Podcasts about american indian

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,297PODCASTS
  • 2,429EPISODES
  • 50mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 16, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about american indian

Show all podcasts related to american indian

Latest podcast episodes about american indian

A Health Podyssey
Mohammed Ali on Health System Fragmentation and Diabetes Outcomes

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 29:22


Today, nearly 40 million Americans are living with type 2 diabetes, which is more than a 40 percent increase from just a decade ago.Black, Hispanic, American Indian, and Alaskan native adults are much more likely than non-Hispanic white adults to develop diabetes and to die from the disease. Even as there have been important medical advances associated with diabetes, the burden of the disease continues to climb.How can we address the growing burden of diabetes?Mohammed Ali from Emory University joins A Health Podyssey to discuss his overview he and coauthors published in the July 2022 edition Health Affairs on diabetes.Ali and coauthors report that the fragmented health care system in the US is a primary reason for our poor diabetes outcomes and high levels of inequity.Ali's overview was part of a six-paper cluster of research on type 2 diabetes, all of which were published in the July 2022 issue of Health Affairs.Order the July 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on type 2 diabetes and more.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Kingdom Cross  Roads Podcast
Finding Washington - Richard Raines pt 2

Kingdom Cross Roads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 30:10


Finding Washington Richard Raines pt 1 https://amzn.to/3oagreE ()For those that know me, and now for those that don't know me as well, I'm a history buff. I have been since middle school. I just love history. Especially WWII history. But second to that is the founding fathers and the Revolutionary War. One of my favorite of all founding fathers, is George Washington. In fact, if you compare the integrity, virtues and leadership ability of almost any President since Washington, you would find most of the lacking in some sense. Especially in this day and time – don't get me started. Amen! Why am I talking about history and George Washington today? I'm so glad you asked! Our guest today is Richard Raines, author of an absolutely great book titled, https://amzn.to/3oagreE (“Finding Washington: Why America Needs to Rediscover the Virtues of Her Most Essential Founding Father.”)  Let's just say this book should be a must read for every presidential candidate considering running for office. Amen! Richard is not only an author, but a Professor of Christian History and Christian Theology, a former CEO and a former elected official (but we won't hold that against him)… Why did you write this book?  (Richard is referencing our closing question from part one about the “Battle of Monongahela”). I believe another of my favorite frontiersmen was involved in this battle as well, Daniel Boone! What role did he play in this battle? Because of his actions during this battle, the American Indians had a prophecy about his future, right? A lot of people today claim that the Founding Fathers were not really Christian, but rather were “deists” who don't really believe in a personal God. What are your thoughts on the subject from the research you've conducted? A lot of the “cancel culture” today are claiming anyone that owned slaves could not be virtuous, no matter their contribution to society. What are your thoughts on this and how can we, as a society, understand the dilemma the Founding Fathers faced in trying to form a new nation that held opposing views to slavery? Richard, this has been so interesting. As I said, I'm a history “nut” and have really, truly enjoyed our conversation. How can someone obtain a copy of your book, https://amzn.to/3oagreE (“Finding Washington: Why America Needs to Rediscover the Virtues of Her Most Essential Founding Father?” ) Is it available on Amazon? If someone wanted to get in touch with you, to ask a question or to maybe do an interview like this, how can they do that? How can someone get in touch with you? I'll put links to all of this down in the show notes. Folks, George Washington was – and still is – an American treasure. Without him, this nation probably would not exist. He did so much in the formation of this great country. From leading a ragtag bunch of individualists and using them to defeat the largest military in the world (at that time); to motivating the squabbling delegates from the states to finally group together and take a stand for Liberty; to helping to form the office of the Presidency as we know it today and take on the title of king… We owe him an eternal debt of gratitude. Despite the arguments to the contrary; despite the naysayers, George Washington should serve as role model for our culture today – instead of whatever the cancel culture has to say. I urge you, if you enjoy reading about history; if you have children or grandchildren that you want to leave a positive legacy for – order Richard Raines book, https://amzn.to/3oagreE (“Finding Washington: Why America Needs to Rediscover the Virtues of Her Most Essential Founding Father.”) Just drop down into the show notes below and click the links right there. Get in touch with Richard as well. Amen!  But be sure to order his book, https://amzn.to/3oagreE (“Finding Washington: Why America Needs to Rediscover the Virtues of Her Most Essential Founding Father.”)   CONTACT...

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Monday, August 15, 2022 – The new book-banning trend

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 55:29


With some success, Native Americans have fought hard to have their voices heard in the narratives about them by predominantly non-Native sources. Those gains are under assault by a new surge of efforts to ban books by Native authors and other works that challenge colonial conventional wisdom. Monday on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce gets a sampling of books that well-meaning parents, administrators, and policy-makers want to keep off of school reading lists and public spaces with Dr. Debbie Reese (Nambe Pueblo), founder of American Indians in Children's Literature blog; Kevin Maillard (Seminole), author and professor of Law at Syracuse University; Mandi Harris (Cherokee), a children's librarian and PhD student in Information Science at the University of Washington; and Lynette Dial (Lumbee), a library supervisor for Hoke County Library.

Back to the Future: The Podcast
Do I Know Your Mother? (Stella Baines) with Frances Lee McCain

Back to the Future: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 47:42


July 3rd, 1985 - a day that a little time travel movie produced by Steven Spielberg and directed by Robert Zemeckis called Back to the Future was released to the public. This podcast will dive into the world of BTTF, and discuss the movies, characters, and behind-the-scenes details on one of the greatest trilogies of all time. So buckle in, make sure your flux capacitor is fluxing, and enjoy the 88 mile per hour adventure of the Back to the Future trilogy. FRANCES LEE MCCAIN returned to New York where she appeared on Broadway in Woody Allen's Play it Again Sam, and off-Broadway in Lanford Wilson's Lemon Sky, creating the role of Carol. She joined the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco under William Ball and played a variety of roles in repertory. Apple's Way TV show (1974-75) and other 1970s work She began her career in film and television after appearing opposite Jon Voight and Faye Dunaway in A Streetcar Named Desire, eventually co-starring with Ronny Cox as the female lead in her own television series, CBS-TV's Apple's Way in 1974. She appeared in a variety of television series and miniseries throughout the 1970s, including the Quincy ME episode Eye Of The Needle playing a Holistic practitioner. In 1978 she played Charles Grodin's wife in Albert Brooks' debut feature film, Real Life. 1980s acting work In the 1980s, she was cast in several major films, usually always playing the mother of a main character. In 1984, she co-starred in the blockbuster film Gremlins as Lynn Peltzer, the mother of main character, Billy Peltzer (played by Zach Galligan). Also that year, she played Ethel McCormack, mother to Kevin Bacon's character, in Footloose. In 1985 she appeared in the hit film Back to the Future as Stella Baines, the mother to the character played by Lea Thompson. In 1986, she played the role of Mrs. Lachance, the mother of Gordie Lachance (played by Wil Wheaton), in the hit drama film Stand by Me. Later work McCain continued to work in television after relocating to the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1980s and also appeared in Scream (1996) as the mother of Rose McGowan's character, and Patch Adams (1998). She received a Master's Degree in Psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies in 2000, and continues to work in Theater extensively in the San Francisco Area. In 2004 McCain initiated a theater project based on oral histories of the blue collar workers responsible for the building and maintaining of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico which received workshop readings at the Lensic Center for Performing Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, most recently at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. McCain is an Associate Artist of the ZSpace Studio in San Francisco, and is an ensemble member of the AlterTheater Ensemble in San Rafael, California. Order the "Back from the Future" paperback with expanded material! Amazon- https://bit.ly/BackFromTheFutureBook Bookshop- https://bit.ly/BackFromTheFuturebook Barnes and Noble- https://bit.ly/BackFromtheFutureBook Mango- https://bit.ly/BackfromTheFutureBook Chapters indigo- https://bit.ly/BackFromThefutureBook Buy the BACK FROM THE FUTURE Book. ORDER: BOND, James Bond now! CLICK HERE. Back to the Future: The Podcast is produced and presented by Brad Gilmore, and is not affiliated with the Back to the Future franchise. This show is meant for entertainment and documentary purposes only, and does not intend to infringe on any copyrights of Universal Pictures, Back to the Future, or any of its characters, clips or music. Brad Gilmore expresses views and statements which represent that of the hosts and the guests of the program alone. The statements made on this program are in no way intended to represent views of any other organization affiliated with the hosts or guests and in no way represent the views of the sponsors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CinemaScope's podcast
August 12th, 2022 with Native Cinema Showcase's Cindy Benitez & Filmmaker & Actor Morningstar Angeline

CinemaScope's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 27:00


In this episode, we're chatting with Native Cinema Showcase Program Manager Cindy Benitez and filmmaker and actor Morningstar Angeline about this year's showcase.   In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the Santa Fe Indian Market, the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian presents the annual Native Cinema Showcase, which takes place in Santa Fe from August 18 to 21. Native Cinema Showcase is an official program of the 2022 Santa Fe Indian Market, which is sponsored by the Southwest Association for Indian Arts.   About Morningstar, whose film Seeds is in the showcase: Born in Santa Fe and raised in Gallup and Los Angeles, Morningstar is a queer Navajo, Chippewa, Blackfeet, Shoshone and Latinx actor and filmmaker. Morningstar was just announced as the second-ever participant in NBCU's director's initiative and is a 2018 Sundance Indigenous Lab, 2020 Native American Feature Writers Lab and 2021 imagineNATIVE Directors' Lab Fellow and serves on the board of directors for the mixed-media company Tse'Nato'. As an actor, Morningstar recently had recurring roles in Outer Range and Westworld.   About Cindy: Cindy lives in NYC and has worked with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian for the past 12 years. Ten of those years have been with Native Cinema Showcase, of which she said this: "One of my favorite memories at Native Cinema Showcase is not necessarily the films or even the filmmakers. It's the incredible subjects that are in these films."   Attendance is FREE, and you can find info and the full program here (35 films, 30 Native nations, 10 Indigenous languages, eight countries): https://nmai.brandlive.com/native-cinema-showcase-santa-fe-2022/en/home.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
"On This Ground," Jason Garcia

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 74:11 Very Popular


Episode No. 562 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Sarah Chasse and Karen Kramer, and artist Jason Garcia (Okuu Pin). Chasse and Kramer are the co-curators of a new installation of the Peabody Essex Museum's Native American and American collections titled "On This Ground: Being and Belonging in America." The installation joins two separate institutional collections in a way that joins art to 10,000 years of North American history. "On This Ground" often suggests and reveals how art influenced and extended ideas core to the continental story. The installation is on view indefinitely. Garcia's work -- specifically artworks from his Tewa Tales of Suspense! series -- is included in the PEM's collection and in "On This Ground." Garcia's work often examines and interprets American and Pueblo history in ways that revise old, whites-centering narratives. His work is in the collection of museums such as the Heard Museum in Phoenix, and the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian.

Dr Bryant Speaks.com
American Indian Veterans - Episode (1 of 4)

Dr Bryant Speaks.com

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 23:51


An episode that discusses facts and stories depicting the valor of underappreciated heroes of America. This is episode number 1, If you want to see the next episodes and amazing shows don't forget to subscribe to our channel.Dr. Bryant Speaks podcast show hits the reality button that is not always easy to hear. A topic that supports military families, veterans, and friends. This show brings all the research, data, and information provided by experts and guests appearances to discuss what is relevant and what is needed.Dr. Bryant served in the US Army with special operations elite military unit called, Airborne Rangers. His unit has deployed all over the world and Dr. Bryant personally has encountered his fair share of various challenges. However, as he looks back, he would have preferred to face what he did during his active duty status versus what he had/is encountering post-active duty. This show covers topic related to veterans, trauma, military issues, mental health and illness, PTSD,…etc.SPECIAL ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: Corporate sponsor - Pflutto's TavernFOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA Twitter:- https://twitter.com/FieldTalk4vetsInstagram :- https://www.instagram.com/fieldtalk4v...Watch On youtube.com/c/FieldTalkforvets

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Tuesday, August 9, 2022 – Facing growing addiction fatalities

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 55:32


The newest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention paint a distressing increase in the number of overdose deaths among Native Americans. It shows Native fatalities rose 39% from 2019 to 2020. That far outpaces the increase for the population as a whole. Also, an investigative report looks into alcohol-related fatalities in the state of New Mexico and finds that, while disproportionately high, the number for Native populations is not the main driving force in the overall problem. Today on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce talks with Heather Benjamin (Ojibwe), Indian Health Board's opioid intervention and prevention health educator; Dr. Spero Manson (Pembina Chippewa), Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health director at the University of Colorado Medical Campus; and independent journalist Ted Alcorn.

Conversations With Coleman
Black, White and Everything In Between With David Bernstein (S3 Ep.26)

Conversations With Coleman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 88:59 Very Popular


My guest today is David Bernstein. David is a professor at George Mason University Law School and the executive director of their liberty and Law Centre. His new book is called "Classified: The Untold Story of Racial Classification in America". Topics covered in this episode include the definition of race and the historical origins of America's Big Five racial and ethnic categories, which are Asian American, Black, Hispanic, American Indian, and White. We discuss the problems with all of these categories and how those problems manifest in race-based affirmative action programs and race-based social spending in general. We talk about the phenomenon of racial fraud trials where judges have to determine the race of individuals seeking to qualify for certain programs. We discuss the malleability of racial identity, and how commonly our racial identities can change in response to incentives. We also go on to discuss the prospect of what David calls "a separation of race and state". I really enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do too. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

First Voices Radio
08/07/22 - Jennifer Robin, Doug George-Kanentiio

First Voices Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 58:35


Tiokasin welcomes back Jennifer Robin (Choctaw) aka "Miss Jiff" to the show. Jennifer is the owner of Ofi Ni Productions and is a multiple award-winning producer and radio host, and television segment producer. Her weekly two-hour live program, "Resilience Radio," airs on KVMR 89.5 FM in Nevada City, CA. It presents Native American authors, artists, musicians, storytellers and activists and showcases contemporary Native music. Over the years Jennifer has interviewed hundreds of well-known Natives, including Buffy Sainte-Marie, Dennis Banks and John Trudell. "Resilience Radio" has an international following and is known for the authentic Indigenous voice. Jennifer's field work in Cannonball, North Dakota during the Standing Rock protest is available as a one-hour audio special. She was a broadcaster for SPIRIT Radio, Standing Rock's official station. Jennifer's ability to engage in honest, in-depth interviews is as entertaining as it is informative. She is a member of the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA).Regular guest Doug George-Kanentiio (Akwesasne Mohawk) was born and raised at the Mohawk Territory of Akwesasne. He attended school on and near the reservation before enrolling at Syracuse University and then the Antioch School of Law. Doug was a co-founder of the Native American Journalists Association before serving the Mohawk Nation as editor of the journals Akwesasne Notes and Indian Time. He worked with the late Vine Deloria, Jr., on the Traditional Knowledge conferences before joining the Board of Trustees for the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Doug is vice-president for the Hiawatha Institute for Indigenous Knowledge, a non-profit higher learning facility that is based on Iroquois principles. He resides on Oneida Iroquois Territory.Production Credits:Tiokasin Ghosthorse (Lakota), Host and Executive ProducerLiz Hill (Red Lake Ojibwe), ProducerMalcolm Burn, Studio Engineer, Radio Kingston, WKNY 1490 AM and 107.9 FM, Kingston, NYTiokasin Ghosthorse, Audio EditorMusic Selections:1. Song Title: Tahi Roots Mix (First Voices Radio Theme Song)Artist: Moana and the Moa HuntersAlbum: Tahi (1993)Label: Southside Records (Australia and New Zealand)(00:00:22)2. Song Title: RevolutionArtist: SOJAAlbum: Peace in the Time of War (2002)Label: DMV Records(00:30:04)3. Song Title: Bullet the Blue SkyArtist: U2Album: The Joshua Tree (1987)Label: Island Records(00:50:08)4. Song Title: Away From HereArtist: Smokey D PalmtreeAlbum: Peace of Mind (2021)Label: Gila River Records(00:56:18)AKANTU INSTITUTEVisit Akantu Institute, an institute that Tiokasin founded with a mission of contextualizing original wisdom for troubled times. Go to https://akantuinstitute.org/ to find out more and consider joining his Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/Ghosthorse.

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 374: 18374 Winter Moons

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 53:27


Chickasaw composer and U.S. Cultural Ambassador Jerod Impichchaachaaha' Tate releases a new album, Winter Moons. Winter Moons is a ballet in four movements based upon American Indian legends from the Northern Plains and the Rocky Mountains, performed with a live storyteller to guide the audience. The title of the ballet is derived from the ancient idea that American Indian stories – some serious historical narratives, and others lighthearted bedtime stories for children, but all usually carrying a moral – are best told during the full moons of the wintertime. Winter Moons was Tate's very first composition, commissioned by and dedicated to his mother, choreographer Dr. Patricia Tate. Spirit Chief Names the Animal People was part of the original version of Winter Moons and is now performed as a separate work with a narrator.Winter Moons TracklistJerod Impichchaachaaha' Tate – Winter Moons (1992)     1. Introduction (The Four Moons) - Winter Moon - Puberty Blessing Songs [13:11]     2. The Indian Spirit at Mesa Falls [9:36]     3. Red Plume and The Medicine Wheel - The Origin of Bitterroot [11:34]     4. She Runs With the Wind - Finale [6:30] Jerod Impichchaachaaha' Tate – Spirit Chief Names the Animal People     5. Coyote [2:16]     6. Bear [2:18]     7. Salmon [1:57]     8. Eagle [3:27]     9. Coyote (reprise) [1:51] Winter Moons OrchestraFrank J. Toth, ConductorRecorded at Kulas Hall Cleveland Institute of MusicPurchase the music (without talk) at:Winter Moons (classicalsavings.com)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @CMDHedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com This album is broadcasted with the permission of Katy Salomon representing Primo Artists. https://khedgecock.podomatic.com/rss2.xml 

The Republican Professor
Home-Sick for a Place That Doesn't Exist Anymore: Spiritual Formation Scholar & Christian Curious Radio Host Dr. Halee Gray Scott, Ph.D. (Ep. 75)

The Republican Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 116:52


"Halee, what happened to you was rape. And if you don't call it that, you're never going to get better," Halee's co-worker said to Halee when she finally told someone the true story 4 months later. Our guest today is the Christian spiritual formation and leadership scholar Dr. Halee Gray Scott, Ph.D. She speaks with a slight, charming Texas drawl. "I grew up in serious country," Texas-native Dr. Halee Gray Scott, Ph.D., begins her story by saying. "I swam in crocodile-infested waters" exploring the nooks and crannies of the East-Texas wilderness. Her childhood was at the same time idyllic for an insatiably curious contrarian kid such as herself, and at the same time quite frightening. There were tornadoes coming down from the uncontrollable, unpredictable and angry giant Texas sky. Later, her adventurous spirit directed her curiosity to scholarship into stable truths about Leadership and the Christian faith, about how young people's attitudes are being shaped by forces we didn't have when we were kids. Whereas the threat of a tornado kept her up at night, now it's the kids. It's the church, and what they're dealing with. It's what the churches and seminaries are or are not doing about it. Maybe they don't know what to do about it, or how to be. Halee's heart is as follows: she hopes to help others to get trained to fill the gap between the challenges facing Leadership and the training they receive. She first got on the radio at 15 years old. Now, she has a Ph.D., is a syndicated radio host, and author of Dare Mighty Things: Mapping the Challenges of Leadership for Christian Women. Her latest book is Not a Hopeless Case: 6 Vital Questions from Young Adults for a Church in Crisis, available April 2023. Check out Christian Curious Radio Program here: https://www.christiancurious.com/ In this wide-ranging discussion, we talk touch on the Kingdom of God and the ethics of eating meat, and naturally from that to hunting. I take the American Indian perspective, for the most part, on the uses of the animal. We camp out on Indian-stuff for a while, what it must have been like for the settlers. We touch on the role of women in ministry. This is a huge part of her professional research. We talk about her Washington Post article where she reported having been raped by her pastor in Texas when she was a young woman, how how she has and is dealing with that. You can find the article titled "#MeToo: I was Raped by my Pastor" published October 16, 2017, https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2017/10/16/metoo-i-was-raped-by-my-pastor/ It ran in the print edition of the Post. She had come to college there at UNT, Denton an atheist, and at the time of the rape, had only been a true Christian for 3 months. Does Halee still believe that there is a good God as revealed in the Bible ? Yes, she does. But it's been a journey, and continues to be. Her passion involves protecting the possibility of that belief in the soil of other vulnerable souls, as well. It's what motivates her research and directs her professional steps. It took her 4 months to tell anyone about it, and when she did, her co-worked used the appropriate term "rape." But it took her 15 years to come to terms with that word for what happened. And she had panic attacks for years every-time she went inside a church. But she's healing. We do not rush through this conversation. There is no rush. We take our time. We just enjoy the company and the conversation, and hope you do, too. The Republican Professor is a pro-coming-to-terms, pro-reminiscing-of-idyllic-childhood-conditions, pro-take-your-shoes-off-and-stay-awhile, pro-theological-discussion, pro-wrestling-with-the-problem-of-evil, pro-let's-help-not-screw-the-kids-up-and-keep-the-leadership-appropriately-trained-up-and-accountable podcast. Therefore, welcome Dr. Halee Gray Scott, Ph.D., Curious Christian The Republican Professor is produced and hosted by Dr. Lucas J. Mather, Ph.D.

Where Am I To Go
Podcast #84-S3 - Lincoln County Museum - Jun 20 2022

Where Am I To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 88:42


Lincoln Historic Site is unique in that it manages most of the historical buildings in the community of Lincoln. This most widely visited state monument in New Mexico is part of a community frozen in time—the 1870's and 1880's. Through a gift from the Hubbard Family Trust, the historic site now includes 17 structures and outbuildings, 7 of which are open year round and 2 more seasonally as museums. Most of the buildings in the community are representative of the Territorial Style of adobe architecture in the American Southwest. Lincoln is a town made famous by one of the most violent periods in New Mexico history. Today's visitors can see the Old Lincoln County Courthouse with museum exhibits that recount the details of the Lincoln County War and the historic use of the "House" as store, residence, Masonic Lodge, courthouse, and jail. Walk in the footsteps of Billy the Kid, Pat Garrett, and other famous and infamous characters of the Wild West. Trace the events of 1878 through the Courthouse and the Tunstall Store, with their preserved 19th-century atmosphere. Remarkably, the Tunstall Store contains displays of the original 19th-century merchandise in the original shelving and cases! Continue your walk through history by visiting El Torreón (a defensive tower built by native New Mexican settlers in the 1850s), the San Juan Mission Church, the Convento, Dr. Woods' House, the Montaño store and other historic structures throughout the town. The Anderson-Freeman Visitor's Center & Museum features historical exhibits in a timeline starting with American Indian prehistory and ending with the Lincoln County War. A 22 minute video about the Lincoln County War and the community is shown every half hour. The importance of this community and the significance of the Bonito Valley in the prehistory and history of the Territory of New Mexico are interpreted within some of the 17 structures that comprise Lincoln Historic Site. These historic adobe and stone buildings are preserved as they were in the late 1800s and represent the factions involved in the Lincoln County War, 1878-1881. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/loren-alberts/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loren-alberts/support

New Books Network
Considering Museum Work? A Conversation with Curators From the Smithsonian

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 81:43


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: Our guests' career paths at the Smithsonian, their work to help create a new Women's history museum, collecting BLM materials during protests, creating exhibits just as the pandemic closed the museum, and a discussion of their book on women's artifacts in the Smithsonian. Today's book is: Smithsonian American Women: Remarkable Objects and Stories of Strength, Ingenuity, and Vision from the National Collection, a book that offers a unique and panoramic look at women's history in the United States through the lens of ordinary objects from, by, and for extraordinary women. Featuring more than 280 artifacts from 16 Smithsonian museums and archives, and more than 135 essays from 95 Smithsonian authors, this book tells women's history as only the Smithsonian can. Portraits, photographs, paintings, political materials, signs, musical instruments, sports equipment, clothes, letters, ads, personal possessions, and other objects reveal the incredible stories of amazing women such as Phillis Wheatley, Julia Child, Sojourner Truth, Mary Cassat, Madame CJ Walker, Amelia Earhart, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mamie Till Mobley, Dolores Clara Fernandez Huerta, Phyllis Diller, Celia Cruz, Sandra Day O'Connor, Billie Jean King, and Silvia Rivera. Published to commemorate the centennial of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote, Smithsonian American Women is a deeply satisfying read and a reflection on how generations of women have defined what it means to be recognized in both the nation and the world. Our guest is: Dr. Margaret A. Weitekamp, who is the Department Chair and Curator of the Space History Department at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Dr. Weitekamp curates the Museum's social and cultural history of spaceflight collection, and is the author of numerous scholarly articles, and co-edited the ninth volume in the Artefacts series on the material culture of science and technology, Analyzing Art and Aesthetics (Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2013). She is currently completing a book on social and cultural history of space memorabilia. Our guest is: Dr. Michelle Anne Delaney, who is the Assistant Director for History and Culture of the National Museum of the American Indian. Dr. Delaney manages the Museum's research and scholarship team, and leads the intellectual program development for exhibitions, educational programming, publications, and digital scholarship; and directs strategic internal pan-Smithsonian projects, and external collaborations and university partnerships. An author and editor of several history of photography books, Dr. Delaney has also curated 25 Smithsonian exhibitions and web projects. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, the co-creator and co-producer of the Academic Life. Listeners to this episode might also be interested in: Information in the National Archives about the 19th Amendment  Because of Herstory webpage  National Women's History Museum website  Information on the 19th amendment from the National Parks Service  The Women's Museum of California Women's history resources at the National Museum of American History  You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you experts about everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Here on the Academic Life channel, we embrace a broad definition of what it means to be an academic and to lead an academic life. We view education as a transformative human endeavor and are inspired by today's knowledge-producers working inside and outside the academy. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DMs us on Twitter: @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Academic Life
Considering Museum Work? A Conversation with Curators From the Smithsonian

The Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 81:43


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: Our guests' career paths at the Smithsonian, their work to help create a new Women's history museum, collecting BLM materials during protests, creating exhibits just as the pandemic closed the museum, and a discussion of their book on women's artifacts in the Smithsonian. Today's book is: Smithsonian American Women: Remarkable Objects and Stories of Strength, Ingenuity, and Vision from the National Collection, a book that offers a unique and panoramic look at women's history in the United States through the lens of ordinary objects from, by, and for extraordinary women. Featuring more than 280 artifacts from 16 Smithsonian museums and archives, and more than 135 essays from 95 Smithsonian authors, this book tells women's history as only the Smithsonian can. Portraits, photographs, paintings, political materials, signs, musical instruments, sports equipment, clothes, letters, ads, personal possessions, and other objects reveal the incredible stories of amazing women such as Phillis Wheatley, Julia Child, Sojourner Truth, Mary Cassat, Madame CJ Walker, Amelia Earhart, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mamie Till Mobley, Dolores Clara Fernandez Huerta, Phyllis Diller, Celia Cruz, Sandra Day O'Connor, Billie Jean King, and Silvia Rivera. Published to commemorate the centennial of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote, Smithsonian American Women is a deeply satisfying read and a reflection on how generations of women have defined what it means to be recognized in both the nation and the world. Our guest is: Dr. Margaret A. Weitekamp, who is the Department Chair and Curator of the Space History Department at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Dr. Weitekamp curates the Museum's social and cultural history of spaceflight collection, and is the author of numerous scholarly articles, and co-edited the ninth volume in the Artefacts series on the material culture of science and technology, Analyzing Art and Aesthetics (Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2013). She is currently completing a book on social and cultural history of space memorabilia. Our guest is: Dr. Michelle Anne Delaney, who is the Assistant Director for History and Culture of the National Museum of the American Indian. Dr. Delaney manages the Museum's research and scholarship team, and leads the intellectual program development for exhibitions, educational programming, publications, and digital scholarship; and directs strategic internal pan-Smithsonian projects, and external collaborations and university partnerships. An author and editor of several history of photography books, Dr. Delaney has also curated 25 Smithsonian exhibitions and web projects. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, the co-creator and co-producer of the Academic Life. Listeners to this episode might also be interested in: Information in the National Archives about the 19th Amendment  Because of Herstory webpage  National Women's History Museum website  Information on the 19th amendment from the National Parks Service  The Women's Museum of California Women's history resources at the National Museum of American History  You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you experts about everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Here on the Academic Life channel, we embrace a broad definition of what it means to be an academic and to lead an academic life. We view education as a transformative human endeavor and are inspired by today's knowledge-producers working inside and outside the academy. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DMs us on Twitter: @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/academic-life

Indianz.Com
Fawn Sharp / National Congress of American Indians

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 6:10


House Subcommittee on Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing – July 28, 2022 Date: Thursday, July 28, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in Room 1324 Longworth House Office Building and via Cisco WebEx, the House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) holds a hybrid legislative hearing on the following bill: • H.R.5549, the Indian Health Service Advance Appropriations Act. The bill amends the Indian Health Care Improvement Act to authorize appropriations for the Indian Health Service for two years in advance. Witness List Panel I Ms. Elizabeth Fowler Acting Director Indian Health Service U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Rockville, Maryland Panel II The Honorable Jonathan Nez President, Navajo Nation Navajo Area Representative, National Indian Health Board Window Rock, Arizona The Honorable Kirk Francis President United South and Eastern Tribes Sovereignty Protection Fund Nashville, Tennessee The Honorable Fawn Sharp President National Congress of American Indians Washington, DC The Honorable Jarred-Michael Erickson Chairman Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation Nespelem, Washington Ms. Maureen Rosette Board Member National Council of Urban Indian Health Washington, DC Ms. Alberta Unok President and CEO Alaska Native Health Board Anchorage, Alaska Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/hybrid-scip-legislative-hearing_july-28-2022

Grounded with Dinée Dorame
Common Ground - Episode 6

Grounded with Dinée Dorame

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 67:47


In our sixth installment of Common Ground, a monthly cross-cast I'm co-hosting with Mario Fraioli of the Morning Shakeout Podcast, we talk all things World Athletics Championships! We give you our favorite moments from the meet and I give some personal updates on my training/running journey. I also give some insight into my day job at College Horizons, a national non-profit that supports American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian youth in their higher education journey. For more info, go to https://www.collegehorizons.org. Common Ground will be released monthly in both the morning shakeout and Grounded Podcast feeds so there's no need to subscribe to a separate show. Please let us know what you think by sending us a message via social media—@theAMshakeout or @groundedpod on both Instagram and Twitter—or leave a rating/review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.   Follow the Morning Shakeout Podcast & Mario Fraioli: Instagram: @theamshakeout Twitter: @theamshakeout Mario Fraioli: Website| Strava   Follow Grounded Pod: Instagram: @groundedpod Twitter: @groundedpod Facebook: facebook.com/groundedpodwithdinee   Subscribe, Listen, & Review on: Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Soundcloud | Stitcher   Editing for this episode by John Summerford. Grounded Podcast theme music by Jacob Shije (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). Photo of Dinée Dorame by Aisha McAdams.

IN SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH with Dr. Celine Gounder
S4E9 / Two Paths, Two Future Physicians / Ashton Glover Gatewood, Victor Lopez-Carmen, Mary Owen

IN SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH with Dr. Celine Gounder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 25:39


Correction: This episode was updated on July 27, 2022, to accurately characterize Dr. Charles Eastman's academic milestone.In 1890, Dr. Charles Eastman became one of the first Native people to graduate from medical school in the United States. Today, one of his descendants, Victor Lopez-Carmen, is a third-year student at Harvard Medical School. He described feeling isolated there.“I did feel alone. There wasn't any Native person around me I could turn to,” said Lopez-Carmen.Less than 1% of medical students in the United States identify as American Indian or Alaska Native. That's according to a 2018 report from the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Association of American Indian Physicians. Lopez-Carmen is working to change that. In 2021, he co-founded the Ohiyesa Premedical Program, which provides mentorship and support to Native American students as they navigate the medical school application process.While Lopez-Carmen is mentoring future medical students in Boston, in Oklahoma, Ashton Glover Gatewood has found community at the first medical school in the United States affiliated with a Native tribe. Gatewood attends Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Cherokee Nation. “I told my husband about it, and he said, ‘That sounds like they're building you a medical school. You have to go,'" Gatewood said.  She's noticed a “momentum” in medical training that she said could one day lessen the health care disparities Indigenous people experience. Episode 9 explores the barriers Indigenous people face to becoming physicians and includes the stories of two medical students working to join the ranks of Indigenous health care workers in the U.S.  Voices from the Episode: Victor Lopez-Carmen — Twitter — Student at Harvard Medical SchoolMary Owen – Director, Center of American Indian and Minority Health at the University of Minnesota; President, Association of American Indian PhysiciansAshton Glover Gatewood — Twitter, Instagram — Student at Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Cherokee NationSeason 4 of “American Diagnosis” is a co-production of KHN and Just Human Productions.Our Editorial Advisory Board includes Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, Alastair Bitsóí, and Bryan Pollard.To hear all KHN podcasts, click here.Listen and follow “American Diagnosis” on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google, or Stitcher.

Podcasts by Larry Lannan
Diane Hunter, Miami American Indian Tribe

Podcasts by Larry Lannan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 28:58


In the first of a podcast series all about the history of Fishers, I talk with Diane Hunter of the Miami American Indian Tribe. We talk about the people inhabiting this area long before the European settlers arrived.

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

There is a great fascination with the lost tribes of Israel. Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormons, taught that the American Indians were among the lost tribes, and there was a television special not long ago that tracked down people in Asia and Africa who believed they were remnants of these forgotten bloodlines.But there is, in the Bible, a prophecy about all the tribes of Israel at the end time. It is found in Genesis 49: And Jacob called unto his sons, and said, Gather yourselves together, that I may tell you that which shall befall you in the last days. If old Jacob is really talking about the last days, then the distinct tribes of Israel should all exist as political entities at the very end of days.So let’s proceed on that assumption. The descendants of Abraham were supposed to become as the sands of the seashore in number. And they were supposed to be a blessing to the rest of the world. All this implies a coherent people. And the prophecies of old Israel also imply a coherent people at the end time. So what exactly did he have to say?

Rightnowish
“You're On Native Land” : The Cultural District Honoring Urban Native History

Rightnowish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 27:14


In Indigenous protocol, we're beginning this week's episode honoring the original stewards of this land that many of us in Frisco now occupy — the ancestral homeland of the Ramaytush Ohlone. Now, let's take a trip down Valencia Street to La Misión. The neighborhood is home to not one, but two rich cultural districts. Calle 24 Latino Cultural District was first established in 1999. More recently, in 2020, it was joined by the American Indian Cultural District — a home base for the Urban Native community. Its aim is to uplift the culture, history, and continuing contributions of American Indians in San Francisco and beyond. On this week's Rightnowish, we introduce you to some of the people behind this cultural district that's the first of its kind in the Golden State. Mary Travis-Allen (Mayagna, Chortega, Seneca) is the President of the District's Advisory Board and recalls memories of "Little Rez" along 16th Street. Debbie Santiago (Washoe, Osage) and her mother, Alberta Snyder (Washoe) share their memories about the SFUSD's Indian Education Program that ran out of the American Indian Cultural Center on Valencia Street in the 70s and 80s. Karen Waukazoo (Lakota) remembers her late mother and local hero, Helen Waukazoo, who co-founded Friendship House, the oldest social service organization in the United States run by and for American Indians. Last but not least, we venture to the waterfront at Fort Mason to talk with Sharaya Souza (Taos Pueblo, Ute, Kiowa), the Executive Director of the American Indian Cultural District about the legacy of the Alcatraz occupation.  There are so many Native stories alive in La Misión — we hope this is just the start to more of us hearing about them.

dHarmic Evolution
341. We Need a Rain Dance Today, A Soulful Prayer To Change Our Set of Circumstance

dHarmic Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 24:08


In today's episode, we have the master storyteller, James, who shares a fantastic story regarding how his song Rain Dance came together. He talks about the inspiration, the creativity flow, instrumentals and production. Just in case you've forgotten, the dHarmic Evolution is centered around discovering indie singers/songwriters before they get discovered by the mainstream. In addition, the show features authors, speakers, and thought leaders, the core culture of the dHarmic Evolution brand is built around doing for others. So strap up your seatbelts, and let's take a ride to New Jersey on this episode of the dHarmic Evolution podcast.   As a Preview In this episode, James touches on Indian Americans. He goes on to talk about their style of faith. James also discusses his song Rain Dance, which came about as a result of a brutal heat wave and how the idea for this song came together. As you listen, get to know more about James' first full length CD, "175 Cherry Lane" which was also self-produced. Also, learn about the Crazy Horse Memorial all on this episode of the Dharmic Evolution. Quotes I've always believed the American Indian is such a special breed of person. What is being an American anymore? It's hard to put your finger on that. Because they didn't have the same name we are using (referring to God) doesn't mean they didn't have faith. They had stronger faith than most cultures and revered nature so beautifully. If you don't believe in prayer, you might think about making a gesture towards prayer, and if you put some energy and some intellectual capacity into prayer, you might get surprised and might want to do it more often.   Timestamps 03:09 What are we talking about in this episode? 03:41 Do you believe in rain dance? 05:37 Faith and the American Indian 07:02 How do we get rain? 07:23 Behind one of James' first full-length CD tracks 09:13 Jean's Evergreens 09:41 James' collaboration with Drums for you 11:38 More collaborations with Drums for you 14:01 James' song Thirteen had a full horn section 14:50 The Great Crazy Horse Memorial in South Dakota 19:00 175 Cherry Rain Collection: Rain Dance Plays Spotify Playlist:   Make sure you're not missing out on all our “Rising dHarmic Stars Spotify Playlists”. We already have four (4) playlists where you can find over a hundred songs from our very own dHarmic Evolution alumni. Don't forget to share them with your family and friends, and let the world support these fantastic indie artists! Check out the links here:   dHarmic Rising Stars: Aquila   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4loDaYF0OuWRjZeMXvEjK4   dHarmic Rising Stars: Orion   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5CnL9tl0xbU4oDh6jtJBZx   dHarmic Rising Stars: Lyra   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1ov0OqNMJmPhHrxZjsXthS   dHarmic Rising Stars: Scorpius   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5oQ4Sc4LAJSexsDgDcixt8   dHarmic Evolution links:   Stay up-to-date with our new releases! You just simply need to go to dharmicevolution.com and subscribe to your favourite podcast platform – there is a lot to choose from! Let me know what you think as well by leaving comments or reviews! And if you're digging this show, please share it with somebody either on social media or just forward it to a friend and let them join the growing community of dHarmic Evolution!   Hey, do you know someone who is suffering from anxiety and depression? Please help them out by suggesting the book “7 Steps to Mental Freedom.” It will be a great read for them. You can easily find it as well on the main page of the website, or you can just send them to 7stepstomentalfreedom.com.   Keep yourself updated with what's going on with dHarmic evolution; check out our Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/dharmicevolution and, if you are an artist, an author, or a keynote speaker, who is trying to find a safe place to post your content to, you can check out our own Facebook community page and let the world support you! Check out the link here: dHarmic Evolution Community.  Special Links and Mentions Drums For You Robin T. Smith James' song Thirteen Crazy Horse Memorial  

TIME's Top Stories
Drug Overdose Deaths Rose Among Black and Indigenous Americans During COVID-19

TIME's Top Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 6:57


The increase was especially high for Black, American Indian, and Alaska Native people

Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color
E162: Samuel Little Pt 2

Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 59:36


(note: time stamps are without ads & may be off a little)This is part two covering the case of Samuel Little, a serial killer who confessed to having committed 93 murders between 1970 and 2005, at least 50 of which have been verified by law enforcement. He has been called the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.First, we get back into the timeline (13:42). Then, we get into the investigation & arrest (22:35), the trial & the confessions (25:41) "Where are they now?" (34:30) followed by our takeaways and what we think made the perp snap (36:35). As usual we close out the show with some tips on how not to get murdered and our shout outs (53:54). This episode was researched & scripted by Wendy & Beth Williams.Thanks for listening! This is a weekly podcast and new episodes drop every Thursday, so until next time... look alive guys, it's crazy out there!SponsorsBetter HelpBetterhelp.com/fruit10% off your first month!Best FiendsDownload Best Fiends free on the Apple App Store or Google Play!Apple https://apps.apple.com/us/app/best-fiends-puzzle-adventure/id868013618Google Play https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Seriously.BestFiends&hl=en_US&gl=USShout OutsThe Staircasehttps://www.hbomax.com/series/urn:hbo:series:GYk93MwWuH4BJoAEAAABuBFF: Black, Fat Femme Podcasthttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bff-black-fat-femme/id1631198874The Girl in The Picturehttps://www.netflix.com/title/81212487The Orvillehttps://www.hulu.com/series/the-orville-21e70fbf-6a51-41b3-88e9-f111830b046cThe Fall Line: The Victims of Samuel Littlehttps://www.thefalllinepodcast.com/season-11-the-victims-of-samuel-littleWhere to find us:Our Facebook page is Fruitloopspod and our discussion group is Fruitloopspod Discussion on Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod/We are also on Twitter and Instagram @fruitloopspodPlease send any questions or comments to fruitloopspod@gmail.com or leave us a voicemail at 602-935-6294. We just might read your email or play your voicemail on the show!Want to Support the show?You can support the show by rating and reviewing Fruitloops on iTunes, or anywhere else that you get your podcasts from. We would love it if you gave us 5 stars!You can make a donation on the Cash Apphttps://cash.me/$fruitloopspodOr become a monthly Patron through our Podbean Patron pagehttps://patron.podbean.com/fruitloopspodFootnotesArticles/WebsitesFBI.gov. (10/06/2019). FBI Seeking Assistance Connecting Victims to Samuel Little's Confessions. Retrieved 05/20/2022 from https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/samuel-little-most-prolific-serial-killer-in-us-history-100619FBI.gov. (11/27/2018). Convicted Killer Linked to 90 Murders. Retrieved 05/20/2022 from https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/vicap-links-murders-to-prolific-serial-killer-112718Vigdor, Neil. (12/31/2020). Samuel Little, Serial Killer Who Confessed to 93 Murders, Dies at 80. New York Times. Retrieved 06/03/2022 from https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/31/us/samuel-little-dead.htmlWikipedia contributors. (05/25/2022). Samuel Little. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Samuel_Little&oldid=1089786503Williams, Timothy. (11/26/2018). He Says He Got Away With 90 Murders. Now He's Confessing to Them All. The New York Times. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/26/us/samuel-little-serial-killer-murderer.htmlBogel-Burroughs, Nicholas; Williams, Timothy; Oppel Jr., Richard A. (10/08/2019). How Did a Serial Killer Escape Notice? His Victims Were Vulnerable and Overlooked. The New York Times. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/08/us/samuel-little-serial-killer-victims.htmlHickman, Hayes. (12/12/2018). Knox woman's death dismissed as natural until serial killer Samuel Little's confession. Knox News. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://www.knoxnews.com/story/news/crime/2018/12/12/samuel-little-serial-killer-victims-martha-cunningham/2224669002/Heavy. (08/31/2020). How Samuel Little Chose Victims Like Melinda Rose LaPree. Retrieved 06/23/2022 from https://heavy.com/entertainment/2020/08/how-samuel-little-chose-victims-melinda-rose-lapree/Ansari, Maira. (01/09/2013). Suspected serial killer arrested in Louisville. WAVE 3. Retrieved 06/26/2022 from https://www.wave3.com/story/20538174/police-arrest-homeless-man-suspected-of-murders-in-california/Abdollah, Tami. (04/07/2013). More cases connected to L.A. serial killer suspect. Star Advertiser. Retrieved 06/27/2022 from https://www.staradvertiser.com/2013/04/07/breaking-news/more-cases-connected-to-l-a-serial-killer-suspect/Bogel-Burroughs, Nicholas; Williams, Timothy; Oppel Jr., Richard A. (10/08/2019). How Did a Serial Killer Escape Notice? His Victims Were Vulnerable and Overlooked. The New York Times. Retrieved 06/27/2022 from https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/08/us/samuel-little-serial-killer-victims.htmlHarris, Jack. (10/17/2019). Even in death, everyone should be equal. West Side Story. Retrieved 07/02/2022 from https://wsspaper.com/52455/opinion/even-in-death-everyone-should-be-equal/Lauren, Jillian. (12/20/2018). The Serial Killer And The ‘Less Dead'. The Cut. Retrieved 07/02/2022 from https://www.thecut.com/2018/12/how-serial-killer-samuel-little-was-caught.htmlHistoryAbout Lorain, Ohio. Columbus Recovery Center. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://www.columbusrecoverycenter.com/about-lorain-ohio/Lorain Historical Society. (n.d.). Lorain's International Legacy. Retrieved 06/21/2022 from https://www.lorainhistory.org/african-american-origin/Editorial Board. (02/26/2022). Lorain County's history with Underground Railroad should be shared. Morning Journal. Retrieved 06/28/2022 from https://www.morningjournal.com/2022/02/26/lorain-countys-history-with-underground-railroad-should-be-shared-editorial/Toni Morrison : Segregation and Racism in Lorain, Ohio. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeoFyiMvQQQOhio History Central. (n.d.). Black Laws of 1807. Retrieved 06/28/2022 from http://ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Black_Laws_of_1807The Equal Justice Initiative. (n.d.). Ohio Prohibits Any Black Person from Testifying Against a White Person. Retrieved 06/29/2022 from https://calendar.eji.org/racial-injustice/apr/1Ohio History Central. (n.d.). American Indians. Retrieved 06/30/2022 from https://ohiohistorycentral.org/w/American_IndiansBerman, Mark and Lowery, Wesley, and Knowles, Hannah. Indifferent Justice | Part 2 Through the Cracks. The Washington Post. 12/2/2020. https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/national/samuel-little-serial-killer/part-two/PodcastsNic and the Captain (hosts). True Crime Garage. Samuel Little- The Killer of Women/// Part 1 /// 585 . Published. June 7 2022. Retrieved on 7/12/22 from URL https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS96YXRVOFhFTA/episode/OWJkZjVhOGYtYTEzNC00ZjBhLThkYWEtZjI4MjI2ZDAxNTE2?ep=14Patrick Hinds and Gillian Pensavalle (hosts). True Crime OBsessed. Obsessed Network. 176: Serial Killer: “Sam Little: To Catch a Killer”. April 13, 2021. Retrieved on 7/12/2022 from URL https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hdWRpb2Jvb20uY29tL2NoYW5uZWxzLzQ5Mjk2ODAucnNz/episode/dGFnOmF1ZGlvYm9vbS5jb20sMjAyMS0wNC0xMzovcG9zdHMvNzg0MzEwMg?ep=14Kathryn (host). Crimepsych's psychological analysis. Psychological Analysis of Sam Little. 2/16/22. Retrieved on 7/12/22 from URL https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5idXp6c3Byb3V0LmNvbS8xNTMzNjM0LnJzcw/episode/QnV6enNwcm91dC0xMDA4NTUwMA?ep=14Pileri, Tim and Reenstierna, Lance. 199// Samuel Little's Victims- The Fall Line. Missing. Crawlspace Media & Glassbox Media. 10/29/2020. Retrieved on 7/12/22 from URL https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hdWRpb2Jvb20uY29tL2NoYW5uZWxzLzQ4NDIxMTMucnNz/episode/OWZlY2U4NzEtMjRhMi00NDVjLWFjYWEtMjk1YTI4Zjg2NzVj?ep=14VideoThe 93 Victims of Samuel Littlehttps://www.investigationdiscovery.com/show/the-93-victims-of-samuel-little-investigation-discovery-atve-usConfronting a Serial Killerhttps://www.starz.com/us/en/series/confronting-a-serial-killer/59920Catching A Serial Killer: Sam Littlehttps://www.oxygen.com/catching-a-serial-killer-sam-littleHow Not to Get Murderedhttps://www.tiktok.com/t/ZTR2Tx19w/?k=1Music“Abyss” by Alasen: ●https://soundcloud.com/alasen●https://twitter.com/icemantrap ●https://instagram.com/icemanbass/●https://soundcloud.com/therealfrozenguy●Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License“Dance of Death” by Purple Planet Music http://www.purple-planet.comLicensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License"Gotta Get it" by AruloMixkit Stock Music Free Licensehttps://mixkit.co/free-stock-music/trap/"Strange Times" by Yung Kartzhttps://freemusicarchive.org/music/Yung_KartzLicensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License“Furious Freak” by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3791-furious-freakLicensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Connect with us on:Twitter @FruitLoopsPodInstagram https://www.instagram.com/fruitloopspodFacebook https://www.facebook.com/Fruitloopspod and https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod

Hacks & Wonks
Claudia Kauffman, Candidate for 47th LD State Senator

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 41:04


On this midweek show, Crystal chats with Claudia Kauffman about her campaign for State Senator in the 47th Legislative District - why she decided to run again for a seat she previously held, what it's like to run in a swing district, how the last legislative session went and her thoughts on addressing and prioritizing issues in the LD47 community such as housing affordability and zoning, COVID-19 impacts on education, making schools more welcoming, and protecting fundamental privacy rights. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Claudia at @SenClaudiaK.   Resources Campaign Website - Claudia Kauffman: https://www.voteclaudiakauffman.com/   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today we're pleased to be welcoming to this program, a former senator who is now running again for State Senate in the 47th legislative district, here in South King County, Claudia Kauffman. Welcome to the program. [00:00:53] Claudia Kauffman: Thank you for having me. [00:00:54] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. So I guess I just wanna start off by asking what made you decide to run again? [00:01:03] Claudia Kauffman: First, I am Claudia Kauffman - I am a member of the Nez Perce Tribe, I grew up in Seattle, I have lived in South King County for about 22 years - raised my family, my children went to the Kent School District, and I am deeply involved and engaged in my community. I am a homeowner and a mother and a grandmother, so I'm engaged and I'm involved and I'm invested in the community. Both my professional and my elected experience positions me well to be running for this seat at this time. I worked over 20 years for Muckleshoot Indian Tribe in government relations - working on government relations on the local state, federal levels and working on legislative agendas and working with consultants and helping to identify strategy behind the agendas. But I also, as you had mentioned - former State Senator of the 47th legislative district. Given those two wonderful aspects in my life that an opportunity has come forward with an open seat in my previous position that I held and I thought it was an excellent opportunity to go back and continue the great work that I did when I was in the State Senate before, and having the understanding and knowledge, experience. I thought this was a fantastic opportunity, and I loved working in the State Senate and being a State Senator - I just loved everything about it. And it's all about serving community. [00:03:05] Crystal Fincher: So it has been eight years since you were in the Senate - do I have that right? And the district has been a swing district, it remains a swing district even after redistricting. And with this open seat, there's a quite competitive primary race going on, with another Democratic opponent, a Republican in the race. It is really one of the races that people across the state are looking at and that may determine the balance of power in at least one chamber in our legislature. And so, as you were looking at this and considering running and having represented the district before, what is it like? Especially for people who are used to living in safe, blue, Democratic districts - what's it like to be running a race in one of our state's top battleground districts, where you have heated Republican rhetoric, at this time when there is so much at stake? What is that like? [00:04:12] Claudia Kauffman: It's true that the 47th district is a swing district and it has gone back and forth and back and forth. Before I was first elected, there was a Republican State Senator for 12 years. And then I got in and then Joe Fain, a Republican, got in. And then Mona Das, a Democrat, got back in. And so it does swing that way. And it's true - this is not a safe blue district like in Seattle - you don't walk up and say, Hello, I'm a young, progressive woman of color. It's just - that doesn't reflect what this district is. There are some large cities - Kent and Auburn and Covington are included in the 47th, but that also includes rural areas. And there are a lot of farms - local farms in the district - and as well as manufacturing, so incorporates a tremendous amount of variety and diversity in terms of the work and the population and the people. But it also is diverse in things that are valued. And so this is a district - and you can't, I think, just put out a number of measures on the ballot to increase taxes to do such things as repair and reconstruct, or even rebuild the Kent Police Department - has always been turned down. There have been measures for taxing to increase support in the water system and that's been turned down. So this is a different district and, as such, there are Democrats and there are Republicans, but there is a huge middle that is more independent and works that way. And so knowing and understanding the district, I think, is very important in this race. And I have that experience, I come with all that knowledge. [00:06:34] Crystal Fincher: It does take knowing the district - it's different, I think - a lot of times when people are here - I live almost on the border of the 33rd and the 47th and have - very familiar with Kent and Covington and elsewhere. So how, as when you're running and there is such a wide variety of people, diverse population in every single way - how do you stay true to your values as you are talking to people who may feel very different ways? How do you stay grounded and how do you stay principled when you're talking to all of those voters? [00:07:17] Claudia Kauffman: For me, I convey that the values that I was raised with are taking care of your children, having respect and dignity for your elders, honoring your veterans, and serving your community. These are some core tenets that I was raised with and this is something that really translates and embraces voters - that we do need to take care of our children and our elders and our veterans and serving the community is very important. And so my - I don't go forward in terms of coming in with a real progressive agenda - it's really about taking care of our community. [00:08:10] Crystal Fincher: So we just came out of a legislative session where some great things happened, some not so great things happened - which is true of a lot of legislative sessions. What was your evaluation of this past session? [00:08:25] Claudia Kauffman: I was - there was a lot of work done on the plastic bags - and so a lot of people are asking me who led that and why did they do that? And that was our State Senator in the 47th, and I'm not sure that those things were the priority of the voters of the 47th legislative district. I think it was a statewide issue, but it became a signature issue for that particular person. And I think it's important that we get back to understanding the basic needs around our children, such as investing in early learning or addressing issues since the pandemic - when children were in school, outta school, in school, outta school and it created a lot of issues around the social and emotional and the mental health issues for the children, as well as the educational needs. I think if we refocus back on some of our basic needs within our communities - would be very important. And I wasn't quite convinced that we needed to send over a hundred million dollars and whatever it was from operating to transportation. And then in transportation, they also increased a number of fees and was a very large transportation budget. When we talk about what our needs are - how are you gonna fund them - well, stop sending operating dollars away. We need to address the needs within our communities. [00:10:28] Crystal Fincher: So with that, I guess we're looking at the transportation budget, which had record investments in transit funding, in mobility improvements and enhancements, including in the 47th district. Are you saying that was a mistake to do? And that we should just focus on maintaining roads and not necessarily investing in transit or other infrastructure? What about that strikes you as excessive? [00:10:59] Claudia Kauffman: Okay, I apologize if that came across the wrong way - I am not saying that I just wanna invest in expanding highways - that's not what I meant at all. We need - [00:11:14] Crystal Fincher: Or even if it's not expanding highways, is it that - I do not wanna put words into your mouth and so just seeking clarification - you were talking about focusing more on the basic needs. What falls outside of the basic needs that they were dealing with in the Legislature when it comes to transportation? [00:11:37] Claudia Kauffman: So I obviously didn't make all that clear, so let me go back. When we're looking at the basic needs for our communities - in running for office or being a state legislator, people always ask - how are you gonna fund that? Where are you gonna get the money to fund that? And what I'm saying about, because you asked me about this last session, was they took out money from operating and they put it into transportation. That's nothing to say about transportation, that's just to say about operating. And imagine the possibilities that we could have, if we had the full money in the operating, to help address more issues within our community. [00:12:23] Crystal Fincher: What would you address in the community? [00:12:25] Claudia Kauffman: Increase early learning, I would increase money going to the Housing Trust Fund to create more affordable housing, I would increase the income threshold for more seniors and veterans, people with disabilities to qualify for property tax relief. There are a number of things that could have went that way - investing in small businesses, having a comprehensive review of the impacts of COVID-19 on our students, on our teachers, our paraeducators. I think there's a number of things that we could have done with that money. And so I'm just talking about the fact that they moved the money from operating and they put it in transportation. [00:13:21] Crystal Fincher: Gotcha. And so with some of those investments that you mentioned, especially in early learning and education and the schooling system, you were known as a champion for education when you served before - certainly, I recall a lot of educators just really being thankful and supportive of the stances you took in a variety of areas. And we're having a time in our local school districts here, including the Kent School District - one of the largest school districts in the state - and an issue that we're hearing about nationally, we're dealing with right here at home with book bans being talked about and a number of issues from some very conservative right-wing elements trying to push that into our schools. Where do you think, what do you think the school should be doing? Do you think the school board is doing the right thing? Do you think we should be reevaluating which books we're looking at in our schools? [00:14:28] Claudia Kauffman: I really think we should be evaluating the impacts of COVID-19 and how our students are doing. Being a mother, I became a fierce advocate for my children's education and I did those things, and I joined the PTAs, and I went to the meetings, and I'll bake the cookies and made cupcakes. And really wanted to have the data - what does the data show for our students? And when I was finally able to get the data, they had data for every racial group except for American Indians. And I said why - you're not providing the data, I said - Go back, just some basic things and what's happening? What is the graduation rate while we're talking about American Indian students. What is the graduation rate for American Indian students? And it was only 36%. And I said - Okay, that should be a priority - that should be a priority for everyone, not just me, not just the native community. Everyone should make that a priority that there is a particular group of students - only 36% graduation rate. And at the - they just recently voted to put in police officers at every school district. Now I'm all for safety and safety is very important. But I also want to have public schools to be an open and welcoming institution in which students are - come in and not being fearful or harassed or intimidated at the atmosphere in which they're placed at, in which they need to walk by every single day. To me, it needs to be more open and accepting and welcoming. When I was in the State Senate, the Kent School District had hired private security at every school, and the school board allowed them to use force and to handcuff children and a little five-year old was handcuffed for not walking down the hall too fast - you're taken down and you're handcuffed if you talk back. And so when I was in the State Senate, and then I tried to work on - can't handcuff children if you're not a law enforcement officer - I received a lot of backlash from the Kent School District on that. And so I said - okay, show me reports - start reporting every single time you use force on children. How many times do you handcuff them? How many children handcuffed? What are the reasons for them being handcuffed? What's the location? What was the - give me some data on the student, demographic data on the students. And that just demonstrated the complete lack of any standards when it comes to that. [00:17:43] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and maybe time has proven - [00:17:44] Claudia Kauffman: And Kent School District - yeah, Kent School District is doing it now with police officers in every single school. So I have concerns about what they're doing and how they're doing it. And I know that they just hired a new superintendent, so I'm hoping things will improve in that area. I think they hired a great superintendent. [00:18:09] Crystal Fincher: I certainly hope things will improve in that area. I do wanna circle back to the original question. And you made mention about wanting kids to feel safe and welcome in school - there are some kids questioning right now, because of some of the books that are being targeted for banning and the reasoning that's being given with them - do you think that any of those book ban discussions should be on the table? Or do you feel like it's inappropriate? [00:18:36] Claudia Kauffman: No, I'm not in favor of the book ban and especially - I was asked recently about how do we help students in the LGBTQ community. And I said - You need to have them to feel welcome in the public school system. And if you're banning books that deal with that, it's not gonna feel very welcoming and you're gonna feel targeted. [00:19:08] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. And in that vein, we're sitting here at a time not too long after the Dobbs decision that eliminated a woman's right to reproductive health and also signaled - from the dissent from Justice Clarence Thomas - that there is an intention and a welcoming of also eliminating rights to same-sex marriage, same-sex relationships, privacy, contraception. What can we be doing now in our state to protect against these coming attacks - the existing one that already happened with the Dobbs decision and these coming ones on some of our fundamental rights. What can you do as a legislator to help protect against that? [00:20:04] Claudia Kauffman: I think that we can start working on some privacy issue - I know that there are a number of apps on phones in which you can, women can track their menstrual cycles and when they have a doctor's appointment. And if we don't have privacy around our own technology, there's opportunities for that information going out. And other states that now offer $10,000 rewards for naming those who get an abortion or those who assist in abortions is really scary. And it's not just ensuring we have the right to make our own medical decisions, it's the privacy issue that everyone's gonna know that you - and I can't believe the amount of information and data that is out there. When I was in the State Senate, I had the bill that prevented the Washington State Patrol from pulling up your car in an accident and downloading your vehicle's data, 'cause they did that all the time without your knowledge or permission. And so my bill was to stop that - it's my car, it's my data, you can't have that, you can't have my cell phone, you can't have anything. And I got a lot of pushback from the Washington State Patrol, but it's all about privacy and consumer protection. And so us as consumers and - 'cause everyone needs to seek medical attention for one reason or another throughout their lives, and we need to have privacy around that. [00:22:05] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely agree. Do you think we should call a special session to do that? There's certainly conversation about - hey, if we do have a number of these competitive races and battleground districts and we aren't sure what the composition of the legislature is going to be, potentially waiting until next session could jeopardize our ability to codify some of these protections into law. Should we be calling a special session to deal with law to protect abortion access in addition to these other things? [00:22:41] Claudia Kauffman: That's certainly up to leadership to decide that and I don't believe that the Senate is going to - they have a comfortable lead in terms of their numbers, the Senate Democrats do. And so I don't believe that's going to - they will lose all those in one swoop. [00:23:04] Crystal Fincher: But if the House did - even if you passed it through the Senate, it potentially wouldn't make it through the House. Do you think it's, do you think it's just probably likely that Democrats will retain control and so we might as well wait to get it done, or do you think it is more urgent than that? [00:23:24] Claudia Kauffman: It might be more urgent, given the redistricting that's happened and what's happened with the Redistricting Commission. That was a real disappointing, 10-year - [00:23:38] Crystal Fincher: That was a lot of things. [00:23:39] Claudia Kauffman: Yeah, so - [00:23:43] Crystal Fincher: Certainly not an ideal process, and we're still waiting to see what the ultimate outcome of the redistricting is, but certainly questions about fairness - whether a variety of districts across the state adhere to the Voting Rights Act. But it looks like we're gonna be voting in these districts right now, so if it were up to you, would you think we need to move on a special session or take some more time to plan and wait until regular session? [00:24:16] Claudia Kauffman: Yeah, maybe - wait until after, because even after the election, people are not in until they're sworn in - and that's in January. I think they'll have a better idea after the elections. [00:24:33] Crystal Fincher: Gotcha. And now you made mention about taking action to make housing more affordable. Lots of talk across the country and the state, in Seattle and elsewhere - we are certainly no exception to this housing affordability crisis. And the cost of housing has skyrocketed - certainly, a lot of people's property values and home values have skyrocketed. And as people are looking at the equity that they have grow, sometimes that makes people feel wonderful. At the same time, that's creating - with strained housing supply, lot of investment property buying, and increased percentage of renters that we're seeing - people are having a harder and harder time managing the rents that are rising faster than they have before. And on an individual basis, rising year-over-year at higher percentages than we've seen them. What should the Legislature do to make housing more affordable in this district? [00:25:43] Claudia Kauffman: I think we can do a few things. One, as I mentioned earlier, invest additional money into the Housing Trust Fund so that more dollars, state dollars can go out for affordable housing. I also believe that the state should invest and look at investment in community developments - community-led, like El Centro De La Raza is a perfect example. They could build housing, so it's not just the for-profit developers who are going out and getting land from cities to develop housing. It really should be community-led, community-driven and build that capacity within our communities - non-profit organizations 'cause nonprofits - they work hard within their communities. So I think if we invest in the capacity building and invest in community-led non-profits - in their vision for their community to create more housing, more affordable housing as an option. Transit-oriented housing - we have the Sounder train that goes straight through Kent and Auburn. And then increasing opportunities - training, technical assistance for home buyers, provide down payment assistance on a realistic level - since the housing market has been so high, we need to be able to match that in a real sense - so that is meaningful in a down payment assistance program. [00:27:40] Crystal Fincher: Should we be increasing zoning, including in single-family areas to help broaden the ability to build more supply and have more options for people in our communities that are more affordable? [00:27:55] Claudia Kauffman: I grew up on Beacon Hill in South Seattle and in a single-family neighborhood. And I really just loved it - and loved all the houses, individual houses on the blocks and blocks and the alleys and the number of neighbors that we had. And given Seattle's history of redlining - is all, mostly all communities of color. And I just love that neighborhood. And so I understand the desire to preserve that neighborhood as single-family. But I also don't want to have undue laws on local cities that say that you have to do that. I think there's a - I think there should be an opportunity to involve communities, neighborhoods, and cities to help identify how we can have additional housing units that provide that density. And a lot of people do it without even realizing that - I was at an event the other day and one of the candidates was like - yeah, I got a mother-in-law house and I rent out this house. I said - See, you're already doing it, you're already creating that middle housing. [00:29:23] Crystal Fincher: That is exactly middle housing, but unfortunately that's exactly the kind of thing that is not permitted in many of the single-family areas without an increase in zoning. And I think one thing that people are trying to contend with is certainly - I've also lived in single-family neighborhoods and a sense of community, wonderful, lots of nostalgia from childhood and thinking about wanting to preserve that - but because of the constrained supply, what was the neighborhood, the neighborhoods that we grew up in 20 years ago are very different today. And the average home values in those same neighborhoods - in Beacon Hill is approaching, it's over $800,000 now, in a previously redlined area and a diverse area. But an area that's seen a lot of gentrification and a lot of displacement because those same homes cost quadruple what they did even 15, 20 years ago. And cities have had this much time to take action themselves and to work together with their neighborhoods and haven't. So do we expect that to change in the short-term without any additional action or prompting, by the state, or do we feel like we need to take more definitive action to help people to be able to stay in neighborhoods, afford them there? How do you balance that and what should be done? [00:31:00] Claudia Kauffman: I think it's a great opportunity - thank you for the question. I think it's a great opportunity to invest in communities, to have more community organizing and community development programs that can work specifically so there is reduction in the gentrification of a neighborhood or a community. And work with the community to reinvest state dollars to improve local area and providing more assistance to homeowners that are there for updates and repairs. But I also think that it's an opportunity to work with the cities to develop those programs and you don't want it to turn into a big fight of "not in my neighborhood." [00:32:08] Crystal Fincher: Which is where, how it's been, which is how it is - actually. [00:32:13] Claudia Kauffman: Yeah. [00:32:13] Crystal Fincher: And so do we continue to just say - okay, they're saying they don't want it and so let's just keep things rolling as they are, or - you did talk about community investment and development. Do you think that is enough to address the crisis that we're facing with just affordability overall? [00:32:47] Claudia Kauffman: Yes. And I think no - I think, sorry - I'm saying - is words coming out of my mouth? I'm saying - yes, I agree with you. Not, yes. [00:32:56] Crystal Fincher: I gotcha, I gotcha. [00:32:57] Claudia Kauffman: I was like - yes, that's perfect. So - no. So that's why I think the state needs to work with the local cities to find a solution. What went through the State Legislature did not pass, but it did create a tremendous amount of concern from the local state governments about their involvement in the decision that would have a direct impact on cities. But there is a need, there is a housing crisis - we need to have housing and housing availability, and I would get back again to community and community organizing and having it being community-led. But if you do that, if there's also a large demand for duplexes and fourplexes within areas, then I think they should be able to do what they wanna do with that. [00:34:07] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and I think that's part of the issue and especially speaking with a lot of candidates who are out on the trail and existing legislators, including Jessica Bateman, who had that middle housing bill. There is fear that when you say - Hey, we're gonna upzone this - that someone's gonna have a humongous apartment building and there's gonna be a 20-story building that gets built next door. But in reality, some duplexes and triplexes, fourplexes are really indistinguishable from other housing - you wouldn't know it's there. And so it's always an interesting discussion hearing that, because it seems like there's a lot of preconceived notions and a lot of fear that's existed. And people afraid of new people coming in or what they have changing, and what seems to get lost in that discussion a lot of times and you talked about it - was just that it already is changing. And we just have to dictate the kind of change that we want. And do we want to build change that enables people, a wide variety of people, diverse people, people of different incomes and backgrounds to be a part of the community? Or are we going to keep moving in the direction of change where it's becoming more exclusive and harder to afford and really limits the diversity of people, the type of people that can live within a community? So I'm sure there'll be a lot of discussion of that heading, moving forward. I guess as we are getting ready to wrap up - being that this is a competitive race, you are gonna be on the primary ballot. You are running against a sitting Kent City councilmember, Satwinder Kaur - two sitting Kent City councilmembers - Satwinder Kaur, who's a Democrat, and Bill Boyce, who's a Republican. As you're talking to voters, what do you tell them as they're considering who to vote for, what the differences are between you, what will be different about their lives if you're elected versus your opponents? [00:36:37] Claudia Kauffman: First of all, I'm Claudia Kauffman, I'm a former state Senator. I've been in government relations for over 20 years. I bring a wealth of experience and understanding, plans, purpose. I have developed relationships with state legislators, local leaders - in those relationships, I cultivate and I work and I maintain good working relationships with a number of people. And so for me, I will hit the ground running - knowing my district and knowing the needs of our community. My priorities will be based on the values that will honor the 47th district. And I've been deeply concerned about recent decisions that the Kent City Council has taken - the recent $1.5 million settlement for assistant police chief. And they had to return or pay a developer $750,000 because they sold him a property so he can develop on it - and only to find out - no, you can't do that, that was a park, you can't just sell a park. And so it was - there's just some decisions that have been happening. Also, they all voted for police in the schools. I'm concerned about just the overall interaction - that the police chief's wife is the head of the PR media for the City of Kent. I think that creates a direct conflict. But that's the operations and that is also the atmosphere in which people feel comfortable doing those things. And so for me, I don't believe that they have set any kind of tone to how you need to operate and what your values are. I haven't seen anyone stand up and say - oh, this was wrong. And so there's a lot of things that have been happening within the City of Kent that are disturbing or concerning to me. You have to be fiscally responsible for your government and your government's money - because you talk about growing economic wealth for everyone, but you can't do that as a city if they're constantly paying out millions of dollars in settlements and then expect to have it be brand new and better this time around. I don't see that happening and that's concerning. [00:39:57] Crystal Fincher: I hear you - thank you so much for joining us today. We will continue to keep an eye on this race and see how this turns out. And I'm sure we'll be talking about this more throughout this election and into the general election. Thank you so much for joining us today, Claudia. [00:40:14] Claudia Kauffman: Thank you. [00:40:15] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

MSU Press Podcast
Bkejwanong Dbaajmowinan / Stories of Where the Waters Divide

MSU Press Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 36:37


Bkejwanong means “where the waters part,” but the waters of St. Clair River are not a point of separation. The same waters that sustain life on and around Bkejwanong—formerly known as Walpole Island, Ontario—flow down into Chippewas of the Thames, the community to which author Monty McGahey II belongs. While there are no living fluent speakers of Anishinaabemowin in this community, McGahey has fostered relationships with fluent speakers from nearby Bkejwanong. Bkejwanong Dbaajmowinan is a collection of stories from these elders, who understand the vital importance of passing on the language to future generations in order to preserve the beloved language and legacy of the community. Like the waters of St. Clair River, the relationships between language speakers and learners have continued to nourish Anishinaabe communities in Bkejwanong and Chippewas of the Thames, particularly in language revitalization. With English translations, this resource is essential for Anishinaabemowin learners, teachers, linguists, and historians.Monty McGahey II is of Anishinaabe and Oneida descent and was raised in Chippewas of the Thames, where he currently works in language revitalization. He is a second-language speaker of Anishinaabemowin and holds a master's of professional education in Indigenous educational leadership from Western University in London, Ontario. Monty McGahey's Bkejwanong Dbaajmowinan/Stories of Where the Waters Divide is available at msupress.org and other fine booksellers. Monty and his wife have a podcast about the challenges of raising their kids in Anishinaabemowin called Enweying (Our Sound) which is available wherever you get your podcasts. You can connect with the press on Facebook and @msupress on Twitter, where you can also find me @kurtmilb.The MSU Press podcast is a joint production of MSU Press and the College of Arts & Letters at Michigan State University. Thanks to the team at MSU Press for helping to produce this podcast. Our theme music is “Coffee” by Cambo. Michigan State University occupies the ancestral, traditional, and contemporary Lands of the Anishinaabeg – Three Fires Confederacy of Ojibwe, Odawa and Potawatomi people. The University resides on Land ceded in the 1819 Treaty of Saginaw.

First Voices Radio
07/17/22 - Jesse Short Bull, Dr. Tink Tinker

First Voices Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 57:35


In the first half-hour Tiokasin welcomes film Director Jesse Short Bull. Jesse wrote and produced the 2013 short Istinma, set in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation of South Dakota. A graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Jesse received a 2016 Sundance Institute Native American and Indigenous Program Development Grant and also attended the Creative Producing Summit at Sundance. In 2014 he was part of the effort to change the name of Shannon County to Oglala Lakota County in South Dakota. Currently employed by the Oglala Lakota tribal government, Jesse is a member of the board of the Black Hills Film Festival. With the First Peoples Fund, Jesse leads youth filmmaking workshops in the Oglala Lakota Nation. Lakota Nation vs. United States - directed by Jesse Short Bull and Laura Tomaselli - had its world premier on June 11, 2022 at the Tribeca Film Festival. View the trailer here: https://youtu.be/HtK5JPZx_XMIn the second half, returning guest Dr. Tink Tinker is the Clifford Baldridge Emeritus Professor of American Indian Cultures and Religious Traditions at Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado. He is a citizen of the Osage Nation (wazhazhe) and has been an activist in urban American Indian communities for four decades. He joined the faculty at Iliff School of Theology in 1985 and brought an American Indian perspective to this predominantly euro-christian school. Dr. Tinker is committed to a scholarly endeavor that takes seriously both the liberation of Indian peoples from their historic oppression as colonized communities and the liberation of euro-christian (White) Americans, the historic colonizers and oppressors of Indian peoples, whose self-narrative typically avoids naming the violence committed against Indians in favor of a romance narrative that justifies their euro-christian occupancy of Indian lands.Production Credits:Tiokasin Ghosthorse (Lakota), Host and Executive ProducerLiz Hill (Red Lake Ojibwe), ProducerMalcolm Burn, Studio Engineer, Radio Kingston, WKNY 1490 AM and 107.9 FM, Kingston, NYTiokasin Ghosthorse, Audio EditorMusic Selections:1. Song Title: Tahi Roots Mix (First Voices Radio Theme Song)Artist: Moana and the Moa HuntersAlbum: Tahi (1993)Label: Southside Records (Australia and New Zealand)(00:00:22)2. Song Title: Feels Like SummerArtist: Donald Glover (Childish Gambino)Album: Summer Pack (2018)Label: Wolf+Rothstein/Liberator Music(00:28:25)AKANTU INSTITUTEVisit Akantu Institute, an institute that Tiokasin founded with a mission of contextualizing original wisdom for troubled times. Go to https://akantuinstitute.org/ to find out more and consider joining his Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/Ghosthorse.

TonioTimeDaily
H.R.5448 - SAFE SEX Workers Study Act and Men Can Be Men and Wear Dresses, Too: Gender Equality in Fashion

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 44:07


"The Congress finds the following: (1) People who engage in consensual, transactional sex utilize online platforms to protect their health, safety, and independence. This use includes building community connections, distribution of harm reduction information and techniques, identification and screening of potential clients, and negotiating the terms of consensual, transactional sex services, including condom use and other harm reduction strategies. (2) Widespread discrimination against populations, including LGBTQI+ individuals, particularly transgender women of color, prevents many from accessing formal employment resources and educational opportunities. (3) In the 2015 United States Transgender Survey conducted by the National Center for Transgender Equality, 19 percent of respondents reported having exchanged sex for resources, such as for money, food, or a place to sleep. Transgender women of color, including Black (42 percent), American Indian (28 percent), multiracial (27 percent), Latina (23 percent), and Asian (22 percent) respondents were more likely to have participated in sex work than the overall sample. (4) In the 2015 United States Transgender Survey, respondents who experienced homelessness in the past year (17 percent) were more than three times as likely to have participated in sex work during that year compared to the overall sample. (5) On a broader scale, internet platforms foster connections between people and play an integral part in American society. Meaningful regulation of internet platforms must take into account the role they play in the health, safety, and privacy of all people's lives. (6) While policymakers, representatives of internet platforms, and some advocates have discussed ways to mitigate the use of internet platforms to decrease exploitation, people who consensually trade sex are rarely involved in the drafting of legislation or policies, or in assessing their impact, despite being amongst the populations who are impacted by legislation and policies related to the regulation of these internet platforms. (7) On February 27, 2018, the House of Representatives passed the Allow States to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act, known as SESTA/FOSTA. While SESTA/FOSTA holds websites liable for user-generated content that facilitates sex trafficking, it also impacts online platforms where users discuss consensual sex work and related topics. (8) Contemporaneously with the passage of SESTA/FOSTA in the Senate on March 21, 2018, websites preemptively shut down, some directly citing the law's passage as the rationale for closure." "If you need more arguments FOR males wearing dresses and skirts, consider the following: Dresses and skirts are non-constricting and very comfortable. Cool down by wearing them during the summer season or in hot climates. People have the freedom to dress as they like. Fabric is not sexualized; attitude is. Women wear pants so why can't men wear dresses? The bottom line is it's OK for men to be in skirts and boys to be in dresses. It doesn't make you less of a man if you want to rock a floral gown. The Harry Styles photoshoot has proven that you can wear a dress and be a man at the same time. Whether you choose to wear it for the night or as part of your streetwear fashion, you do you." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color
E161: Samuel Little Pt1

Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 61:01


(note: time stamps are without ads & may be off a little)This is part one covering the case of Samuel Little, a serial killer who confessed to having committed 93 murders between 1970 and 2005, at least 50 of which have been verified by law enforcement. He has been called the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.First, we dive into the setting (14:32), the killers early life (31:00) and the timeline (36:12). As usual we close out the show with some tips on how not to get murdered and our shout outs (53:44). This episode was researched & scripted by Wendy & Beth Williams.Thanks for listening! This is a weekly podcast and new episodes drop every Thursday, so until next time... look alive guys, it's crazy out there!SponsorsBetter HelpBetterhelp.com/fruit10% off your first month!Best FiendsDownload Best Fiends free on the Apple App Store or Google Play!Apple https://apps.apple.com/us/app/best-fiends-puzzle-adventure/id868013618Google Play https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Seriously.BestFiends&hl=en_US&gl=USShout OutsReclaimedhttps://abcaudio.com/podcasts/reclaimed-mamie/Will Be Wildhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/will-be-wild/id1618471287Star Trek: Strange New Worldshttps://www.paramountplus.com/shows/star-trek-strange-new-worlds/Where to find us:Our Facebook page is Fruitloopspod and our discussion group is Fruitloopspod Discussion on Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod/We are also on Twitter and Instagram @fruitloopspodPlease send any questions or comments to fruitloopspod@gmail.com or leave us a voicemail at 602-935-6294. We just might read your email or play your voicemail on the show!Want to Support the show?You can support the show by rating and reviewing Fruitloops on iTunes, or anywhere else that you get your podcasts from. We would love it if you gave us 5 stars!You can make a donation on the Cash Apphttps://cash.me/$fruitloopspodOr become a monthly Patron through our Podbean Patron pagehttps://patron.podbean.com/fruitloopspodFootnotesArticles/WebsitesFBI.gov. (10/06/2019). FBI Seeking Assistance Connecting Victims to Samuel Little's Confessions. Retrieved 05/20/2022 from https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/samuel-little-most-prolific-serial-killer-in-us-history-100619FBI.gov. (11/27/2018). Convicted Killer Linked to 90 Murders. Retrieved 05/20/2022 from https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/vicap-links-murders-to-prolific-serial-killer-112718Vigdor, Neil. (12/31/2020). Samuel Little, Serial Killer Who Confessed to 93 Murders, Dies at 80. New York Times. Retrieved 06/03/2022 from https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/31/us/samuel-little-dead.htmlWikipedia contributors. (05/25/2022). Samuel Little. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Samuel_Little&oldid=1089786503Williams, Timothy. (11/26/2018). He Says He Got Away With 90 Murders. Now He's Confessing to Them All. The New York Times. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/26/us/samuel-little-serial-killer-murderer.htmlBogel-Burroughs, Nicholas; Williams, Timothy; Oppel Jr., Richard A. (10/08/2019). How Did a Serial Killer Escape Notice? His Victims Were Vulnerable and Overlooked. The New York Times. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/08/us/samuel-little-serial-killer-victims.htmlHickman, Hayes. (12/12/2018). Knox woman's death dismissed as natural until serial killer Samuel Little's confession. Knox News. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://www.knoxnews.com/story/news/crime/2018/12/12/samuel-little-serial-killer-victims-martha-cunningham/2224669002/Heavy. (08/31/2020). How Samuel Little Chose Victims Like Melinda Rose LaPree. Retrieved 06/23/2022 from https://heavy.com/entertainment/2020/08/how-samuel-little-chose-victims-melinda-rose-lapree/Ansari, Maira. (01/09/2013). Suspected serial killer arrested in Louisville. WAVE 3. Retrieved 06/26/2022 from https://www.wave3.com/story/20538174/police-arrest-homeless-man-suspected-of-murders-in-california/Abdollah, Tami. (04/07/2013). More cases connected to L.A. serial killer suspect. Star Advertiser. Retrieved 06/27/2022 from https://www.staradvertiser.com/2013/04/07/breaking-news/more-cases-connected-to-l-a-serial-killer-suspect/Bogel-Burroughs, Nicholas; Williams, Timothy; Oppel Jr., Richard A. (10/08/2019). How Did a Serial Killer Escape Notice? His Victims Were Vulnerable and Overlooked. The New York Times. Retrieved 06/27/2022 from https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/08/us/samuel-little-serial-killer-victims.htmlHarris, Jack. (10/17/2019). Even in death, everyone should be equal. West Side Story. Retrieved 07/02/2022 from https://wsspaper.com/52455/opinion/even-in-death-everyone-should-be-equal/Lauren, Jillian. (12/20/2018). The Serial Killer And The ‘Less Dead'. The Cut. Retrieved 07/02/2022 from https://www.thecut.com/2018/12/how-serial-killer-samuel-little-was-caught.htmlHistoryAbout Lorain, Ohio. Columbus Recovery Center. Retrieved 06/17/2022 from https://www.columbusrecoverycenter.com/about-lorain-ohio/Lorain Historical Society. (n.d.). Lorain's International Legacy. Retrieved 06/21/2022 from https://www.lorainhistory.org/african-american-origin/Editorial Board. (02/26/2022). Lorain County's history with Underground Railroad should be shared. Morning Journal. Retrieved 06/28/2022 from https://www.morningjournal.com/2022/02/26/lorain-countys-history-with-underground-railroad-should-be-shared-editorial/Toni Morrison : Segregation and Racism in Lorain, Ohio. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeoFyiMvQQQOhio History Central. (n.d.). Black Laws of 1807. Retrieved 06/28/2022 from http://ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Black_Laws_of_1807The Equal Justice Initiative. (n.d.). Ohio Prohibits Any Black Person from Testifying Against a White Person. Retrieved 06/29/2022 from https://calendar.eji.org/racial-injustice/apr/1Ohio History Central. (n.d.). American Indians. Retrieved 06/30/2022 from https://ohiohistorycentral.org/w/American_IndiansVideosThe 93 Victims of Samuel Littlehttps://www.investigationdiscovery.com/show/the-93-victims-of-samuel-little-investigation-discovery-atve-usConfronting a Serial Killerhttps://www.starz.com/us/en/series/confronting-a-serial-killer/59920Catching A Serial Killer: Sam Littlehttps://www.oxygen.com/catching-a-serial-killer-sam-littleHow Not to Get Murderedhttps://www.tiktok.com/t/ZTR2THGPJ/?k=1Music“Abyss” by Alasen: ●https://soundcloud.com/alasen●https://twitter.com/icemantrap ●https://instagram.com/icemanbass/●https://soundcloud.com/therealfrozenguy●Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License"Melrose", “u know” & “Jeopardy” by Yung Kartz https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Yung_KartzLicensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License“Furious Freak” by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3791-furious-freakLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Connect with us on:Twitter @FruitLoopsPodInstagram https://www.instagram.com/fruitloopspodFacebook https://www.facebook.com/Fruitloopspod and https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod

Southern Discomfort
Scents of the past

Southern Discomfort

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 54:17


Spanish engineer Ignacio Daza designed Castillo de San Marcos as a hollow square with diamond-shaped bastions at each of its four corners. Named St. Pedro, St. Carlos, St. Augustine, and St. Pablo, the bastions connect by thick walls that provided soldiers with a good overview of the area, particularly the sea, from which the Spanish expected most of the attacks to come. From the bastions they could also shoot at the enemy from multiple directions, creating a crossfire effect. The walls, built from more than 400,000 blocks of coquina stone, with thickness ranging from 14 to 19 feet at the base and tapering to nine feet at the top, afforded the necessary protection from enemy fire. Castillo de San Marcos stands today as a monument to the Spanish empire's 300-year occupation of Florida and to the interaction and clashes of cultural groups that built the unified nation that is the United States today. Constructed to protect Spain's settlement in St. Augustine from pirate raids, hostile American Indian tribes, and neighboring imperial powers, the fortification is a symbol of the cultural and imperial struggles that shaped early North America. Never captured in battle, Castillo de San Marcos is both architecturally impressive as the oldest surviving masonry fortress in the United States and culturally significant because its stone walls are a testament to the endurance of this nation's Latino heritage and to the other cultural groups that have played a role in its story.   Drink DuJour: It's 2 oz of St. Augustine Florida Cane Sugar Vodka and 2 oz Mule Mix which is 4 parts lime juice, 2 parts simple syrup and 1 part ginger. Mix it in a Copper Mug with crushed ice. Top with club soda and garnish with fresh mint.   Sources : https://wanderwisdom.com/travel-destinations/Twenty-facts-about-St-Augustine-FL https://www.legendsofamerica.com/fl-staugustineghosts/ https://ghostcitytours.com/st-augustine/haunted-places/castillo-de-san-marcos/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castillo_de_San_Marcos https://www.nps.gov/people/osceola https://www.staugustine.com/story/news/local/2010/03/21/fort-undergoing-major-repairs/16089958007/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uchee_Billy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Florida https://www.visitstaugustine.com/history/motor-age/castillo-menendez.php https://www.staugustinedistillery.com/blog/st-augustine-distillery-story

Dig: A History Podcast
Julia's Bureau: The Temperance Virtuoso, the Father of Journalism, and Life after Death in the Spiritualist Anglo-Atlantic

Dig: A History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 53:52


Spiritualism Series. Episode #2 of 4. For three years before his untimely death on the Titanic, British newspaper man W. T. Stead gathered the bereaved and curious in a room in Cambridge House so they could communicate with the dead. Several psychics, including the blind medium Cecil Husk and materialization medium J. B. Jonson, worked these sessions which had become known as Julia's Bureau. After Stead's death, Detroit medium Mrs. Etta Wriedt sought to channel the dead newspaper man. Wriedt was also known to channel a Glasgow-born, eighteenth-century apothecary farmer named Dr. John Sharp. Other frequent visitors include an American Indian medicine chief named Grayfeather, the Welsh pirate Henry Morgan, and a female Seminole Indian named Blossom who died in the Florida everglades as a young child. But the bureau's most important spirit visitor can also be said to have been the founder of the bureau, Julia herself. Who was Julia? And how do these seances fit into the long history of Spiritualism? Find out today! Find show notes and transcripts here: www.digpodcast.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Mom Show
Why race representation matters for moms and women

The Mom Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 37:42


Host Lindsay Aerts talks with Dr. Susan Madsen of the Utah Women and Leadership Project about her latest reaserch showing some of the areas where American Indian women don't have access to the same resources as white women. They discuss with Emily Bell McCormick of The Policy Project about why it's so important that different races and ethnitcities to be represented in positions of leadership, and how that all ties into policy that's enacted, specifically in Utah.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Friday, July 8, 2022 — Summer at the Native Museum

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 56:08


Museums are offering unique Native exhibitions this summer as people are feeling more comfortable traveling and attending public events. In New Mexico, the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture is reimagining its permanent exhibit, “Here Now and Always.” And the Albuquerque Museum opened its “Traitor, Survivor, Icon: The Legacy of La Malinche” exhibit, which examines the life and influence of an Indigenous woman caught in the conflict between Spanish and Indigenous people of Mexico. The National Museum of the American Indian is featuring Black-Indigenous artists in the new exhibit “Ancestors Know Who We Are.” Shawn Spruce previews some of the brand-new Native museum exhibits with Anya Montiel (Mexican and Tohono O'odham), curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian; Terezita Romo, independent curator and an affiliate faculty at University of California-Davis; Manuelito Wheeler Jr. (Navajo), director of the Navajo Nation Museum; Aaron Roth, historic site staff manager for Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner Historic Site; and Tony Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo), curator at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Real Black Consciousnesses Forum
The Reason Black American Indians Tribes Are Not Recognized By The United States Government!

Real Black Consciousnesses Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 35:00


#blackindians #indian #africanamericans Podcast: https://anchor.fm/realblackforum/episodes/The-Reason-Black-American-Indians-Tribes-Are-Not-Recognized-By-The-United-States-Government-e1kth20Email the podcast: rbcforum313@yahoo.com https://cash.app/$BlackConsciousness Join us as we have a conversation about what is the legal definition of "Indian Tribes," and once we get that breakdown, we go into the reason why Black Indian tribes are not federally or state recognized. To assist with this conversation, we bring out a couple of sources in which one of them is called: National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) https://www.achp.gov/sites/default/files/whitepapers/2018-06/GuidetoWorkingwithNon-FederallyRecognizedTribesintheSection106Process.pdf And the other source will be listed in the conversation. So, yeah family, make sure you tap into this conversation and don't forget to like, share, and comment! Thanks in advance! RBCF! Follow Us On: Twitter: https://twitter.com/Prest_St_BigVJInstagram: https://instagram.com/realblackco... Youtube: https://youtube.com/user/detroitrocFB: https://facebook.com/RealBlackConscio... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/realblackforum/message

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
Study says American Indian women face more struggles than other Utah women

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 4:22


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Minnesota Native News
A Market and Much More

Minnesota Native News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 4:59


This is Minnesota Native News, I'm Marie Rock. Coming up... A Food and Art Market in Duluth uplifts Indigenous and BIPOC entrepreneurs while providing goods to the local community.  And a new children's book celebrating Ojibwe teachings is celebrating its debut. [[accentuate that “celebration” is used twice]] Here's Reporter Leah Lemm with more. STORY #1: AICHO MARKET Reporter: The American Indian Community Housing Organization dreams big. And its Food and Art Market is no different - offering so much more than buying and selling.  Khayman Goodsky: (00:34) Bojo my name is Cayman de good sky. My I'm a Bo Fort tribal band member. Um, I live in Duluth and I work at ACO. That's the American Indian community housing organization. Reporter: Khayman is the Indigenous First Co-Coordinator at AICHO. Indigenous First showcases and sells art from majority Native artists. And the upcoming Food and Art Market is helping inform future plans to expand AICHO's food and retail operations, to provide goods to the HIllside area. Khayman Goodsky: (04:43) our hopes is to have it be an indigenous food market, especially in hillside where it's kind of a food desert.  Khayman Goodsky: (04:09) this is kind of gearing us up to when we're ready to open the knee ne one market and to see how well that's going and to, you know, keep finding more and more producers who need that retail space that we're able to provide.  Khayman Goodsky: (03:20) Duluth has a lot of food deserts and so it's really hard to get out, to travel where healthy food is and that's something that we're addressing. Reporter: This focus on providing for the community is mirrored in the market's goal of providing opportunity to vendors.  Khayman Goodsky: (03:31) there is a lot of indigenous food producers, a lot of artists who don't necessarily have the means to find retail space, to start promoting their businesses and to have these markets where they're being highlighted is really important because then they can see there's a community who, um, is willing to like help them and support them. Reporter: Providing for the community and Economic opportunity is a great example of AICHO's role in the area. It's also… fun and delicious. Khayman Goodsky: (07:21) We bought prints from Kelly Martinson who does really beautiful paintings. So I just wanna give 'em a shout out, but there's so many great vendors there. There was Kambucha the best Kambucha I've ever had… Baby Cakes was there.  Reporter: That's Baby Cakes Wild Rice Bakery… with items like wild rice cupcakes and cakes… Spirit lake will be there selling their maple syrup. Like there's so many great people to meet and talk with about art and food and just, um, everything. Reporter: Two markets are happening in July and they are open to everyone. Khayman Goodsky: (08:19) it's not just Indigenous people. Everyone is welcome. And uh, hopefully see the market grow and grow because I know there will be people who get that spark from coming to meet these people and wanna start their own stuff and we wanna support you too.  Reporter: If there's inclement weather, the market will move inside of the AICHO building. More info at A-I-C-H-O DOT ORG TRANSITION MUSIC STORY #2: MASHKIKI ROAD Reporter: Next, join Lily, Ogimaa, and Ellie on a journey to find medicines for Grandma Mindy. Author Elizabeth Barrett and illustrator Jonathan Thunder bring young readers along Mashkiki Road, where they meet animals who introduce the Seven Grandfather Teachings. The colors are vibrant, as is the story. My son recently read the book to his younger cousin, and they remembered all the Ojibwe names of the wise beings the story introduced. Multiple book launch events are planned including at the Red Lake Boys and Girls Club on July 14th. More information at https://www.mnhs.org/ For MN Native News, I'm Leah Lemm.

Our American Stories
The Interrupted Odyssey of US Grant and Ely Parker and Visiting a Devastated Town After a Tornado... and Lending a Hand

Our American Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 38:13


On this episode of Our American Stories, Dr. Mary Stockwell, author of Interrupted Odyssey: Ulysses S. Grant  and the American Indians, tells the story of how the lives of America's first Native American appointed to a cabinet level position and our 18th President intertwined. Listener Paul Kotz shares about his service trip to Mayfield, Kentucky several months after a tornado devastated the town.  Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate) Time Codes: 00:00 - The Interrupted Odyssey of US Grant and Ely Parker  35:00 - Visiting a Devastated Town After a Tornado... and Lending a Hand See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Indianz.Com
President Biden pays tribute to Cherokee Nation veteran Dwight Birdwell

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 3:56


President Joe Biden pays tribute to Dwight Birdwell, a citizen of the Cherokee, during a ceremony at the White House on July 5, 2022. Biden recognized Birdwell's heroism during the Vietnam War. He said Birdwell went above and beyond the call of duty to save other members of his U.S. Army unit during a particularly violent portion of the military conflict. "When he was ordered to load onto the medevac helicopter, he complied -- this I find amazing -- only to crawl right back off the other side and to keep on fighting," Biden said, noting that Birdwell had sustained serious injuries of his own. Biden also pointed out that American Indians and Alaska Natives serve in the military at the highest per capita rates of any racial or ethnic group in the United States. At the end of the ceremony, Biden awarded Birdwell the Medal of Honor, the highest and most prestigious U.S. military decoration. The following information was provided by the White House: Specialist Five Dwight W. Birdwell will receive the Medal of Honor for acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Troop C, 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam on January 31, 1968. That day, a large enemy element initiated an assault on the Tan Son Nhut Airbase near Saigon. They disabled or destroyed many of the unit's vehicles and incapacitated Specialist Five Birdwell's tank commander. Under heavy enemy small-arms fire, Specialist Five Birdwell moved the tank commander to safety and fired the tank's weapons at the enemy force. Afterwards, he dismounted and continued fighting until receiving enemy fire to his face and torso. He refused evacuation and led a small group of defenders to disrupt the enemy assault until reinforcements arrived. He then aided in evacuating the wounded until he was ordered to seek attention for his own wounds. He was honorably discharged on December 29, 1968, and today practices law in Oklahoma City. Additional information can be found at the U.S. Army website: https://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/birdwell/?from=hp_spotlight

The Federalist Radio Hour
Naomi Schaefer Riley On The Federal Government's ‘New Trail Of Tears'

The Federalist Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 36:28 Very Popular


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Naomi Schaefer Riley, a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and senior fellow at the Independent Women's Forum, joins Federalist Western Correspondent Tristan Justice to discuss her book "The New Trail of Tears: How Washington Is Destroying American Indians."You can find Riley's book here: https://www.naomiriley.com/books/the