Podcasts about Britain

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Best podcasts about Britain

Show all podcasts related to britain

Latest podcast episodes about Britain

A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers

Paul Reas is a British social documentary photographer and educator, born in Bradford in the north of England in 1955. Until he recent retirement, Paul was the Course Leader of the Documentary Photography course (established by Magnum photographer David Hurn) at the University of South Wales in Cardiff, UK. He has worked commercially and editorially for many years and publishes and exhibits work internationally.Paul is perhaps best known for photographing consumerism and various aspects of daily working class life in Britain, especially during the 1980s and 1990s and is a member of a group of hugely influential photographers commonly referred to as the second wave of British colour documentarists.Paul has produced the books I Can Help (1988), Flogging a Dead Horse: Heritage Culture and Its Role in Post-industrial Britain (1993) and Fables of Faubus (2018). He has had solo exhibitions at The Photographers' Gallery and London College of Communication, London; Cornerhouse, Manchester; and Impressions Gallery, Bradford. His work is held in the collection of the British Council and he is represented by the James Hyman Gallery in London.On episode 164, Paul discusses, among other things:Thoughts on retirement.Being politically motivated during the Thatcher years.Creativity sometimes being finite.How he has started to paint and why he paints photographs.Reflections on the future for documentary photography.His life-long lack of confidence.His father and learning about his WW2 trauma.How his love of Northern Soul sparked an interest in photography.Why from the start he photographed what he knew and what felt familiar.The Valleys Project.I Can Help.Criticism of the portrayal of working class life.Flogging A Dead Horse.Referenced:Andy SimpsonEileen Gibson CowanIan WalkerRon McCormickJohn DaviesPaul GrahamMartin ParrCharlie MeechamBob PhilipsJem SouthamWebsite | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook“Although I was photographing people, I never really think about my photographs as being totally about people. They're about the systems that we're all subjected to. Whether it's consumerism or unempolyment or whatever, they try to be about those bigger themes. ”

House of Rugby
The Comeback

House of Rugby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 43:17


Seánie and Goodie are joined by Adam Jones in the studio. They talk about Seanie's love of animals, Goodie's best fancy dress efforts and Bomb and Seánie go head to head in a brand new game.  The boys answer some of your questions and take a look forward to the autumn international series. Join the House of Rugby Facebook GroupWant to hear more great podcasts from JOE?All To Play For, Joe Cole and Tom Davis bring huge guests and hilarious stories from football's front linesTKO with Carl Frampton, bringing you unprecedented access and brutal honesty from inside the world of boxingSportspages - Dig into the stories behind some of the greatest sports books ever writtenBoys Don't Cry with Russell Kane, the show that gets men talking about the things men never talk aboutUnfiltered with James O'Brien, our critically-acclaimed and award-nominated interview seriesPioneers with John Amaechi - Meet the trailblazers behind Britain's most exciting businessesIn Defence Of - Stevo the Madman challenges his friends from the worlds of sport and entertainment to come and debate with him on some of football's most contentious issues. Will they CHANGE HIS MIND!?

Kill James Bond!
Episode 19: Tomorrow never dies

Kill James Bond!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 97:17


This week, Kill James Bond, three trans people from Britain, ponder the eternal question: What if a media tycoon.... was bad? Join us for an in-depth investigation into Brosnan Bond's newest Technique (Walking up to the villain in a social setting and asking him directly if he's evil), and we encounter a Guy for the ages. Find bonus episodes at our reasonably-priced patreon! https://www.patreon.com/killjamesbond *SHIRT ALERT* We are accepting pre-orders for a new shirt design until the end of the day on October 31st, 2021 -- get it here! https://www.killjamesbond.com/store/p/kill-james-bond-presents-the-moore-pre-order *WEB DESIGN ALERT* Tom Allen is a friend of the show (and the designer behind our website). If you need web design help, reach out to him here:  https://www.tomallen.media/   Find us at https://killjamesbond.com and https://twitter.com/killjamesbond

Intelligence Squared
Mary Beard on Images of Power from the Ancient to the Modern World

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 57:16


What does the face of power look like? Who gets commemorated in art and why? And how do we react to statues of figures we deplore? In October 2021 Mary Beard, Britain's best known classicist, came to Intelligence Squared to talk about the ideas in her new book Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern.To follow along with the images referenced in the podcast visit: https://intelligencesquared.com/slides/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Late Night Live - ABC RN
Joe's woes, Iraq's upcoming election and the stately homes controversy

Late Night Live - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 53:36


Bruce Shapiro on President Joe Biden's struggle to get his climate policy in place before Glasgow, Rasha Al-Aqeedi on the upcoming Iraqi elections and Sam Knight on the dark side of Britain's stately homes.

Shield of the Republic
Woodrow Wilson and the Great War (with Philip Zelikow)

Shield of the Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 48:24


In this episode Eliot and Eric explore why Woodrow Wilson was unable to end World War I in 1916 despite the exhaustion of Britain, France, and Germany (the main combatants on the Western Front), how the lack of an adequate staffing may have contributed, the rise of a staffing culture inside the US government and the more recent loss of staffing and strategic competence, the role of reviewing past policy failures, the work of the House January 6 Committee investigation, and prospects for an Afghanistan and COVID-19 independent commissions. Our special guest is Philip Zelikow, the White Burkett Miller Professor of History at the University of Virginia, the former Executive Director of the 9/11 Commission and author of the recent book, The Road Less Travelled: The Secret Battle to End the Great War, 1916-1917 (New York: Public Affairs Press, 2021). Shield of the Republic is co-sponsored by the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia.

The Early Tee
Breaking Down the Barriers of the USGA

The Early Tee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 1:55


Twenty-eight players competed in the 1896 Open – most of the professionals were originally from Britain. But among the entries were John Shippen, an African-American, and Oscar Bunn, a full-blooded Shinnecock Indian. What hap­pened when the other professionals discovered that Shippen and Bunn were to play is undocumented, but before his death, Shippen recalled it in this fashion: "The other pros in the Open held a meeting and said they would refuse to play if Bunn and I were allowed in the championship."

New Books in East Asian Studies
Hongjian Wang, "Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation" (Cambria Press, 2020)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 88:52


European Decadence, a controversial artistic movement that flourished mainly in late-nineteenth-century France and Britain, has inspired several generations of Chinese writers and literary scholars since it was introduced to China in the early 1920s. Translated into Chinese as tuifei, which has strong hedonistic and pessimistic connotations, the concept of Decadence has proven instrumental in multiple waves of cultural rebellion, but has also become susceptible to moralistic criticism. Many contemporary scholars have sought to rehabilitate Chinese Decadence but have found it difficult to dissociate it from the negative connotations of tuifei. More importantly, few have reconnected Decadence with its steadfast pursuit of intellectual pleasure and unique paradoxes or explored the specific socio-historical conditions and cultural dynamics that gave rise to Decadence. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation (Cambria Press, 2020) is the first comprehensive study of Decadence in Chinese literature since the early twentieth century. Standing at the intersection of comparative literature and cultural history, it transcends the framework of tuifei by locating European Decadence in its sociocultural context and uses it as a critical lens to examine Chinese Decadent literature and Chinese society. Its in-depth analysis reveals that some Chinese writers and literary scholars creatively appropriated the concept of Decadence for enlightenment purposes or to bid farewell to revolution. Meanwhile, the socialist system, by first fostering strong senses of elitism among certain privileged groups and then rescinding its ideological endorsement and material support, played a crucial role in the emergence of Chinese Decadent literature in the European sense. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture is an important book for scholars and students interested in Decadence, modern Chinese literature and cultural history, Asian studies, and comparative literature. This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania). Victoria Oana Lupașcu is an Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies at University of Montréal. Her areas of interest include medical humanities, visual art, 20th and 21st Chinese, Brazilian and Romanian literature and Global South studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History: Addendum
EP15 The Supernova Coda

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History: Addendum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 71:37


Author Ian W. Toll who has written extensively on the Pacific Theater in the Second World War joins Dan to put the finishing touches on the Supernova in the East subject matter. 1. Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941–1942 by Ian W. Toll 2. The Conquering Tide: War in the Pacific Islands, 1942–1944 by Ian W. Toll 3. Twilight of the Gods: War in the Western Pacific, 1944-1945 by Ian W. Toll

Gone Medieval
Eels: Meals, Money & The Middle Ages

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 39:31


The European eel is now categorised as a critically endangered species, but 1000 years ago they flourished in abundance, and were an important aspect of Medieval life. In this episode, Cat is joined by Medieval historian Dr. John Wyatt Greenlee, also known to many as the ‘Surprise Eel Historian'. We examine the cultural history and significance of Eels in England. From a delicious meal to being used a a form of currency, just how vital was the presence of Eels in the Middle Ages to Britain? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1762: Paul Stobart, CEO of Zen Internet on Going Net Zero by 2028

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 30:57


Everyone has talked about how much the world has changed in the last two years. But today, I want to explore how our home internet expectations have increased. Wi-fi is now fundamental to every aspect of the family home. In some cases, doorbells, lighting, heating, 4k streaming, online gaming, and a long list of smart devices are all hungry for a slice of bandwidth. Research from Zen Internet recently revealed that 75% of people are unaware microwaves could interfere with their internet connection, and one in seven regrets not switching broadband providers over the last year. I invited Paul Stobart on the podcast to learn more about the report. We also discuss how Zen is the first broadband provider to go Net Zero by 2028 – meaning it will remove more carbon emissions from the environment than it generates. I also learn more about why Zen has also been awarded the Cisco Powered SD-WAN Service accreditation for its SD-WAN solution. Finally, we talk about how CityFibre, with help from Zen, is extending its infrastructure to 216 additional towns and villages across Britain – delivering gigabit-speed broadband and ensuring everyone has access to full fiber.

Novara Media
TyskySour: McDonnell's Budget Preview

Novara Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 53:33


Rishi Sunak will this week deliver a budget and spending review that will shape how Britain rebuilds following Covid-19. We speak to former shadow chancellor John McDonnell about what he thinks should be in it. With Michael Walker and Ash Sarkar.

Millionaire Mindcast
The 3 Pillars Of Unlocking Your Ultimate Peak Performance | Eric Partaker | Replay

Millionaire Mindcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 32:04


In this episode of the Millionaire Mindcast, we have a world-class guest, Eric Partaker who shares insights on holding accountability, how to reach the full potential in health, wealth, and relationship, and how to have constant success without sacrificing your health and your family! Eric is a certified high-performance coach, award-winning entrepreneur, motivational speaker, author of the book The 3 Alarms, peak performer CEO, and co-founder of Chilango. He has been working with high net worth individuals, entrepreneurs, business owners from all around the world to perform at their best and reach the top of their game in both their businesses and lives. He has been named "CEO of the Year" at the 2019 Business Excellence Awards, one of the "Top 30 Entrepreneurs in the UK" by Startups Magazine, and among "Britain's 27 Most Disruptive Entrepreneurs" by The Telegraph. Eric has worked with and led high-performing teams at McKinsey & Company, Skype, and Chilango. He is one of 300 people worldwide certified as a “High-Performance Coach”, by the High Performance Institute. This man was spending all his time at work and compromising his health. Then, something came up that made him realize the importance of being physically fit and healthy to reach his full potential and ultimate goals. Now, Eric has been obsessed with peak performance for 20 years. Eric wanted to perform at a peak level without sacrificing his health, and relationships with his family. He has proven that anybody can reach their full potential in health, wealth, and relationships and have it at the same time without breaking down. Some Questions I Ask: How did you fall into this space of working with high net worth individuals from all around the world? (00:52) What did your business, your routine, & what was your line of thinking at that time? (03:00) What are some of the things that you've seen that most everyone struggled with and how they might be able to deal with it?  (07:01) What are some of the things that you've seen have worked well for those who need to have some pivots and some small changes in how they're approaching what they wanted a life to look like? (10:40) How intentional should somebody have accountability and be looking at their environment and who they're spending their time with? (22:28)  In This Episode, You Will Learn: 3 things in life that need to be constantly in balance (04:57) Glimpse on The 3 Alarms book (11:18) The framework to reach your full potential (12:08) Why you need to change your identity piece to create a better future (12:22) Why you need to focus on productivity piece (14:20) Anti-fragility: Turning chaos into strength (14:46) Understanding the Pro VS. Amateur Mindset & how to turn pro in life (17:44)  Quotes                                                            “Everyone is typically quite successful but it just comes with a lot of pain.”  “Performing at a peak level not perfectly but at our best is a path to get in there.” “Behavior follows identity.” “Knowledge is no longer power, it's action.” “The more shock that I take, the stronger I become.” “Your potential becomes literally limitless.” “What gets measured gets done.”    Connect with Eric Partaker on: The 3 Alarms book by Eric Partaker Website Peak Performance Insights Email: @ericpartaker.com Facebook Instagram YouTube 

Leadership and the Environment
522: Abdal Hakim Murad, part 1: Britain's most influential Muslim thinker

Leadership and the Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 64:48


A reader followed up on my conversations with religious figures and authorities from branches of Christianity and Judaism. He wroteYou have presented religious people with «the book». That's good, and I hope you will find space for a muslim person/scholar and relate it to your concern about the sustainability and climate. I can recommend one person. He is, I believe the leader of Cambridge Muslim College, UK. Abdal Hakim Murad (actually British who converted to islam). He is highly and well respected and also provide guidance on the contemporary society to the community of muslims in UK and also in Europe.While I know about Islam, I don't know many Muslims, so loved the suggestion and connected with Abdal Hakim.Beyond his leadership role in Cambridge, England, his personal story and accomplishments intrigued me. The conversation was for me enlightening, especially his insider view of communities that, to the extent I've learned of them, I got a one-sided, American view. He shared of erudite sophistication. We spoke about cultures intersecting and intermingling.He also share of Islam's long history in Europe, patiently given my knowing little, so if you'd like to learn more and don't know much, I think you'll appreciate our conversation.Religion and the environmentOur conversation also reinforced my impression that religious people connect with sustainability and stewardship with emotions mine are closer to: beauty and joy, for example, more than obligation and chore, which I hear from environmentalists. He recounts examples of Islam and sustainability, practiced naturally, not just following a recent trend.The Cambridge Central MosqueThe University of Cambridge Faculty of Divinity: Dr Timothy WinterThe Independent UK: Timothy Winter: Britain's most influential Muslim - and it was all See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
1794: J. H. Gelernter #Unbound. Napoleonic-era espionage. The complete, twenty-minute interview. May 3, 2021. LXX GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 23:41


Photo:  CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow J. H. Gelernter #Unbound. The complete, twenty-minute interview. May 3, 2021. LXX GLXXG Hold Fast: A Novel.   Hardcover – May 4, 2021, by J. H. Gelernter  https://www.amazon.com/Hold-Fast-J-H-Gelernter/dp/0393867048 It's 1803. The Napoleonic Wars are raging, Britain is on her heels, and His Majesty's Secret Service has just lost its best agent, Thomas Grey. Deeply depressed by his wife's untimely death, Grey resigns from the service and accepts an offer to join a lumber firm in Boston. But when a sea battle with a privateer forces the ship carrying him west to make port in neutral Portugal, Grey is approached with a counteroffer: become a wealthy man by selling out Britain's spy network to France. The French take Grey for a disgruntled ex–naval officer, blithely unaware that Grey had lost his wife to an unlucky shot from a French cannon. Now, after many years serving King and Country, Grey seizes the opportunity to fight a covert war of his own. He travels to Paris, and―playing the part of the invaluable turncoat the French believe him to be―proceeds to infiltrate the highest levels of Napoleon's government. If he can outwit his handlers, outmatch his French counterparts, and outrun Napoleon's secret police, Grey may just avenge his wife's death and turn the tide of war in England's favor. Bursting with action and intrigue, Hold Fast sends readers headlong into an unrelenting spy thriller

ON THE WAKE UP RADIO
Yarima Karama: US, Britain, And Germany Refuse To Show Up For Reparations Call

ON THE WAKE UP RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 123:04


Download The Yarima Karama APP Host @yarimakarama https://www.yarimakarama.com/ https://linktr.ee/yarimakarama https://www.otwtube.com/user/YarimaKarama https://www.otwtube.com/user/YaKarBrand #yarimakarama #heavilyflawedindividual #onthewakeupradio listen https://radio.securenetsystems.net/v5/SAB https://onthewakeupradio.com/ Sign Up https://www.otwtube.com/ Donate https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/onthewakeupradio https://cash.app/$onthewakeupradio

Vedic Worldview
The Difference Between Vedic Knowledge and Hinduism

Vedic Worldview

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 51:21


A very frequent question Thom receives is "What is the difference between Vedic knowledge, learned through Vedic Meditation, and Hinduism?"Hinduism, as a religion, is supposed to honor thousands, if not millions, of Gods. This religion offers many offerings to people from all over the world and is practiced by around a billion people in India. It surprised many to learn that Hinduism does not originate in the Vedic or Sanskrit languages, which makes it quite an intriguing conundrum.Hinduism in reality is a linguistic construction that came about as a result of British rule in India. Hinduism is a combination of religious beliefs, some of which are based on Vedic understandings, while others may derive from the practices they adopted to show dignity and self-respect while they were dominated by the British.In this fascinating episode, Thom shares the history of Hinduism and what sets the Vedic worldview apart from Hinduism.Episode Highlights: [00:52] - What Distinguishes the Vedic Worldview From Hinduism?[01:47] - The Origin of Hinduism [03:51] - The Multi-Pronged Approach of Britain[05:39] - The Indus River Became Hindus[07:24] - Hinduism Turned Into a Fabricated Religion[08:58] - Statuary in India[10:06] - Hinduism is a Construct[11:53] - The True Meaning of Yoga [13:51] - Sanatana Dharma[15:51] - The Meaning of Veda and Apaurusheya[18:08] - What Is the Veda[19:17] - An Exponent of Reality[21:09] - The Cosmic Law of the Evolutionary Process[22:51] - The Destruction Operator at Work[24:38] - The Cycle of Evolution[25:36] - We Design Suffering for Ourselves[27:43] - Does God Want You to Suffer? [28:42] - Suffering and Happiness From the Vedic Perspective[30:33] - The Purpose of Life is the Expansion of Happiness[32:31] - Our Brain Personalises the Laws of Nature[33:40] - The Expression of Your Inner Nature[35:16] - Why the Vedic Worldview Doesn't Qualify to be a Religion[37:02] - There is No Concept of God in the Vedic Worldview[39:12] - Practicing Your Technique Helps You to Grow Your Conscious State[41:25] - The Vedic Experience of Growth[42:48] - Medicinal Properties of the Willow Bark[44:02] - The Problems With Aspirin[45:21] - The Relationship Between Hinduism and Vedic Knowledge[46:18] - The Problem Of Active Ingredient Mentality in the West[47:56] - The Western Approach to Spirituality and Active Ingredient Mentality[48:56] - Heaven on Earth is the Vedic Worldview[50:26] - The Difference Between Vedic and HinduismUseful Linksinfo@thomknoles.com https://thomknoles.com/https://www.instagram.com/thethomknoles/https://www.facebook.com/thethomknoleshttps://www.youtube.com/c/thomknoles https://thomknoles.com/ask-thom-anything/

Newshour
President Erdogan says ten ambassadors will be declared non grata

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 48:28


Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said that ten ambassadors will be declared persona non grata. Persona non grata removes diplomatic status and often results in expulsion.The decision follows calls from the envoys for the urgent release of activist Osman Kavala. We hear from the wife of Osman Kavala and from President Erdogan's chief adviser. Also in the programme: the effects of climate change on Indonesia; and a high school history text book is withdrawn in Britain. (Picture: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. CREDIT: REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde/File Photo)

Sea Control - CIMSEC
Sea Control 287 — Small Wars and More with Dr. Mark Folse

Sea Control - CIMSEC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021


By Walker Mills Historian Dr. Mark Folse joins the program to talk about Marine Corps history during the early 20th Century and his recent essay in Naval History Magazine, “Never Known a Day of Peace.” The discussion covers Marines in the Spanish American War, the Philippine Insurgency, interventions in Cuba, Nicaragua, Haiti, Mexico, China, the … Continue reading Sea Control 287 — Small Wars and More with Dr. Mark Folse →

Bad Boy Running
Ep 318 - Britain's Naturally Strongest Man to 48 Marathons - 48 Days - 48 Counties - John Clark

Bad Boy Running

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 94:22


The John Batchelor Show
1789: Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND,Arctic exploration, the complete, forty-minute interview; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 41:00


Photo:  THE AIRSHIP ITALIA: A MYSTERY AT THE END OF THE GOLDEN AGE OF POLAR EXPLORATION Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND,Arctic exploration, the complete, forty-minute interview; August 28, 2021 CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow   N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527  

Profile
Katharine Birbalsingh

Profile

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 14:08


The UK's ‘strictest' headteacher Katharine Birbalsingh has landed a new role as head of the Social Mobility Commission, a public body designed to boost the life chances of the country's most disadvantaged children. Born to Jamaican and Guyanese immigrants, Katharine Birbalsingh first rose to prominence at the 2010 Tory party conference. Her speech about Britain's “broken” education system received a standing ovation, but it also made her one of the most controversial figures in British education, and for a while she couldn't even get a teaching job. Then, in 2014, she founded the Michaela free school in north-west London, which has a zero tolerance behaviour policy. Pupils are penalised for forgetting to bring a pencil, or even for talking in corridors between lessons. The school has been deemed “outstanding” in all areas by Ofsted inspectors. Edward Stourton examines the life and career of Katharine Birbalsingh, and asks if her forthright personality and achievements as a headteacher will equip her to address issues of entrenched inequality. Producer: Nick Holland Researcher: Bethan Head

Woman's Hour
Weekend Woman's Hour: Hillary Clinton and Louise Penny discuss their new novel, the Singer Ella Eyre & the Science of Knitting

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 43:50


The former presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton has a new book out, “State of Terror”, a political thriller written with the award winning author Louise Penny. The two women were already friends before deciding to pen the novel which features a President who “smells of meat” and appears to resemble Donald Trump and a British Prime Minister who's “a twit” and seems to have a more than a passing resemblance to Boris Johnson. According to a new survey on mental wellbeing in agriculture, 58% of women in farming experience anxiety compared to 44% of men. What's the reason behind it? How much impact has Brexit and the pandemic had on the problem? We discuss with Alicia Chivers, Chief Executive of the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution, and East Yorkshire pig farmer Kate Moore. Campaigner Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah is raising awareness of asthma and the health problems that can be caused by air pollution. Last year her daughter, Ella, became the first person in Britain to have air pollution listed as the cause of death after an inquest. She died in 2013 aged nine. Now Rosamund is calling on Boris Johnson to “set an example for the whole world” with ambitious clear air goals. Are you a keen knitter? Have you ever considered that patterns for knitting your jumpers, hats or gloves could be seen as having parallels to computer coding? Do we undervalue the scientific aspects of some female-dominated skills? Emma speaks to Shetland knitter and pattern writer Hazel Tindall - aka World's Fastest Knitter - and to Sue Montgomery, who went viral in 2019 for knitting data into a shawl. After undergoing vocal cord surgery, MOBO and Brit award-winning singer songwriter Ella Eyre is back on her first headline tour in six years. She reveals how she's had to learn how to sing again - and how the experience has inspired a new musical direction. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Decades From Home
Decades From Home - Episode 45

Decades From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 60:50


On the show this week:We're joined once again by guest-host Dilli Algama as we discuss Simon's short but sharp experience of a house full of small children. While Nic can sympathise, Dilli impresses the lads with her creative distractions for parents and babysitters alike.Having lived through the torment of being a ginger haired child in Britain, Nic marvels at the distinct lack of ginger hair hatred in Germany, whereas Simon points out that there are other types of hair discrimination and Dilli explains why people seem so desperate to touch her hair.Dilli recounts her experiences of being told off by Germans for inexplicable reasons and why it is that Nic and Simon are unlikely to suffer such public abuse. Finally, we take a look at a Raccoon in Heidelberg that has given up on freedom and voluntarily moved into the local zoo.

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline
Weekend of October 22, 2021 – Hour 3

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 42:59


Tech News and Commentary Dave and the team discuss a multimillion fine against Facebook in Britain, Microsoft Kinect back from the dead, Microsoft shutting down LinkedIn in China, NASA helping to narrow the digital divide, Waze and Headspace, Fisher Price adding bluetooth to their toy phones, LG paying the costs of a GM recall, the […]

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy
Ep 1242: Inflation in Post-Brexit Britain Will Spread to Ireland

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 27:50


Chris Johns talks to Eamon about the events of the week in Britain. Chris is an economist and political commentator and hosts his own podcast, The Other Hand, with Jim Power. The Stand is proudly sponsored by Tesco. Recorded 22/10/21

Valley Beit Midrash
Torah with the Way of the Land: The Legacy of German Judaism

Valley Beit Midrash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 59:53


A virtual event presentation by Professor Paul Franks ABOUT THE EVENT: What is the legacy of German Judaism, and what can it still offer us today? German Judaism began with Moses Mendelssohn's controversial German translation of the Humash in 1783, and ended with the Nazi pogrom of November 1938. The best known slogan of the Torah-true wing of German Judaism is “Torah im derekh erets” (“Torah with the way of the land”). But this slogan is often misunderstood as nothing more than an educational philosophy that came in one flavor. In fact, it is an ideal of humanity articulated, in several competing versions, in the context of the quest for Jewish civil rights. The German-Jewish tradition raises vital questions that remain relevant today: What is the mission of Jews within civil society? What makes a Jewish community Jewish? What role should Jews play within the ongoing struggle for social justice and civil rights? ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Paul Franks is the Robert F. and Patricia Ross Weis Professor of Philosophy and Judaic Studies at Yale University. He was educated at Gateshead Yeshiva; Balliol College, Oxford; and Harvard University. Before arriving at Yale in 2011, he was the inaugural holder of the Jerahmiel S. and Carole S. Grafstein Chair in Jewish Philosophy at the University of Toronto. He has also taught at University of Michigan, Indiana University Bloomington, University of Notre Dame, and University of Chicago, and he has given shiurim at synagogues and Jewish community centers throughout Britain, Israel, and North America. Paul works at the intersection of the Jewish and German philosophical traditions, specializing in Kantian and post-Kantian metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of the humanities and social sciences. He is the translator and annotator, with Michael L. Morgan, of Franz Rosenzweig, Philosophical and Theological Writings (Hackett, 2000); and he is the author of All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism (Harvard, 2005), as well as over fifty academic articles. He is currently writing, with his collaborator Morgan, an ambitious survey that will reveal the dynamic interaction between Jewish philosophy and modern European philosophy from Luria to Levinas, and he is also working on a monograph on Kant's metaphysical and epistemological legacy. -- DONATE: www.bit.ly/1NmpbsP​​​​​​​ For podcasts of VBM lectures, GO HERE: www.valleybeitmidrash.org/learning-library/ www.facebook.com/valleybeitmi...​ Become a member today, starting at just $18 per month! Click the link to see our membership options: www.valleybeitmidrash.org/become-a-member/

Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)
Read_572 - Bitcoin & the US Fiscal Reckoning [Avik Roy]

Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 71:02


"It is understandably difficult for most of us to imagine a monetary world aside from the one in which we've lived for generations. After all, the U.S. dollar has served as the world's leading reserve currency since 1919, when Britain was forced off the gold standard. There are only a handful of people living who might recall what the world was like before then. Nevertheless, change is coming." - Avik Roy The fiscal promiscuity of the United States is reaching its end. The bill for the 50 year party and bull market in US treasury bonds is coming to an end. But everything might not be as bleak as it seems, with Bitcoin incentivizing a return to sound money, and providing a global, neutral place to secure wealth, our current disaster could be an amazing opportunity. Don't miss an incredible piece from Avik Roy, on "Bitcoin and the US Fiscal Reckoning." Check out the original on National Affairs at the link below: https://nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/bitcoin-and-the-us-fiscal-reckoning For the best products and services to get you started in Bitcoin, our sponsors are literally a handful of those that I use most in this space: • Buy Bitcoin automatically and painlessly with SwanBitcoin • Get Bitcoin rewards on literally everything you buy with the Fold Card (20% discount) • Keep your Bitcoin keys safe on the secure, open source BitBox02 (5% discount code GUY) • Get tickets to the biggest & most exciting Bitcoin conference in the world! Bitcoin 2022 (10% discount code GUYSWANN) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Verb
Puddings

The Verb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 44:23


Ian McMillan on the language and poetry of puddings - with Lorraine Bowen, Joseph Coelho, Kate Fox, Frances Atkins and Fariha Shaikh. Singer, comedian and songwriter Lorraine Bowen is known to many as the 'Crumble Lady' - her song about cooking crumble won her huge audiences on 'Britain's Got Talent', and went viral on social media. We find out about how the word 'crumble' translates into other languages and Ian offers a Yorkshire dialect interpretation of the 'Crumble Song'. Joseph Coelho shares his spooky pudding poetry and reads a special commission for The Verb - a poem which explores the pleasure of disastrous puddings. His first poetry collection 'Werewolf Club Rules' was published in 2014. What if Emily Dickinson, T.S.Eliot and Maya Angelou took part in a poetry themed bake-off? That's the kind of thought experiment that stand-up poet Kate Fox likes to conduct for The Verb. She imagines their baking - and wonders if you can tell how well a poet will cook from their poetry. D Fariha Shaikh is a New Generation Thinker and Senior Lecturer in Victorian Literature at the University of Birmingham. She tells us about the pudding making of emigrant Catharine Parr Traill, born in 1801, who emigrated to Canada and wrote many books on her life there and on natural history, for women readers in particular. Frances Atkins is a Michelin star winning chef. She explains the difference between a pudding and a dessert and argues that descriptive pudding names are most likely to excite the palate.

Trumpet Hour
#639: Week in Review: China’s New Game-Changing Hypersonic Nuclear Missile, and Much More

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:02


China has tested a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile that circled the Earth at five times the speed of sound before hitting near its intended target, a game-changing technology that blindsided American intelligence. A Muslim migrant murdered a British M.P., yet officials in Britain have bent over backward to respond in a way that utterly ignores the fact it was motivated by Islamic extremism. Russia is already flexing the power it will wield with the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, saying it will not send any extra gas into Europe until European regulators green-light the pipeline's use. We also talk about a coordinated attack on American troops in Syria, Germany's new plans for beefed-up European battle groups, record-high illegal crossings into America's southern border, the Biden administration's bold signal of its intent to divide Jerusalem, and Prince Charles's support for the “Great Reset” of global economic transformation. Links [00:39] China's Hypersonic Missile (11 minutes) Nuclear Armageddon Is ‘At the Door' [11:51] British M.P. Murder (9 minutes) “The Head of the Snake” “Manchester Attack: ‘Keep Calm and Carry on' Is Not Working” [21:07] U.S. Troops Attacked in Syria (7 minutes) “America Is Back…ing Out” [28:02] U.S. Southern Border (8 minutes) “Illegal Border Crossings Hit All-Time High” America Under Attack [36:07] Russia Threatens Europe (5 minutes) “Germany and Russia's Secret War Against America” [41:25] European Military (6 minutes) TRENDS: “Why the Trumpet Watches Europe's Push Toward a Unified Military” [46:54] Biden Against Jerusalem (4 minutes) “Is the Fall of East Jerusalem Imminent?” [50:30] Prince Charles and the Great Reset (6 minutes) “Prince Charles Supports the Great Reset” “What the Paris Climate Agreement Was Really About”

War Studies
Immigration, decolonisation and Britain's Radical Right

War Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 42:50


What did the British empire, it's history and legacy mean for Britain's fascists? And what does this tell us about where the radical right fits into the politics of race in Britain today? From the creation of the pro-Empire British Fascisti by Rotha Lintorn-Orman in the 1920s to Enoch Powell's ominous Rivers of Blood speech in 1968, the language of white supremacy and imperialism has been on the lips and in the actions of the British Radical Right historically, and still permeates aspects of political discourse on immigration today. Yet our guest, Dr Liam Liburd, Historian in Colonial/Postcolonial British History, argues that the study of British fascism has so far failed to recognise the imperial obsession of British fascists and the Far Right, or to approach it through critical race theory. In this special Black History Month episode of the War Studies podcast, he unpicks the reasons behind this and calls for the excavation of critical black perspectives to understand the motivations and impact of Britain's fascist movement on the country.

Ways to Change the World with Krishnan Guru-Murthy
Shon Faye on the liberation of transgender people, the problems with the trans ‘debate' and choosing to save her own life

Ways to Change the World with Krishnan Guru-Murthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 41:55


Shon Faye is a writer, comedian and podcaster who had an instant Sunday Times Bestseller with her debut book The Transgender Issue - An Argument for Justice, making her the first trans person to be a bestseller since 1974. Shon's new book is a detailed overview of the systemic violence and discrimination trans people face in Britain today. From access to healthcare, to poverty and homelessness, Shon outlines what it will take for trans people to achieve true liberation. She talks to Krishnan about how the liberation of Trans people would benefit everyone in society, the problems with the ‘debate' about Trans people in the media and how transitioning saved her life.

Witness History
Britain's lesbian families ‘scandal'

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 8:58


In January 1978 a London newspaper revealed how several British lesbians had conceived babies using donor sperm with the help of a respected gynaecologist. The doctor hadn't broken any laws in providing the fertility treatment but the stigma surrounding homosexuality at the time meant the revelations started a media frenzy and a heated national debate. There were discussions in the press, in the streets and in Parliament. One MP called for a ban on the practice and called it ‘evil', ‘selfish' and ‘horrific'. Dr Gill Hanscombe had used artificial insemination to start a family with her two lesbian partners. When the press found out about them she was terrified that they were about to lose their jobs, and potentially their child. Produced and presented by Viv Jones. (PHOTO: Gill Hanscombe (left) with her partners Dee and Pru, and their son. Courtesy of Gill Hanscombe.)

The Daily Objective
Insulate Britain: Worse Than Just Road-Blockers - TDO 357 | Nikos and Jonathan

The Daily Objective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 31:11


UK Podcast – Big Red Barrel
BRB UK 461: Everyone's My Butler

UK Podcast – Big Red Barrel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


Back 4 Blood, Metroid Dread, DC Fandome and Destiny… It's Podcast time bay-bay! The post BRB UK 461: Everyone's My Butler appeared first on Big Red Barrel.

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille
Britain's ASEAN Dilemma And COP26's Energy Challenges

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 34:14


Charles Hay, the United Kingdom's High Commissioner to Malaysia, addresses Malaysia's policy vacuum and political and business uncertainty from the perspective of British investment even as Glasgow welcomes the world to UK soil for COP26 to debate what detractors suggest are global environmental goals that are probably too ambitious to be achieved. Image credit: Shutterstock.com

History Unplugged Podcast
Winston Churchill: Political Master, Military Commander

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:40


From his earliest days Winston Churchill was an extreme risk taker and he carried this into adulthood. Today he is widely hailed as Britain's greatest wartime leader and politician. Deep down though, he was foremost a warlord. Just like his ally Stalin, and his arch enemies Hitler and Mussolini, Churchill could not help himself and insisted on personally directing the strategic conduct of World War II. For better or worse he insisted on being political master and military commander. Again like his wartime contemporaries, he had a habit of not heeding the advice of his generals. The results of this were disasters in Norway, North Africa, Greece, and Crete during 1940–41. His fruitless Dodecanese campaign in 1943 also ended in defeat. Churchill's pig-headedness over supporting the Italian campaign in defiance of the Riviera landings culminated in him threatening to resign and bring down the British Government. Yet on occasions he got it just right, his refusal to surrender in 1940, the British miracle at Dunkirk and victory in the Battle of Britain, showed that he was a much-needed decisive leader. Nor did he shy away from difficult decisions, such as the destruction of the French Fleet to prevent it falling into German hands and his subsequent war against Vichy France.To talk about these different aspects of his leadership is today's guest, Anthony Tucker-Jones, author of Winston Churchill: Master and commander. He explores the record of Winston Churchill as a military commander, assessing how the military experiences of his formative years shaped him for the difficult military decisions he took in office. He assesses his choices in the some of the most controversial and high-profile campaigns of World War II, and how in high office his decision making was both right and wrong.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Britain's Overlooked Hero: From the Trenches to the Blitz

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:35


Serving on the front lines of the First World War, the homefront of the Second World War and as a community leader throughout his life, George Arthur Roberts was a truly inspirational figure. Yet, his amazing story is little known. After the outbreak of the First World War broke out he travelled from Trinidad to the UK and eventually joined the Middlesex Regiment. He saw considerable action at the Battle of Loos, the Dardanelles campaign and the Somme where his wounds forced him out of the war. A man of considerable bravery and a keen cricketer George was known for picking up and throwing enemy grenades back into their trenches. Too old to fight in the Second World War he became a firefighter serving in Southwark, London. In 1944 he was awarded the British Empire Medal for his work in the fire service and the community. That community work was equally impressive as whilst in the fire service he founded the Discussion and Education groups of the fire service. He was also one of the founder members of the League of Coloured Peoples, an influential civil rights organisation that looked after Britain's black community.To say that he is an inspirational figure is an understatement and joining dan to talk about his extraordinary life Dan is joined by his great-granddaughter, Samantha Harding. She and Dan discuss the events of George's life, Samantha's own story of discovery as she uncovered his life and the vital legacy that figures such as George can have today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bunker
Are MPs Safe?

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 55:25


The horrific murder of Sir David Amess has put MPs' personal security into sharp relief. But should the Government tighten rules for online speech which, however ugly, seems to have little to do with this outrage? Plus, climate change deniers the Global Warming Policy Forum rebrand as Net Zero Watch. Will claiming that carbon reduction is too expensive succeed where denying it outright failed? And why can't Britain stop harping on about the Blitz Spirit? “Two MPs have been killed in last five years. We simply cannot say that MPs are safe to do their job.” – Justin Quirk “Prevent was never designed as a predictive programme… Just because this person was referred doesn't mean their name would go straight to MI5.” – Arthur Snell Presented by Andrew Harrison with Yasmeen Serhan, Arthur Snell and Justin Quirk. Produced by Andrew Harrison. Assistant producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic . Music by Kenny Dickinson. Audio production by Alex Rees. The Bunker is a Podmasters Production Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

That Was Genius
Tom‘s Ping-Pong Canary Show (Traditions week) - That Was Genius Episode 127

That Was Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 58:06


Like carving a pumpkin at Halloween, sprouts at Christmas, and burning policemen in giant wicker cages, this week it's all about traditions! Sam kicks us off this week with a look at the not-as-nice-as-it-sounds Aztec tradition of the Flower War - a sporting contest with very real and deadly consequences, and an even worse runner-up prize. Nest, Tom's been looking at 'Line Crossing' ceremonies: The filthy, raucous, and often unwilling initiation ceremonies for sailors on their first crossing of the equator. Next week's episode is a patron exclusive all about Honours and Awards! Find it at patreon.com/thatwasgenius Subscribe and listen to us! Apple Music // Podbean // Overcast // Stitcher // TuneIn // Spotify Welcome to That Was Genius: Two blokes. An immature sense of humour. And 10,000 years of human civilisation. A weekly podcast looking at the weirder side of history. Join Sam Datta-Paulin (he likes history and lives in Britain) and Tom Berry (he also likes history and used to live in New Zealand but is now in the UK as well), for a weekly reflection on the bold, the brilliant... And the downright strange. From bizarre events and stories to equally odd inventions, barely a day goes by without something incredible (or incredibly stupid) happening around the world. We upload new episodes every Wednesday night/Thursday morning (UK time). Check us out on Facebook (and our Facebook group for memes and fun), Instagram, Twitter and via our website, and please do subscribe to us and leave us a review if you like what you hear!

The New European Podcast
A climate change special: will COP26 be any cop?

The New European Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:46


In this week's episode, host Steve Anglesey discusses the plight of the British 'expats' (not migrants) returning to Britain because of Brexit, before hearing listener's thoughts on what the government should be doing to tackle climate change. Columnist and award-winning journalist James Ball joins the podcast to analyse the challenges that COP26 presents, essentially for developing nations, and outlines his expectations for the summit. He also shares his thoughts on banning anonymity on social media, which, in light of recent events in Leigh-on-Sea, he compares to bolting the door after a chip pan fire as, he believes, the two aren't related. Plus, the Hall of Shame returns this week, as our host believes Sir David Amess's death should not drive us to a fear of critiquing politicians, to feature Julia Hartley-Brewer, Ann Widdecombe and Boris Johnson. Enjoyed this episode and the podcast's new shorter, snappier format? Let us know by tweeting @TheNewEuropean

Woman's Hour
Singer Ella Eyre; Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah; Sofie Hagen; Neonatal deaths & stillbirth disparities; Covid & Xmas plans

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 56:45


Over the summer it's been tempting to think that the pandemic is almost over. But last night, Health Secretary Savid Javid insisted that "life is not back to normal". 49,000 people tested positive for Covid-19 yesterday - levels we haven't seen since the end of last year - and he warned that they could hit 100,000 a day over winter. But despite all this, the government has decided not to implement its so-called Plan B - which would include mandatory mask wearing, working from home and vaccine passports. Instead its encouraging people to get their booster jabs, and advising people to make their own decisions on mask wearing and socialising more outside. But will the public, who've already seen one Christmas fall into oblivion, be willing to change their behaviour for a second winter? Campaigner Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah is raising awareness of asthma and the health problems that can be caused by air pollution. Last year her daughter, Ella, became the first person in Britain to have air pollution listed as the cause of death after an inquest. She died in 2013 aged nine. Now Rosamund is calling on Boris Johnson to “set an example for the whole world” with ambitious clear air goals. The Environment Bill was debated in the House of Commons yesterday (Wednesday). Rosamund discusses her work and the changes she wants to see. Lockdowns and working from home have changed how we dress but 'fat people don't have the luxury of wearing the dressed down look'. That's according to the activist and stand-up comedian Sofie Hagen who says that society dictates that people who are over-weight have to look like they are trying. She and Emma discuss the pressures she believes exist. Mortality rates remain exceptionally high for babies from ethnically diverse backgrounds despite overall rates of stillbirth and neonatal death rates having fallen. Neonatal death rates are 73% higher than those living in the least deprived areas. With Asian babies 60% higher than white babies, and 43% greater for babies of Black ethnicity. Emma is joined by Clea Harmer, Chief Executive of SANDS, and Professor of Perinatal & Paediatric Epidemiology, Elizabeth Draper part of the MBRRACE team who collect and analyse the numbers and rates of baby deaths in the UK. After undergoing vocal chord surgery, MOBO and Brit award-winning singer songwriter Ella Eyre is back on her first headline tour in six years. She reveals how she's had to learn how to sing again - and how the experience has inspired a new musical direction. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Harriet Baldwin Interviewed Guest: Professor Stephen Reicher Interviewed Guest: Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah Interviewed Guest: Sofie Hagen Interviewed Guest: Clea Harmer Interviewed Guest: Professor Elizabeth Draper Interviewed Guest: Ella Eyre

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
History of food in Australia

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:11


The history of Australian food is complex and surprising. From the desert fig, in the Central Desert, to the Australian wines exported to Britain in the 1870s! From the 1950s wonder of cakes conjured up by European migrants, to the halal foods boycott campaign led by Pauline Hanson. Our food history tells us a lot about ourselves, and it's all been painstakingly compiled in a book by food writer Paul van Reyk. 

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Nostalgia For Gaddafi

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:47


Libya has been marking an anniversary of sorts this week: ten years since the dictator Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was killed, having been toppled from power as part of the Arab Spring. Since then, elections have been held, and a much-delayed election for a new President is due at the end of this year. But few have much faith in this process. Whole swathes of Libya are beyond the control of the national government in Tripoli. So it's perhaps not surprising in these circumstances that some Libyans are nostalgic for the days of Gaddafi's rule, despite the human rights abuses which took place. Among those who remain loyal is the man who was once Gaddafi's advisor, and sometime interpreter. Tim Whewell has been talking to him. Democracy in Libya may be very much a work in progress, but here in Europe, there are some who feel that long-standing democracies are also being threatened. The murder in Britain of the MP, David Amess was described by many as an attack on democracy itself. And that suggestion had echoes from a recent killing in the Peter De Vries was famous as an investigative reporter in the Netherlands. He ignored repeated threats to his life, while he bravely uncovered the power of international criminals. This week, two men went on trial in Amsterdam, accused of murdering him. It was an act the Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Rutte, said was “an attack on the free journalism so essential for our democracy". But then Mr Rutte has himself had to change his habit of cycling alone through Holland's streets, because he too has received death threats. Anna Holligan reports. During its twenty year presence in Afghanistan, American troops brought in billions of dollars' worth of gear, and quite a lot of it seems to have found its way into the hands of smugglers, who brought it across the border to neighbouring Pakistan. Some of it is still sold furtively in small towns, but one Lahore shopkeeper is making a good living by selling very openly this stolen US Army equipment. Ironically, he considers himself an implacable enemy of all things American, and a supporter of the Taleban. Ali Kazmi went to meet him. With just days to go until the COP26 summit on climate change, there's ever more pressure being applied to countries to explain how they propose to get to net zero or in other words, how to reach the point where they do not contribute any net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. They're being encouraged both to set targets, and to outline what measures they will introduce to reach them. But there's an island in Denmark which has already gone one stage further and become “carbon positive.” Ritula Shah went to Samsoe to find out how they've done it. When you think of ancient mummies, you might think of Egypt, with its famously preserved pharoes and other leading lights of that ancient civilisation. In fact, the oldest mummies in the world were discovered in Chile. They were discovered in 1917 by a German archaeologist, but it took decades for the mummies to be correctly dated, and identified as part of the Chinchorro civilisation. And they're still not on the tourist map, the way that the pyramids and their long dead occupants are. Jane Chambers travelled into the heart of what was once Chinchorro country, to see the mummies for herself.

Sea Control - CIMSEC
Sea Control 286 — Taiwan and Sea Denial with Collin Fox and Jonathan Selling

Sea Control - CIMSEC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


By Jared Samuelson This week, we are joined by two of our editors and CIMSEC contributors, Jonathan Selling and Collin Fox. They have each written on Taiwan for CIMSEC within the last year and join the program to discuss Taiwan and sea denial. Download Sea Control 286 – Taiwan and Sea Denial with Collin Fox … Continue reading Sea Control 286 — Taiwan and Sea Denial with Collin Fox and Jonathan Selling →

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle
France: Fishing grounds dispute

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 4:39


Since Brexit, a British-French dispute over access to the fishing grounds near Jersey has flared up. The waters around the Channel Island are particularly rich in fish.

Science Weekly
Who are Insulate Britain and what do they want?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:59


For the past few months Insulate Britain have been blocking roads in an effort to pressure the government into sealing up the UK's leaky, draughty housing-stock. So why are a group of eco-activists facing confrontations from angry drivers, and even risking injury, for insulation? Shivani Dave speaks to environment correspondent Matthew Taylor about Insulate Britain's demands and explores the possible health benefits of properly insulated homes with Dr James Milner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

Unorthodox
Spooky Schmoozing: Ep.291

Unorthodox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 67:52


This week on Unorthodox, former guest Gavriel Savit joins us for a spooktacular Halloween episode. We talk about the Jewishness of Dune, William Shatner's mission to the moon, why some religious Jews don't celebrate Halloween, and more. Our Jewish guest is actor, author, and substance abuse counselor Stacey Nelkin, who starred in the 1982 film Halloween III: Season of the Witch. She joins us to reminisce about the critically panned cult classic. Our Gentile of the week is Carrie Harris, a fiction writer whose work features monsters, mayhem, and murder. She tells us why horror writing flourishes in uncertain times, and reads a passage from her new young adult book, Elder God Dance Squad, which she describes as ‘Stranger Things meets Bring It On.' Dara Horn, author of the new book People Love Dead Jews, and host of the podcast “Adventures with Dead Jews,” gets us in the holiday spirit with a reading of “The Dead Town” by Yiddish writer I.L. Peretz. (Translated by Helen Frank and Hillel Halkin, abridged and adapted by Dara Horn.) Listen to Liel on a special crossover episode of “People of the Pod,” discussing “How the Jews Went Right in Britain.” It's the first installment of “21st Century Europe and the Jews,” a four-part collaboration between Tablet and American Jewish Committee. Listen to the episode here, and learn more about the series here. It's that time of the year! Please support Unorthodox and the other Tablet shows you know and love by visiting bit.ly/givetounorthodox. Send comments and questions to unorthodox@tabletmag.com, or leave us a voicemail at (914) 570-4869. You can also record a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more. Join our Facebook group, and follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram. Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt. Want to book us for a live show? Email producer Josh Kross at jkross@tabletmag.com. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Sponsors: Rothy's shoes are stylish and sustainable, and now they're available for men too! Get $20 off your first purchase at rothys.com/UNORTHODOX Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Studs Terkel Archive Podcast
Quentin Crisp discusses homosexuality

Studs Terkel Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 0:01


First broadcast on October 21, 1992. Quentin Crisp, author of many works about gays in Britain and the United States and, notably, about "coming out" as gay in England in the 1930s, discusses homosexuality and his experiences.

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Battle of Trafalgar

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 67:05


On 21 October 1805, A British fleet commanded by Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson met the combined might of the French and Spanish fleets off the coast of Spain. Outnumbered, Nelson used innovative tactics to break up the allied fleet and ensure success but at great cost to his men and of course himself. It was a truly crushing defeat for the Franco-Spanish forces though. With the majority of their ships destroyed or captured it confirmed Britain's naval supremacy for decades to come. In this dramatic telling of one of the most famous battles in naval history, Dan brings to life the men, the commanders, the ships, and the tactics that enabled the British fleet to emerge as victors. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.