When the first Unknown Soldier was laid to rest in Arlington, General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, selected eight of America's most decorated, battle-hardened veterans to serve as Body Bearers. For the first time, O'Donnell portrays their heroics on the battlefield one hundred years ago, thereby animating the Tomb by giving voice to all who have served. The Body Bearers appropriately spanned America's service branches and specialties. Their ranks include a cowboy who relived the charge of the light brigade, an American Indian who heroically breached mountains of German barbed wire, a salty New Englander who dueled a U-boat for hours in a fierce gunfight, a tough New Yorker who sacrificed his body to save his ship, and an indomitable gunner who, though blinded by gas, nonetheless overcame five machine-gun nests. Their stories slip easily into the larger narrative of America's involvement in the conflict, transporting readers into the midst of dramatic battles during 1917–1918 that ultimately decided the Great War https://www.amazon.com/Unknowns-Americas-Soldier-Decorated-Brought/dp/0802128335

The John Batchelor Show
2/4 The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 8:00


Photo:  Sailor and girl at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Washington, D.C. 2/4    The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell                        Hardcover – May 22, 2018  When the first Unknown Soldier was laid to rest in Arlington, General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, selected eight of America's most decorated, battle-hardened veterans to serve as Body Bearers. For the first time, O'Donnell portrays their heroics on the battlefield one hundred years ago, thereby animating the Tomb by giving voice to all who have served. The Body Bearers appropriately spanned America's service branches and specialties. Their ranks include a cowboy who relived the charge of the light brigade, an American Indian who heroically breached mountains of German barbed wire, a salty New Englander who dueled a U-boat for hours in a fierce gunfight, a tough New Yorker who sacrificed his body to save his ship, and an indomitable gunner who, though blinded by gas, nonetheless overcame five machine-gun nests. Their stories slip easily into the larger narrative of America's involvement in the conflict, transporting readers into the midst of dramatic battles during 1917–1918 that ultimately decided the Great War https://www.amazon.com/Unknowns-Americas-Soldier-Decorated-Brought/dp/0802128335

The John Batchelor Show
1/4 The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 10:50


Photo:   Tomb of Unknown Soldier, Oct. 20, 1938 1/4    The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell   Hardcover – May 22, 2018  When the first Unknown Soldier was laid to rest in Arlington, General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, selected eight of America's most decorated, battle-hardened veterans to serve as Body Bearers. For the first time, O'Donnell portrays their heroics on the battlefield one hundred years ago, thereby animating the Tomb by giving voice to all who have served. The Body Bearers appropriately spanned America's service branches and specialties. Their ranks include a cowboy who relived the charge of the light brigade, an American Indian who heroically breached mountains of German barbed wire, a salty New Englander who dueled a U-boat for hours in a fierce gunfight, a tough New Yorker who sacrificed his body to save his ship, and an indomitable gunner who, though blinded by gas, nonetheless overcame five machine-gun nests. Their stories slip easily into the larger narrative of America's involvement in the conflict, transporting readers into the midst of dramatic battles during 1917–1918 that ultimately decided the Great War https://www.amazon.com/Unknowns-Americas-Soldier-Decorated-Brought/dp/0802128335

Your Brain on Facts
This Land is Our Land (ep 173)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:51


In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, and it's been downhill for New World peoples ever since.  Today we look at residential schools, the occupation of Alcatraz by Indians of All Tribes, the Oka crisis (aka the Mohawk resistance), and Sacheen Littlefeather's Oscar speech. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website. Late summer, 1990.  The protest had been going on for two months; tensions were escalating.  Soldiers had been dispatched to enforce the government's will, but the Kahnawake Mohawk weren't going to give up another inch of their land.  14 year old Waneek and her 4 year old sister Kaniehtiio were there with their activist mother when the violence started.  Waneek tried to get little Tio to safety when she saw a soldier who had taken her school books from her weeks prior...and he stabbed her in the chest.  My name's...   One of my goals with this podcast is to tell the stories that don't get told, the stories of people of color and women.  It's not always easy.  Pick a topic to research and it's white men all the way down.  But, even when I haven't been struggling with my chronic idiopathic pulmonary conditions, as I've been for the past three acute months, I've dropped the ball.  Mea culpa.  So let me try to catch up a little bit here as we close out November and Native American Heritage month.  And since the lungs are still playing up a bit, I'm tagging past Moxie in to help, though I've done with I can to polish her audio, even though I lost more than 100 episodes worth of work files when I changed computers and deleted the hard drive on my right rather than the hard drive on my left.     Today's episode isn't going to be a knee-slapping snark fest, but the severity of the stories is the precise reason we need to tell them, especially the ones that happened relatively recently but are treated like a vague paragraph in an elementary school textbook.  Come with me now, to the 1960's and the edge of California, to a rocky island in San Francisco bay.  Yes, that one, Alcatraz, the Rock.     After the American Indian Center in San Francisco was destroyed in a fire in October 1969, an activist group called “Indians of All Tribes” turned its attention to Alcatraz island and the prison which had closed six years earlier.  I'm going to abbreviate Indians of All Tribes to IAT, rather than shorten it to Indians, just so you know.  A small party, led by Mohawk college student Richard Oakes, went out to the island on Nov 9, but were only there one night before the authorities removed them.  That didn't disappoint Oakes, who told the SF Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   11 days later, a much larger group of Indians of All Tribes members, a veritable occupation force of 89 men, women and children, sailed to the island in the dead of night and claimed Alcatraz for all North America natives.  Despite warnings from authorities, the IAT set up house in the old guards' quarters and began liberally, vibrantly redecorating, spray-painting the forboding gray walls with flowers and slogans like “Red Power” and “Custer Had It Coming.”  The water tower read “Peace and Freedom. Welcome. Home of the Free Indian Land.”  And of course I put pictures of that in the Vodacast app.  Have you checked it out?  I'm still getting the hang of it...  The IAT not only had a plan, they had a manifesto, addressed to “The Great White Father and All His People,” in which they declared their intentions to use the island for a school, cultural center and museum.  Alcatraz was theirs, they claimed, “by right of discovery,” though the manifesto did offer to buy the island for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”—the price supposedly paid for the island of Manhattan.     Rather than risk a PR fall-out, the Nixon administration opted to leave the occupiers alone as long as things remained peaceful and just kinda wait the situation out.  The island didn't even have potable water; how long could the IAT stay there?  Jokes on you, politicians of 50 years ago, because many of the occupiers lived in conditions as bad on reservations.  They'd unknowingly been training for this their entire lives.  Native American college students and activists veritably swarmed the island and the population ballooned to more than 600 people, twice the official capacity of the prison.  They formed a governing body and set up school for the kids, a communal kitchen, clinic, and a security detail called “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs.”  Other activists helped move people and supplies to the island and supportive well-wishers send money, clothes and canned food.    Government officials would travel to the island repeatedly to try, and fail, to negotiate.  The IAT would settle for nothing less than the deed to Alcatraz Island, and the government maintained such a property transfer would be impossible.  The occupation was going better than anyone expected, at least for the first few months.  Then, many of the initial wave of residents had to go back to college and their places were taken by people more interested in no rent and free food than in any cause.  Drugs and alcohol, which were banned, were soon prevalent.  Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz after his stepdaughter died in a fall, and things began to unravel even more quickly.  By May, the sixth month of the occupation, the government dispensed with diplomatic efforts and cut all remaining power to Alcatraz.  Only a few weeks later, a fire tore across the island and destroyed several of Alcatraz's historic buildings.  Federal marshals removed the last occupiers in June of the second year, an impressive 19 months after they first arrived, six men, five women and four children.  This time, when laws were passed after an act of rebellion, they were *for the rebels, which many states enacting laws for tribal self rule.  When Alcatraz opened as a national park in 1973, not only had the graffiti from the occupation not been removed, it was preserved as part of the island's history.   People gather at Alcatraz every November for an “Un-Thanksgiving Day” celebrating Native culture and activism. RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL   The American government took tens of thousands of children from Native families and placed them in boarding schools with strict assimilation practices.  Their philosophy - kill the Indian to save the man.  That was the mindset under which the U.S. government Native children to attend boarding schools, beginning in the late 19th century, when the government was still fighting “Indian wars.”   There had been day and boarding schools on reservations prior to 1870, when U.S. cavalry captain, Richard Henry Pratt established the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania.  This school was not on a reservation, so as to further remove indigenous influences.  The Carlisle school and other boarding schools were part of a long history of U.S. attempts to either kill, remove, or assimilate Native Americans.  “As white population grew in the United States and people settled further west towards the Mississippi in the late 1800s, there was increasing pressure on the recently removed groups to give up some of their new land,” according to the Minnesota Historical Society. Since there was no more Western territory to push them towards, the U.S. decided to remove Native Americans by assimilating them. In 1885, Commissioner of Indian Affairs Hiram Price explained the logic: “it is cheaper to give them education than to fight them.”   Off-reservation schools began their assault on Native cultural identity as soon as students arrived, by first doing away with all outward signs of tribal life that the children brought with them.  The long braids worn by boys were cut off.  Native clothes were replaced with uniforms.  The children were given new Anglicized names, including new surnames.  Traditional Native foods were abandoned, as were things like sharing from communal dishes,  forcing students to use the table manners of white society, complete with silverware, napkins and tablecloths.  The strictest prohibition arguably fell on their native languages.  Students were forbidden to speak their tribal language, even to each other.  Some school rewarded children who spoke only English, but most schools chose the stick over the carrot and relied on punishment to achieve this aim.  This is especially cruel when you consider that many of the words the children were being forced to learn and use had no equivalent in their mother tongue.   The Indian boarding schools taught history with a definite white bias.  Columbus Day was heralded as a banner day in history and a beneficial event for Native people, as it was only after discovery did Native Americans become part of history.  Thanksgiving was a holiday to celebrate “good” Indians having aided the brave Pilgrim Fathers.  On Memorial Day, some students at off-reservation schools were made to decorate the graves of soldiers sent to kill their fathers.   Half of each school day was spent on industrial training. Girls learned to cook, clean, sew, care for poultry and do laundry for the entire institution.  Boys learned industrial skills such as blacksmithing, shoemaking or performed manual labor such as farming.  Not receiving much funding from the government, the schools were required to be as self-sufficient as possible, so students did the majority of the work.  By 1900, school curriculums tilted even further toward industrial training while academics were neglected.   The Carlisle school developed a “placing out system,” which put Native students in the mainstream community for summer or a year at a time, with the official goal of exposing them to more job skills.  A number of these programs were out-right exploitive.  At the Phoenix Indian School, girls became the major source of domestic labor for white families in the area, while boys were placed in seasonal harvest or other jobs that no one else wanted.   Conversion to Christianity was also deemed essential to the cause.  Curriculums included heavy emphasis of religious instruction, such as the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes and Psalms.  Sunday school meant lectures on sin and guilt.  Christianity governed gender relations at the schools and most schools invested their energy in keeping the sexes apart, in some cases endangering the lives of the students by locking girls in their dormitories at night.     Discipline within the Indian boarding schools was severe and generally consisted of confinement, corporal punishment, or restriction of food.  In addition to coping with the severe discipline, students were ravaged by disease exacerbated by crowded conditions at the boarding schools. Tuberculosis, influenza, and trachoma (“sore eyes”) were the greatest threats.  In December of 1899, measles broke out at the Phoenix Indian School, reaching epidemic proportions by January.  In its wake, 325 cases of measles, 60 cases of pneumonia, and 9 deaths were recorded in a 10-day period.  During Carlisle's operation, from 1879 and 1918, nearly 200 children died and were buried near the school.   Naturally, Indian people resisted the schools in various ways. Sometimes entire villages refused to enroll their children in white schools.  Native parents also banded together to withdraw their children en masse, encouraging runaways, and undermining the schools' influence during summer break.  In some cases, police were sent onto the reservations to seize children from their parents.  The police would continue to take children until the school was filled, so sometimes orphans were offered up or families would negotiate a family quota. Navajo police officers would take children assumed to be less intelligent, those not well cared for, or those physically impaired.  This was their attempt to protect the long-term survival of their tribe by keeping healthy, intelligent children at home.     It was not until 1978, within the lifetime of many of my gentle listeners. that the passing of the Indian Child Welfare Act that Native American parents gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.   Though the schools left a devastating legacy, they failed to eradicate Native American cultures as they'd hoped. Later, the Navajo Code Talkers who helped the U.S. win World War II would reflect on the strange irony this forced assimilation had played in their lives.  “As adults, [the Code Talkers] found it puzzling that the same government that had tried to take away their languages in schools later gave them a critical role speaking their languages in military service,” recounts the National Museum of the American Indian.   In addition to documentaries, I'd like to recommend the movie The Education of Little Tree, starring James Cromwell, Tantu Cardinal and Graham Green, about a part-Charokee boy who goes to live with his grandparents in the Tennessee mountains, but is then sent to an Indian school.   There are a number of off-reservation boarding schools in operation today.  Life in the schools is still quite strict, but now includes teaching Native culture and language rather than erasing it.  Though they cannot be separated from their legacy of oppression and cultural violence, for many modern children, they're a step to a better life.  Poverty is endemic to many reservations, which also see much higher than average rates of alcoholism, drug use, and suicide.    For the students, these schools are a chance to escape.   OKA   Some words are visceral reminders of collective historic trauma. “Selma” or “Kent State” recall the civil rights movement and the use of military force against U.S. citizens. “Bloody Sunday” evokes “the Troubles” of Northern Ireland. Within Indigenous communities in North America, the word is “Oka.”  That word reminds us of the overwhelming Canadian response to a small demonstration in a dispute over Mohawk land in Quebec, Canada, in 1990. Over the course of three months, the Canadian government sent 2,000 police and 4,500 soldiers (an entire brigade), backed by armored vehicles, helicopters, jet fighters and even the Navy, to subdue several small Mohawk communities.  What was at stake?  What was worth all this to the government?  A golf course and some condos.   The Kanesetake had been fighting for their land for centuries, trying to do it in accordance with the white man's laws, as far back as appeals to the British government in 1761. In 1851, the governor general of Canada refused to recognize their right to their land.  8 years later, the land was given to the Sulpicians, a Catholic diocese.  In 1868, the government of the nascent Dominion of Canada denied that the Mohawk's original land grant had even reserved land for them, so it wasn't covered under the Indian Act. In the 1910's, the he Mohawks of Kanesatake's appealed all the way to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, Canada's highest appeals court at the time, who ruled that official title to the land was held by the Sulpicians.  By the end of the Second World War, the Sulpicians had sold all of their remaining land and had left the area. Surely the Mohawk could have their land back now!  Nope.  The Mohawk of Kanesatake were now confined to about 2.3mi sq/6 km sq, known as The Pines, less than 1/10th of the land they once held.  The Mohawk people of Kahnawake, Kanesetake and Akwesasne asserted Aboriginal title to their ancestral lands in 1975, but their claim was rejected on the most BS possible reason -- that they had not held the land continuously from time immemorial.  And on and on.   So you can understand why they'd be a little miffed when plans were announced to expand a golf course that had been built in 1961, expanding onto land that was used for sacred and ceremonial purposes and included a graveyard.  Again, the Mohawk tried to use the proper legal channels and again they got royally fucked over.  That March, their protests and petitions were ignored by the City Council in Oka.  They had to do something the city couldn't ignore.  They began a blockade of a small dirt road in The Pines and they maintained it for a few months.  The township of Oka tried to get a court injunction to order its removal.  On July 11, 1990, the Quebec provincial police sent in a large heavily armed force of tactical officers armed with m16s and tear gas and such-like to dismantle this blockade.  The Mohawks met this show of force with a show of their own.  Behind the peaceful protestors, warriors stood armed and ready.     Let me try to give this story some of the air time it deserves.  April 1, 1989, 300 Kanesatake Mohawks marched through Oka to protest against Mayor Jean Ouellette's plan to expand the town's golf course.  On March 10, 1990, --hey, that's my birthday!  the day, not the year-- After Oka's municipal council voted to proceed with the golf course expansion project, a small group of Mohawks barricades the access road.  With a building.  They drug a fishing shack into the Pines and topped it with a banner that read “Are you aware that this is Mohawk territory?” and the same again in French, because Quebec.  There's a picture on the Vodacast app, naturally, as well as a photo called Face to Face is a photograph of Canadian Pte. Patrick Cloutier and Anishinaabe warrior Brad Larocque staring each other down during the Oka Crisis. It was taken on September 1, 1990 by Shaney Komulainen, and has become one of Canada's most famous images.  It really should be more famous outside of Canada, like the lone protestor blocking tanks in Tiananmen Square or 1968 Summer Olympics, Tommie Smith and John Carlos staged a protest and displayed a symbol of Black power during their medal ceremony.  Check it out on Vodacast and let me know if you agree, soc. med.   during the summer of 1990 the Mohawk warrior society engaged in the 78 day armed standoff with the s.q Provincial Police and the Canadian Armed Forces in order to protect an area of their territory from development known as the pines near the town of oka.   This area was used as a tribal cemetery along with other tribal activities important to the Mohawks.  The oka crisis or also known as the Mohawk resistance was a defensive action that gained international attention,  taken by Mohawks of the Kanna Satake reserve along with other Mohawks from the nearby communities of Kanna waka as well as the Aquosasne on a reservation on the American side of the u.s. Canadian colonial border.  It was one of the most recent examples of Native armed resistance that was successful in stopping construction and development on to tribal lands.  So what was being developed that led to this armed confrontation leading to the death of an sq SWAT officer during that hot summer?  Golf.  The town of oka and investors wanted to expand a nine-hole golf course at the Open Golf Club into an 18-hole course as well as build around 60 condominiums into Mohawk territory.  Since 1989 the Mohawks had been protesting these plans for development by the town of oka and investors of the Golf Course expansion.  Seeing that the local courts were not of any help in recognizing Mohawk claims of the land under development, Mohawk protesters and community members held marches rallies and signed petitions.   Eventually the Mohawks set up a barricade blocking access to the development site on a gravel road.  Later on it was occupied mainly by Mohawk women and children OCA's mayor jean wallet one of the nine hole golf course expanded and filed the injunction against the Mohawks. He went into hiding during the oka crisis. [sfx clip] I will occupy this land for what it takes he has to prove it to me that it's his and I will prove it to him that's mine.  Oak is mayor had stated the land in question actually belonged to the town of oka and did not back down from the issue, but instead filed an injunction one of many that had been issued prior to remove the Mohawks from the area and take down the barricades by force if necessary.  if I have to die for Mohawk territory I will but I ain't going alone are you armed no the Creator will provide in anticipation of the raid by the sq mohawks of knesset Aki sent out a distress call to surrounding communiti.  In the Mohawk warrior society from the Aquos austenite reservation and the American side of the Mohawk reserve as well as kana waka have begun filtering into the barricade area with camping gear communications equipment food and weapons.  It's difficult to pin down just who makes up the Warriors society. the leaders an organization you each depending on the circumstances.  the member roles are  treated like a military secret, which is fitting since many or most of the Warriors were veterans, with a particular persistance of Vietnam Marines.   why the Warriors exist is easier to answer   mohawk have closed off the Mercier bridge sparking a traffic nightmare.  Provincial police arrived at dawn secure position in case of Mohawk until 8:00 to clear out.  The natives stood their ground the battle for the barricade started just before nine o'clock on one side heavily armed provincial police bob tear gas and stun grenade power [sfx reporter] a 20-minute gun battle ensued dozens of rounds of ammunition were shot off and then the inevitable someone was hit a police officer took a bullet in the face which proved fatal that seems to turn the tide the police has been advancing until then turned tail and fled leaving six of their vehicles behind.  The Mohawk celebrated when the police left celebrated what they called a victory over the qpm.  Most of the Mohawks each shot that the raid had taken place they said they were angry - angry that a dispute over a small piece of land had ended in violence.  [sfx this clip but earlier] I mean the non-indians that initiated this project of a golf course and then and then trying to take the land away because it's Mohawk clan it's our land there's a little bit left they're sucking the marrow out of our bones.  [sfx this clip, little earlier] we've kept talking in and saying you know what kind of people are you there's children here and you're shooting tear gas at us we're not we're on armed and you're aiming your weapons at us what kind of people are you.     The police retreated, abandoning squad cars and a front-end loader, basically a bulldozer.  They use the loader to crash the vehicles and they push them down the road, creating two new barricades, blocking highway 344.  The Mohawk braced for a counterattack and vowed to fire back with three bullets for every bullet fired at them.  due to the inability of the SQ to deal with the heavily armed Mohawks   The Canadian government called in the Royal Canadian Armed Forces to deal with the Mohawks. As the army pushed further into the Mohawk stronghold there was a lot of tension with Mohawk warriors staring down soldiers getting in their faces taunting them challenging them to put down their weapons and engage in hand-to-hand combat.   this is how the remainder of the siege would play out between the Warriors and Army as there were thankfully no more gun battles. [Music] as the seige wore on and came to an end most of the remaining Warriors as well as some women and children took refuge in a residential treatment center.   instead of an orderly surrender as the army anticipated warriors simply walked out of the area where they were assaulted by waiting soldiers and the police.  50 people taken away from the warrior camp including 23 warriors, but that means right over half the people taken into custody were non-combatants.   by 9:30 that night the army began to pull out, at the end of their two and a half months seige  a number of warriors were later charged by the sq.  5 warriors were convicted of crimes included assault and theft although only one served jail time.  during the standoff the Canadian federal government purchased the pines in order to prevent further development, officially canceling the expansion of the golf course and condominiums.  Although the government bought additional parcels of land for connoisseur taka there has been no organized transfer of the land to the Mohawk people. investigations were held after the crisis was over and revealed problems with the way in which the SQ handled the situation which involved command failures and racism among sq members.   Ronald (Lasagna) Cross and another high-profile warrior, Gordon (Noriega) Lazore of Akwesasne, are arraigned in Saint-Jérôme the day after the last Mohawks ended their standoff. In all, about 150 Mohawks and 15 non-Mohawks were charged with various crimes. Most were granted bail, and most were acquitted. Cross and Lazore were held for nearly six months before being released on $50,000 bail. They were later convicted of assault and other charges. After a community meeting, it was the women who decided that they would walk out peacefully, ending the siege. With military helicopters flying low, spotlights glaring down and soldiers pointing guns at them, Horn-Miller carried her young sister alongside other women and children as they walked to what they thought was the safety of the media barricades.  They didn't make it far before violence broke out. People started running, soldiers tackled warriors, fights broke out and everyone scrambled to get to safety. Up until that point Horn-Miller said she was able to keep her older sister calm by singing a traditional song to her.   LITTLEFEATHER on the night of 27 March 1973. This was when she took the stage at the 45th Academy Awards to speak on behalf of Marlon Brando, who had been awarded best actor for his performance in The Godfather. It is still a striking scene to watch.  Amid the gaudy 70s evening wear, 26-year-old Littlefeather's tasselled buckskin dress, moccasins, long, straight black hair and handsome face set in an expression of almost sorrowful composure, make a jarring contrast.  Such a contrast, that is beggered belief.   Liv Ullman read the name of the winner and Roger Moore made to hand Littlefeather Brando's Oscar, but she held out a politely forbidding hand.  She explained that Brando would not accept the award because of “the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry.”  Some people in the audience applauded; a lot of them booed her, but she kept her calm.  Here, you can listen for yourself.  [sfx clip]  At the time, Wounded Knee, in South Dakota, was the site of a month-long standoff between Native American activists and US authorities, sparked by the murder of a Lakota man.  We're used to this sort of thing now, but on the night, nobody knew what to make of a heartfelt plea in the middle of a night of movie industry mutual masturbation.  Was it art, a prank?  People said Littlefeather was a hired actress, that she was Mexican rather than Apache, or, because people suck on several levels at once, that she was a stripper.  How did this remarkable moment come to pass?   Littlefeather's life was no cake-walk.  Her father was Native American and her mother was white, but both struggled with mental health.  Littlefeather had to be removed from their care at age three, suffering from tuberculosis of the lungs that required her to be kept in an oxygen tent at the hospital.  She was raised by her maternal grandparents, but saw her parents regularly.  That may sound like a positive, but it exposed her to domestic violence.  She once tried to defend her mother from a beating by hitting her father with a broom.  He chased her out of the house and tried to run her down with his truck.  The young girl escaped into a grove of trees and spent the night up in the branches, crying herself to sleep. r   She did not fit in at the white, Catholic school her grandparents sent her to.  At age 12, she and her grandfather visited the historic Roman Catholic church Carmel Mission, where she was horrified to see the bones of a Native American person on display in the museum. “I said: ‘This is wrong. This is not an object; this is a human being.' So I went to the priest and I told him God would never approve of this, and he called me heretic. I had no idea what that was.”  An adolescence of depression and a struggle for identity followed.   Fortunately, in the late 1960s and early 70s Native Americans were beginning to reclaim their identities and reassert their rights.  After her father died, when she was 17, Littlefeather began visiting reservations and even visited Alcatraz during the Indians of all Tribes occupation.  She travelled around the country, learning traditions and dances, and meeting other what she called “urban Indian people” also reconnecting with your heritage.  “The old people who came from different reservations taught us young people how to be Indian again. It was wonderful.”  By her early 20s Littlefeather was head of the local affirmative action committee for Native Americans, studying representation in film, television and sports.  They successfully campaigned for Stanford University to remove their offensive “Indian” mascot, 50 years before pro sports teams like the Cleveland Indians got wise.  At the same time, white celebrities like Burt Lancaster began taking a public interest in Native American affairs.  Littlefeather lived near director Francis Ford Coppola, but she only knew him to say hello.  Nonetheless, after hearing Marlon Brando speaking about Native American rights, as she walked past Coppola's house to find him sitting on his porch, drinking ice tea.  She yelled up the walk, “Hey! You directed Marlon Brando in The Godfather” and she asked him for Brando's address so she could write him a letter.  It took some convincing, but Coppola gave up the address.   Then, nothing.  But months later, the phone rang at the radio station where Littlefeather worked.  He said: ‘I bet you don't know who this is.'  She said, “Sure I do.  It sure as hell took you long enough to call.”  They talked for about an hour, then called each other regularly.  Before long he was inviting her for the first of several visits and they became friends.  That was how Brando came to appoint her to carry his message to the Oscars, but it was hastily planned.  Half an hour before her speech, she had been at Brando's house on Mulholland Drive, waiting for him to finish typing an eight-page speech.  She arrived at the ceremony with Brando's assistant, just minutes before best actor was announced.  The producer of the awards show immediately informed her that she would be removed from the stage after 60 seconds.  “And then it all happened so fast when it was announced that he had won.  I had promised Marlon that I would not touch that statue if he won. And I had promised [the producer] that I would not go over 60 seconds. So there were two promises I had to keep.”  As a result, she had to improvise.   I don't have a lot of good things to say about Marlon Brando --he really could have had a place in the Mixed Bags of History chapter of the YBOF book; audiobook available most places now-- but he had Hollywood dead to rights on its Native Americans stereotypes and treatment, as savages and nameless canon fodder, often played by white people in red face.  This was a message not everyone was willing to hear.  John Wayne, who killed uncountable fictional Natives in his movies, was standing in the wings at that fateful moment, and had to be bodily restrained by security to stop him from charing Littlefeather.  For more on Wayne's views of people of color, google his 1971 Playboy interview.  Clint Eastwood, who presented the best picture Oscar, which also went to The Godfather, “I don't know if I should present this award on behalf of all the cowboys shot in all the John Ford westerns over the years.” In case you thought fussing out an empty chair was the worst we got from him.  When Littlefeather got backstage, people made stereotypical war cries and tomahawk motions at her.  After talking to the press --and I can't say I'm not surprised that event organizers didn't spirit her away immediately -- she went straight back to Brando's house where they sat together and watched the reactions to the event on television, the ‘compulsively refreshing your social media feed' of the 70's.   But Littlefeather is proud of the trail she blazed. She was the first woman of colour, and the first indigenous woman, to use the Academy Awards platform to make a political statement. “I didn't use my fist. I didn't use swear words. I didn't raise my voice. But I prayed that my ancestors would help me. I went up there like a warrior woman. I went up there with the grace and the beauty and the courage and the humility of my people. I spoke from my heart.”  Her speech drew international attention to Wounded Knee, where the US authorities had essentially imposed a media blackout.  Sachee Littlefeather went on to get a degree in holistic health and nutrition, became a health consultant to Native American communities across the country, worked with Mother Teresa caring for Aids patients in hospices, and led the San Francisco Kateri Circle, a Catholic group named after Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint, canonized in 2012.  Now she is one of the elders transmitting knowledge down generations, though sadly probably not for much longer.  She has breast cancer that metastasized to her lung.  “When I go to the spirit world, I'm going to take all these stories with me. But hopefully I can share some of these things while I'm here.  I'm going to the world of my ancestors. I'm saying goodbye to you … I've earned the right to be my true self.”   And that's...Rather than being taken to the hospital for the stab wound a centimeter from her heart, Waneek and the other protesters were taken into custody.  Thankfully, she would heal just fine and even went on to become an Olympic athlete and continued her activism.  And little Tio?  She grew up to be an award-winning actress, best known in our house for playing Tanis on Letterkenny.  Season 10 premier watch party at my house.  Remember….Thanks...       Sources: https://www.history.com/news/how-boarding-schools-tried-to-kill-the-indian-through-assimilation http://www.nativepartnership.org/site/PageServer?pagename=airc_hist_boardingschools https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17645287 https://hairstylecamp.com/native-american-beard/ https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jun/03/i-promised-brando-i-would-not-touch-his-oscar-secret-life-sacheen-littlefeather https://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/reflections-of-oka-stories-of-the-mohawk-standoff-25-years-later-1.3232368/sisters-recall-the-brutal-last-day-of-oka-crisis-1.3234550 https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/oka-crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArOIdwcj2w8 https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago  

western canada canadian playboy pr students california american music audible black indian god home world war ii freedom english oscars history french nope boys north america hollywood army city council british rock aids poverty san francisco peace girls land brainiac united states manhattan federal tennessee warriors government education drugs clint eastwood academy awards pennsylvania new world mississippi native americans native thanksgiving natives memorial day navajo alcatraz reach roger moore francis ford coppola hang jokes indians mexican soldiers aboriginal creator cross golf john wayne navy dominion quebec stanford university national museum pines columbus christianity catholic oak oca northern ireland bs olympic games brando south dakota apache godfather american indian psalms surely roman catholic bureau swat john ford marlon brando tio tribes john carlos naturally coppola troubles discipline mercier anishinaabe moxie carlisle summer olympics graham green judicial committee privy council mea mulholland drive conversion mother teresa columbus day cleveland indians beatitudes provincial lakota amid ten commandments storyid golf courses tanis tuberculosis mohawk burt lancaster wounded knee oka sq kanna letterkenny alcatraz island code talkers bloody sunday tiananmen square iat mohawks liv ullman american indian center james cromwell residential schools carlisle indian school commissioners aki little tree akwesasne oakes kent state canadian armed forces red power kahnawake oka crisis tommie smith sf chronicle saint j native american heritage pageserver anglicized indian act sacheen littlefeather pilgrim fathers minnesota historical society indian child welfare act curriculums navajo code talkers richard henry pratt kanesatake richard oakes
Ken Webster Jr
WJ 6AM_ MADONNAS CENSORED NIPPLE IS WORSE THAN THE PLIGHT OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 37:48


Public Health Epidemiology Careers
PHEC 224: Decolonizing Data With Dr. Rosalina James, Urban Indian Health Institute

Public Health Epidemiology Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 33:00


Public health spans all communities and cultures. However, smaller populations are being overlooked due to historical discrimination. Today we talk to Dr. Rosalina James, Director of Research and Evaluation at Urban Indian Health Institute (UIHI), about her interests in decolonizing data and the importance of getting people of American Indian and Native Alaska descent a seat at the table. We hear the challenges Dr. James faced as a woman of color in academia, and her advice on facing these issues. Find out how Dr. James moved into public health from lab work, why workforce development is so important to her, and why she feels epidemiologists are uniquely equipped to make overlooked cultures visible. Tune in to hear what the UIHI has been working on throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and how you can get involved as an intern. We look forward to having you join us! Visit the PHEC Podcast Show Notes: https://PHECPodcast.com/  Grab Your FREE 10-Page PHEC Podcast eBook: https://mypublichealthcareer.com/ Work With Me - Business Coaching: https://www.drchhuntley.com/coaching  

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
11-29-21 Making strides in Native-led school curricula

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 57:00


A survey in 2019 backed by the National Congress of American Indians concluded that the lack of access to adequate funding, equitable curricula, and professional development hinders suitable Native American lessons in schools. The good news is many states since then have recognized those barriers and are making strides to introduce Native-led curricula into schools. The state of Minnesota, for instance, is committing an extra $1.3 million for recruiting and training Native teachers, bringing in more input from Native educators and connecting better with Native students.

SOS with Molly & Alissa
No.99 Genocide For Prophet

SOS with Molly & Alissa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 37:17


This week we cover the Brackeen v Haaland adoption case and the current destruction of Native laws, families, and culture by white evangelists and right-wing politicians.CHARITY/ NON-PROFITThe National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA):NICWA works to support the safety, health, and spiritual strength of American Indian and Alaska Native children along the broad continuum of their lives. They support tribes in building the capacity to prevent child abuse and neglect through positive systems change at the state, federal, and tribal levels. They are the most comprehensive source of information on American Indian and Alaska Native child welfare. NICWA is a nonprofit, membership organization based in Portland, Oregon. Their members include tribes, individuals—both Native and non-Native—and private organizations from around the United States concerned with Native child and family issues. Together, their partners, board, and staff work to protect Native children and keep them connected to their family, community, and culture. To learn more and donate please visit nicwa.orgFollow us on IG & Twitter @thesospodSubscribe and review on Youtube, iTunes, Spotify, Google, and more.We're on Patreon :)...here's to turning meltdowns into magic!

TonioTimeDaily
I am recovering from religious imperialism and religious extremism

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 22:32


"Ireland: Beginning in the late seventeenth century, the British government passed a series of anti-Catholic laws in Ireland known as the Penal Laws. The first of these was passed in 1695. This was followed in 1697 by the Bishops' Banishment Act, and in 1704 by the Act to Prevent the Further Growth of Property. The Penal Laws were designed to force Catholics to the lowest socioeconomic status. For example, under the Penal Laws, Catholics were not allowed to own a horse worth more than five pounds. Furthermore, any Catholic who was offered five pounds for a horse was required to sell it. Catholics were also prohibited from possessing arms. Only Protestants were allowed to hold political positions or allowed to practice law. Catholics were excluded from political power and they were not allowed to be members of a grand jury. Catholics were not allowed to vote in parliamentary elections. The land laws also served to divide the Catholics by conferring extraordinary privileges on any member of a Catholic family who became a Protestant. For example, an eldest son could deprive his father of the management and disposal of his property by becoming a Protestant. Bishops and members of Catholic religious orders were banished from the island. Ordinary priests had to register their names and parishes and were required to promise that they would uphold the law. Only one priest was allowed per parish. No new Catholic clergy were allowed to enter the country. Since bishops were required for ordination and with no Catholic education allowed, it was assumed that the Catholic clergy would die out within a generation. However, the laws were not rigidly enforced nor was there any attempt to promote the conversion of the Catholic masses to Protestantism. By the 1720s, Catholic priests and bishops operated fairly freely, but discreetly, in much of Ireland. The United States: The policy of the United States with regard to American Indians has assumed that “civilizing” the Indians so that they could be assimilated into American culture required them to become Christians, preferably Protestant Christians. The United States government actively encouraged and financially supported missionary efforts on Indian reservations. The period of time from 1870 to 1934 can be considered the Dark Ages for American Indian Religious Freedom. During this time, the active suppression of American Indian religions reached its peak. While the government had always supported missionary efforts, conversion of Indians and suppression of Indian religions took a new dimension with the implementation of President Ulysses Grant's Peace Policy in 1870. Under the policy, a single Christian denomination would become responsible for administering all Indian programs on each reservation and would have a monopoly on proselytization. There was no concern at this time for either the existence or validity of any Indian religions. In fact, Indian religious leaders were seen as barriers to progress and could be jailed for expressing their religious concerns." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Truth Be Told
DNA Confirms Sun Dancer Ernie LaPointe is Chief Sitting Bull's Great-Grandson

Truth Be Told

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 79:40


In honor of Native Heritage Day and Month, Tony Sweet has an open discussion with Chief Sitting Bull's great grandson, Ernie La Pointe. A discussion about America's distorted history of the Native American Culture and Chief Sitting Bull.Visit our website www.Truthbetoldworldwide.com Please subscribe to our channel and share this video, thank you for your support

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
11-25-21 Slavery from an Indigenous perspective

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 56:28


The scourge of slavery was an unfortunate reality for Indigenous people in the history of North America. Spanish colonizers set in motion a complicated legacy of slavery throughout the Americas that changed identity, culture and relationships forever. We'll talk about the history and legacy of Indigenous slavery and get insights from speakers with the National Museum of the American Indian's symposium, “The Other Slavery: Histories of Indian Bondage from New Spain to the Southwestern United States.” (This is an encore show so we won't be taking listeners' calls)

The Ten News
400 Years Since The First Thanksgiving

The Ten News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 14:57


In today's episode: It's Thanksgiving and we are talking about the original day 400 years ago.

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson
National Day of Mourning

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 27:39


Jean-Luc Pierite, Director of the North American Indian Center in Boston and member of the United American Indians of New England, shares with us in today's episode about the National Day of Mourning, which is an annual celebration that seeks to educate people on the myths of Thanksgiving and raise awareness of the ongoing struggles that Native Americans are still facing today. In addition to the day's details, Jean-Luc talks about fighting back against historicizing Native Americans, because it's not just about the injustices that have already taken place--it's about those that are still happening. And are you unsure if you should say Indian, American Indian, Native American, or Indigenous? Well Jean-Luc helps us understand what the most proper and respectful form of reference can be. Executive Producer: Adell Coleman Producer: Brittany Temple Distributor: DCP Entertainment For additional content: makeitplain.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Late Boomers
The world's Native American and Indigenous Filmmakers have a voice because of Joanelle Romero. Listen in.

Late Boomers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 44:31


How did Actress, Director, Film Distributor and only Native American filmmaker short-listed for an Academy Award Joanelle Romero open doors for Native Americans and Indigenous filmmakers worldwide? Listen in as she talks about founding Red Nation Celebration Institute and creating the first Native International Film Festival, Native Women in Film Festival, the first TV channel devoted to American Indian and Indigenous content, a community outreach program for native youth, the California/New Mexico Native Film Commission and more.

All Of It
'New Native Kitchen' Cookbook

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 15:11


Acclaimed chef Freddie Bitsoie, and James-Beard award-winning writer James O. Fraioli, join us to talk their new cookbook, New Native Kitchen: Celebrating Modern Recipes of the American Indian. The cookbook explores and celebrates Indigenous cuisine from across the country, providing modern interpretations of one hundred recipes that have been the basis of American cuisine for centuries.   BISON BURGERS WITH CARAMELIZED SWEET ONIONS This recipe works the opposite of many in this book—instead of modernizing a traditional recipe, I'm traditionalizing a modern recipe. Imagine your favorite burger, then swap out the beef patty for ground bison. Ground bison is one of the least expensive ways to try this Indigenous staple, and I give my preparation additional Native American ingredients, topping the burger with caramelized onions seasoned with fresh herbs and juniper berries. Serve bison burgers over wilted greens, alongside any of my salads, or on a fresh-baked brioche bun for a Native American-meets-modern-American classic. Serves 4 1 pound (455 g) ground bison2 teaspoons salt2 teaspoons freshly cracked black pepper 1⁄2 cup (25 g) chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley1⁄4 cup (25 g) grated queso fresco Caramelized Sweet Onions, recipe follows4 hamburger buns Condiments of choice Prepare and preheat an outdoor grill to high heat. In a large bowl, add the bison, 2 teaspoons salt, 2 teaspoons pepper, parsley, and queso fresco. Mix well by hand, but do not overmix. Divide evenly and shape into quarter-pound burgers, about 1⁄4 inch (6 mm) thick. Arrange the burgers on the grill and cook 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium-rare (cook longer if you prefer medium-well). Do not touch or press the burgers during the grilling process. The key is to keep the juices inside. Otherwise, the burgers will be dry. Remove the burgers and let rest for a couple minutes. Top with the caramelized sweet onions and serve on buns with any condiments you like. CARAMELIZED SWEET ONIONS Makes approximately 1⁄2 cup (115 g) 2 teaspoons canola oil1 large sweet onion, peeled and diced1 sprig fresh thyme1 bay leaf2 teaspoons salt2 teaspoons freshly cracked black pepper 1⁄2 teaspoon ground juniper berries2 tablespoons agave nectar In a medium sauté pan over low heat, add the oil. When the oil is hot, add the onion, thyme, bay leaf, 2 teaspoons salt, and 2 teaspoons pepper. Allow the onion to sweat for about 10 minutes, at which time it will begin to caramelize. Deglaze the pan with 1⁄4 cup (60 ml) water and keep sautéing for 15 minutes. If the onions caramelize too quickly, deglaze with another 1⁄4 cup (60 ml) water to slow the cooking process. You want the onions soft and caramelized, not burnt. Add the juniper berries and agave nectar. Stir well to combine, remove from the heat, discard the thyme sprig and bay leaf, and set aside and keep warm.   Reprinted from 'New Native Kitchen: Celebrating Modern Recipes of the American Indian' by Freddie Bitsoie and James O. Fraioli. Photography by Quentin Bacon. Illustrations by Gabriella Trujillo. Published by Abrams.

Enlighten: Uplift & Inspire
Episode 188 Debra Beal, Woman of the Ramapough Lenape Nation

Enlighten: Uplift & Inspire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 74:26


My guest today is Debra Beal. Debra was one of the women featured in Lisa Levart's photography exhibit “Women of the Ramapough Lenape Nation”. Debra shares her own assimilation experience of how her parents initially downplayed their Native American culture when she was a child, only to pursue and embrace a relationship with her Lenape tribe when she was a young teenager. As her father's bumper sticker read “I was Indian before it was cool to be Indian”. Debra has recently retired from her 33 year career in NY State's Office of Mental Health and is exploring the ongoing delicate balance to integrate the fullness of who she truly is.  Her Indian name “Walela” translates as Hummingbird, which symbolizes Debra's desire to create harmony in the world, by building genuine, compassionate relationships, helping people and being a conduit for healing. Check out the show notes for links to see Debra featured in Lisa's photography exhibit at Bergen Community College, opened through November 24th, as well as in Myles Aronowitz's documentary. I hope this inspires you to learn of the Native people of your land; let's make Thanksgiving more meaningful, by educating ourselves and our extended family of our true history with American Indians. Enjoy the podcast! Links: Women of the Ramapough Lenape Nation Bergen Community College Gallery Exhibit IG: @goddessonearth IG: @debra.powell.7587

Earth Ancients
Dr. Ardy Sixkiller Clark: The indigenous Tradition of Star People

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 138:48


A UNIQUE AND SIGNIFICANT UFO DOCUMENTA noted American Indian researcher offers up a collection of intimate narratives of encounters between contemporary American Indians and the Star People. The first-person accounts, described as conscious experiences and recalled without the aid of hypnosis, reveal a worldview that unquestionably accepts the reality of the StarPeople. The stories also reveal cultures that almost universally regard Star People as ancestors, which allows for interactions that take place without fear and helps explain the uniqueness of the encounters and experiences.The stories are told by people from all walks of life. Some had graduate degrees; others had never attended school. Some were adept at technology; others had never used a cell phone, owned a computer or a television set. A few of the stories are about events that occurred before the 1947 Roswell incident, however, the majority of the events took place between 1990 and 2010.This book significantly contributes to the knowledge about UFOs from a group that until now have mostly remained silent. For readers, it is likely they will never look at the UFO phenomenon in the same way again.DR. ARDY SIXKILLER CLARKE, a Professor Emeritus at Montana State University, has dedicated her life and career to working with indigenous populations. She is the author of several children's books and the bestselling "Sisters in the Blood." While retired from academia, Dr. Clarke continues to work as a consultant to American Indian tribes and indigenous communities worldwide. She maintains website at www.sixkiller.com.

UEN Homeroom
Native American Curriculum Initiative with Heather Francis and Brenda Beyal

UEN Homeroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:10


In this episode, Dani and Matt are joined by Heather Francis and Brenda Beyal from the BYU Arts Partnership's Native American Curriculum Initiative. They talk about the initiative, why it exists, how they built the curriculum and how it will help educators.BYU Arts Partnership Native American Curriculum Initiative WebsiteMoving Towards Culturally Responsible Classrooms Blog Post“What do you want children in Utah to know about your tribe?” Blog Post    

Hupitit Pâri
Episode 9, Robin Maxkii

Hupitit Pâri

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:00


In this weeks episode of the Hupitit Pâri Podcast we are joined by a special guest - Robin Maxkii. Robin is a Native American technology activist, filmmaker, and writer. Maxkii is known primarily for her work on broadening the participation of Native Americans in education and technology. She co-starred in the Microsoft-funded PBS series "Code Trip" showcasing diversity within the technology industry. In 2016 Maxkii organized and directed the first national American Indian collegiate Hackathon, focused on addressing the digital divide and access to technology in rural and under served communities. Two years later, Google launched a documentary about her journey in technology.

Inspire Health Podcast
Creation Story, Indigenous Insights & The Power of Nature In Spiritual Development with Darryl Williams and Christine Dulong : IHP 117

Inspire Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 101:25


Today we welcome back Mohawk elder Darryl Williams and our good friend Christine Dulong to share with us the traditional indigenous perspective on energy, frequency and vibration. Join us as we learn about the original creation story from the Hopi tradition and how this relates to our current life events. Darryl and Christine also explain the importance of the sun and lightening in spiritual development, how to work with worry and how we literally create physical changes in our world through our thoughts and feelings. Highlights Learn about the original Creation Story from the Hopi tradition. Discover the importance of the sun for spiritual development. Understanding the necessity of grounding and earthing. Practice strategies to work with worry and fears. See clearly the role of thoughts and feelings in relation to energy and frequency.

Voices of Montana
Native Hoops: The Rise of American Indian Basketball

Voices of Montana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Basketball has deep roots all across America since its creation in 1891, but what do we know about the game’s impact on Native American communities and vice versa? University of Montana Professor Wade Davies researched this for nearly two decades […]

Charlotte Talks
How have Native American communities fared during the pandemic?

Charlotte Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 49:22


We sit down with tribal members and advocates for Native Americans to discuss how the American Indian community has fared during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Bay
Remembering the Native American Occupation of Alcatraz

The Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 18:18


52 years ago this month, a group of Native Americans began to occupy Alcatraz to assert their right to self-determination. The 19-month occupation is still known as one of the most important actions in contemporary Native American history and in the fight for American Indian civil rights. On Indigenous Peoples' Day in 2019, Native people from across the West Coast gathered in San Francisco for a ceremonial canoe journey to Alcatraz Island. This episode originally aired on Oct. 16, 2019.

Here & Now
History behind the Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier; Native Americans and climate change

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 41:26


The Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery is 100 years old on Thursday. Author Patrick O'Donnell tells the story of how that first soldier was selected and interred there. And, a new study shows how forced relocation of Native Americans in the U.S. has moved them to lands more susceptible to climate change. Fawn Sharp, president of the National Congress of American Indians, discusses the climate crisis facing Indigenous peoples.

Triangle 411
AMERICAN INDIAN: THE POW-WOW, CULTURE, TRIBES, ETC.

Triangle 411

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 22:06


Greg Richardson, of the NC Department of Administration's Commission of Indian Affairs, explains tribal connections, elder influences, Native American identification, etc. Also: American Indian Heritage Celebration hosted by the North Carolina Museum of History--  Non-Profit Spotlight: Salvation Army Kettle Program

Room 36
99- Weekly Updates (November 8-12, 2021)

Room 36

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 4:40


Dear Parents, We're going to have a great upcoming week. Below is a short description of what's coming up and important links and/or announcements: Watch These Announcements on Video Here Mr. Gray's Class Podcast Class Website Multiplication and Division Facts Practice (Check your student's progress report) It is getting colder and the grass is very wet in the morning. We do PE monday morning. Please have kids wear shoes that can get wet on Monday. Nov 11- No School (Veteran's Day) Nov 15-19 Book Fair Nov 16- Chick-Fil-A Restaurant Night Nov 19- Report Cards Online after 2:00pm Nov 23- Minimum Day Nov 24-26 No School (Thanksgiving) Don't forget to sign up for PTA! Reader's Workshop The kids will work on pulling information out of nonfiction texts. They will jot post-its in their notebook as they read about fascinating facts, questions they have, growing ideas, and making connections. We will also try to lift the level of conversations about books. Finally, we will transition to narrative nonfiction books for the last couple weeks of our nonfiction unit. Writer's Workshop As we continue our information books the students will be drafting sections and revise by researching facts and ensuring text accuracy, creating introductions through research mentor authors, and putting themselves in the shoes of readers to clear up confusion. Math What happened to math class? We will continue studying multiplication facts and patterns. Specifically we will look at 3s and 6s. Keep practicing math facts with your students. Ask them what patterns exist for each set of numbers. 5-10 minutes a day will really help! Social Studies The students will continue studying the history of early California. We will study early settlers in California and the effect of those settlers on American Indians. Science The kids will keep looking at forces. We will read about the forces involved in soccer and tug-of-war. Thank you,

KQED’s Forum
San Francisco-based American Indian Film Festival Centers Native Stories and Creators

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 55:28


For 46 years, the San Francisco-based American Indian Film Festival has showcased features, documentaries and animated works from Native filmmakers. This year's festival kicks off Friday with more than a hundred films at a time when filmmakers and audiences are clamoring for more representation of Native communities. Although, Native creators are seeing more interest in their stories and projects in recent years, films made by and about Native Americans rarely, if ever, reach mainstream success. The Hollywood Diversity Report found that Native Americans account for less than 1 percent of on-screen and behind the scenes talent in the U.S. entertainment industry. We talk about Native representation in film and the challenges of making and distributing Native American-centered films.

UEN Homeroom
Native American Culture and Education with This Land's Rebecca Nagle

UEN Homeroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 37:48


On this episode of UEN Homeroom, Matt and Dani get the pleasure of speaking with "This Land" podcast host and activist, Rebecca Nagle about Native American culture and education. Their conversation covers storytelling, uplifting marginalized voices and how educators can learn more about Native American culture.Rebecca Nagle on TwitterThis Land PodcastAmerican Indians in Children's Literature BlogChildren's books that Rebecca recommends:Sharice's Big Voice: A Native Kid Becomes a Congresswoman by Sharice DavidsWe Are Water Protectors by Carole Lindstrom 

Your Call
This year's American Indian Film Festival tackles addiction, environmental justice, and sovereignty

Your Call

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 52:29


Something Cryptid This Way Comes
Darkness into Light

Something Cryptid This Way Comes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 77:34


Michael has helped lives. He has given validation and honor back to those that have suffered trauma due to a sighting. And... he's created an outlet that is unique and supportive for countless individuals.This episode is also available on YouTube, where you'll see Michael and I analyze some of his drawings and the process he uses. It is highly suggested that you view this show to see what he is doing to create amazing drawings. You can also visit his YouTube channel The Drawings of Bigfoot as well as purchase some of his drawings online.Follow SOMETHING CRYPTID THIS WAY COMES on Instagram and Facebook. Subscribe to YouTube to be immersed in visuals and watch live interviews, and visit us online.EARLY RELEASES: Join OMM+  For as little as $3/month, with extra benefits for higher tiers, members will have access to extended episodes, behind-the-scenes interviews with guests, free merchandise, and many other exciting materials that will only be available through a membership. https://www.ommstories.com If you have a potential story to share, one you'd like to hear set to a story-telling format, or would even like to discuss sponsorship, send an email to Russ@ommstories.com  We've got some GREAT swag and gear that you can find on Redbubble  and Tee Public too. Stickers, t-shirts, mugs and more… you name it, we've got it! 

Government Accountability Office (GAO) Podcast: Watchdog Report

American Indian and Alaska native women are more likely to experience intimate partner violence and other violence, such as human trafficking and murder when compared with White women. But understanding the full scope of this problem and how to…

Borne the Battle
#262: Discovering Your Warrior Spirit with Air Force Veteran DJ Vanas

Borne the Battle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 69:23


If there is anyone who knows what it means to be a warrior, it is Air Force Veteran D.J. Eagle Bear Vanas. D.J. Vanas travels around the country speaking at conventions packed with audience members, giving motivational presentations that teach people how to find their unique warrior spirit.You might be wondering, what exactly is the warrior spirit? Tribal nations, Fortune 500 companies, the military, and even the White House on two occasions have hired Vanas to answer that question. This episode of Borne the Battle offers the opportunity to hear him describe what exactly it means to embody the warrior spirit.Modern American culture often over romanticizes the warrior role and makes it out to be something unrealistic. Vanas brings the term back down to earth and emphasizes the beauty of imperfection, especially the warrior's ability to learn and grow from mistakes.Leading by example, in this episode of Borne the Battle, Vanas talks about his life's highs and lows: The life changing moment he learned of his appointment to the U.S. Air Force Academy Struggling to learn how to take responsibility when starting out in the Academy Serving as the Academy's youngest Chief of Minority Enrollment Grappling with managing his military duties while also building up his speaking business Developing a network and building the momentum he needed to reach the professional height he is at today Vanas sympathizes with the challenges that many face when leaving the military. Part of embodying the warrior spirit entails being flexible and leveraging the many skills we honed while in the military to build our new tribe, and then using those skills to make our communities a better and brighter place.To learn more about the warrior spirit, PBS hosted a program featuring Vanas teaching audiences how to tap into their slumbering warrior spirit.Being a warrior does not mean facing life's struggles alone. It is okay to feel overwhelmed and it is okay to not always know the answer. We might not be bulletproof, but as Vanas argues, being a warrior means rising over and over again and to keep moving forward one step at a time.Borne the Battle Veteran of the Week:Army Veteran Dennis Wolfe. Additional Links: Check out our interview with fellow Lakota Warrior Billy Mills, a Marine Corps Veteran and 1964 Olympic Gold Medalist. His path to Olympic Gold was never certain but he certainly never quit. Lakota Warrior and Vietnam Veteran Dr. Robert Primeaux bounced back after suffering a terrible car accident while serving. He kept moving forward and achieved his dream of being an actor. VA expands offering of COVID-19 booster vaccines VA extends presumptive period for Persian Gulf War Veterans

The Tribalbrand Podcast
A Change of Vision and Ignorant Math Teacher

The Tribalbrand Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 36:36


Listen to Patman babble about unemployment, my change in eye sight and a math teacher dancing like an American Indian.Support the show (http://PayPal.me/thetribalbrandpodcas )

Room 36
98- Weekly Updates (November 1-5, 2021)

Room 36

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 4:36


Dear Parents, We're going to have a great upcoming week. Below is a short description of what's coming up and important links and/or announcements: Watch These Announcements on Video Here Mr. Gray's Class Podcast Class Website The kids gave me some suggestions for my Halloween Costume this year. Check out their ideas here! Multiplication and Division Facts Practice (Check your email for your student's progress report) Nov 11- No School (Veteran's Day) Nov 19- Report Cards Online after 2:00pm Nov 23- Minimum Day Nov 24-26 No School (Thanksgiving) Don't forget to sign up for PTA! Reader's Workshop This week students will work on a few elements of being a great nonfiction reader: getting better by setting clear goals with a learning progression, approaching nonfiction as a learner, and distinguishing the reader's opinion from the author. There will also be a short quiz to help me pinpoint areas of need. Writer's Workshop This week students will use a checklist to assess their own writing in their first attempt at information writing this year. As the kids write their next information book, they will try to make connections across chapters and create introductions. We will continue to use mentor texts (nonfiction chapter books) as examples for great pieces of writing. Math What happened to math class? Students will continue to practice their multiplication facts. At this point, students should be spending a few minutes at home each day working with you practicing math facts. They can bring home their blue notebooks which not only have the math facts to practice but also examples of patterns and strategies students can use to practice. Social Studies The kids will wrap up our current chapter: American Indians of California and move on to our next chapter: Changes in California over time. We will look at early exploration and early settlement of California and study some map skills looking at timelines. Science The students will continue studying the forces of pushing and pulling as well as designing a rollercoaster that uses gravity. Thank you, Mr. Gray

In The Moment podcast
Beasts of Seattle: Dogs

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:32


There are famously more dogs in Seattle than there are children—a function of the city's high cost of living, perhaps, or a sign that our transient tech workforce craves furry friendship. But canines are so much more than modern-day apartment-dwelling companions; long ago, the Salish Wool Dog provided blankets for Coast Salish peoples and today, working dogs keep our ferries running, among other essential jobs. As part of the Beasts of Seattle podcast series, Town Hall's Podcast Artist-in-Residence Samantha Allen interviews photographer Holly Cook, Museum of the American Indian technician Pat Jollie, and more about our best friends. Credits: The music for this podcast was written and performed by John Gould. You can find more of John's music at johngould.bandcamp.com. The art for this podcast was made by Sadie Collins.  Shey Ruud's art account is @twocats_art on Instagram. Send Me: Working Dogs of the Pacific Northwest is available on hollyccook.com. Sources: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/data/kids-making-a-comeback-more-than-100000-under-18-in-seattle-for-the-first-time-in-50-years/ https://www.americanindianmagazine.org/story/a-woolly-tale https://www.rover.com/blog/insiders-guide-seattle-dog-owners/ https://seattle.curbed.com/maps/best-off-leash-dog-parks-seattle Presented by Town Hall Seattle. Beasts of Seattle is part of Town Hall's Artist-in-Residence program.

American Ground Radio
American Ground Radio 10.25.21 Full Show

American Ground Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:14


This is the full show for October 25, 2021. Off the Top, Louis and Stephen talk about how the left used COVID-19 to help their fundamental transformation of America. We Ask the Mamas about a teacher fired for dressing up like an American Indian. In Digging Deep, we play a new game, "Intentional, Incompetent, or Unavoidable." Plus, this year's World Series is a political Bright Spot for Republicans. And, we finish with "Moment of Whoa" about bagel store owner who goes the extra mile for a young customer with cancer.

National Native Network Podcast
Episode 24 - Traditional Tobacco and Native American Youth

National Native Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 26:37


Overview: This is a roundtable conversation around traditional tobacco with a Native American youth perspective, speaking on what makes it different from commercial tobacco, and how it is used in ceremony and prayer. Target Audience: Physicians, nurses, health educators, administrators, and support staff working with American Indian and/or Alaska Native communities. Panelists: Melissa Meza California Rural Indian Health Board Hannah Bartol Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan Devin Beltran, President CRIHB Youth Advisory Board Lake Miwok and Southeastern Pomo For free help to quit smoking, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW Visit our website www.keepitsacred.org for more resources.

First Voices Radio
10/24/21 - Valerie Lambert, Michael Lambert, and Elisa (EJ) Sobo

First Voices Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 57:45


Host Tiokasin Ghosthorse explores the topic of land acknowledgements. The inspiration is an article that was published October 7, 2021 in The Conversation: "Land acknowledgments meant to honor Indigenous people too often do the opposite - erasing American Indians and sanitizing history instead."Guests: Valerie Lambert (Choctaw Nation, Oklahoma), Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, President of the Association of Indigenous Anthropologists (a Section of the American Anthropological Association), and an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. Valerie's first book, "Choctaw Nation: A Story of American Indian Resurgence" (University of Nebraska Press 2007), is a story of tribal nation building in the modern era. It is the winner of the North American Indian Prose Award and was a finalist for the Oklahoma Book Award. Michael Lambert (Eastern Band Cherokee) is Associate Professor of African Studies and Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an enrolled citizen of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. His research has focused on francophone West Africa and American Indians. He is author of Longing for Exile: Migration and the Making of a Translocal Community in Senegal (Heinemann), and co-author (with Leonard Lambert) of Up from These Hills; Memories of a Cherokee Boyhood (U of Nebraska Press. Elisa (EJ) Sobo, Professor and Chair of Anthropology, is a sociocultural anthropologist. She is past President of the Society for Medical Anthropology and a longstanding member of the editorial boards of Anthropology and Medicine, Medical Anthropology, and Medical Anthropology Quarterly. Dr. Sobo has published 13 books (e.g., Culture and Meaning in Health Services Research) and numerous peer-reviewed articles. Read the article and find out more about this week's guests here: https://bit.ly/3nm0D7VProduction Credits:Tiokasin Ghosthorse (Lakota), Host and Executive ProducerLiz Hill (Red Lake Ojibwe), ProducerMalcolm Burn, Studio Engineer, Radio Kingston, WKNY 1490 AM and 107.9 FM, Kingston, NYTiokasin Ghosthorse, Audio EditorMusic and Audio Selections:1. Song Title: Tahi Roots Mix (First Voices Radio Theme Song)Artist: Moana and the Moa HuntersCD: Tahi (1993)Label: Southside Records (Australia and New Zealand)(00:00:44)Song Title: Getting StartedArtist: Buffy Sainte-MarieCD: Coincidences and Likely Stories (1992)Label: Ensign/Chrysalis/EMI Records(00:24:50)3. Audio SelectionSpeaker: Jahan Khalighi, Program Director at Chapter 510, a youth writing, bookmaking and publishing center, Oakland, CA. Janah is a youth educator and community arts organizer.Background music: Tiokasin GhosthorseSong Title: MomentumCD: Akantu: The Origin Series (2021)Label: Ghosthorse(00:48:57)

Indianz.Com
Aaron Payment / National Congress of American Indians

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 5:02


The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs holds an oversight hearing titled “Voting Matters in Native Communities” on October 27, 2021. The committee hears from tribal leaders and Native voting rights advocates about ongoing challenges to exercising the right to vote in Indian Country. They also learn more about the less-formally documented Native Hawaiian voter experience. Witness List The Honorable Janet Davis Chairwoman Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Nixon, Nevada https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/janetdavis102721.pdf The Honorable Fawn Sharp President National Congress of American Indians Washington, DC https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/fawnsharp102721.pdf The Honorable Julie Sitka President Alaska Federation of Natives Anchorage, Alaska https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/juliekitka102721.pdf Professor Patty Ferguson-Bohnee Director Indian Legal Clinic, Arizona State University Phoenix, Arizona https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/pattyfergusonbohnee102721.pdf Ms. Jacqueline De Leon Staff Attorney Native American Rights Fund Boulder, Colorado https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/jacquelinedeleon102721.pdf Mr. Nā'ālehu Anthony Community Advocate & Principal Palikū Films Honolulu, Hawiii https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/naalehuanthony102721.pdf Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Notice: https://www.indian.senate.gov/hearing/business-meeting-consider-hr1688-oversight-hearing-voting-matters-native-communities

Indianz.Com
Chase Meierotto / Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 5:34


The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States, led by Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández (D-New Mexico), holds an oversight hearing titled “Strengthening Indigenous Communities Through Cultural and Environmental Preservation” on October 26, 2021. The U.S. government has a long history of cultural and physical violence against American Indian and Alaska Native communities resulting in a significant loss of traditional language, knowledge, and culture. To address this, tribal governments and organizations have dedicated funding and community initiatives towards cultural and environmental preservation. Cultural and environmental preservation efforts protect and sustain the traditional teachings and lifeways that strengthen tribal communities by promoting tribal self-determination, education and economic development opportunities. The hearing will explore how Congress can support tribal communities actively engaging in such efforts and ensure their longevity. Witnesses The Honorable Michael Fairbanks Chairman White Earth Nation Ogema, Minnesota Mr. Chase Meierotto Division Administrator, Treaty Natural Resources Division Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Bayfield, Wisconsin Ms. Elizabeth Azzuz Secretary Cultural Fire Management Council Hoopa, California Mr. Cody Desautel President Intertribal Timber Council Portland, Oregon House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/strengthening-indigenous-communities-through-cultural-and-environmental-preservation

Indianz.Com
Opening Remarks

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 9:06


The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States, led by Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández (D-New Mexico), holds an oversight hearing titled “Strengthening Indigenous Communities Through Cultural and Environmental Preservation” on October 26, 2021. The U.S. government has a long history of cultural and physical violence against American Indian and Alaska Native communities resulting in a significant loss of traditional language, knowledge, and culture. To address this, tribal governments and organizations have dedicated funding and community initiatives towards cultural and environmental preservation. Cultural and environmental preservation efforts protect and sustain the traditional teachings and lifeways that strengthen tribal communities by promoting tribal self-determination, education and economic development opportunities. The hearing will explore how Congress can support tribal communities actively engaging in such efforts and ensure their longevity. Witnesses The Honorable Michael Fairbanks Chairman White Earth Nation Ogema, Minnesota Mr. Chase Meierotto Division Administrator, Treaty Natural Resources Division Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Bayfield, Wisconsin Ms. Elizabeth Azzuz Secretary Cultural Fire Management Council Hoopa, California Mr. Cody Desautel President Intertribal Timber Council Portland, Oregon House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/strengthening-indigenous-communities-through-cultural-and-environmental-preservation

Indianz.Com
Q&A

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 51:39


The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States, led by Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández (D-New Mexico), holds an oversight hearing titled “Strengthening Indigenous Communities Through Cultural and Environmental Preservation” on October 26, 2021. The U.S. government has a long history of cultural and physical violence against American Indian and Alaska Native communities resulting in a significant loss of traditional language, knowledge, and culture. To address this, tribal governments and organizations have dedicated funding and community initiatives towards cultural and environmental preservation. Cultural and environmental preservation efforts protect and sustain the traditional teachings and lifeways that strengthen tribal communities by promoting tribal self-determination, education and economic development opportunities. The hearing will explore how Congress can support tribal communities actively engaging in such efforts and ensure their longevity. Witnesses The Honorable Michael Fairbanks Chairman White Earth Nation Ogema, Minnesota Mr. Chase Meierotto Division Administrator, Treaty Natural Resources Division Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Bayfield, Wisconsin Ms. Elizabeth Azzuz Secretary Cultural Fire Management Council Hoopa, California Mr. Cody Desautel President Intertribal Timber Council Portland, Oregon House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/strengthening-indigenous-communities-through-cultural-and-environmental-preservation

Indianz.Com
Elizabeth Azzuz / Cultural Fire Management Council

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 5:52


The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States, led by Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández (D-New Mexico), holds an oversight hearing titled “Strengthening Indigenous Communities Through Cultural and Environmental Preservation” on October 26, 2021. The U.S. government has a long history of cultural and physical violence against American Indian and Alaska Native communities resulting in a significant loss of traditional language, knowledge, and culture. To address this, tribal governments and organizations have dedicated funding and community initiatives towards cultural and environmental preservation. Cultural and environmental preservation efforts protect and sustain the traditional teachings and lifeways that strengthen tribal communities by promoting tribal self-determination, education and economic development opportunities. The hearing will explore how Congress can support tribal communities actively engaging in such efforts and ensure their longevity. Witnesses The Honorable Michael Fairbanks Chairman White Earth Nation Ogema, Minnesota Mr. Chase Meierotto Division Administrator, Treaty Natural Resources Division Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Bayfield, Wisconsin Ms. Elizabeth Azzuz Secretary Cultural Fire Management Council Hoopa, California Mr. Cody Desautel President Intertribal Timber Council Portland, Oregon House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/strengthening-indigenous-communities-through-cultural-and-environmental-preservation

Indianz.Com
Cody Desautel / Intertribal Timber Council

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 5:07


The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States, led by Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández (D-New Mexico), holds an oversight hearing titled “Strengthening Indigenous Communities Through Cultural and Environmental Preservation” on October 26, 2021. The U.S. government has a long history of cultural and physical violence against American Indian and Alaska Native communities resulting in a significant loss of traditional language, knowledge, and culture. To address this, tribal governments and organizations have dedicated funding and community initiatives towards cultural and environmental preservation. Cultural and environmental preservation efforts protect and sustain the traditional teachings and lifeways that strengthen tribal communities by promoting tribal self-determination, education and economic development opportunities. The hearing will explore how Congress can support tribal communities actively engaging in such efforts and ensure their longevity. Witnesses The Honorable Michael Fairbanks Chairman White Earth Nation Ogema, Minnesota Mr. Chase Meierotto Division Administrator, Treaty Natural Resources Division Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Bayfield, Wisconsin Ms. Elizabeth Azzuz Secretary Cultural Fire Management Council Hoopa, California Mr. Cody Desautel President Intertribal Timber Council Portland, Oregon House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/strengthening-indigenous-communities-through-cultural-and-environmental-preservation

Indianz.Com
Michael Fairbanks / White Earth Nation

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 5:03


The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States, led by Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández (D-New Mexico), holds an oversight hearing titled “Strengthening Indigenous Communities Through Cultural and Environmental Preservation” on October 26, 2021. The U.S. government has a long history of cultural and physical violence against American Indian and Alaska Native communities resulting in a significant loss of traditional language, knowledge, and culture. To address this, tribal governments and organizations have dedicated funding and community initiatives towards cultural and environmental preservation. Cultural and environmental preservation efforts protect and sustain the traditional teachings and lifeways that strengthen tribal communities by promoting tribal self-determination, education and economic development opportunities. The hearing will explore how Congress can support tribal communities actively engaging in such efforts and ensure their longevity. Witnesses The Honorable Michael Fairbanks Chairman White Earth Nation Ogema, Minnesota Mr. Chase Meierotto Division Administrator, Treaty Natural Resources Division Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Bayfield, Wisconsin Ms. Elizabeth Azzuz Secretary Cultural Fire Management Council Hoopa, California Mr. Cody Desautel President Intertribal Timber Council Portland, Oregon House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Notice https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/strengthening-indigenous-communities-through-cultural-and-environmental-preservation

Room 36
97- Weekly Updates (October 25-29, 2021)

Room 36

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 6:14


Dear Parents, We're going to have a great upcoming week. Below is a short description of what's coming up and important links and/or announcements: Watch These Announcements on Video Here Mr. Gray's Class Podcast Class Website October 25-29th is Red Ribbon Week! Don't forget to sign up for PTA! Reader's Workshop Starting Tuesday, the kids will go to the library to check out Nonfiction books, and then we will start a new unit on Nonfiction called “Reading to Learn”. Next week we will discuss prepping our mind for learning something when reading. The kids will learn to ask questions like “What will this mostly be about?” and “What sort of text is this?”. We will also discuss recalling prior knowledge before reading. Writer's Workshop The kids will continue our writing unit “The Art of Information Writing”. We will start off learning and writing different text structures: boxes and bullets, causes and effects, problems and solutions, pros and cons, and compare and contrast. Math What happened to math class? We review strategies for learning and understanding math facts. We will start with Goal 1: 10s and 5s. Next week I'll send out information on how we will manage keeping track of how students are meeting math fact goals and how parents can help at home. Social Studies We will continue our next chapter in social studies: American Indians in California. Science The kids will continue studying forces, motion, gravity, friction, push, pull, and more. Thank you, Mr. Gray

RadioWest
An American Indian Captive In The House of Brigham Young

RadioWest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:58


In 1847, soon after Latter-Day Saints settled in Utah, a battered and bloody young Pavant Ute woman was traded to the family of Brigham Young for a rifle. Given the name Sally Kanosh, she lived the next 30 years as a servant in the household of the LDS leader.

Antonia Gonzales
10-15-21 National Native News

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:58


The Blackfeet Nation's Chief of over 40 years, Earl Old Person is remembered as a respected leader and culture bearer Fawn Sharp was re-elected to a second term as president of the National Congress of American Indians

On Point
The College Educators Behind The Push To Speak Freely On Campus

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 47:13


Steven Salaita was a rising star in the field of American Indian studies. In the fall of 2012, he applied for a job at the University of Illinois. Then, he lost everything. “I had taken to Twitter and other forms of social media to condemn Israel's bombardment of the Gaza Strip in Palestine," Salaita remembers. "And suddenly, I got an email out of the blue informing me that the job offer had been pulled." Today, On Point: Academic freedom on American campuses. Keith Whittington joins Meghna Chakrabarti.