Podcasts about Britain

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 11,344PODCASTS
  • 41,064EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 18, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Britain

Show all podcasts related to britain

Latest podcast episodes about Britain

Late Night Live - ABC RN
Ian Dunt's Britain, the potential oil spill disaster off Yemen, and fractions - why they mess with our thinking

Late Night Live - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 53:37


The UK's Northern Ireland Protocol Bill is straining EU relations. An internationally co-ordinated effort is underway to prevent a huge oil spill from a rusting ship off Yemen. And how our poor understanding of fractions allows us to be manipulated by politicians and others.

The Intelligence
It's his party: American primaries

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 24:41


Five American states held primary elections yesterday. The most important were in Pennsylvania, where a Trump-backed candidate won the Republican gubernatorial primary. The Republican senate race remains too close to call. Wide-area motion imaging is a surveillance technique developed by the military in Iraq but now creeping into the civilian world. And why war in Ukraine is raising the price of berries in Britain. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Our Fake History
Episode #155- What Became of the Benin Bronzes? (Part II)

Our Fake History

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 70:05


In 1897 Queen Victoria marked her diamond jubilee and Britain was in a celebratory mood. The British Empire had never been stronger. Few could imagine that this world-spanning empire might very well be peaking. But in 1897 Britain was in no mood for painful self-reflection. Instead Britons were gaily celebrating the what they perceived to be the "triumphs" of empire. Earlier that year a British punitive expedition sacked the West- African city of Benin. The victorious Brits carried off thousands of priceless cultural treasures, many of which were then displayed as trophies of war and instructive curios at the British Museum. The British press had painted Benin City as a hopelessly "savage" place, but these artworks instead reflected a society of great sophistication and artistic skill. Perhaps Britain had been wrong about Benin. How did a British expeditionary force end up at the gates of Benin City in the first place? Tune-in and find out how miscommunications, shady treaties, and pageants with machine guns all play a role in the story.

CBS This Morning
Britain's Most Decorated Diver Tom Daley on memoir "Coming Up for Air"

CBS This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:27


Tom Daley is the most decorated British diver of all time, winning four Olympic medals, including a gold medal. He joins CBS News correspondent Jamie Yuccas to discuss his memoir "Coming Up for Air," about what was really happening both on and off the diving board.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Canary Cry News Talk
MEDIA MASSACRE MIND 

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 228:06


Canary Cry News Talk #485 - 05.16.2022 MEDIA MASSACRE MIND  LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party   LEAD 5:23 V / 2:26 P GUN CONTROL/RACE WARS Buffalo “racist massacre” 10 black people dead (ABC) + NY Times Source  Note: Pope Francis names 10 new saints, includes “Patron Saint of Journalism” (Fox) → Buffalo shooter isn't a “Lone Wolf” (Rolling Stone) → State Senator suggests False Flag (Huffpo) → Great Replacement GOP Mainstream (Vice) → Internet Control (LA Times) Clip: Kamala on buffalo, Black community speaking out Churchgoers tackled, hogtied gunman on deadly Laguna Woods church shooting (LA Times) Clip: Justice Clarence Thomas joke about media (set up for v4v pitch)   INTRO (M-W-F)  52:19 V / 49:22 P B&G Update, V4V/Exec./Asso./Support   FLIPPY  58:28 V / 55:31 P Robot teaching yoga class (Denver Post, submitted by producer Kira OC)   [Party Pitch/Ravel/CCClips/text alerts]  1:09:19 V / 1:06:22 P   RUSSIA/FOOD/WITCHCRAFT  1:12:25 V / 1:09:28 P → McDonalds moving out of Russia for good (Reuters) → McDonald's deal for Mercury retrograde: Get a free McChicken or McDouble (USA Today)   4 HORSEMAN TECHNOCALYPSE  1:28:30 V / 1:25:33 P Bezos: Jeff critical of Biden, invokes Disinfo Board (Tweet) → Jeff also critical of Biden trying to print more money (Tweet) **White House fired back at Bezos (Yahoo/Insider) [Larry Summer sides with Biden (Insider)] → This morning, Jeff again, responds to the critique   [TREASURE/SPEAKPIPE/BYE YOUTUBE]  1:40:31 V / 1:37:34 P   COVID/WACCINE  1:58:54 V / 1:56:03 P US has hit 1 Million C19 Deaths, but Numbers likely higher (ABC) Why is C19 SURGING in San Fransisco? (SF Chron.) Explosive outbreak causing upheaval in North Korea, 820,000 cases (National Post)   [TALENT]  2:43:40 V / 2:40:43 P   NEPHILIM UPDATE  3:02:56 V /  3:00:00 P Is an unknown, extraordinarily ancient civilization buried under eastern Turkey? (Spectator) Scripture: Deut. 4, covenant and graven images; Rev. 9, 16, angel in River Euphrates, 1 Chron. 20.6 six fingers, Rev. 21:1 new heaven new earth, divine council   [TIME/OUTRO]  3:25:40 V / 3:22:43 P   EPISODE 485 WAS PRODUCED BY… Executive Producers Dame Lynn Lady of the Lakes**   Supply Drop Jessie S   Producers MORV, Natalie C, Sir James Knight and Servant of the Lion of Judah, Puddin2022, Michael B, LX PROTOCOL V2, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Veronica D, Gail M, Sir Scott Knight of Truth, Jackie U   AUDIO PRODUCTION (Jingles, Iso, Music): Psalm40, Jonathan F   ART PRODUCTION (Drawing, Painting, Graphics): Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation, Sir Dove Knight of Rusbeltia   CONTENT PRODUCTION (Microfiction etc.): Runksmash: Hearing the cacophony being caused by Monty and Propaganda Rooster, Kodi pokes around the corner and sees his person talking to the spooky eyed man. Steeling his nerve Kodi bursts in with a mighty “NO WOBBLE EYES! BIG MOUSE IS BAD, ROOSTER SAID SO!”   The Sentinel: While Basil practices in his new skates, on the other side of town… the Alpha-Bois are preparing for the tournament as well. It is now only 2 weeks away. Master Grease stands in the center of the rink barking commands. “ONE!” The Alpha-bois all lean to the right, extending their arms out in a shoving motion as they circle their master. “TWO!” They lean left, shoving again. “THREE!” They jump forward, pulling themselves past an invisible adversary. The roller-skating rink thunders as they all land at the same time. “FOUR!” The new janitor looks on in awe as all the Alpha-Bois perform a sweeping motion in unison. “FIVE!”   CLIP PRODUCER Emsworth, FaeLivrin, Epsilon   Timestamps: Mondays: Jackie U Wednesdays: Jade Bouncerson Fridays: Christine C ADDITIONAL STORIES: Lab grown human milk just 3 years away (CNN) Algae powered computing, renewable biological photovoltaic cell (Cambridge) Chinese Spy Ship Makes First Appearance Near Australian Submarine Communications Base (theDrive) If you think gas prices are bad, diesel is in its worst crisis since the 1970s and has even raised fears of localized rationing (Insider) Kyiv wins Eurovision Song Contest while Britain gets best result for 20 years (but France and Germany just avoid nul points) (DailyMail) Ukraine shares footage of soldiers firing British made Brimstone missiles at Russian forces after military hardware was adapted so they can be fired from small vehicles on battlefield (DailyMail) Indian surgeon plans to transplant womb into a TRANS woman in world-first op that could pave way for biological men to get pregnant (DailyMail) Kyiv wins Eurovision while Britain gets best result for 20 years (DailyMail) → Sorry, that's not a doorway on Mars (CNET) → Mars sample collection risks introducing Alien Virus on earth (WION) SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com CLIP CHANNEL: CanaryCry.Tube SUPPLY DROP: CanaryCrySupplyDrop.com SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com Basil's other podcast: ravel Gonz' New Youtube: Facelikethesun Resurrection Gonz' Video Archive: Facelikethesun.Live App Made by Canary Cry Producer: Truther Dating App

Dan Snow's History Hit
HMS Black Joke

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 23:59


Please note that this episode contains mentions of racial trauma, slavery and violence.The most feared ship in Britain's West Africa Squadron, His Majesty's Black Joke was one of a handful of ships tasked with patrolling the western coast of Africa in an effort to end hundreds of years of global slave trading. Once a slaving vessel itself, only a lucky capture in 1827 allowed it to be repurposed by the Royal Navy to catch its former compatriots.A.E. Rooks is an expert in this little-discussed facet of the transatlantic slave trade. Rooks joins Dan on the podcast to chronicle this history of the daring feats of a single ship - whose crew and commanders would capture more ships and liberate more enslaved people than any other in the Squadron.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TRASHFUTURE
All My Bulls, Gone feat. Heidi Swart

TRASHFUTURE

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 70:15


The gang discusses the inevitable crypto crash, tether, and the charlatans who sold ordinary people down the river. We also review Britain's strategy for dealing with its many overlapping crises including mental health. Then, we speak to journalist Heidi Swart (@heidi_swart), whose work for the MIT technology review is all about how the surveillance industry is slowly rebuilding apartheid in South Africa. Read Heidi's article here: https://www.technologyreview.com/2022/04/19/1049996/south-africa-ai-surveillance-digital-apartheid If you want access to our Patreon bonus episodes, early releases of free episodes, and powerful Discord server, sign up here: https://www.patreon.com/trashfuture *MILO ALERT* Milo has shows coming up in Brighton. Learn more here! https://miloedwards.co.uk/live-shows *WEB DESIGN ALERT* Tom Allen is a friend of the show (and the designer behind our website). If you need web design help, reach out to him here:  https://www.tomallen.media/ Trashfuture are: Riley (@raaleh), Milo (@Milo_Edwards), Hussein (@HKesvani), Nate (@inthesedeserts), and Alice (@AliceAvizandum)

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 300 - Jubilee - guest Stan Kenton-Delta Rhythm Boys-Toni Harper-Lionel Hampton-Kay Starr-Benny Goodman-Dizzy Gillespie 12-24-48.

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:04


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 269 - Showtime - Alexanders Ragtime Band - Tyrone Power - Al Jolson 04-07-47

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 29:48


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 173 - Music Hall replaced By Eddie Cantor 02-20-46

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:15


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 170 - Dixieland Club - First Song - Thats A Plenty 05-01-52

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 15:37


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Explaining History (explaininghistory) (explaininghistory)
Update: Sinn Fein, Northern Ireland and the prospects for reunion

Explaining History (explaininghistory) (explaininghistory)

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 24:50


Two weeks ago Sinn Fein achieved something that had previously been considered politically impossible in Northern Ireland, it gained a majority in the Northern Ireland Assembly elections and is now likely to form a government. This edition of the update explores the ramifications for Northern Ireland, Britain, the Irish Republic and the EU of this momentous event and the ongoing problems caused by Brexit. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/explaininghistory.

Radio 4 Quiz
Round Britain Quiz Ep 8

Radio 4 Quiz

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:05


Kirsty Lang is in the chair as the South of England take on Northern Ireland.

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Flooding and Energy

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 34:06


How decoding Erewash, Trent, Averham and other field, river and place names from old maps can help us understand flooding patterns in Britain. Dr Richard Jones, Associate Professor of Landscape History at the University of Leicester is one of Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough's guests. Her second guest is Dr Rebecca Wright, a Social and Cultural Historian of Energy from Northumbria University. The research projects featured are: Flood and Flow: https://waternames.wordpress.com/team/ Forthcoming manuscript Moral Energy in America: From the Progressive Era to the Atomic Bomb which explores the birth of an ‘energy consciousness' in the United States in the first half of the twentieth century. This episode was made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI Producer: Paula McFarlane You can find more conversations about New Research gathering into a playlist on the Free Thinking programme website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03zws90

Woman's Hour
Girl Bands, Period Tracking Apps, Couples Therapy

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 56:49


After Little Mix said goodbye to their fans with their final show on Saturday before going on hiatus, it seems that for the first time in decades, Britain is without a major girl band. Emma is joined by Melanie Chisholm from The Spice Girls and music journalist, Jacqueline Springer. We discuss recent work from home data with Dr Jane Parry is Associate Professor of work and employment at Southampton Business school and Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff. In the wake of the tragic killings of toddlers Star Hobson and Arthur Labinjo Hughes, a government report is expected to be published shortly looking into what went wrong. Social workers had failed to act on warnings from relatives, which meant the children were not removed from their abusive homes. But a BBC ONE Panorama explores a different perspective - what about when children's services intervene too far, too fast – and when they act unethically, even unlawfully towards children and their parents, causing lifelong trauma in the process? One local authority in Herefordshire has been severely and repeatedly criticised by a high court judge for breaching children's human rights through what the judge called “appalling” social work practice. Woman's Hour talks to Panorama Reporter Louise Tickle about her investigation. Women in the US have been raising concerns about period and pregnancy tracking apps on phones. BBC Technology reporter Shiona McCallum and Jillian York from the American digital rights group, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, join Emma to discuss. Relationships for many of us are just downright fascinating. Susanna Abse is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist and joins Emma to discuss her new book. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 169 - Dixieland Club - First Song - The South Rampart Street Parade 04-30-52

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 15:37


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 157 - Jubilee - guest Lionel Hampton - Delta Rhythm Boys - Lena Horne 11-19-45

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 29:38


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 155 - Music Hall - Frank Morgan - Vera Vague - Carmen Cavallaro 11-22-45

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:05


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 147 - Fred Allen - Guest - Henry Morgan 03-06-49

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 25:39


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 140 - jubilee - guest Count Basie - Lena Horne 07-05-45

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 29:56


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 085 - Fibber Mcgee And Molly 12-26-44

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 29:30


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 085 - Charlie Mccarthy - guest Signe Hasso 12-10-44.

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 29:58


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 064 - Garry Moore 11-18-49

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:38


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 062 - Burns Allen - Gracie Hires A Drama Coach 12-26-44

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:06


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 062 - Bob Burns - Replacing Village Store 11-16-44

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:20


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 047 - Manhattan Merry - go - round - First Song - I'll Go Home With Bonnie Jean Xx-xx-47

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 29:54


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

She's a Rec'
S2 Ep 7 Nadia Whittome Youngest MP in Britain - The Baby Of The House

She's a Rec'

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 66:19


Nadia Whittome is the youngest member of parliament in British government and she has a very unique perspective on ruling the country. Lauren and Nadia discuss the her journey into one of the most powerful institutions in the world, lessons she's learned so far, and why FKA twigs is her icon. Tune in for a peek into one of the most exciting and unusual world's that it's so rare to take a glimpse at.  Host instagram: @laurenlyle7 and @shesarec Twitter: @Llaurenlyle To advertise on this podcast email shesarec@gmail.com or visit Advertisecast

Mens Rea:  A true crime podcast
111 - Unsolved: The killing of Belinda Pereira

Mens Rea: A true crime podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 38:11


On the 29th of December, 1996, Gardai were called to a flat on Liffey St in Dublin city centre. Inside was the body of 26 year old British-Sri Lankan woman, Belinda Pereira, who was staying in Dublin for just a week. The nature of her trip prompted many inches of tabloid fodder. She had come to Dublin in order to carry out sex work.  But the voyeuristic media attention on Belinda's case did not last long.  Sadly, today, her name is all but forgotten.  ************ Join me at CrimeCon Uk on June 11-12 in London 2022! Head to crimecon.co.uk and use the code MENSREA for 10% off (and to let them know I sent you!) ********** With thanks to our sponsors for this episode: Sign up today for a free trial of Noom – the habit changing app for a healthier you! Find it at noom.com/mensrea  Sign up for professional online counselling at betterhelp.com/mens and get 10% off your first month! ********* Find us on Facebook or Twitter! With thanks to our supporters on Patreon! Donate today to get access to bonus and ad-free episodes! Check out the Mens Rea Merch Store! ********* Theme Music: Quinn's Song: The Dance Begins Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Additional Music:   Allemande (Sting) by Wahneta Meixsell. Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ ************ Sources: John Maher, “Parents due to arrive to identify murder victim” in The Irish Times (1 January 1997) p. 4. Stephen Rae, “New 'Flying Squad' ready to smash the crime lords” in The Evening Herald  (4 January 1997) p. 2. “New breakthrough in search for killer” in The Evening Herald  (4 January 1997) p. 36. Mike McNiffe and Joanne McElgunn, “Greedy pimps who cashed in on Belinda's life” in The Sunday World  (5 January 1997) p.p. 2-3. Ben Proctor, “£3000 for sex trip to Ireland” in The Sunday World  (5 January 1997) p. 2. “Bank manager's love for hooker” in The Sunday World  (5 January 1997) p. 4-5. Joanne McElgunn, “Sex trade is terrified” in The Sunday World  (5 January 1997) p.p. 4-5. Susan McKay, “The high price of selling sex” in The Sunday Tribune   (5 January 1997) p. 11. Tom Cooney, “Prostitutes are flesh and blood just like we are” in The Sunday World  (5 January 1997) p. 8 John Lee, “Dublin's high-tech call girls go mobile” in The Sunday Independent  (5 January 1997) p. 12. “The pimp who ran Belinda brothel” in The Sunday World  (5 January 1997) p. 1, 2, 3. Mike McNiffe and Joanne McElgunn, “Find my girl's savage killer” in The Sunday World  (5 January) p.p. 1 – 5, 8. Frank Khan, “Murder victim's lifestyle big shock” in The Sunday Independent  (5 January 1997) p. 3. John Maher, 'Sri Lankan parents identify body of murdered woman” in The Irish Times (6 January 1997) p. 7. Annemaria McEneaney, “Gardai sift statements for call girl death clues” in The Irish Independent  (6 January 1997) p. 9. “Belinda: Gardai hunt for clues” in The Evening Herald  (6 January 1997) p. 6. Stephen Rae, “Call girl killer: hunt in Britain” in The Evening Herald  (8 January 1997) p. 16 Stephen Rae, “Gardai appeal for information” in The Evening Herald  (9 January 1997) p. 1 “Picture of victim released” in The Irish Times  (10 January 1997) p. 4. Tom Reddy, “Gardai release slain call girl photo” in The Irish Independent  (10 January 1997) p. 4. “Call girl killed 'for her money'” in The Evening Herald   (10 January 1997) p. 18 “Cash clue to killing” in The Irish Independent   (11 January 1997) p. 9 Joanne McElgunn, “Slain hooker's diary names celeb clients” in The Sunday World  (12 January 1997) p. 4. Joanne McElgunn, “Inside the sleazy world of Irelands pimps and prostitutes” in The Sunday World  (19 January 1997) pp 30-31. Liz Walsh, “Pereira 'was not killed by one of her clients” in The Sunday Tribune  (19 January 1997) p. 14 Liz Walsh and Susan McKay, “Anonymous 'Asian beauty' died as she lived” in The Sunday Tribune  (19 January 1997) p. 14. Liz Walsh, “Pereira 'was not killed by one of her clients” in The Sunday Tribune  (19 January 1997) p. 14. Jim Cusack, “Murder probe told of severe beating of prostitute” in The Irish Times  (20 January 1997) p. 11. “UK pimps 'protect' coloured hookers” in The Sunday World  (26 January 1997) p. 2. Joanne McElgunn, “Pimp suspect in hooker slaying flees to Britain” in The Sunday World  (26 January 1997) p. 35. Joanne McElgunn, “50 clients of dead vice girl talk to cops” in The Sunday World  (9 February 1997) p. 32 Stephen Rae, “'Game' that can end in murder” in The Evening Herald  (10 February 1997) p.p. 16-7. Richard balls, “Inquest on murdered woman adjourned” in The Irish Times (19 April 1997) p. 4. “Call-girl inquest is put back for probe” in The Irish Independent   (19 April 1997) p. 4. “Coroner adjourns Pereira inquest” in The Irish Times   (17 April 1998) p. 4. Stephen Rae, “Sex ring smashed” in The Evening Herald   (19 February 1998) p. 1, 2. Jerome Reilly, “Belinda Pereira: the secret life that led to her lonely death” in The Irish Independent  (18 April 1998) p. 31. Kitty Holland and Conor Lally, “The sad life and death of Sinead Kelly” in The Sunday Tribune  (28 June 1998) p. 10 Paul Williams, Mike McNiffe and Joanne McElgunn, “Red-light nutter could kill again” in The Sunday World  (28 June 1998) p. 4. “Appeal for information on killing” in The Irish Times  (30 July 1998) p. 7. Catherine Cleary, “400 questioned over murder” in The Irish Times  (30 July 1998) p. 7. Billy Foley, “Young prostitute killed by repeated blows to her head” in The Irish Independent  (30 July 1998) p. 6. Catherine Cleary, “Reward for news of murders” in The Irish Times  (1 August 1998) p. 5 Eugene Moloney, “Drug dealer is held in probe of canal murder” in The Irish Independent  (1 August 1998) p. 7. “Ciara's case is on list” in The Drogheda Argus and Leinster Journal  (7 August 1998) p. 7. Stephen Rae, “Prostitute murdered over £850 drug debt say gardai” in The Irish Independent  (7 August 1998) p. 3. “New plea on murdered prostitute” in The Sunday World  (25 October 1998) p. 2. Lara MacMillan. “A magazine that's more 'out' then 'in'” in The Evening Herald(  12 August 1999) p. 19. Jerome Reilly, “Ireland's sex industry: the crackdown begins” in The Irish Independent  (21 August 1999) p. 31. Eilis O'Hanlon, “We can't blame 'In Dublin' for murder” in The Sunday Independent   (22 August 1999) p. 4. Jim Cusack and Judith Crosbie “Garda appeal over abduction and rape of prostitute” in The Irish Times  (27 September 2000) p. 4 “Murder re-lived” in The Evening Herald  (18 October 2005) p. 17. Eugene Moloney, “Gardai renew witness appeal in hunt for prostitute's killer” in The Irish Independent  (18 December 2006) p. 3. Tom Brady, “Cold case investigators confident of breakthrough” in The Irish Independent  (28 November 2007) p. 11. “Appeal for information – Murder of Belinda Pereira on the 29/12/1996” Garda Press office  https://www.garda.ie/en/about-us/our-departments/office-of-corporate-communications/press-releases/2014/december/appeal-for-information-murder-of-belinda-pereira-on-the-29-12-1996.html  (December 2014) “Gardai renew appeal in Belinda Pereira case” in The Irish Examiner https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/arid-30656044.html  (28 December 2014) Jim Cusack, “Belinda killer's remorse could lead to case breakthrough” in The Irish Independent https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/belinda-killers-remorse-could-lead-to-case-breakthrough-30880436.html  (3 January 2015) Michael Doyle, “Cead Mile Murder: The most well known cases over the past 25 years where people came to Ireland looking for a better life – but met a tragic end” in The Irish Sun https://www.thesun.ie/news/1599745/the-most-well-known-cases-over-the-past-25-years-where-people-came-to-ireland-looking-for-a-better-life-but-met-a-tragic-end/ (29 September 2017)

What A Time To Be Alive
#235 Hot Slide

What A Time To Be Alive

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 84:12


Folks, on this week's What A Time To Be Alive we hear about the world's most boring playground, why sea turtles have no idea where they're going, why a wrestling death match in Britain shocked a small town, why James Cromwell glued himself to a Starbucks counter, and why South Koreans are changing everyone's age by one year We're doing another live show this July 8th at the Gutter in Greenpoint, Brooklyn! Tickets available now! (Are you a patron? Check the Patreon for discounted tickets! Or join right now and get the discount!) https://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-a-time-to-be-alive-live-at-the-gutter-tickets-337420623167 We are on Patreon! Become a patron for weekly bonus eps and more stuff!: www.patreon.com/whatatimepod Check out our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/whatatimetobealive Get one of our t-shirts, or other merch, using this link! https://whatatimepod.bigcartel.com/ whatatimepod.com J oin our Discord chat here: discord.gg/jx7rB7J @pattymo // @kathbarbadoro // @eliyudin // @whatatimepod © 2022 What A Time LLC

Thinking in English
152. Why are the Falkland Islands so Controversial? (English Vocabulary Lesson)

Thinking in English

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 22:26


CLICK HERE TO DONATE OR SUPPORT TO PODCAST!!!! - https://thinkinginenglish.blog/donate-and-support/ 40 years ago Britain and Argentina fought a bitter war over a few small and remote islands in the Atlantic ocean. The Falkland islands remain a controversial issue today. Where are the Falklands? Why did Argentina and Britain go to war over them? And who should control the islands? Let's discuss these questions on today's episode of Thinking in English! TRANSCRIPT - https://thinkinginenglish.blog/2022/05/16/why-are-the-falkland-islands-so-controversial/ You may also like... 151. What is Roe v. Wade? (English Vocabulary Lesson) 150. How to Stop Procrastinating!! (English Vocabulary Lesson) Does Your English Accent Matter? w/ Dan Sensei (English Conversation Lesson) 149. Should Cannabis be Legal? (English Vocabulary Lesson) INSTAGRAM - thinkinginenglishpodcast (https://www.instagram.com/thinkinginenglishpodcast/) Blog - thinkinginenglish.blog Vocabulary List Remote (adj) - far away in distance He lives in a remote mountain village Sparsely (adv) - with only a small number or amount of people or things His room is sparsely furnished To renounce (v) - to say formally or publicly that you no longer own, support, believe in, or have a connection with something Gandhi renounced the use of violence Sovereignty (n) - the power of a country to control its own government Talks are ongoing over the sovereignty of the disputed island To occupy (v) - to move into and take control and/or possession of a place Troops quickly occupied the city To surrender (v) - to stop fighting and admit defeat They would rather die than surrender To inherit (v) - if you inherit a situation, problem, department, etc., you become responsible for dealing with it or managing it When I took on the job of manager, I inherited a lot of financial problems Undisputed (adj) - if something is undisputed, everyone agrees about it He is the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world Self-determination (n) - the ability or power to make decisions for yourself, especially the power of a nation to decide how it will be governed The UN considers self-determination to be a human right --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thinking-english/message

Even the Podcast is Afraid
Ivan Milat: Backpacker Serial Killer - Part II

Even the Podcast is Afraid

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 49:19


The 2005 horror film, “Wolf Creek,” was inspired by a real sadistic serial killer from Australia, Ivan Milat, the Backpacker Murderer. These series of murders occurred between 1989 and 1993, taking the lives of seven people from Germany, Britain, and Australia. But we have to wonder, was there possibly more victims?[SOCIAL MEDIA, OUR TV SHOW, PATREON, & MORE]LINK to EVERYTHING: https://solo.to/etpia[MUSIC USED IN THIS EPISODE]Music from https://filmmusic.io "In Your Arms" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)[THANKS & MENTIONS FOR THIS EPISODE]Stephanie Kemmerer, researcher & writer for Even the Podcast is Afraid, conducted all the writing and research for this series on the serial killer Ivan Milat.Created, produced, & hosted by Jared OrdisCo-hosted by Nick Porchetta & Samantha VazquezEven the Podcast is Afraid is an original Ordis Studios ProductionCopyright © 2022 by Ordis Studiossolo.to/ordisstudios

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast [May 15, '22 Business Report]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 52:19


On this episode of the Business Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are “Rocket Ron” Epstein, PhD, of Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Richard Aboulafia of AeroDynamic Advisory and Sash Tusa of Agency Partners. Topics: — Analysis of the biggest sustained drop on world markets since 2008 and how aerospace and defense equities fared — Disconnect between stately pace of US and European defense spending in wake of Russia's war on Ukraine and investor expectations of rapid budget increases — Defense industrial implications of Finland's decision to join NATO, with Sweden expected to follow soon, and Britain's security agreements with Helsinki and Stockholm — Security agreement between Japan and UK and whether Japan and Saudi Arabia might be the next partners in the British-led Tempest next-generation fighter development program and what expanded membership means for other Italy and Sweden that are already part of the effort — Investors punish Boeing stock over company's debt loading and whether new management needed in wake of program missteps — Speculation that Boeing might end troubled development of 777X, a view the firm has dismissed   — Reuters report that Federal Aviation Administration has concerns with Boeing's proposed fixes to 787 jetliner, production of which has been suspended over manufacturing concerns  — Comac's 919 regional airliners moves toward service — Update on US Army Aviation's approach to modernization that will include Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft program that will be downselected in September as well as sustained role for UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 031 - The Big Show - Tallulah Bankhead - Jimmy Durante -Jack Carson 10-28-51

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 30:32


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 019 - A Date With Judy 10-22-46

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 30:49


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 015 - Dinah Shore - First Song - The One I Love Belongs To Somebody Else 01-13-43

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 30:28


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 013 - Hoosier Hot Shots - First Song - Wait At The Gate For Me Katie Xx-xx-50

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 29:54


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------