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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

The Economist


    • Jan 27, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 21m AVG DURATION
    • 2,611 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from Economist Radio

    On the edge of his seat: Stephen Breyer

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 22:42

    The departure of one of America's Supreme Court justices is an opportunity for President Joe Biden to choose a replacement, but the clock is ticking. We ask who might be in the running. West Africa's latest coup, in Burkina Faso, bodes ill for an already stumbling campaign against jihadism in the region. And why countries change their capitals. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Money Talks: The energy weapon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 31:15

    What happens if Vladimir Putin invades Ukraine again, the West hits Russia with sanctions, and Mr Putin retaliates by shutting down supply of Russian gas? The Economist's global energy & climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran explores how this would rock energy markets from American shale oil to Chinese imports of LNG. What are the lessons from the last time Russia turned off the taps and how could Europe, already facing record prices, wean itself off its dependency?With Thane Gustafson, professor of energy policy at Georgetown University and author of “Klimat: Russia in the Age of Climate Change”; Amy Myers Jaffe, director of the climate policy lab at Tufts University and author of “Energy's Digital Future”; and Daniel Yergin, vice president of IHS Markit and author of “The New Map: Energy, Climate, and the Clash of Nations”.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Twist of faith: religious hatred in India

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 22:45

    As the country celebrates its secular constitution, we examine the rising bigotry of Hindu nationalists—at best tolerated and at worst encouraged by the ruling party. China's propagandists are onto something: after years of dull jingoism, the entertainment they put out now is glossy, big-budget and ever more watchable. And why South-East Asia's obsession with otters poses a threat to them.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: Sequencing the future

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 33:38

    Genomic sequencing has risen to prominence during the pandemic. But the technology has vast potential to transform many aspects of human health. Host Alok Jha investigates the rise of the genome and personalised medicine.For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    What's it good for? Putin's Ukraine calculus

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 22:36

    More Russian troops piling in. Embassy staff pulling out. American forces on alert and sober diplomacy still on the docket. We examine Vladimir Putin's ways, means and motivations. The Omicron variant is making its mark in Mexico, a place that our correspondent says never really shut down. And considering the merits and the risks of work-related drinks. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The World Ahead: Technologies to watch

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 19:57

    The rapid development and roll-out of coronavirus vaccines has been a reminder of the power of science and technology to change the world. Host Tom Standage considers some of the technologies to watch in 2022, from 3D-printed housing and heat pumps to flying electric taxis and meetings in the metaverse. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Prime mover? Mario Draghi and the Italian presidency

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 21:36

    This week's secretive votes will determine the next president and the current prime minister looks to be a favourite. But that move would be bad for Italy. Many African countries that are rife with resources remain persistently underdeveloped; we dig into the reasons. And we meet the chefs bringing unsung Native American cuisine to the table.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: January 24th 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 22:53

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the parable of Boris Johnson, and what it says about the country he governs. Also, America's tech giants' ambitious investments (10:05) and do vaccine mandates actually work? (19:10) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: Left side story

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 41:00

    Joe Biden voters are more likely to have a negative view of the United States than those who voted for Donald Trump, according to new research from The Economist. A year since his inauguration, is this miserablism largely a result of President Biden's recent woes, or is there something inherently gloomy in the left's mindset? The Economist's Daniella Raz sifts through the poll findings. We go back to the time when a liberal philosopher imagined a dark future for America. And political psychologist Peter Ditto examines what makes liberal brains tick. John Prideaux presents with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Unsustainable envelopment goals: China's zero-covid fight

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 20:04

    The Omicron variant is destined to test the limits of a policy that has already proved costly: consumption, growth and confidence are all flagging. The effects of Russia's gulag did not stop when the labour camps closed: there appear to be long-term benefits for nearby areas. And why cycling in the Arab world is on the rise.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: Carl Bernstein

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 26:04

    The veteran reporter was a teenager when he first walked into a newsroom. He tells Anne McElvoy how that moment led him to become one half of the most famous bylines in journalism. They discuss the decline in trust in the media and echoes of Watergate in American politics today. And the author of “Chasing History” reflects on a painful moment from his past being turned into a film. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Heavyweight-price fight: how to beat global inflation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 24:27

    Shoppers across the developed world face sharply rising prices, and leaders are reaching for all manner of remedies—but that's what central banks are for. Behind the story of Myanmar's brutal military leadership is a slow stream of defectors; our correspondent meets the support network they rely on. And cover songs muddle the notion of who can call it their tune.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Money Talks: Moonshooters

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 31:41

    This week Microsoft announced its biggest ever deal, spending $69bn on games publisher Activision Blizzard to advance its ambitions in gaming and the metaverse. The world's most powerful tech companies are racing to splash their cash on frontier technologies. We crunch the numbers on where they are investing their billions and ask whether these new corporate moonshots will supercharge productivity or further entrench the giants' dominance in the future.Rachana Shanbhogue hosts, with Kevin Scott, chief technology officer of Microsoft, and Margrethe Vestager, competition commissioner for the European Union. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Drilling into the numbers: ExxonMobil

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 22:56

    America's biggest oil firm has long been recalcitrant on climate matters, so its new net-zero targets may seem surprising. We examine the substance of its pledges—and motivations. For an economist, tipping is an odd practice; whether you love it or hate it may be a question of control. And how unusual Novak Djokovic's refusenik vaccine stance is among elite athletes. Additional audio courtesy of Tennis Australia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: Havana syndrome

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 39:47

    New cases of Havana syndrome are baffling scientists. Alok Jha investigates the theories behind the mysterious malady plaguing Western diplomats. Are microwave weapons to blame, or could the illness have psychological origins?For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Through deny of a needle: vaccine mandates

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 22:51

    Austria is set to enact a bold policy of levying fines on the unvaccinated. We look at what is driving governments to such measures, and whether they will work. Japan's shift in thinking about its growing elderly population holds lessons for countries set for a similar demographic shift. And why the Mormon church is struggling to retain its foreign converts.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The World Ahead: Following the money

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 28:09

    Inflation in America has reached its highest level in four decades. What is the outlook for 2022? Host Tom Standage asks former US treasury secretary Larry Summers. Meanwhile, China is pushing ahead with its plans for a “central bank digital currency”. How do such digital coins stack up against cryptocurrencies?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    But who's counting? Voting rights in America

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 23:04

    Democrats will spend the week battling for a tightening of laws on casting votes; that will overshadow Republicans' worrying push into how those votes are counted and certified. Earthquakes remain damnably unpredictable, but new research suggests a route to early-warning systems. And why hammams, the declining bathhouses of the Arab world, will cling on despite even the challenge of covid-19. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: January 17th 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 24:34

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, beware the bossy state, Britain's party-animal prime minister (11:45) and, why America and China are one military accident away from disaster (18:00) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: “Refund the police”

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 41:45

    After George Floyd's murder protestors took to the streets, angry about racially-motivated brutality and discrimination. They urged authorities to “defund the police” and over 20 cities listened. But now, with rising murder rates, many of those same places are increasing investment in law enforcement. Can you “refund” and reform the police at the same time? Mayor of Portland, Oregon Ted Wheeler tells us why his city is raising its police budget. We go back to a war on crime that's been largely forgotten. And criminal justice reformer David Muhammad discusses the best ways to cut crime while also fixing policing.John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    His royal minus: Prince Andrew

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 23:20

    The queen's second son has been stripped of his titles—an apparent bid to insulate the crown from his legal troubles. But dangers to the prince and to the monarchy remain. A blockade of Mali, intended to force a return to democratic order, may worsen security and entrench foreign influences. And the genre of “eco-horror” evolves alongside environment-driven anxieties.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: Mandy Patinkin

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 24:07

    The Broadway legend has entertained audiences for four decades. He tells Anne McElvoy why he combines acting and activism and how he became a late-life TikTok sensation. And the star of “Homeland” reveals the personal story that inspired him to highlight Europe's refugee crisis. Also, he gives us a burst of song from his days working with the late Stephen Sondheim. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    In vino, veritas: Boris Johnson under fire

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 22:42

    While Britons followed covid strictures, the prime minister's residence hosted boozy gatherings; widespread fury hints that his prevarications this time may be his last as leader. Religious institutions struggled during the pandemic, as all businesses did—so they are selling assets and courting new customers in innovative ways. And road rage is common, but in America it is getting decidedly deadlier. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Money Talks: The bossy state

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 34:42

    Governments around the world are deciding it is time to bring big business to heel. Host Rachana Shanbhogue and The Economist's business editor Jan Piotrowski explore the new age of state interventionism. A suite of old tools is being dusted off and reimagined—from a return to picking winners to turning the century-old global tax system on its head. The big state is back in business.With Oren Cass, director of American Compass; Sarah Miller, founder of the American Economic Liberties Project; Christiane Arndt-Bascle, head of regulatory performance at the OECD; and Professor Michael Devereux, director of the Centre for Business Taxes at Oxford University.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Not in the same class: America and schools

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 22:09

    The country's children have missed more in-person learning than those in most of the rich world—to their cost. We ask why battles about schooling rage on. Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippine president, came to power on big promises; few were fulfilled. We ask about the skimpy legacy he leaves behind. And a look at the metaverse's red-hot property market.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: The smartwatch will see you now

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:31

    A new tech boom is disrupting medicine. We investigate how wearable trackers, such as the Fitbit or Apple Watch, could transform health care. And, could the devices help prevent the next pandemic? Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Talking out his asks: Putin's NATO demands

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 21:55

    This week's flurry of diplomacy aims to address what Vladimir Putin, Russia's president, says he wants. He cannot get it. Does an invasion of Ukraine hang in the balance? At an annual jamboree of economists our correspondent finds an unusual focus on the future—in particular the future of home working. And why Cuba has an enormous trade in grey-market garlic.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The World Ahead: On the borderline

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 17:44

    China is unlikely to reopen its borders in 2022 as it continues its zero-covid policy. What will the long-term impact of the pandemic be on tourism and business travel? Meanwhile, the tourist map of South-East Asia will look very different in 2022 as the number of destinations adopting the “sandbox” model is set to grow. Tom Standage hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Hope for the crest: an Omicron wave hits India

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 21:35

    The country has the world's worst estimated covid-death total—but as another variant takes hold there are reasons for optimism. Mexico's president has some old-fashioned notions about energy, and his pet legislation would make it both dirtier and costlier. And the Orient Express was itself a murder victim, just one line in a continent-spanning rail network that may yet be revived.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: January 10th 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 18:45

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to talk to Mr Putin, the rise of performative work (9:45) and the lingering effects of covid-19 on elite footballers (15:00) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: Capitol punishment

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 44:50

    “The former president of the United States has created and spread a web of lies about the 2020 election.” Joe Biden had harsh words for Donald Trump in a speech marking the anniversary of the Capitol attack. What has the House Select Committee set up to investigate January 6th discovered so far? The Economist's James Astill combs through the committee's findings. We trace the link between the disputed election of 1876 and the insurrection. And anti-Trump Republican Sarah Longwell assesses her party's response to the events of a year ago.John Prideaux presents with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Fuel to the flames: uprising in Kazakhstan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 23:13

    What started as a fuel-price skirmish has engulfed the entire country; now Russian-led troops have been summoned to help. How did things escalate so quickly? The spike in global house prices has several pandemic-related causes—but do not expect them to fall much when those factors fade. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of Britain's first transgender activist. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: Robert Kaplan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 27:22

    The new year presents President Biden with a raft of foreign-policy challenges – from Russian troops on Ukraine's border, to an aggressive China in the Taiwan Strait. Host Anne McElvoy asks a leading geopolitical thinker how the United States will face the tests to its power in 2022. Plus, the author of “The Revenge of Geography” assesses America's willingness to go to war and the influence domestic factors will have on diplomacy.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Capitol crimes: one year after America's insurrection

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 23:37

    The insurrection's horrors might have marked a turning point for Donald Trump's supporters and enablers. Not so; the people and the politics remain as divided as they were one year ago. We examine why, despite the rampant uncertainty that should lift it, gold had a terrible 2021. And London's farcical attempt to draw consumers to a famed shopping district. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Money Talks: Rags to riches

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 29:18

    How did second-hand clothes become fashion's hottest buy? Online resale and rental firms are changing the calculus on what it means to buy fashion “as an investment”. Host Alice Fulwood speaks to entrepreneurs and economists to find out how technology is creating new markets and why consumers are saying out with the new and in with the old.With Eshita Kabra-Davies, founder of By Rotation; Francesca Muston, vice president of fashion at forecaster WGSN; James Reinhart, founder of thredUP; Professor Alvin Roth, economist at Stanford University and Julie Wainwright, founder of The RealReal.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Stop the presses! Hong Kong's media crackdown

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 22:11

    The closure of two independent, Chinese-language media outlets all but completes the push to silence pro-democracy press; we ask what is next for the territory. Sudan's military seems as uninterested in civilian help with governing as legions of protesters are in military leadership. What could end the standoff? And why sanctions on Iran are affecting the purity of saffron. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: Everyone's going to the Moon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:38

    A new age of lunar exploration is dawning, bringing opportunity and geopolitical jostling. We explore the science and economics of the next space race. Also, correspondent Alok Jha investigates how to avoid conflict on missions to Mars. Kenneth Cukier hosts.For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.With thanks to NASA for additional audio used in this episode. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Holmes stretch: Theranos's founder convicted

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 21:34

    Elizabeth Holmes has been found guilty of fraud. We ask what lessons her downfall holds for Theranos's high-profile backers—and for a startup culture of hype before science. As Apple crosses a $3trn valuation we examine the motives for its stop-start forays into the competitive streaming-video business. And what lies behind the curious resurgence of syphilis.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The World Ahead: COP-out?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 32:13

    After a major UN climate summit, momentum behind climate policy often falters. But will that happen in 2022 in the wake of COP26? Climate cooperation is leading to some unlikely alliances and new reports on the impact of global warming underline greater urgency. Will significant action follow? Tom Standage hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Separate weighs: Brexit, one year on

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 22:00

    Trade is down, red tape is up, details of regulatory harmony are still being hammered out. Britain may be less divided about it, but the benefits of the divorce are still to be seized. For the clinically vulnerable, covid restrictions go beyond government mandates; our correspondent shares a personal view. And a visit to mainland Singapore's last rural village.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: January 3rd 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 32:20

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to think about the threat to American democracy, which economies have done best and worst during the pandemic (10:33) and whether video games really are addictive (17:34) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: Three chords and the truth

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 45:10

    Morgan Wallen became one of the stories of 2021 after he was caught using a racial slur. Banned from radio, the country music star's sales and streams spiked anyway. The affair reinforced a stereotype of the genre as home to hillbilly bigotry. But country is changing and its politics were always more complex than its popularity in Republican heartlands indicates. What does the story tell us about America's shifting views of class and identity?Nadine Hubbs of the University of Michigan unpicks Wallen's story and tells us how streaming and social media are revolutionising country music. And we find out how embracing country propelled Richard Nixon to the presidency.John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 26:40

    We look back to some of our favourite moments and guests from the past 12 months—featuring conversations about how our work lives are changing and business is transforming. From technological breakthroughs to shifting workplaces, you'll hear from six guests we wanted to revisit—Kai-Fu Lee, Joanna Coles and Melora Hardin, Whitney Wolfe Herd, Indra Nooyi, and Ray Dalio. Also features a calming gift of meditation for all our listeners. Anne McElvoy hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    All she wrote: our obituaries editor reflects on 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 25:00

    From Prince Philip to Desmond Tutu, from an anti-racism campaigner and member of the Auschwitz Girls' Orchestra to a war surgeon focused on civilians to an impoverished Ethiopian whose school for the poor educated 120,000 students: our obituaries editor reflects on the famed and the lesser-known figures who died in 2021. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    A few bright spots: our country of the year

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 20:10

    Each year The Economist selects its country of the year: a place that has improved the most. Improvement, though, was damnably rare in 2021. We run through our nominations and the shortlist, and take a close look at why the winner won. And we examine what has gone on in South and South-East Asia, which offered no contenders whatsoever.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    You bet your dollar-bottomed: Erdogan's next gambit

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 23:20

    President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's idea for saving the lira by backing deposits with dollars means the Turkish taxpayer will end up bailing out the Turkish depositor. Our correspondent finds striking insights in 40 years'-worth of humdrum submissions to a unique sociology project. And Saudi Arabia's multi-billion-dollar push into the cinema industry it outlawed for decades.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: December 27th 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 28:49

    A taste of the special Christmas double issue of The Economist. This week: Hong Kong's parents face up to an uncertain future for their children. And the rise and rise of an unfairly ignored building material—corrugated iron (14:50) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Beginning of the endemic? Omicron's spread

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 22:20

    The lightning-fast spread of a seemingly milder coronavirus variant may represent a shift from pandemic to endemic; we ask how that would change global responses. Concern about video-game addictiveness is as old as video games themselves—but the business models of modern gaming may be magnifying the problem. And newly publicised photographs shed light on Bangladesh's brutal war for independence.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: Merry Quizmas

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 39:01

    On this special holiday episode the team highlights the stories we didn't get a chance to cover on the podcast this year. Plus a couple of mystery quiz masters from The Economist family join, and listeners try to out-fox our trivia champion Jon Fasman with questions of their own. John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: Anya Hindmarch

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 22:49

    The designer is rethinking sustainability and style, but can luxury fashion really be green? She talks to Anne McElvoy about making sought-after handbags out of recycled plastic bottles and biodegradable leather and assesses whether renting clothes is the solution to the environmental impact of changing trends. And which political heavyweight – known for handbagging – inspired her to go into business? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    No safety in numbers: security in Haiti

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 24:05

    The security situation is hopeless, following violent unrest and a presidential assassination—as one family's epic and ultimately failed attempt to leave reveals. The sum total of the missing banknotes in the world is staggering, but what is worrying is that no one seems interested in finding it all. And meeting the man who unwittingly became Sherlock Holmes's secretary.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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