Economist Radio

Follow Economist Radio
Share on
Copy link to clipboard

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

The Economist


    • Aug 11, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 22m AVG DURATION
    • 2,898 EPISODES

    Listeners of Economist Radio that love the show mention: babbage, cieloscent, jason palmer, anne mcelvoy, economist podcast, conservative s definition, checks and balances, john prideaux, shareholders, charlotte howard, jon fasman, great magazine, full audio, kkkrump, neoliberalism, newspaper, news from around, pip, quality journalism, loading.



    More podcasts from The Economist

    Search for episodes from Economist Radio with a specific topic:

    Latest episodes from Economist Radio

    The Economist Asks: What does it mean to win a war today?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 37:44

    As the prospect of a long war in Ukraine looms, host Anne McElvoy asks national security expert Philip Bobbitt how to define victory in 21st-century warfare. They assess the war on terror, as the one-year anniversary of America's withdrawal from Afghanistan approaches. And, the author of “The Shield of Achilles” shares memories of his uncle, President Lyndon Johnson, and describes what it's like to be inside Washington's war rooms. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Teflon Don: Trump's legal woes

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 24:10

    Donald Trump endured an FBI raid, questioning in a civil lawsuit and an adverse court ruling, all in 48 hours. But at least in the short-term, he's making political hay from his legal woes. Why Apple's future increasingly rests on services rather than just hardware. And how France is coping with a mustard shortage.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Money Talks: Fragile economies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 33:02

    From Sri Lanka to Pakistan, El Salvador to Ghana, Egypt to Tunisia, some emerging economies are feeling the pain of rising commodity prices, higher interest rates and a strong dollar. Is a wave of historic debt defaults coming for emerging markets?On this week's episode, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird, and Alice Fulwood continue their exploration of the impact of the strong dollar. First, Kroll chief economist Megan Greene explains which countries she thinks are most vulnerable. Then, a look at what was behind the Latin American debt crisis of the 1980s, which led to an economic downturn more severe than the Great Depression. Finally, our trade and economics editor Ryan Avent says that many nations have learned lessons from past crises that could help them weather this difficult period.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Latin-ex Democrats: Republicans and Hispanic voters

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 24:04

    Our series on America's mid-term elections begins with a visit to a citizenship class in Doral, Florida, given by Republicans. We examine how the GOP is cutting into Democrats' advantage with Latino voters. Britain's trial of a superhighway for drones is a bid to unleash their commercial potential. And meeting a Thai dissident issuing dystopian pop music from self-imposed exile. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: The child hepatitis mystery

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 42:37

    Since April a mysterious outbreak of hepatitis in children around the world has baffled doctors. Some children have required liver transplants and more than 20 have died. Recent findings may link the spike in cases to covid-19 lockdowns. We examine the evidence and ask how a lack of exposure to bugs can affect immune systems. What other consequences could pandemic restrictions have for the long-term health of children—and adults? Kenneth Cukier hosts.For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Strike repose: Hamas sits out Gaza violence

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 23:21

    A ceasefire is holding after a weekend of deadly strikes. We ask why Hamas, the Palestinian movement that controls Gaza, did not get involved. As Generation Z tentatively enters the workforce, they are clamouring for more flexibility and money than their forebears enjoyed. And reflecting on the flawed but brilliant poet Philip Larkin on the centenary of his birth. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: August 8th 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 61:33

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, MBS: despot in the desert, the era of big-tech exceptionalism may be over (49:05), and why it's OK not to be perfect at work (55:30). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Greenlighted: American climate legislation

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 26:56

    On Sunday America's Senate passed the most-ambitious climate legislation in the country's history, giving Democrats and President Joe Biden a huge win heading into the midterms. Why Africa is experiencing a boom in startups. And the nascent, necessary efforts to understand how the menstrual cycle affects athletic performance. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: Pennsylvania mania

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 46:49

    The second part of our occasional series on the race for Pennsylvania's open Senate seat. For now the campaign is largely happening online, with Democrat John Fetterman staying off the trail due to a health scare, and Republican Dr Oz failing to take advantage of the open lane. But away from the memes and internet stunts, what do voters actually want?Local journalist John Micek gives an update on the horse race. We go back to a sea-change moment in Pennsylvania's electoral landscape. And The Economist's Stevie Hertz heads into the Philadelphia suburbs to find out how voters are feeling with less than 100 days to go until the midterms. What can one state tell us about the national picture?John Prideaux hosts with Idrees Kahloon and Jon Fasman.You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Our summer special: a despot, a magic trick and a star

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 36:07

    In a bumper episode, we highlight a summer's-worth of deeply reported stories from 1843, our sister magazine: we profile Muhammad bin Salman, the de facto leader of Saudi Arabia, who is both a liberalising reformer and a fearsome consolidator of power. We ask why magicians are behind so many viral videos. And we explore humanity's long-running ambivalence toward the sun. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: Can we learn to disagree better?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 33:44

    In a polarised world opportunities to disagree are plentiful – and frequently destructive. Host Anne McElvoy asks Adam Grant, an organisational psychologist and author of “Think Again”, why he thinks the key to arguing well is to be open-minded. They discuss whether social media erode reasoned argument, and the new breed of powerful political communicators. Plus, how does the psychology of resilience help those who are “languishing”?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Real rate of return: Ukraine's Kherson bid

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 21:24

    As Russia's campaign in the eastern Donbas region loses steam, our correspondent finds Ukraine's efforts to recapture Kherson are gaining momentum. But at what cost? India is notorious for its staggering road-death statistics; we ask what is being done to improve them. And the two surprising factors that predict how worried people are about climate change. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Money Talks: Top dollar

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 39:42

    This year, the dollar is up by 15% against the yen, 10% against the pound and 5% against the yuan. In July, it briefly hit parity against the Euro, something that last happened two decades ago. What's behind the greenback's rise?In this week's show, hosts Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes examine what the dollar's strength says about its role as the world's dominant reserve currency. First, our US economics editor Simon Rabinovitch goes in search of lunch to determine if the dollar is overvalued. Then, Eurizon chief executive Stephen Jen tells us why the dollar is smiling. Finally Megan Greene, a senior fellow at Brown University and global chief economist for CRO, explains why efforts to replace the dollar as the world's reserve currency have mostly failed.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Nancy meeting you here: a tetchy Taiwan trip

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 22:24

    The visit of America's speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi has Chinese tempers flaring. We ask what the trip suggests about American policy and what it means for Taiwan. Crowdfunding is making a real difference in the war in Ukraine—but its effects vary between the two sides. And a close listen to a young pianist's prizewinning Rachmaninoff-concerto performance.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: How AI cracked biology's biggest problem

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 34:34

    DeepMind's artificial-intelligence system AlphaFold has predicted the three-dimensional shape of almost all known proteins. The company's boss Demis Hassabis tells us how the AI was able to solve what was, for decades, biology's grand challenge. Plus, Gilead Amit, The Economist's science correspondent, explores the significance of the breakthrough for scientists tackling neglected diseases and designing new molecules. The leap forward could be AI's greatest contribution to biology to date, but how else could machine learning help science? Kenneth Cukier hosts.For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Not-so-safe house: America kills al-Qaeda leader

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 24:11

    For decades Ayman al-Zawahiri was the chief ideologue of the terrorist group. We ask what his death in Afghanistan means for the broader jihadist movement. A vote on abortion in Kansas today is a sharp test of the electorate following the gutting of Roe v Wade. And remembering Diana Kennedy, an indefatigable food writer and champion of Mexican cuisine.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: August 1st 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 73:54

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what happened to the Ukrainians who fled to Russia, how the sun is both our creator and destroyer (27:56), and how magicians won the attention economy (34:32). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Blistering pace: monkeypox spreads

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 24:22

    As the first fatal cases outside Africa are reported, we investigate the response to the disease, and the parallels with the early days of HIV. Nuclear waste has been stockpiled in supposedly temporary pools for decades; our correspondent visits the first place it is being permanently entombed. And where education is failing even amid encouraging enrolment numbers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: Peak progressive

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 46:30

    The Democratic party is in the throes of a rude awakening. Despite Donald Trump remaining at its head, the Republican Party is widely expected to make significant gains in the upcoming mid-term elections. Working class and Hispanic voters seem to be turning away from the Democrats. In some liberal cities, voters are in open revolt against progressive policies. How did the party lose touch with its voters? And does a flurry of recent dealmaking suggest it can moderate in time to avoid electoral disaster?Pramila Jayapal, chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, makes the case for progressive success beyond the mid-terms. We ask Elaine Kamarck, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and author of “The New Politics of Evasion”, how the central myths of the Democratic party have changed. And Ro Khanna, a Democratic congressman from Silicon Valley, argues for how to reframe the Democratic narrative.John Prideaux hosts with Idrees Kahloon and Charlotte HowardYou can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod"Triplicity, or Donkey, Moose or Elephant", by L. Mae Felker and H.S. Gillett, performed Harry Style See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Deus ex Manchina: American climate legislation's revival

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 22:55

    Joe Biden's climate legislation stalled, in large part because Joe Manchin, West Virginia's senior senator and a Democrat, had reservations. But Mr Manchin reversed course on Wednesday. Mr Biden looks likely to notch a major legislative win heading into the midterms. Why women's sports are booming. And remembering a fighter for democracy in Myanmar.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: How can America counter China and Russia?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 26:14

    Joe Biden and Xi Jinping bonded on basketball courts when they were vice-presidents. Today their relationship has turned tense as they tussle over Taiwan and trade. But the war in Ukraine is also consuming much of President Biden's attention. Host Anne McElvoy asks Wendy Sherman, America's deputy secretary of state, how the administration is balancing its two biggest foreign-policy challenges as well as its renewed focus on the Indo-Pacific. And the steely negotiator discusses the frustrating reality of high-stakes talks.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Getting more interesting: the Fed raises rates

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 24:35

    America's central bank has raised interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point—its fourth rise this year. It is walking a fine line between cooling the economy and tipping the country into recession. Scientific results fundamental to more than a decade's-worth of Alzheimer's research may have been fabricated. And the region where the gender divide in obesity rates is highest. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Money Talks: How should crypto be regulated?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 41:15

    The crypto winter has left many investors out in the cold. People have lost money as lending platforms have gone bust and complex stablecoin systems have unravelled. The push for better guardrails to be put in place has accelerated. But how do you protect consumers without stifling innovation?This week hosts Alice Fulwood, Mike Bird and Soumaya Keynes hear from Senator Cynthia Lummis, co-author of a bill that would split oversight of crypto in the US between existing agencies. They then speak to the head of one of those agencies, Rostin Behnam from the CFTC, about the role it can play. And our editor Kim Gittleson heads to an industry gathering in Paris, to find out how European crypto insiders are reacting to attempts to regulate them.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalksFor full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Kicking the canister down the road: EU energy policy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 19:21

    Russia cut the gas flowing through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline by half in what many see as retaliation for Europe's support of Ukraine. EU energy ministers fear further cuts as winter approaches. A new research review suggests the decades-long reliance on SSRIs to treat depression was based on a false premise. And why Dakar's plant vendors show such high levels of trust. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: Can technology personalise your diet?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 43:38

    Digital tools and sophisticated wearable devices are being combined with the latest knowledge on metabolic science to build personalised eating plans. Slavea Chankova, The Economist's health-care correspondent, explores the future of nutrition. Data from new nutrition technology can also be tied to exercise monitoring devices and blood biomarkers, to build algorithms that aim to make people get healthier. But can the emerging personalised nutrition era make a real difference to public health? Alok Jha hosts.Listen to our recent collection of episodes on the digital health revolution at economist.com/babbagewearables.For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Two to make a quarrel: the battle to be Britain's PM

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 22:58

    The campaigning is a bit nasty, by British standards, as Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak vie to become Conservative Party leader and thus prime minister. What will the mud-slinging do for the party's image? We examine a potentially simple solution to address the Catholic Church's problem with child abuse. And why prices are skyrocketing at posh hotels. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: July 25th 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 33:49

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why ESG should be boiled down to emissions, why the Tory leadership race should focus on Britain's growth challenge (10:00), and how software developers aspire to forecast who will win a battle (18:20) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    With the grain, assault: Ukraine's iffy deal

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 25:05

    Missile strikes on the port of Odessa have dimmed hopes for a UN-brokered deal to get Ukraine's grain on the move. We ask what chances it may still have. Tunisia's constitutional referendum looks destined to formalise a march back to the autocratic rule it shook off during the Arab Spring. And how Formula 1 is looking to crack America. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: What is the fight over CRT really about?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 50:23

    The final episode in our three-part special series investigating the battle over what is taught in America's public schools and asking how the anti-CRT movement became such a powerful social, legislative and political force in its own right. Although there is plenty of anecdotal evidence of teachers getting it wrong, there is little sign so far that CRT is causing widespread harm. What then explains the frenzy?The Economist's Tamara Gilkes Borr speaks to a teacher in Tennessee who lost his job after getting caught up in the debate. She visits a seemingly unconnected hearing in the Arizona legislature and unearths something surprising. And she goes back to Christopher Rufo, one of the leaders of the anti-CRT movement, to find out what the connection is between his campaign and the push to increase school choice in America. Does the anti-CRT movement have a bigger target?You can listen to the rest of this special series in full via the Checks and Balance homepage and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. Audio of labour-activist Dolores Huerta from “Outlawing Dolores Huerta: The Tucson Diaries” by NonProfit News See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Duty unbound: the January 6th hearings

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 26:03

    Last night, the committee investigating the events of January 6th 2021 said that Donald Trump's failure to stop his supporters' attack was a “dereliction of duty”. The evidence was strong; whether it will change anything remains unclear. We examine the thinking behind the European Central Bank's surprise half-point rise in interest rates. And the money motivations of Bangladesh's loosening booze laws. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: How should America tackle the border problem?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 30:00

    The deaths of 53 migrants in San Antonio, Texas are a reminder of the risks taken to enter America illicitly. Border crossings are at record levels. President Joe Biden promised to fix immigration, but his critics say his policies stoke disorder. Host Anne McElvoy asks Ted Cruz, a Republican senator from Texas, how he would solve the problem. Plus, Alexandra Suich Bass, The Economist's senior US correspondent, explains why Congress has failed to tackle immigration.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Knock-down, Draghi-out fight: Italy in turmoil

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 22:40

    For the second time in a week, Prime Minister Mario Draghi has tendered his resignation as his motley coalition government splintered further. The upheaval could not come at a worse time for the country. The pandemic's devastating costs not only to children's learning but also to their development are becoming clearer. And researchers are getting bacteria to make jet fuel.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Money Talks: The backlash against ESG

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 43:41

    One of the hottest areas of investing in recent years has been ESG: using environmental, social, and governance metrics as ways to assess potential investments. But the idea that you can make profits with purpose has recently come under pressure. Elon Musk has called ESG a scam; German police have just launched “greenwashing” raids; and insiders are spilling the beans. For something with hints of a moral crusade, ESG is in danger of turning into an unholy mess. In this week's episode, hosts Alice Fulwood, Soumaya Keynes and Mike Bird investigate the problems plaguing ESG, and ask if the industry can survive. Blackrock's former co-Chief Sustainability Officer Tariq Fancy explains why he decided the industry wasn't fit for purpose. Lisa Woll, CEO of the Forum for Sustainable and Responsible Investment, argues that the private sector has an important role to play alongside government policy. And Henry Tricks, the author of our special report on ESG, explains why he thinks the industry should focus solely on reducing emissions - and jettison the S and G. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Variable-fate mortgage: China's protests

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 23:43

    Property developers are going belly-up, home-buyers are not paying mortgages, protests after a banking scandal have been quashed. We ask about the instability still to come. Ukraine's new HIMARS rocket launchers are proving exceedingly effective against Russian forces. And a look at Britain's world-leading collection of diseases-in-a-dish.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: How to keep secrets in the age of quantum computing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 40:17

    The age of quantum computing is coming closer, presenting both an opportunity and a risk for individuals, companies and governments. Host Alok Jha explores why quantum computers threaten to crack the codes that keep data and communications secure over the internet. We also investigate how encryption techniques can be improved for a post-quantum age, and why it is urgent that they be deployed as soon as possible.For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    To a greater degree: widespread heatwaves

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 24:21

    Vast stretches of the temperate world are baking or burning, and as climate change marches on widespread heatwaves will only grow more intense and more common. After a half-century of insurgency, some rebels of Colombia's disbanded FARC group needed a new calling: they have become tour guides. And a look at where Ukraine can store its considerable grain harvest. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: Is CRT taught in schools?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 42:21

    The second of a three-part special series investigating the fight over critical race theory and asking how the anti-CRT movement became such a powerful new social, legislative and political force. The debate has become centred on how race, gender and sexuality are discussed in public schools. In this episode, The Economist's Tamara Gilkes Borr, a former public-school teacher, puts the politics to one side to find out what is actually happening in America's classrooms.When critics point to the evils of CRT, they are often talking about programmes like ethnic studies and social-emotional learning. Tamara travels to San Francisco to sit in on some classes and find out what is really being taught. She hears from a mother in Arizona concerned about a book assigned to her 9-year-old daughter. And she speaks to researchers working to quantify whether the teaching of topics associated with CRT helps or harms students.You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Steal girders: Brazil's fraught coming election

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 23:11

    President Jair Bolsonaro, an unabashed fan of Donald Trump, is telegraphing that he may not accept a loss in the October election—there is too much at stake for him and his family. The West has a delicate chance to stem the tide of Russian weapons that have long been pouring into India. And why America is rebranding a much-maligned fish.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Editor's Picks: July 18th 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 22:20

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why the Democrats need to wake up and stop pandering to their extremes, Europe's winter of discontent (9:50), and why bottling white wine in clear glass is an error (18:09). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Checks and Balance: What is critical race theory?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 32:16

    The first episode of a three-part special series investigating the fight over what is taught in America's public schools. Until recently, critical race theory (CRT) was a niche legal field encountered only by graduate students. It is now a catch-all term for whatever the right thinks is going wrong with America and a new front in the culture war alongside abortion and guns. The anti-CRT movement has become a powerful new social, legislative and political force in its own right. But what actually is critical race theory?The Economist's Tamara Gilkes Borr, a former public-school teacher, has spent months reporting on this issue. In this episode she speaks to Kimberlé Crenshaw, a professor at UCLA and Columbia law schools and one of the scholars who first developed critical race theory. She meets Christopher Rufo, the man who started the conservative furore over CRT. And she examines what the bans against the teaching of CRT in 17 states actually do. You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Jeddah mind trick: Joe Biden in Saudi Arabia

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 22:02

    Joe Biden lands in Saudi Arabia this morning, having spent two unremarkable days in Israel and the West Bank. As president, he has been unusually disengaged from the Middle East, and will probably return home with little to show for his peregrinations. We survey the state of sex education in Latin American schools, and explain why dinosaurs outcompeted other species.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: How has Ukraine changed warfare?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 28:35

    As the Ukraine conflict grinds into its fifth month, host Anne McElvoy and Shashank Joshi, The Economist's defence editor, ask Admiral Sir Tony Radakin, Britain's chief of the defence staff, how Ukraine can win as Russia wages a long war of attrition. The head of the UK's armed forces assesses the strengths of the Russian army and how western militaries are meeting that challenge.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Claim Economist Radio

    In order to claim this podcast we'll send an email to with a verification link. Simply click the link and you will be able to edit tags, request a refresh, and other features to take control of your podcast page!

    Claim Cancel