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Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Economist


    • Sep 16, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 21m AVG DURATION
    • 678 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from The Intelligence

    Shake, rattle the roles: Britain's cabinet reshuffle

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 21:04

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson has re-allocated a number of key government posts. We ask how the changes reflect his political standing and what they mean for his agenda. A first-of-its-kind study that deliberately infected participants with the coronavirus is ending; we examine the many answers such research can provide. And the rural places aiming to capitalise on their dark skies.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Hunger gains: Afghanistan's humanitarian crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 20:28

    Economic collapse and halting international aid following the Taliban's takeover have compounded shortages that were already deepening; we examine the unfolding disaster. The verdict in a blockbuster case against Apple might look like a win for the tech giant; a closer read reveals new battle lines. And the data that reveal how polluters behave when regulators are not watching.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Percent of the governed: California's recall vote

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 23:14

    Governor Gavin Newsom is fighting off a bid to remove him that puts the world's fifth-largest economy and, possibly, control of the Senate in play for Republicans. Russia's exercises in Belarus are the largest in 40 years—showcasing a chummy relationship and worrisome military might. And how Dante Alighieri's masterwork “The Divine Comedy” still holds lessons, 700 years after his death.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Getting their vax up: America's vaccine mandates

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 20:54

    President Joe Biden's requirements for employers to insist on vaccinations are a bold move amid flatlining inoculation rates. But will they work? For decades the world's cities seemed invincible, but the pandemic has hastened and hardened a shift in urban demographics and economics. And an ancient Finnish burial site scrambles notions of gender roles in the distant past.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    From the ground up: New York after 9/11

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 22:02

    The horrors of 20 years ago spurred an ambitious transformation, not just at the site of the attacks but across the city's five boroughs. We visit what has risen from the ashes. A growing body of academic work—and plenty of examples on the ground—suggest countries that most mistreat women are the most violent and fractious. And solving a flashy-hummingbird mystery.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Putsch back: Africa's latest coup in Guinea

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 22:25

    It is unclear whether better governance lies ahead after a military takeover; what is certain is that Africa's unwelcome trend of defenestrations has returned. We ask why. Justin Trudeau, Canada's prime minister, thought it a good time to shore up his party's mandate; as election day nears that plan looks shaky. And the rise and fall of Georgia's sex-selective abortions.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The call before the storm? Brazil's protests

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 21:34

    Tens of thousands of people aligned with President Jair Bolsonaro held protests—at his direction. Yet the numbers are increasingly aligned against him as he eyes next year's elections. Conspiracy theories are nothing new, but politicians espousing them, and exploiting them to great effect, make them much more than harmless tales. And a listen to the disappearing sounds of old Beijing.Additional Beijing audio courtesy of Colin Chinnery.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Bitcoin of the realm: El Salvador's experiment

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 20:52

    President Nayib Bukele thinks obliging businesses to take the cryptocurrency will help with remittances, inclusion and foreign investment. So far, few are convinced. From after-school tutoring to endless extracurricular activities, education is an increasingly cut-throat affair; we examine the costs of these academic arms races. And Sally Rooney's new novel and the question of what makes great contemporary fiction.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Heartbeat of the matter: Texas's draconian abortion law

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 22:25

    The Supreme Court's surprise decision to let the country's harshest “heartbeat bill” stand bodes ill for the landmark Roe v Wade decision; we ask what happens next. Brazil's police kill six times as many people as America's—and the numbers bear out a clear racial divide among the fallen. And how Lebanon is reviving its olive-oil industry, with global ambitions.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Taking the fifth: Venezuela's talks

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 23:43

    Four previous resolution meetings involving President Nicolás Maduro have changed little. This time international backing and aligned incentives might at last spur fair elections. Madagascar already had it hard, but the coronavirus and repeated, brutal droughts have conspired to push the country's south to the brink of famine. And our obituaries editor reflects on war surgeon and hospital-builder Gino Strada.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Reeling and dealing: how to engage the Taliban

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 21:29

    In some ways America has more leverage now that its forces have left; we ask how diplomatic and aid efforts should proceed in order to protect ordinary Afghans. A global pandemic has distracted from a troubling panzootic: a virus is still ravaging China's pig farms, and officials' fixes are not sustainable. And the first retrospective for activist artist Judy Chicago.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Out for blood: the Theranos trial

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 21:17

    Elizabeth Holmes founded a big blood-testing startup; her claims were founded on very little. As her trial begins we ask how the company got so far before it all crumbled. Research on primates is increasingly frowned upon in the West, leaving a strategic opportunity in places such as China. And lessons in a lost novel by French philosopher Simone de Beauvoir.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    CDU later? Germany's topsy-turvy election

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 20:05

    The party of Angela Merkel, the outgoing chancellor, is flailing in polls. We ask why the race has been so unpredictable and what outcomes now seem probable. In America, obtaining a kit to make an untraceable firearm takes just a few clicks; we examine efforts to close a dangerous legal loophole. And as sensitivities change, so do some bands' names. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Banks note: the Jackson Hole meeting

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 21:14

    The message for central bankers at the annual jamboree: relax a bit about inflation and be loud and clear about plans to stanch the cash being pumped into economies. The halt to an Albanian hydroelectric-dam project reflects a growing environmental lobby in the country, which sees better uses for its waterways. And following dinosaur tracks—but finding no bones—in Bolivia.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The terror of their ways: Kabul and global jihadism

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 21:52

    The suicide-bombings that have killed scores of people signal how the Taliban will struggle to rule Afghanistan; meanwhile the rest of the world's jihadist outfits are drawing lessons from the chaos. The swift reversal of an explicit-content ban by OnlyFans, a subscription platform, reveals a growing tension between pornography producers and payment processors. And the many merits of 3D-printed homes.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    To all, appearances: Israel's PM in Washington

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 19:20

    Naftali Bennett's first face-to-face meeting with President Joe Biden will look calm and co-operative. But in time, sharp differences will strain the “reset” they project today. Indonesia's anti-corruption agency is being defanged; it was simply too good at routing the rot President Joko Widodo once promised to eradicate. And estimating the breathtaking global cost of vaccine inequality.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Delta‘s force: Australia's covid plans crumble

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 20:45

    For a while, closed borders and strict contact-tracing held the coronavirus at bay. What lessons to take now the Delta variant has broken through in the region? The European Union once had few prosecutorial powers to tackle rampant fraud by member states' citizens; we examine a new office that can start cleaning house. And a look at Japan's seasonal-sweet obsession.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How you like them: Apple's decade under Tim Cook

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 20:44


    The tech firm has ballooned under his leadership, but Mr Cook's next ten years will not be as rosy as the first. We ask how he can maintain Apple's shine. Activists, academics, journalists, now labour unions: Hong Kong's authorities keep stifling democracy's defenders wherever they turn. And why California may soon find it hard to bring home the bacon.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    Annexed question, please: Ukraine's summit on Crimea

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 19:31

    President Volodymyr Zelensky wants to draw attention to Russia's continued occupation of Crimea, and its failure to look after the region's citizens. A new report attempts to put numbers to the “enforced disappearances” of Bangladesh's opposition voices. And why so few astronauts have been women, and how that is changing. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Value-free investing: China and Afghanistan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 21:45

    The Taliban's takeover is a boon for China's propaganda machine: America is tired, its policies disastrous, its values a distraction. Meanwhile China has its own interests in the country. New research may explain rising covid-19 cases among the vaccinated: jabs' effectiveness wanes with time, and “breakthrough” infections appear more contagious. And the case for working, a bit, while on holiday.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Fits and starts: SARS-CoV-2's origin

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 21:30

    In the end, the World Health Organisation's report in March revealed little. We ask why the coronavirus origin story is so crucial, and whether China will ever let it be told. Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson will struggle to square his current green promises with his past love—and his party's—of cars. And the forgotten cooks in fried chicken's history.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Stymie a river: the American West dries up

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 19:14

    The first-ever water shortage declared for the Colorado River is just one sign of troubles to come; as the climate changes, century-old water habits and policies must change with it. Israel's Pegasus spyware has raised concerns the world over, but the country is loath to curb its exports of hacking tools. And the resurgence of a beloved and funky Nigerian seasoning.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    It rains, it pours: Haiti's tragedy compounds

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 20:03

    A president's assassination, a cratered economy and now this: a tropical depression that will hamper rescue efforts after a massive earthquake. The country cannot catch a break. India and Pakistan parted ways 74 years ago this week; we discuss how the tensions that defined their division still resonate today. And why Indonesia is so good at badminton.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Nothing to break the fall: Afghanistan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 21:42

    The fall of Kabul, the capital, sealed the country's fate: after 20 years, the Taliban are back in charge—a fearsome outcome for its people and for the Biden administration. As capital punishment fades, life sentences proliferate; that comes with its own costs and iniquities. And visiting an enclave in Uruguay that is in many ways more Russian than Russia.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Thicket and boarding pass: travel's tangle of rules

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 22:47

    Restrictions are opaque, fickle and often illiberal—and it is not even clear how much they help curb the coronavirus. Chinese officials want to boost the economy of the province of Xinjiang, but our correspondent says plans predicated on repressing the Uyghur minority are unlikely to work. And bidding farewell to our work-and-management columnist, who still hates useless meetings.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Bridges and divides: America's infrastructure push

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 21:53

    The Senate has passed the first part of President Joe Biden's mammoth plan, which is now tied to a far more ambitious part two. We examine their prospects for passage. Zambia is undertaking a pivotal election—but it seems far from a fair fight to oust the incumbent. And our Germany-election tracker cuts through reams of data and tricky electoral politics.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Blazed and confused: Turkey's raging fires

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 20:23

    Across the Mediterranean and beyond, flames are consuming the landscape. Our correspondent says Turkey's government helped make the country a tinderbox and was caught flat-footed by the blaze. State secrets, business intelligence, even conservation data: it's all online, and freely available. We examine the pros and cons in an era of open-source intelligence. And the “murder hornet” threatening America's north-west.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Shots or fired: America's vaccine mandates

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 17:42

    Inoculation or testing requirements are spreading nearly as fast as the Delta variant. But it is not clear they will actually drive more people to get vaccinated. A broad semiconductor shortage has hit plenty of industries; we examine supply-chain subtleties that have made it particularly bad for carmakers. And why Mumbai is suffering from a plague of snakes.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Hot prospects: a sobering IPCC report

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 21:13

    The UN climate body's latest doorstopper report is unequivocal: climate change is human-caused, and already here—and 1.5°C of warming is looking ever harder to avoid. In Bolivia, debate still rages as to whether a 2019 election was rigged, or a coup; the people want pandemic relief, not paralysed politics. And investigating the received wisdom of the “difficult second novel”.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Coming in harder: Iran's new president

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 22:09

    Ebrahim Raisi takes office as the country is blamed for multiple attacks in the region; a more mistrustful, hardline and aggressive regime awaits. Our correspondent meets a woman first trafficked into a sprawling Bangladeshi brothel at age 12 and who is now in charge of it. And the high-tech shoes that may be contributing to tumbling world records in Tokyo.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    No consent of the governed: Andrew Cuomo on the brink

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 20:42

    After a damning report into sexual-harassment allegations, support for New York's governor has cratered. He is hanging on—for now. LinkedIn seems to do a brisk trade in China, without revealing how it keeps on the right side of the censors. So users increasingly censor themselves. And the mutual appreciation of Chechnya's brutal dictator and a star mixed-martial-arts fighter.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    No port, still a storm: Lebanon a year after the blast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 22:24

    The explosion at Beirut's port was a symptom, not a cause, of the country's malaise. We find more questions than answers about the blast and a political class unshaken by it. For half a century, one Beirut resident has, from the same apartment, witnessed a history pockmarked by unexpected disaster. And our Big Mac index reveals the depth of Lebanon's economic crisis. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Block off the old chips? Nvidia's fraught merger

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 21:46

    The semiconductor giant wants to acquire ARM—a British firm that is more complement than competitor—but regulators may balk. We look at what's at stake in chips. Something is changing in Americans' spiritual lives: a drift away from organised religion. We examine the startling rise in the “nothing in particular” denomination. And how women are leading China's growing surfing scene.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    No-sanctuary cities: the Taliban's latest surge

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 21:15

    Sweeping rural gains made as American forces have slipped out are now giving way to bids for urban areas; an enormous, symbolic victory for the insurgents looms. Singapore has enjoyed relative racial harmony for decades, but shocking recent events have revealed persistent inequalities. And why chewing gum has lost its cool.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Neither borrower nor renter be: America's coming foreclosures

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 22:41

    America's pandemic-driven measures granting relief on mortgages and rent arrears will soon expire, and millions of people are in danger of losing their homes. The Netherlands' history of slavery is often overlooked; a new exhibition goes to great lengths to confront it. And how Marmite's love-it-or-hate-it reputation represents an unlikely marketing coup.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Good news, ad news: Facebook's big bucks and bets

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 22:46

    The social-media behemoth revealed huge profits and stressed even bigger plans: to become an e-commerce giant and a hub for digital creators, and to pioneer something called the “metaverse”. After a bruising election, Peru has an inexperienced new president; matching policy to his hard-left platform will be a dangerous game. And the publisher trying to bring ethnic diversity to romance novels.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Borderline disorder: the UN's refugee treaty at 70

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 22:47

    An international convention devised after the second world war is ill-suited to the refugee crises of today—and countries are increasingly unwilling to meet their obligations. Vancouver's proposed response to a spate of drug overdoses is a sweeping decriminalisation; we ask whether the plan would work. And the bid to save a vanishingly rare “click language” in Africa.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Alight in Tunisia: a democracy in crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 21:05

    The president has sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. It is clear that the country needed a shake-up in its hidebound politics—but is this the right way? A sprawling trial starting today involving the most senior Catholic-church official ever indicted is sure to cast light on the Vatican's murky finances. And how climate change is already changing winemaking.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The blonde leading: Britain's two years under Boris Johnson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 22:22

    As the country tests a bold reopening strategy in the face of the Delta variant, our political editor charitably characterises the prime minister's tenure as a mixed bag. Hong Kong's national-security law has now come for its universities, sending shudders through the territory's last bastion of pro-democracy fervour. And why the alcohol-free beer industry is fizzing. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    A dangerous games? A muted start to the Olympics

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 23:14

    Tokyo is under a state of emergency; covid-19 cases are piling up. But for Japan, a super-spreader event is just one of the potential costs of this year's games. We ask why Britain's government has essentially given amnesty to those involved in Northern Ireland's decades of deadly violence. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of an Auschwitz accordionist.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Three-degree burn: the warmer world that awaits

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 22:37

    It seems ever more certain that global temperatures will sail past limits set in the Paris Agreement. We examine what a world warmed by 3°C would—or will—look like. Our correspondent speaks with Sudan's three most powerful men; will they act in concert or in conflict on the way to democracy? And why Liverpool has been booted from UNESCO's world-heritage list.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Changing horses mid-streaming? Netflix's next act

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 19:42

    On the face of it, the streaming giant's quarterly results were lacklustre. But our media editor explains why its international growth looks promising, and how it is spreading its bets. A largely uncontested purge of LGBT accounts from China's social-media platform WeChat reveals much about a growing Chinese-nationalist narrative online. And why researchers are cataloguing the microbes of big cities.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Joint pain: a rare rebuke of China's hackers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 20:10

    The European Union, NATO and the “Five Eyes” intelligence partners have all joined America in accusing China's government of involvement in hacking campaigns. Now what? Away from the spectacle of billionaires' race to the heavens, many African countries are establishing space programmes—with serious innovation and investment opportunities on the ground. And why Australia is suffering from a plague of mice.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    In a flash: floods devastate Europe

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 20:58

    Disaster-recovery efforts continue, even as heavy rains continue in many places. The tragedy brings climate change to the fore, with political implications particularly in Germany. Syria's oppressive regime is short of cash, so it has apparently turned to trafficking in an increasingly popular party drug. And why kelp farms are bobbing up along America's New England coast.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferRuntime: 21min See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    A pounder of a quarter: American banks report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 22:33

    Bank bosses are jubilant: revenues were down but profits way up. We look at the pandemic-driven reasons behind the windfall, and ask how long their influence may last. A thicket of conflicting laws is complicating Jamaica's plans to enter the wider medical-marijuana market. And our critic reports from a slimmed-down Cannes film festival.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferRuntime: 22min See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Loot cause: South Africa's unrest

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 22:01

    Widespread looting and the worst violence since apartheid continue, exposing ethnic divisions and the persistent influence of Jacob Zuma, a former president. How to quell the tensions? As some countries administer third covid-19 “booster shots” we ask about the epidemiological and moral cases for and against them. And the bids to reverse the decline of America's national pastime.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferRuntime: 22min See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Texas hold-'em-up: a voting-rights standoff

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 21:21

    The state's Democratic lawmakers have fled to Washington, stymieing a voting-rights bill. We examine the growing state-level, bare-knuckle fights on voting rights across the country. Ransomware attacks just keep getting bolder, more disruptive, more sinister; what structural changes could protect industries and institutions from attack? And Britain's efforts to bring back the eels that once filled its rivers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferRuntime: 21min See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Flight attendance: airlines after the pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 19:56

    Which carriers will thrive? Long-haulers or short-hoppers? The no-frills or the glitzy? The bailed-out or the muddled-through? Our industry editor scans the skies. Record numbers of Latin American migrants heading for America's southern border mask another trend: many are stopping and making a home in Mexico. And Japan's storied but declining public bathhouses get hipster makeovers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Hasta la victoria, hambre: rare protests rock Cuba

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 20:53


    Food shortages are nothing new. But it has been decades since shelves have been so empty—and since Cubans took to the streets in such numbers. Richard Branson's space jaunt was intended to mark the start of a space-tourism industry; we examine its prospects. And why, despite last night's disappointment, England's football fans should be hopeful about their national side.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


    A decade decayed: South Sudan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 22:54

    The world's youngest state was born amid boundless optimism. But poverty is still endemic and ethnic tensions still rule politics; what hope for its next decade? Mass graves found at Canada's “residential schools” have sparked a reckoning about past abuses of indigenous peoples. And marking 50 years since the final album of Karen Dalton, the forgotten queen of folk.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferRuntime: 22min See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Assassins' deed: Haiti's president killed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 21:21

    Jovenel Moïse presided, in an increasingly authoritarian way, over a country slipping toward failed-state status. The unrest is likely to worsen following his assassination. The Democratic primary race for New York's mayor has at last been decided, with lessons for Democrats elsewhere and for fans of ranked-choice voting. And the movement to revive Islam's bygone relaxed attitudes to homosexuality. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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